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    Egyptian Ground Forces

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    ahmedfire

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  ahmedfire on Sun Mar 20, 2011 1:44 am

    nightcrawler wrote:
    ahmedfire wrote:if i get more inf. i'll bring it..
    sorry but the army did not publish easily any new data about self modifications in our weapons .. Embarassed

    Request your government if they can buy our AlKhalids Tanks which will surely meet your demands.
    http://defencedog.blogspot.com/2011/03/hit-al-khalid-main-battle-tank.html
    They have Ukrainian built engines & also come with a PUNCH like smooth-bore 120mm cannon instead of antiquated rifled ones.
    we already manufacturing abrams with alicence ,we have abig experience in it and built 1005 ones,,so we can upgrade our russian tanks effectively,120 canon could be added to upgraded m60 in near future,,not aproblem.
    thanks...

    egyptian abrams
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    IronsightSniper

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  IronsightSniper on Sun Mar 20, 2011 2:06 am

    ahmedfire wrote:
    IronsightSniper wrote:Apparently they've put a limited coverage of ERA on the Front Hull and Side Front Hulls. They've also sloped the Frontal Turret armor to an extreme, near-horizontal angle, kinda like that on the Merkava 4 and Leopard 2. I wouldn't know about it's armor composition though.

    spaced armor and,
    i think there are ERA in front of turret but coverage by someway,
    look carefully to back and front of turret ERA extended from front to back but it is covered from front not from back....



    also track guards and to protect suspension....

    aquestion ,in next pic:
    is number 2 is Periscope


    Yeah, I know it has spaced armor, but I was more or less inquiring about the M60's material composition, i.e. 50 mm of steel, 30 mm of Air, 50 mm of fiber glass, etc.

    I'd say that #2 is either the Gunner's sight or the commander's periscope. If I had to bet on it, I'd guess it was the gunner's sight.
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    ahmedfire

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    Egypt get bmp3 from russia ?!

    Post  ahmedfire on Thu Mar 24, 2011 7:32 pm

    ok..this photo taken from avideo of egyptian army....
    is egypt buyed bmp3 ?!!

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    GarryB

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  GarryB on Tue May 31, 2011 3:55 am

    Looks like a simulator to me.

    Perhaps they are testing/evaluating it?
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    ahmedfire

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  ahmedfire on Tue May 31, 2011 11:06 am


    why we buy asimulator although we didn't but any amounts of bmp3

    ,the problem is there is ahigh secrecy on the deals that egypt make with the East (russia,china,..etc) !!

    in 2009 ,news out that egypt buyed torm1 and some buks,,and we discovered that the deal was in 2007 and delivering in 2007 also Very Happy

    T-80 and some radars is another examples..
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    GarryB

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  GarryB on Wed Jun 01, 2011 4:42 am

    I doubt it is to hide it from the Egyptian people... more likely to not antagonise the US that because of Egyptian agreements with Israel gives Egypt just over a billion bucks a year to spend on US military products.

    Don't want to upset the gravy train.
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    ahmedfire

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  ahmedfire on Wed Jun 01, 2011 10:36 am

    ofcourse,,we don't want to cut these millions os dollars, so we played in asmart way with americans,,Mubarak was the best one to play this smart game..
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    ahmedfire

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    Egyptian ground forces

    Post  ahmedfire on Sat Jul 02, 2011 5:25 pm

    welcome

    I'll take part by part...

    Personnel (regular): 450000

    No. of Divisions : 12

    No. of brigades : 49

    Tanks :

    1015 M1A1 Abrams ( prduce in egypt unde licence from USA ),Egyptians has abig experience in tanks ,sayed meshaal (Minister of Military Production) said that egypt produced ABRAMS that better than american one, we solved the prob of hieh engine temperature, self produced some electronics and used more modern europian elcetronics...

    factory 100 that produces these tanks







    Egyptians also is upgrading M1A1 to M1A2SEP level

    received permission (along with GDLS) to begin a modernization program for their M-1A1s – they will be modernized to full M-1A2 SEP standards

    __________________________________________________________

    M60A3: more than 1900 : is the biggest numbers of this tank type around the world.

