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    Indian Su-30MKI: News

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    Russia, India may hold first aircraft launches of BrahMos by year end

    Post  Pinto on Tue Aug 02, 2016 6:43 pm

    In late June, a modified Su-30MKI fighter jet performed its first experimental flight with a BrahMos missile demonstrator

    Russia, India may hold first aircraft launches of BrahMos by year end

    In late June, a modified Su-30MKI fighter jet performed its first experimental flight with a BrahMos missile demonstrator

    MOSCOW, August 2. /TASS/. Russia and India may hold two launches of BrahMos cruise missiles from a Sukhoi Su-30MKI fighter jet against sea and ground targets at the end of this year, the CEO of Russia’s Research and Production Association of Machine-Building told TASS on

    The Research and Production Association of Machine-Building is involved in the development of BrahMos cruise missiles jointly with the Indian side.

    "If positive results of the work with the technologically operational missile are received, there are plans to carry out demonstration launches of two organic missiles against a sea and a ground target," CEO of the Research and Production Association of Machine-Building Alexander Leonov said.

    In late June, a modified Su-30MKI fighter jet performed its first experimental flight with a BrahMos missile demonstrator, he added.
    According to Leonov, a flight with a mock-up equipped with a system of sensors confirmed the calculated data and the results of tests on scaled models in a wind tunnel.

    "After fulfilling the program of flights to get operational performance readings, the so-called emergency release of the mock-up is planned to get data on the dynamics of the missile’s safe separation from the aircraft," Leonov said.

    Spokesman for the Russian-Indian joint venture BrahMos Aerospace Praveen Pathak earlier told Russian daily Izvestia that the possibility of the missile’s separation from an aircraft would be checked in August. In his estimate, the first launch of a missile from a Su-30MKI may take place in autumn.

    India plans to arm three regiments of Su-30MKI fighter jets with BrahMos missiles. For this purpose, the missile has been improved: the airborne version is 500 kilograms lighter and almost half a meter shorter. BrahMos missiles are already operational with the Indian Army and Navy.


    More:
    http://tass.ru/en/defense/892006

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    India, Russia make progress in talks on Su-30 upgrade

    Post  Pinto on Tue Aug 16, 2016 9:58 am

    India and Russia made significant progress in the discussions for modernisation of all Su-30 fighters of the Indian Air Force (IAF) during the visit of a Russian team last month. An agreement is possible by the year-end, senior officials say.

    “Discussions were held last month, and significant ground was covered. We hope to conclude the deal soon,” a top official told The Hindu.

    The upgrade will give the fight jets new avionics and radar, improved stealth characteristics to reduce the radar cross-section, better electronic warfare capability and new weapons. Though the quantum of the deal is not finalised, some officials said it could be in the range of $7-8 billion.

    Su-30 are the most modern fighters and the main stay of the IAF. Given the delay in procurement of new fighters, they are crucial for maintaining the combat edge of the IAF. Discussions had been under way for some time for upgrading the aircraft to what was called ‘Super Sukhoi’, but the talks gained momentum recently. “There is nothing called Super Sukhoi, but we have been discussing the upgrade of Su-30 to comprehensively improve their capabilities. Some progress has been made, and we are trying to finalise the technical specifications of the upgrade,” a senior IAF officer said.

    India had signed the initial agreement with Russia in the late 1990s for procuring 50 Su-30 multi-role fighter jets in a fly-away condition.

    Then, it ordered 272 Su-30MKI fighter jets to be made by Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) at Nasik. Most of the aircraft to be made by HAL have been delivered, and the entire lot of 222 aircraft is expected to be completed in the next couple of years. The HAL has a production rate of 10-12 aircraft a year.

    No progress on FGFA
    This comes in the backdrop of the delay in concluding the final agreement for the Fifth Generation Fighter Aircraft (FGFA) to be developed by India and Russia, besides the delay in concluding an agreement for the purchase of the Rafale fighter jets and in the induction of the indigenous Light Combat Aircraft.

    A preliminary design agreement was signed in 2010 between HAL and Russia’s Sukhoi Design Bureau to make the FGFA for use by both countries. So far, both sides have invested $295 million in the preliminary design. However, the final agreement got stuck because of the disagreements over the work share and investment. Several rounds of talks have been held, but there has been no progress.

    “The FGFA is a long project. It will take some time,” one officer said.

    http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/india-russia-make-progress-in-talks-on-su30-upgrade/article8991493.ece

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    Re: Indian Su-30MKI: News

    Post  Viktor on Tue Aug 16, 2016 5:33 pm

    So what would the modernization affect?

    - engines
    - avionics
    - radar
    - ??

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    Re: Indian Su-30MKI: News

    Post  Pinto on Tue Aug 16, 2016 9:42 pm

    Viktor wrote:So what would the modernization affect?

    - engines
    - avionics
    - radar
    - ??

    avionics and radar are main focus as of now, engine is not yet clear wil be modified or not

    1st 180 su30 will be modified to super level as new ones inducted in past 2-3 yrs wont be upgraded with them, they will wait till the first older lot is modified. since the cost of upgrade is being told at 8b$ for 180-194 aircraft may be it includes engine modification too ?

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    Re: Indian Su-30MKI: News

    Post  Viktor on Wed Aug 17, 2016 5:42 pm

    Yes, because of the price I assumed it would be the engines too. Engines are ready anyway.

    Do you know the pace of modernization?

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    Re: Indian Su-30MKI: News

    Post  Pinto on Wed Aug 17, 2016 6:19 pm

    Viktor wrote:Yes, because of the price I assumed it would be the engines too. Engines are ready anyway.

