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    Russian Electronics: Semiconductor and Processors #2

    lancelot
    lancelot


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    Post  lancelot Sat Jan 06, 2024 8:32 pm

    kvs wrote:"Ancient" circuit board manufactured in 2023 for a Russian MLRS guided missile.    The wankers in the comments show their ignorance.
    ...
    2) Obviously no precious western washing machine chips anywhere.    But high grade military components that resist EW attacks.  The
       three main ICs are factory set gate array chips that are cheaper and more reliable than FPGAs.  

    3) Russia obviously has the manufacturing capacity to produce the parts needed for its military equipment.   No need to run to China
       for help.
    Most military tech in the West uses either what we would today consider basically obsolete technology predating the 2000s, not any better and often worse than we see here, or they use common off the shelf (COTS) i.e. commercial chips with commercial FPGAs for custom designs. If it was a Cold War era design the chips will definitively be worse than this.

    The large chips on this board (1537HM2) are made at Angstrem. That is their logo. Like you said they are gate array chips. These ones have 17,600 gates. They have similar gate array chips with up to 100,000 gates. This is basically an ULA as seen on the ZX Spectrum computer except this is much larger and modern. They replace a ton of discretes. The lower layers of the chip are fixed designs, always the same for any chip, they have a bunch of gates. The upper layers basically determine how those gates are connected together and this is custom to each chip design. You design the circuit with a VHDL software tool like you would an FPGA, generate a file with their converter tools, then send this file to the factory where they basically "program" the chip by etching the last layers. This unlike an FPGA is fixed in place and can't be reprogrammed. FPGAs use memory cells for the programmable bits instead.

    These huge ceramic IC packages did not exist back in the Soviet Union. They only had smaller ones. The company which makes them pretty much kept this expertise alive and made improvements since then. They are quite competitive and offer their services to the world market. The IC plastic package companies from the Soviet Union basically died because they weren't competitive against Asian companies like the ones in Malaysia. Russian chips in plastic packages are typically sent to be packaged abroad.

    As for the fab which etches the actual chips on silicon wafers. Angstrem has a huge facility in Zelenograd near Moscow. They can make 150mm wafers at 600nm. More than enough for something like this. 600nm is basically the technology level used to make the Intel Pentium chips. Once again this technology level wasn't available in the Soviet Union either.

    These large chips are basically representative of early 2000s Russian IC technology. Which wasn't available in Soviet times. When the Soviet Union collapsed the densest chips they could make were at the technology level of an 8086.

    Russia can make denser programmable chips than this. They make their own FPGAs. The Russians have a waste capacity to make 180nm chips at Mikron. Also at Zelenograd near Moscow. Which is a process three generations newer than this. So it is 8x denser. This is basically the technology level used to make the Intel Pentium III chips. This is representative of early 2010s Russian IC technology.

    Unfortunately things kind of stagnated since then. Mikron licensed a 90nm process from STMicroelectronics in France and made a small 200mm production line that can make chips with this process. Angstrem bought the AMD Fab in Dresden which used to make the Athlon 64, which were 90nm chips, and a new building was made and the tools were moved in. But this took like a decade to do. Partly thanks to the financial crisis and the bank freezing then funding for the project midway. This is the Angstrem-T fab. Owned today by NM-Tech. It has huge capacity and probably is only partially operating. According to the terms of the license the technology can't be used to make military chips though.

    Like I said before in this forum the Russians are building what seems to be a pilot 300mm wafers at 28nm fab in Zelenograd between the Angstrem and Angstrem-T fabs. The building should have been topped off a couple months ago. I am sure they will find some way to get the tools for it. This should allow them to make 28nm versions of the Elbrus2K and NeuroMatrix which will be more than competitive against the yet to be deployed Block 4 electronics in the F-35.

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    Singular_trafo


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    Post  Singular_trafo Sun Jan 07, 2024 9:36 am

    lancelot wrote:

    Unfortunately things kind of stagnated since then. Mikron licensed a 90nm process from STMicroelectronics in France and made a small 200mm production line that can make chips with this process. Angstrem bought the AMD Fab in Dresden which used to make the Athlon 64, which were 90nm chips, and a new building was made and the tools were moved in. But this took like a decade to do. Partly thanks to the financial crisis and the bank freezing then funding for the project midway. This is the Angstrem-T fab. Owned today by NM-Tech. It has huge capacity and probably is only partially operating. According to the terms of the license the technology can't be used to make military chips though.


    Since 2014 the russian electronics development went underground.

    There areno publicly available informations, everything done secretly.

    Understandable, the usa using up all oportunity to identify anything that can cause delays, and use any legal or illegal means to harm them.
    Including, but not limited to assassination and terrorist attack.

    Like the MRAM development.