    egyptians are upgrading some things in M60A3 like new engines and armour protection,no more details but the new upgrades suddenly noticed in arecent egyptian video (army here doesn't announce in official there developments )

    the upgraded



    _______________________________________________________

    T-62 : 600 : upgraded with nice specifications :german engine ,a20 mm gun and using K-5 protection armour.

    http://www.morozov.com.ua/eng/body/t62.php

    also egypt get technology transfer from ukraine

    The contract also provides for technology transfer, an increasingly important element for many purchasers of foreign-made armaments. Under terms of the contract, Ukrainian arms producers will transfer machinery to the Egyptian state-owned Abu Zaabal Tank Repair Factory near Cairo and the Kader Factory for Developed Industries

    ___________________________________________________________

    Ramsis 2 Tank: 260: egyptian upgrade to T-55...

    ____________________________

    T-55 :1500 <numbers are upgraded with nice levels



    ______________________________________________

    T-80 Tanke: 34...

    According to Strategypage and a newsclipping from July of 2002, Egypt is currently fielding 34 - T-80 MBTs in its military since 1997


    _____________________________________________________


    Last edited by ahmedfire on Sat Jul 02, 2011 7:16 pm; edited 1 time in total
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    ahmedfire

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  ahmedfire on Sat Jul 02, 2011 7:13 pm

    YP R -765: no. 1030

    M113 :2950 { 300 of them EEF (Egyptian version of the armored or -113) (900 under the demand to replace the armored YP R -765)

    BMP-1: (n: 220)

    BTR 50,60 : 600

    OT62,64 : 550

    egypt has all capabilities to upgrad and develop these armoured vehicles,as example they upgraded the M113A2 and put on it the turret of bradly...
    some pic:










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    ahmedfire

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  ahmedfire on Sat Jul 02, 2011 7:44 pm

    Wheele vehicles:

    FAHD(home made ): 1500 many variants


    Waleed Mk 1/ Mk 2 :650

    Commando Scout :112

    Quadir: 1470

    CBSS Radar to Humvee :42

    BTR-152: 300

    BMR-600 : 260

    RG32 : 112

    btr 40+btr 152 :650

    brdm 1+brdm 2 : 500

    ot62+btr50 : 750

    ot64+btr60 : 500

    Walid Mk 1/ Mk 2 :650

    some pic.

    [img]h










    Last edited by ahmedfire on Sun Jul 03, 2011 12:14 am; edited 2 times in total
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    ahmedfire

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  ahmedfire on Sat Jul 02, 2011 8:25 pm

    Multiple launcher rocket systems :

    VAP-80: 80 mm towed/self propelled non-guided rocket system of 40 tubes arranged in 4 rows of 10: Range: 6.5 km (250 Launcher Units) (Used by Paratrooper and Air Mobile Brigades)

    m-51 130 mm towed non-guided rocket system of 16 tubes arranged in 4 rows of 4: Range 8.2 km (36 Launcher Units) (Used by Paratroopers and Air Mobile units)
    Bm-13 132 mm towed non-guided rocket system of 16 tubes arranged in 2 rows of 8: Range 13 km (24 Launcher Units) (Used for training)

    Bm-21 122 mm non-guided rocket system of 40 tube arranged in 4 rows of 10: Range: 20.8 km (215 Launcher Units) (Being phased out and replaced by Sakr-45)

    BM-11: North Korean version of the Bm-21 non-guided rocket system of 30 tubes arranged in 2 rows of 15: Range: 20.8 km (96 Launcher Units) Being phased out and replaced by Sakr-45)

    Sakr-4:122 mm non-guided rocket system of a single tube based on a tripod stand: Range: 4 km, Egyptian modified version of the BM-11 (120 Launcher Units)

    Sakr-8:122 mm non-guided rocket system of 2 tubes based on a tripod stand or a Jeep: Range: 8 km, Egyptian modified version of the BM-11 (48 Launcher Units)(Used by Paratroopers and Air Mobile units)

    Sakr-10:122 mm non-guided rocket system of 4 tubes arranged in 2 rows of 2: Range: 10 km, Egyptian modified version of the BM-11 (50 Launcher Units) (Used by Infantry battalions)