    Do you know the pace of modernization?

    Final deal is expected by end of the year, only then details will be clear. So many stuck Indo-Russian defence deals in line now that no one knows which ones will be signed first. Hopefully by December when annual India-Russia summit takes place things will be more clear

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    Re: Indian Su-30MKI: News

    Post  Pinto on Wed Aug 17, 2016 6:57 pm

    http://www.cassindia.com/inner_page.php?id=53&&task=military

    Enhancing potentiality: Super Sukhoi to add punch to IAF

    The Sukhoi-30 MKI which is the main stay of IAF fighter fleets will have to undergo upgradation to remain relevant to future air warfare. Although the software is wearing out too fast, the fighter remains a potent combat machine. The IAF’s SU-30 MKIs which look similar to many Sukhoi fighters is significantly different from other SU-30s in terms of capabilities. This time IAF should clearly spell out what it needs in SU-30MKIs by 2020. Often, the upgradation cost of a jet comes pretty close to buying a new one.

    Indian Air Force would be significantly enhancing its combat capabilities by upgrading its most formidable SU-30MKI fighters to the approaching level of Fifth Generation Fighter Aircraft, which India plans to develop jointly with the Russian Sukhoi company.

    The FGFA and Super Sukhoi would thus form a ferocious combination of multi-role aircraft, which can dominate the skies over the neighboring countries and the entire Indian Ocean area. The FGFA is likely to be inducted in the IAF from 2018 and the Super Sukhois would also begin joining the fleet around same time.

    The IAF would have almost 270 Sukhoi-30MKIs by 2017 and the IAF Headquarters plans all them to be upgraded to the near fifth generation level and the IAF has decided to name them as Super Sukhoi.

    At present, the IAF has a fleet of five squadrons of SU-30MKIs and the rest are being license produced in Indian HAL, almost 10 per year. This will be for the first time that while an aircraft which is still under induction phase will be undergoing significant upgradation in combat capabilities.

    The Super-Sukhois would be maximally close to FGFA claimed Alexei I Fedorov who is President and Chairman of the Board of Irkut Corporation, a Russian Joint Stock Company.

    In Moscow during the MAKS-2011 Fedorov talked extensively about the modernization of Sukhoi-30 MKI. According to Fedorov, “our cooperation with India is going on very well. We have very good industrial cooperation with HAL.”

    “We began our cooperation with MiG-27. Together with HAL we have supplied IAF 165 MIG-27s.As far as Sukhoi-30 MKI is concerned 15 years ago we launched cooperation with HAL under SU-30MKI project. In the beginning it was delivery of aircraft, and then in cooperation with HAL we together started license manufacture. India remains our largest and biggest partner,” he said.

    He added if we speak about product line among SU-30MKI family we began the production of combat trainer Yak-130. Now we are developing many large projects of medium range airliner.

    The modernization program

    At this stage Irkut is presenting cabin mockup, power plant and the wind box. The wing of this aircraft will be made of carbon fibres. According to Fedorov, India will remain Irkut’s largest and biggest partner in future as well.

    This is the first such in Russia and not many foreign countries produce such aircrafts. Irkut is the largest flier of aircraft and aviation products in the market.  

    In response to questions, Fedorov informed that “as far as SU-30MKI is concerned, we have two modernization programs. First is the modernization where the cockpit and all systems would be improved. We are moving in the stage of negotiating technical part.”

    He hopes that during this financial year Irkut will conclude the project. It is very large program which is several billion dollars. The second part would be the modernization of the aircraft together with Brahmos air-to-ground supersonic cruise missile program.

    Now together with Indian Ministry of Defence we are working out how to share work under the modernization program. What will be done in Russia and in India will be finalized. Fedorov hoped, “this year we will come to conclusion.”

    Asked what systems are being proposed, Fedorov declined to give details. But said that we are in negotiation for the upgrading of the entire Sukhoi-30 MKI USD 12 billion project for which the cost has gone up by USD 4 billion.

    Under our signed contract, escalation of prices has been included, which is changing. Next year we plan to finalize the development work. After the development work we hope that two year time will be required to finish.

    Fedorov revealed that the IAF wants that the new upgraded SU-30 MKIs should be called as Super Sukhoi fighter. Irkut is negotiating to incorporate the AESA radar in the Sukhoi-30MKIs.

    Our idea is to modernize the SU-30 MKI to bring it to near 5th generation aircraft capability. At present, we are negotiating the upgradation. He asserted, “we are trying to get SU-30MKI maximally to FGFA.”

    First of all, Irkut is modernizing the cockpit for pilots. This is so designed that it will be easier for the pilots to shift to Fifth Generation Fighter Aircraft being developed jointly by India and Russia.

    The upgraded Super Sukhoi would also have advanced stealth characteristics. The Super Sukhoi can also be equipped with other long range missiles like R-27P (AA-10 D) infrared homing extended range version of 120 km distance.

    Besides medium range missiles like R-77 (AA-12) with active radar homing medium range 100 km along with other 80 km medium range missiles can also be added.

    At present, the current fleet of Sukhoi-30MKIs in IAF will be upgraded to Super Sukhoi. He expressed confidence that the first Super Sukhoi aircraft will be ready by 2015. First the conversion of initial fleets inducted in the early years of last decade will be undertaken for conversion to Super Sukhoi.


    As soon as all the testing is completed the older ones will start getting upgraded. But he refused to answer queries on the costs. But said, “total value will be of several billion dollars. It is difficult to tell you about exact price. SU-30 has good market in South East Asia.”