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    thegopnik
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    Post  thegopnik Sun Feb 18, 2024 5:56 pm

    if they are talking about the latest micro circuits on the competetive level of leading foreign manufacturers than this is significant news.
    https://rostec-ru.translate.goog/news/roselektronika-sozdast-peredovye-mikroskhemy-dlya-bortovogo-oborudovaniya/?_x_tr_sl=ru&_x_tr_tl=en&_x_tr_hl=en&_x_tr_pto=wapp
    Ruselectronics will create advanced microcircuits for on-board equipment
    The Ruselectronics holding of the Rostec State Corporation is developing a line of integrated circuits and microassemblies that will be used in on-board power supply systems of aircraft. The created ECB has dynamic characteristics at the level of leading foreign manufacturers. The start of mass production is planned for 2025.

    New electronic components are capable of operating in a temperature range from –60 to +125 degrees Celsius, and have built-in protection against low supply voltage and static electricity. The products are planned to be used in on-board power supply systems of aircraft, as well as in electric drive control circuits.

    A key feature of new microcircuits and microassemblies is the presence of capacitive galvanic isolation implemented on the crystals themselves. Thanks to the use of modern technological processes, ECU developers managed to achieve performance characteristics corresponding to similar products from leading foreign manufacturers: Infineon, International Rectifier, Texas Instruments and others.

    NPP Pulsar is proactively developing components for Ruselectronics.

    “Ensuring technological sovereignty is one of the key tasks of Russian industry, and we continue to actively work in such a sensitive area as microelectronics. By the end of 2024, the company plans to complete the development phase and begin production of a new electronic component next year,” said Sergei Korneev, Deputy General Director for Technological Development and Production of Pulsar Research and Production Enterprise.

    The new product range includes high-voltage single- and dual-channel drivers for driving high-power N- and P-channel transistors with voltages up to 600 V.

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    sepheronx
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    Post  sepheronx Sun Feb 18, 2024 6:01 pm

    Sounds like VRM's and SMD's for onboard PSU's.

    If so, this is rather very important as it can spread beyond just the jet engine market unless these ones are very specific.

    Good news.

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    thegopnik
    thegopnik


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    Post  thegopnik Wed Feb 21, 2024 5:24 am

    https://rostec.ru/news/sotrudnik-shvabe-razrabotal-lazernye-izluchateli-novogo-pokoleniya-/

    An employee of the Polyus Research Institute named after M.F. Stelmakh of the Shvabe holding of Rostec State Corporation has developed a new technology for producing semiconductor nanostructures, and also created high-power laser emitters of a new generation based on them. The results of the scientific work can be applied in the production of medical equipment, unmanned vehicles, lidar systems and other devices. The invention was awarded the highest award at the competition of young scientists organized by the Moscow government.

    Maxim Ladugin, Doctor of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, has developed the physical foundations for the design of laser quantum-dimensional structures, the dimensions of which range from nanometers to several micrometers, which ultimately makes the final device more compact, as well as reduces energy consumption. The project was implemented on the basis of semiconductor compounds of aluminum, gallium and indium with phosphorus and arsenic. Such structures will be the most optimal for the popular spectral ranges of 750-850 nm, 900-980 nm and 1500-1600 nm and will increase the power of laser devices.

    "Improved performance of near-infrared lasers is extremely important for many areas. For example, for metrology, medicine, rangewatch, high-speed fiber optic communication, and others. In his scientific work, our colleague demonstrated the results of creating a new generation of high-power laser emitters – laser diodes, rulers and gratings – that operate in pulsed and continuous modes in the infrared spectral range from 750 to 1600 nm. The use of the proposed technologies will make laser emitters more efficient, faster and miniaturized, which will have a positive effect on the devices being created. In particular, on the productivity and compactness of technological units, rangefinders and medical devices, including surgical and cosmetology. Congratulations to Maxim on his well-deserved victory, I wish him to continue to achieve his goals!" said Evgeny Kuznetsov, CEO of Polyus Research Institute.

    Maxim Ladugin won the competition of young scientists of the Moscow government. In total, 76 people became laureates. Specialists under the age of 35 applied for the award.

    This is not the first time that the merits of the specialist have been assessed at a high level. In 2012, the team of authors of the Polyus Research Institute, which included Maxim Ladugin, was awarded the Prize of the Government of the Russian Federation in the field of science and technology for young scientists for the development and implementation of technology for the production of nanoheterostructures and high-power diode lasers for optical pumping of active media of advanced laser systems for controlled thermonuclear fusion.

    Today, the Polyus Research Institute develops and manufactures semiconductor and solid-state lasers and devices based on them, laser gyroscopes, navigation devices, medical devices and other products. Employees of the institute contribute to the development of domestic science by developing and implementing innovative products.

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