    Sakr-18:122 mm non-guided rocket system of 30 tubes arranged in 3 rows of 10: Range: 20.8 km, Egyptian modified version of the BM-11 (72 Launcher Units)

    Sakr-30:122 mm non-guided rocket system of 40 tubes arranged in 4 rows of 10: Range: 30 km, Egyptian modified version of the Bm-21(130 Launcher Units)

    Sakr-36:122 mm non-guided rocket system of 40 tubes arranged in 4 rows of 10: Range: 36 km, enhanced range Egyptian modified version of the Bm-21(50 Launcher Units)

    Sakr-45: 227 mm battlefield rocket system, Range: 45 km, Egyptian licensed built version of the M270 rocket combined with the traditional Sakr-36 6X6 launching truck system of 12 tubes arranged in 2 rows of 6 (100 Launcher Units) (In production: 25-30 launchers/year to replace the Bm-21 & the BM-11 by 2012)

    M270: 227 mm battlefield rocket system of 12 tubes arranged in 2 rows of 6: (26 Launcher Units)(+ 20 Launcher units ordered for 2009-2010 delivery)
    Range with M26 rocket ammunition: 32 km
    Range with M26A1/A2 ammunition: 45 km
    Range with M30 ammunition: 45 km

    Bm-24: 240 mm non-guided rocket system of 12 tubes arranged in 2 rows of 6: Range 12 km (48 Launcher Units)






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    ahmedfire

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  ahmedfire on Sat Jul 02, 2011 9:02 pm

    Egypt's Missile Efforts Succeed with Help from NK


    The Risk Report
    Volume 2 Number 5 (September-October 1996)

    Washington does not like to talk about Egypt as a proliferation threat, but Cairo's flourishing missile partnership with North Korea is beginning to worry U.S. officials. After years of help from Pyongyang, Cairo can now produce its own version of the Soviet Scud-B missile, which can deliver nuclear or chemical warheads up to 300 kilometers. It is also developing a more advanced Scud-C version that could threaten all of Israel and target Arab cities in Libya, Syria and Sudan.

    "If we were to rank our concerns in Egypt," a U.S. official tells the Risk Report, "it would be missiles first, then chemical weapons, then biological weapons, and last--a good ways down on the list--Egypt's nuclear program." Because Egypt, a U.S. ally, does not possess nuclear weapons and currently has a peace treaty with Israel, Washington has watched Cairo's missile industry grow without saying much. But that may change.

    "There is a 15-year old Scud relationship between North Korea and Egypt," says a U.S. official who tracks missile proliferation, "and by now Egypt is relatively far along in its indigenous production effort--there are Scud-Bs coming out of the production line."

    Washington has expressed its concern about the missile trade to Pyongyang and Cairo, but the question is whether the Administration will impose sanctions. Under U.S. law, the Clinton administration can impose two-year trade sanctions on any foreign company or person that "conspires or attempts to engage in" the export of Scud-size missiles or the transfer of equipment or technology that "contributes to the design, development or production of missiles" in a country such as Egypt. If applied, the sanctions would penalize the buyers in Egypt as well as the sellers in North Korea.

    The early years

    Cairo began its quest for nuclear-capable missiles in the early 1960s. A group of German engineers and scientists were imported to help build a satellite launcher and a series of liquid fuel missiles known as the Zafir, the Kahir and the Ra'id, with projected ranges of 370km, 600km and 1,500 kilometers respectively. None of these missiles ever became operational, partly due to problems with the guidance technology and partly due to widespread mismanagement of the projects.

    After Egypt's defeat in the 1967 Arab-Israeli war, Egypt turned to the Soviet Union for help. In 1972, Moscow agreed to train Egyptian technicians in guidance technology and later shipped unguided FROG-7 missiles to Egypt that could fly up to 70 kilometers. By early 1973, the Soviet Union had also agreed to supply approximately 18 completed Scud-B missiles and nine transporter-erector launchers (TELs). During the 1973 Arab-Israeli war, Egypt was able to launch three Soviet-supplied Scuds at Israeli positions in the Sinai. After the war, Egypt began an effort to upgrade its Scuds, and to replace Soviet parts with Egyptian-made components.