    Export plans

    Irkut now plans to export to Malaysia and Indonesia and Algerian Air Forces which will enlarge the order book. Fedorov thus asserted that India will have no role in exporting the SU-30MK aircraft to third country.

    In response to a question, Fedorov said that Sukhoi-30 and MiG-35 (offered under MMRCA contract for the IAF) are different aircrafts. SU-30 is a heavy multi role fighter but MiG-35 is a medium fighter.

    That is why SU-30 can carry more arms, although technologically they have lot of similarities. In Super Sukhoi, the electronics will be upgraded heavily and the Super Sukhois will carry more weapon loads.

    Asked if China has sought the upgradation of the SU-30MKK, Fedorov said that first of all there are basic differences between Indian and Chinese SU-30s as the Power plants do not match. On other counts also the Indian and Chinese SU-30s do not match.

    Fedorov revealed that the Super Sukhoi will have same engine as in FGFA. It will enhance the life cycle of SU-30MKIs. However, first aircraft will be upgraded in two years time.

    After the contract is signed prototype will be made in Russia after the finalisation of the technical design. When asked if all the 270 SU-30 to be inducted in IAF in the coming years would be upgraded, Fedorov said that, “as far as we know IAF would like to upgrade most of the fleet. Customers want like that.”

    Asked about the recent crash of the Sukhoi-30MKI, Fedorov revealed that it was due to pilot error.

    Russia would thus be getting another multi billion dollar contract after the almost 30-35 billion dollar deal for the next 20 years from the FGFA project.

    Fedorov said that Super Sukhoi program would not be covered under the offset rules of the Indian MoD’s Defence Procurement Procedure, as the upgradation project would be done under an extension of the previous Sukhoi-30 MKI agreement.

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    Fighter jet lands in Arunachal base in first such military movement since 1962

    Post  Pinto on Fri Aug 19, 2016 4:31 pm

    An Indian Air Force Sukhoi-30 fighter jet landed at an advance landing ground (ALG) in Arunachal Pradesh on Friday, the first such military movement in the strategic border state since the 1962 Chinese aggression.
    The reactivation of the ALG at Pasighat, 198 km east of capital Itanagar, comes weeks after India deployed around 100 T-72 battle tanks in Ladakh, close to the disputed border with China, drawing a sharp reaction from Beijing.

    The ALG in Pasighat is 100 km from the nearest point on the 1,080-km border the state shares with China-occupied Tibet. China claims thousands of square kilometres of Indian territory in Arunachal Pradesh.

    The Pasighat ALG is one of eight in the frontier state the IAF had taken up for upgradation in 2009 for boosting air defence preparedness in the eastern sector. The total project cost is Rs 1,000 crore.

    Three Sukhoi-30s took off from IAF’s Chabua base in eastern Assam’s Dibrugarh district, flew part in a formation before landing at Pasighat about 10 am, officials said.

    The ALG was later inaugurated by minister of state for home Kiren Rijiju in presence of Air Marshal C Hari Kumar, chief of the Shillong-based Eastern Air Command.

    “The touchdown by a frontline fighter jet of the IAF at the ALF is a historic first in Arunachal Pradesh, which has several ALGs at varying altitudes,” Air Marshal Kumar was quoted as saying.

    Rijiju, who arrived in a Border Security Force helicopter, said the ALGs will also help improve connectivity in the landlocked state.

    The Pasighat ALG was earlier a small partly-paved and party-grassy strip reinforced with perforated steel plates. It was used in the past for air maintenance sorties and casualty evacuation by the IAF. Commercial helicopter operations were also being undertaken from the helipads that existed earlier.

    The other ALGs are at Mechuka, Ziro, Along and Walong, which were inaugurated between March and May this year. Two more, at Tuting and Tawang, are expected to be ready by the year-end.

    http://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news/fighter-jets-touch-down-at-iaf-base-close-to-china-border-in-arunachal/story-TNeu9sCktXdVZUWNutr00H.html

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    Russia, India discuss modernization of Su-30 aircraft

    Post  Pinto on Fri Aug 19, 2016 5:17 pm

    http://rbth.com/news/2016/08/18/russia-india-discuss-modernization-of-su-30-aircraft_622079

    Moscow and New Delhi may work out an agreement on modernizing the Indian Air Force’s Sukhoi Su-30MKI multirole fighters before year-end, The Hindu reported on August 17.


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    According to the newspaper, the parties made considerable headway with their upgrade talks last month, when a Russian delegation came to New Delhi to discuss the military-technical cooperation.
    “The consultations took place last month, and good progress was made. We hope for the deal to be made soon,” The Hindu quoted an official who spoke on the condition of anonymity.

    The upgrade will equip the fighter jets with sophisticated avionics, radar and weapons and reduce their radar signature.

    According to preliminary estimates, the upgrade of up to 200 Su-30MKIs may cost $8 billion.

    The upgrade will be handled by India’s state-owned Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd.

    The Su-30MKI multirole fighter was developed to meet the requirements of the Indian Air Force.

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    Re: Indian Su-30MKI: News

    Post  Pinto on Fri Aug 19, 2016 5:33 pm

    So no new engine or upgrade being considered in super shukhoi

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    Re: Indian Su-30MKI: News

    Post  Viktor on Fri Aug 19, 2016 6:09 pm

    Pinto wrote:So no new engine or upgrade being considered in super shukhoi

    I would still wait for the official deal to know. I have little fate beside general direction on their reporting. But still who knows they may be right.

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    Re: Indian Su-30MKI: News

    Post  Pinto on Fri Aug 19, 2016 8:00 pm

    Viktor wrote:
    Pinto wrote:So no new engine or upgrade being considered in super shukhoi

    I would still wait for the official deal to know. I have little fate beside general direction on their reporting. But still who knows they may be right.

    very true specifically for Indian media, since the opening up of defense deals with US and lingering defence deal of Rafale, the indian (western paid) media has gone over board, Since the up gradation is likely to cost 8b$, it might include at least engine upgrades too(not sure though the deal to upgrade french Mirages 2k costed 3b$ for 60 aircraft).

    More su30mki might be ordered as indian fighter strength is falling rapidly because of rafale fiasco or we can call it MMRCA tender

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    HAL may put in Rs 2,000 crore for Sukhoi 30 spares hub

    Post  Pinto on Tue Aug 30, 2016 1:13 pm

    With defence minister Manohar Parrikar determined to increase the efficiency of the existing fighter fleet, state-owned PSU Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) is working on a pact with the air force and the Russian government to set up a spares hub for Sukhoi 30 fighters in India.

    The Russian origin aircraft has been facing technical difficulties with several fighter grounded for prolonged periods as the current process of ordering spare parts is time consuming and inefficient. This has resulted in a situation in which at any given point of time, only 50-55 percent of the fleet is ready for operations.

    The aim is to increase this to at least 75 percent. Sources have told ET that HAL is looking to invest over Rs 2,000 crore to create a spares hub that will store and deliver all parts needed for the fleet. A long term spares agreement is likely to be signed between India and Russian shortly that will help in reducing the amount of time frontline fighters are grounded due to technical issues.

    Senior officials said that as per the new agreement, the Air Force will source all its spares from HAL that will maintain an inventory of parts. As per current practice, spare parts are to be ordered separately with a lengthy process involving license, customs clearance and bank guarantees. The plan is to have a system in place that will ensure that spare parts are delivered within days of the Air Force raising a requirement.

    Officials told ET that at times, the bureaucratic processes would lead to even a yearlong waiting time between the Air Force raising a requirement and the spare part getting manufactured. The Su 30 fighter – 272 of the planes have been ordered – is India’s largest fighter fleet with bases in the east as well along the western borders.

    http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/defence/hal-may-put-in-rs-2000-crore-for-sukhoi-30-spares-hub/articleshow/53919425.cms

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    Russia’s Sukhoi Super 30: The Outlook for India’s Ultra-Advanced Flanker Upgrade

    Post  Pinto on Thu Sep 01, 2016 9:18 am

    Indications in recent months suggest that the upgrade program for India’s fleet ofSu-30MKI fighters is finally gathering pace. The Indian Air Force (IAF) has so far placed orders for 272 aircraft, of which 50 were delivered by Russia in 2002-2004 and 2007. Another 222 are to be supplied by the HAL Corporation; production under Russian license began at HAL’s Indian facilities in 2004. So far, more than 200 planes have already been delivered, and the Su-30MKI is the most numerous of the multirole fighters currently in service with the IAF.

    Even though the Su-30MKI is one of the most advanced of the Generation 4+ fighters in service with the IAF, the need for its upgrade is becoming ever more obvious. The first of the planes built to the current specification were delivered to India back in 2004. Since then, a lot of new technology has become available in Russia, India, and other markets, including advanced new radars, air-launched missiles and bombs. Retrofitting the plane with this new hardware can make it much more capable. In fact, the Su-30 platform itself is extremely well suited for all kinds of upgrades, from fairly conservative to the most radical because the plane has a two-seater cockpit and can accommodate a lot of bulky and heavy additional equipment.

    For a long time, the only thing we knew about the proposed Su-30MKI upgrades was the name of the program: Sukhoi Super 30. There was no information about the technical specifications, timeline or costs. Commentators often confuse Sukhoi Super 30 with another upgrade program that aims to integrate the Su-30MKI with the air-launched version of the BrahMos anti-ship cruise missile. These are in fact two independent and unrelated projects. BrahMos will be installed on only 40-42 planes. The program has already reached a fairly advanced phase of flight-testing to ascertain mechanical compatibility of theBrahMos-A air-launched missile with a reinforced Su-30MKI airframe. Live missile launches are due to commence very shortly. The Sukhoi Super 30 program, on the other hand, will be rolled out to the entire Indian fleet of Su-30MKI fighters; it has yet to begin in earnest, and up until recently, there was very little information about it in the public domain.

    Recently, however, the influential Indian newspaper The Hindu reported that in July 2016 Russia and India held consultations on Sukhoi Super 30, and that they hoped to sign a deal very soon. Another well informed newspaper, The Economic Times, reported that the technical requirements would be finalized by the year’s end, and that the contract would be signed in early 2017. The estimated cost of the program is $7-8 billion. It is therefore clear that the program is still at the very early stages, and that the Sukhoi Super 30 technical specifications have yet to be agreed. One of the central issues in the upcoming discussions will certainly be the use of local suppliers as part of the Indian government’s Make in Indiaindustrial policy.

    The Specifics of Indian Procurement Policy

    The original Su-30MKI program was implemented at lighting speed, by Indian standards. The upgrade program, however, has been making glacial progress, which is fairly normal for the Indian defense procurement system. After Russia introduced the original Su-30MKI proposal, it took only three years to sign the first contract. The proposal was submitted in December 1993 during a visit to India by representatives of the Irkutsk Aircraft Plant and the Sukhoi Design Bureau; the contract was signed in November 1996. Incidentally, the final technical specifications of the Su-30MKI were very different from the Su-30KRussia had originally tried to sell to India. The differences concerned not just avionics but even the platform itself.

    The Su-30MKI program still remains unprecedented in terms of the time it took to implement. Most of the Indian aerospace programs are very slow. They include, for example, the Mirage 2000 and MiG-29 upgrades. Such upgrades, however, appear to be the best way for the IAF to bolster its fighting ability, especially in view of the budget constraints and the ongoing paralysis of the tender procedures that prevent the IAF from increasing the number of its squadrons to 45. Upgrading the existing planes obviates the need for increasing the already excessive number of various plane models in service with the IAF. Upgrade programs are also cheaper than buying new planes, and they are fully in line with the government’s Make in India policy.

    The languid pace of decision-making on the IAF upgrade programs may be a reflection of India’s fundamental cultural patterns and of the additional red tape introduced by the DPP mechanism. Back in the 2000s, the IAF had a clear superiority over the Pakistani Air Force (PAF) by every possible measure, and it compensated for the Chinese Air Force’s greater numbers by superior technology (thanks primarily to the rapid implementation of the Su-30MKI program). Slow and deliberate decision-making therefore did not pose any major military-political risks, and it did help to keep costs under control. With the existing balance of military power and technology at the time, there was no pressing need for the Indian MoD to rush the procurement of new planes or the upgrades of the existing ones, so its relaxed approach was entirely rational.

    Now, however, the situation is completely different. Pakistan has received up-to-date versions of America’s F-16 fighters and dozens of the Chinese-Pakistani FC-1 planes. What was once India’s complete dominance over the Pakistani Air Force has become a mere superiority. In fact, Pakistan may well achieve near-parity over time if it receives J-10 fighters from China (as well as the J-31, the quasi-5thgeneration fighter now being developed by the Chinese). Such near-parity between the IAF and the PAF would be completely unprecedented.

    The power balance with the Chinese Air Force is an even greater worry for India. In the 1990s and early 2000s China bought 76 Su-27SK/UBK fighters and 100Su-30MKK/MK2 fighters from Russia. It quickly built another 105 Su-27SKplanes under Russian license, and then launched production of its own clones of these planes without bothering with the license. All of these planes represented early 1980s technology – but now China is about to start receiving the latest Russian Su-35 fighters. It is also working on its own quasi-5th generation fighter programs. As a result, the Chinese Air Force will catch up with the Indian Air Force in terms of technology, while also maintaining its impressive numerical superiority. India’s old defense procurement model, in which seven to 10 years is required merely to prepare a contract, has therefore become obsolete and unsustainable.


    There is a pressing need for speeding up the Su-30MKI program in order to restore the Indian Air Force’s technological superiority over the Chinese. Essentially, India needs to pull off the same trick it did in the mid-1990s, when it responded to China’s mass procurement of Su-27/30 fighters with the originalSu-30MKI program. Two decades on, India needs to respond to China’s Su-35 and J-31 jets with the Sukhoi Super 30.

    Upgrade options

    The choice of the specific upgrade option will represent some kind of compromise between the price tag, the time frame, and the capability of the upgraded plane. In theory, this leaves a broad variety of technological solutions on the table. The most conservative solution – which is also the cheapest and quickest – would be to roll out to the entire Su-30MKI fleet the improvements already incorporated in the latest versions of the plane. The Su-30MKI is the oldest member of the family that also includes the Malaysian Su-30MKM (the 2007 model), and the Russian Su-30SM (the 2011 model). A conservative upgrade option would include a limited number of additional self-defense systems (similar to the ones used in the Malaysian model), as well as the numerous new missiles and smart bombs that are now being developed as part of the Russian 2020 State Armament Program for the Su-30SM. The conservative approach would essentially bring the Su-30MKI up to the Su-30SM level.

    Meanwhile, the most radical upgrade option would be to develop an equivalent of America’s Silent Eagle fighter. This option would include replacing most of the plane’s systems. Most importantly, its passive phased array radar would be replaced with an active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar. Changes would also be made to the plane’s airframe to reduce its radar cross-section. The obvious drawback of this option is the high cost and the long time it would take to implement.

    Finally, the most realistic option that would deliver great returns in terms of the plane’s capability without costing too much or taking too much time sits somewhere in the middle. It includes a deep upgrade of the plane’s N-011M Bars radar and integration of the latest Russian and Indian-made electronics, optics and infrared systems without modifications to the airframe.

    It would also make sense to implement the Su-30MKI upgrade program in several batches of 50-55 planes, with each successive batch incorporating more complex technology. Such an approach was mentioned as a possibility by Yuri Beliy, chief of the NIIP Tikhomirov company, the developer of the Bars radar. Speaking in an interview, Beliy said that the first phase of the program could include upgrading the Bars radar to give it a greater range, higher resolution, better jamming resistance, and support for new weapons systems. At a later phase, the Bars radar could be equipped with an active phased array. The planes upgraded in the first batch could later be brought to the technical standard of the latest batches without any major difficulties.

    The approach would make it possible to start the program quickly (thereby securing orders for India’s HAL and other local suppliers). It would improve the IAF’s capability in an evolutionary way, and it would be easier on the IAF pilots, who will not have to deal with a quantum leap in the complexity of the upgraded plane’s systems. Such a phased strategy worked well in 2002-2004, when Russia delivered the first 32 Su-30MKI planes. The fighters were supplied in three batches of 10, 12 and 10. Each successive batch included some improvements that were later incorporated in the previous batches, so all 32 planes were eventually brought to the same standard.

    When the Su-30MKI specifications were being drawn up, the Indian military came up with an extremely well-balanced set of requirements for the new plane. Those requirements were at the cutting edge of – but not beyond – the Russian defense industry’s capability at the time, and could be implemented at a reasonable cost and within reasonable deadlines. It is to be hoped that a similarly well-balanced solution will be found for the Sukhoi Super 30 program.

    http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/the-sukhoi-super-30-the-outlook-indias-ultra-advanced-17535

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    Re: Indian Su-30MKI: News

    Post  Pinto on Thu Sep 01, 2016 9:43 am

    IAF needs to start making wise quick decisions based on long term requirements because new acquisitions are stuck

    Super SU-30MKI and Rafales are more than enough to counter China and Pakistan. But if China decides to deploy newly acquired SU-35 on or close Indian border, then India must need to buy 2 squadrons of newly built PAKFA.

    Even if they don't deploy SU-35s, India should still buy PAKFA and fly them for a couple years to know what changes it requires. IAF pilots will gain additional experience flying a new jet. FGFA will have only avionics changed, structure and flying characteristics will won't change. FGFA is definitely coming, so why not gain the experience faster. These 2 squadrons can later be upgraded to FGFA standard.


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    Re: Indian Su-30MKI: News

    Post  medo on Thu Sep 01, 2016 6:51 pm

    Su-35 Will not be a problem for India, as China will have only 24 of them. Bigger problem for India will be a combination of J-16 and J-20 fighters. J-16 with AESA radar and more powerfull WS-10A engines will be guite equal to Indian Super Su-30MKI.

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    Re: Indian Su-30MKI: News

    Post  Pinto on Thu Sep 01, 2016 7:45 pm

    medo wrote:Su-35 Will not be a problem for India, as China will have only 24 of them. Bigger problem for India will be a combination of J-16 and J-20 fighters. J-16 with AESA radar and more powerfull WS-10A engines will be guite equal to Indian Super Su-30MKI.

    WS-10A engine i think will take few more yrs to mature bro ? Any how i sincerely hope by that time chinese sort out there issues wth engine india start getting FGFA or atl east couple of sq of PAKFA as is being widely expected in indian defence circles

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    Re: Indian Su-30MKI: News

    Post  medo on Thu Sep 01, 2016 8:39 pm

    When India will receive their FGFA fighters, China will already have J-20 in armament and J-11D and J-16 are also very potent fighters although J-16 is seen more as F-15E style fighter bomber.

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    Re: Indian Su-30MKI: News

    Post  Pinto on Thu Sep 01, 2016 9:13 pm

    medo wrote:When India will receive their FGFA fighters, China will already have J-20 in armament and J-11D and J-16 are also very potent fighters although J-16 is seen more as F-15E style fighter bomber.

    well bro the way things are going in india's fighter modernization and new induction i am pretty sure pakfa will be inducted much earlier and numbers can be as high as 60

    what if china reverse engineered su 35 ?

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    India plans Two-Stage upgrades to its Frontline Sukhoi-30s Bars radars

    Post  Pinto on Tue Sep 13, 2016 12:46 pm

    India and Russia have agreed to carry out two stage upgrade program to Radar control system “BARS” presently used on board India’s front-line Su-30MKI reported in the latest editorial for an Aerospace Magazine .

    In Stage 1 upgrades “BARS” Fire control system will retain Passive Electronically Scanned array (PESA) antennae yet will have enhanced radar performance and operating modes due to upgrades to its components and software allowing it to launch and provide guidance feed to BrahMos-A towards target designation on its advertised range of 290km .

    Stage 1 upgrades will bring a host of improvements like higher air targets detection in track-while-scan mode and considerable improvements in the track of air targets in discrete tracking mode . New “Air-to-Air” and “Air-to-Ground” weapons of Russian and Indian origin will be easy to incorporate after upgrades which will considerably improve firepower of the aircraft especially related to long range standoff weapons which India is developing locally .

    At Stage-2 Bars will acquire Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) antennae which are currently being developed for Indo-Russian 5th Generation FGFA Stealth fighter jet programme based on Sukhoi’s T-50 fighter jet, which will see considerable improvements in all performance parameters particular it would be capable of viewing stealth aircraft at distances beyond the range of air-to-air missiles.

    India recently also has started negotiations with Russia to upgrade 194 Sukhoi Su-30MKI multirole aircraft with the near fifth-generation level and the upgraded version would be renamed Super Sukhoi and final negotiation for which will be concluded in next four to six months as reported in Indian media.

    Super Sukhoi will see adoption of stealth measures in minimizing RCS of the aircraft and the aircraft will also be equipped with longer range missiles along with an infrared homing system and upgraded cockpit and major changes in avionics and sensors are planned to bring Super Sukhoi’s close to FGFA in performance minus inherent stealth design, super-cruise capability and internal weapon-carrying bays.

    http://idrw.org/india-plans-two-stage-upgrades-to-its-frontline-sukhoi-30s-bars-radars/

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    Sukhoi, other IAF war aircrafts land at Agartala airport

    Post  Pinto on Fri Sep 16, 2016 8:19 pm

    In an unusual scene, a Sukhoi war plane, along with other carrier planes of the Indian Air Force (IAF), was found landed at the Agartala airport on Thursday.

    Official of the Airport Authority of India (AAI) said the aircrafts had come to check the landing and takeoff facility available at the airport for fighter aircrafts.

    Airport Director of Agartala Airport S.D Barman said, "Today, fighter aircraft Sukhoi landed in Agartala airport to find out the suitability of Agartala airport for the operation of the fighter aircraft so that this airport can be used if it necessary during war time. The commander has said that our airport is absolutely suitable for fighter operation they found the circuit of the aerodrome quite convenient. The commander had said that quite frequently they would come to the Agartala airport to operate."

    Along with the Sukhoi, two more AN32 transport aircrafts of the IAF, also landed here which is an unusual scene at the civil airport.

    Sukhoi is a heavy twinjet multirole air superiority, all-weather, long-range fighter developed by Russia's Sukhoi and built under licence by India's Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) for the IAF.

    In Tripura, out of four airports, the Agartala airport is the only operational and the rest three at Khowai in Khowai district, Kamalpur in Dhalai district and Kailashajhar in Unakoti district are abandoned.

    All four airports of Tripura are located very close the India-Bangladesh international border.

    Recently, Indian junior Civil Aviation Minister Jayanta Sinha said India is emphasizing on rehabilitating several unused airports build during the World War II across the north-eastern states to improve the regional connectivity informed.

    Sinha declared an investment of Rs. 400 crores will be done towards improving the Agartala airport into an international airport.

    http://www.business-standard.com/article/news-ani/sukhoi-other-iaf-war-aircrafts-land-at-agartala-airport-116091500910_1.html

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    Russia's Sukhoi Super 30: The Outlook for India’s Ultra-Advanced Flanker Upgrade

    Post  Pinto on Tue Sep 27, 2016 7:50 pm

    Konstantin Makienko


    Konstantin Makienko is deputy director of the Centre for the Analysis of Strategies and Technologies (CAST) in Moscow

    August 31, 2016



    The Su-30MKI program still remains unprecedented in terms of the time it took to implement. Most of the Indian aerospace programs are very slow. They include, for example, the Mirage 2000 and MiG-29 upgrades. Such upgrades, however, appear to be the best way for the IAF to bolster its fighting ability, especially in view of the budget constraints and the ongoing paralysis of the tender procedures that prevent the IAF from increasing the number of its squadrons to 45. Upgrading the existing planes obviates the need for increasing the already excessive number of various plane models in service with the IAF. Upgrade programs are also cheaper than buying new planes, and they are fully in line with the government’s Make in India policy.

    The languid pace of decision-making on the IAF upgrade programs may be a reflection of India’s fundamental cultural patterns and of the additional red tape introduced by the DPP mechanism. Back in the 2000s, the IAF had a clear superiority over the Pakistani Air Force (PAF) by every possible measure, and it compensated for the Chinese Air Force’s greater numbers by superior technology (thanks primarily to the rapid implementation of the Su-30MKI program). Slow and deliberate decision-making therefore did not pose any major military-political risks, and it did help to keep costs under control. With the existing balance of military power and technology at the time, there was no pressing need for the Indian MoD to rush the procurement of new planes or the upgrades of the existing ones, so its relaxed approach was entirely rational.

    Now, however, the situation is completely different. Pakistan has received up-to-date versions of America’s F-16 fighters and dozens of the Chinese-Pakistani FC-1 planes. What was once India’s complete dominance over the Pakistani Air Force has become a mere superiority. In fact, Pakistan may well achieve near-parity over time if it receives J-10 fighters from China (as well as the J-31, the quasi-5th generation fighter now being developed by the Chinese). Such near-parity between the IAF and the PAF would be completely unprecedented.

    The power balance with the Chinese Air Force is an even greater worry for India. In the 1990s and early 2000s China bought 76 Su-27SK/UBK fighters and 100 Su-30MKK/MK2 fighters from Russia. It quickly built another 105 Su-27SK planes under Russian license, and then launched production of its own clones of these planes without bothering with the license. All of these planes represented early 1980s technology – but now China is about to start receiving the latest Russian Su-35 fighters. It is also working on its own quasi-5th generation fighter programs. As a result, the Chinese Air Force will catch up with the Indian Air Force in terms of technology, while also maintaining its impressive numerical superiority. India’s old defense procurement model, in which seven to 10 years is required merely to prepare a contract, has therefore become obsolete and unsustainable.

    There is a pressing need for speeding up the Su-30MKI program in order to restore the Indian Air Force’s technological superiority over the Chinese. Essentially, India needs to pull off the same trick it did in the mid-1990s, when it responded to China’s mass procurement of Su-27/30 fighters with the original Su-30MKI program. Two decades on, India needs to respond to China’s Su-35 and J-31 jets with the Sukhoi Super 30.

    Upgrade options

    The choice of the specific upgrade option will represent some kind of compromise between the price tag, the time frame, and the capability of the upgraded plane. In theory, this leaves a broad variety of technological solutions on the table. The most conservative solution - which is also the cheapest and quickest – would be to roll out to the entire Su-30MKI fleet the improvements already incorporated in the latest versions of the plane. The Su-30MKI is the oldest member of the family that also includes the Malaysian Su-30MKM (the 2007 model), and the Russian Su-30SM (the 2011 model). A conservative upgrade option would include a limited number of additional self-defense systems (similar to the ones used in the Malaysian model), as well as the numerous new missiles and smart bombs that are now being developed as part of the Russian 2020 State Armament Program for the Su-30SM. The conservative approach would essentially bring the Su-30MKI up to the Su-30SM level.

    Meanwhile, the most radical upgrade option would be to develop an equivalent of America’s Silent Eagle fighter. This option would include replacing most of the plane’s systems. Most importantly, its passive phased array radar would be replaced with an active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar. Changes would also be made to the plane’s airframe to reduce its radar cross-section. The obvious drawback of this option is the high cost and the long time it would take to implement.

    Finally, the most realistic option that would deliver great returns in terms of the plane’s capability without costing too much or taking too much time sits somewhere in the middle. It includes a deep upgrade of the plane’s N-011M Bars radar and integration of the latest Russian and Indian-made electronics, optics and infrared systems without modifications to the airframe.

    It would also make sense to implement the Su-30MKI upgrade program in several batches of 50-55 planes, with each successive batch incorporating more complex technology. Such an approach was mentioned as a possibility by Yuri Beliy, chief of the NIIP Tikhomirov company, the developer of the Bars radar. Speaking in an interview, Beliy said that the first phase of the program could include upgrading the Bars radar to give it a greater range, higher resolution, better jamming resistance, and support for new weapons systems. At a later phase, the Bars radar could be equipped with an active phased array. The planes upgraded in the first batch could later be brought to the technical standard of the latest batches without any major difficulties.



    The approach would make it possible to start the program quickly (thereby securing orders for India’s HAL and other local suppliers). It would improve the IAF’s capability in an evolutionary way, and it would be easier on the IAF pilots, who will not have to deal with a quantum leap in the complexity of the upgraded plane’s systems. Such a phased strategy worked well in 2002-2004, when Russia delivered the first 32 Su-30MKI planes. The fighters were supplied in three batches of 10, 12 and 10. Each successive batch included some improvements that were later incorporated in the previous batches, so all 32 planes were eventually brought to the same standard.

    When the Su-30MKI specifications were being drawn up, the Indian military came up with an extremely well-balanced set of requirements for the new plane. Those requirements were at the cutting edge of – but not beyond – the Russian defense industry’s capability at the time, and could be implemented at a reasonable cost and within reasonable deadlines. It is to be hoped that a similarly well-balanced solution will be found for the Sukhoi Super 30 program.


    http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/the-sukhoi-super-30-the-outlook-indias-ultra-advanced-17535?page=2

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    IAF converting Su-30 MKI’s to Super Sukhois coupled with deadly BrahMos missiles

    Post  Pinto on Wed Oct 05, 2016 1:30 pm


    https://www.ibcworldnews.com/2015/10/03/iaf-converting-su-30-mkis-to-super-sukhois-coupled-with-deadly-brahmos-missiles/

    IAF’s Su-30 fighter plane pilots are focusing on beyond visual range combat and night flying capabilities even as they gear up for the installation of the ‘game changer’ BrahMos missiles, with a strike range of nearly 300 kms, in the aircraft.

    They are also looking forward to the plane’s next generation ‘Super 30’ version which will have advanced avionics.

    Explaining the concept of the beyond visual range (BVR) fights, senior IAF officials at a forward base close to the border with Pakistan explained that future wars are unlikely to have close combat fights like in wars in 1965 or 1971.

    “Nowadays, the fighter jets are very modernised with state-of-the-art radar systems. What matters now is BVR which means that one can engage with the enemy in air without actually seeing him. Once the enemy is locked in, a BVR missile is fired,” Wing Commander Sharad Sharma, who has clocked more than 1000 hours on the Sukhoi, said.

    The BVR missiles carried by Sukhoi currently have a range of about 50-70 kms. But what will truly turn the tide is the integration of the supersonic missile BrahMos with the Sukhoi.

    Fighter pilots at the base, one of the newest of the Sukhoi, say that the BrahMos will be game changer.

    “Imagine, one can fire a missile nearly 300 kms away from the target. Installations across the border can be targeted by our fighter jets without even crossing the border,” a senior pilot explained.

    The first test, a dead weight one, of the BrahMos integrated Sukhoi is likely to take place early next month or even this month-end.

    The second test will be by firing a dummy missile while the third and fourth stages of testing will be with actual missile, but without the 200 kg warhead to validate the guidance system and accuracy. Two Sukhois will be used for the tests which will be completed in the next one year.

    The fourth generation Sukhois were inducted into the Indian Air Force in 2002 and is the frontline fighter aircraft of the country. But the DRDO, HAL (the production agency) and the Sukhoi Design Bureau in Russia are working together on ‘Super 30’ Project.

    “The Super 30 Project will make the aircraft a 4.5 generation one. While there won’t be modification to the air frame, the planes will be equipped with next generation radar system, software, integrated touch display and a helmet- mounted display,” IAF officials said.

    The Sukhois, which have a range of 3,000 kms without mid-air refueling and over 8000 kms with two refuelings, have a capacity to carry up to 12 missiles, including a combination of air-to-air and air-to-surface. The fighter plane can carry up to 32 bombs also.

    The Sukhoi fighter aircraft pilots are carrying out intensive training for night operations.

    “In 1962 and 1971 wars, our fighters did not have night flying capability. We feel that future wars may be fought in the skies during night time and hence a lot of focus is being given to night flying. Flying at night is a different game altogether in comparison to day time flying,” they said.

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    Re: Indian Su-30MKI: News

    Post  George1 on Sun Oct 09, 2016 6:49 pm



    _________________
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    Re: Indian Su-30MKI: News

    Post  Pinto on Sun Oct 09, 2016 7:10 pm

    well by the end of this year the su30mki will be tested with real launch of Brahmos missile increasing its capacity to strike land targets manifold and more devastatingly and more over the proposed upgrade to super sukhoi is also expected to be signed during this period

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