    Missile cooperation in the 1980s

    It was in the 1980s that Egypt began its first successful drive for missile production capability. Argentina, Iraq and North Korea were all recruited as helpers. Egypt's first step was to ship at least two of its Soviet-supplied Scuds to North Korea for reverse-engineering. In return for the missiles, Pyongyang agreed to help Cairo build Scuds on its own. North Korea provided technical documents, drawings and extensive access to North Korea's own Scud production program.

    At the same time it was working with North Korea, Egypt began a secret project with Argentina and Iraq to build a 1,000km-range missile known as the Condor-II in Argentina and the Badr-2000 in Egypt. "The goal was to develop a missile in Argentina and then pass the cookbook to Egypt and Iraq," says a knowledgeable U.S. official. The project began in 1982, with Egypt promising to help Argentina with technology and with Iraq paying the bills. The Condor-II/Badr-2000 was a solid-fuel, two-stage missile designed to fly 800-1,200 kilometers with a 500-kilogram payload.

    Work on the Condor-II began at a site near Falda del Carmen in Argentina's Sierra Chica mountains. Similar sites were later built in Egypt and Iraq. The Egyptian site reportedly included a missile fuel and test area at Abu Zaabal and a missile production facility at Helwan. Argentina, Egypt and Iraq procured the necessary technologies from a number of Western armament and aerospace companies, primarily in Germany and Italy. The leading supplier was Germany's Messerschmitt-Boelkow-Blohm (MBB), which had designed the missile's Argentine predecessor, the Condor-I.

    Due to the sensitivity of the project, its suppliers sought to conceal their participation after 1985. To accomplish this, work on the Condor-II was taken over by a consortium of companies known as "Consen," including some of Europe's defense industry giants. The whole operation was headquartered in Munich and used foreign subsidiaries. Press reports have linked several supplier firms to the project, including SNIA-BPD, a subsidiary of Italy's Fiat; Transtechnica, a subsidiary of MBB; the French company Sagem; and the German firm MAN. Nearly 20 others were reported to have played a role in procuring technologies for the Condor, including companies named Delta Consult, Ifat, Desintec, Condor Projeckt and Aerotec.

    In addition to procuring technology in Europe, Egypt went shopping for controlled goods in the United States. A California rocket scientist, Egyptian-born Abdelkader Helmy, was recruited by the Egyptian Defense Minister General Abdel Halim Abu Ghazala to obtain materials for the Badr-2000 missile program. Helmy arranged for the export of restricted U.S. rocket materials to Egypt. But the scheme was thwarted in June 1988, when an Egyptian military officer was arrested in Baltimore as he tried to illegally load "carbon-carbon" on a Cairo-bound military transport plane. One year later, Helmy pleaded guilty to one count of illegally exporting about 420 pounds of carbon-carbon. Carbon-carbon is used in the manufacture of rocket nose cones, nozzles, and heat shields on re-entry vehicles. It improves missile accuracy by protecting the nose cone from the tremendous frictional heat caused during re-entry of the atmosphere. The Egyptian government insisted on diplomatic immunity for the Egyptian officers who were implicated. But Helmy was sentenced in June 1989 to 46 months in prison and fined over $350,000. He was also ordered to forfeit most of what prosecutors said were $1 million in payments by Egyptian intelligence operatives via Swiss banks. James Huffman, an associate of Helmy's who had helped arrange the export, was sentenced to 41 months in prison and fined $7,500. The U.S. district judge who tried the case in California reportedly described Helmy's scheme to acquire sensitive U.S. missile materials as a "large, complex, intricate conspiracy" developed by Egypt with financial backing from Iraq. President Mubarak fired Abu Ghazala in April 1989, but official American and Egyptian reactions to this incident were muted. The incident did not affect Egypt's $2 billion in military and economic aid each year from the United States.

    At the same time Helmy was active in the United States, Egyptian missile experts were in Iraq working on the Condor-II. From 1987 until the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in 1990, Egyptian experts were working alongside Iraqis at a missile complex about 40 kilometers south of Baghdad. In August 1989, an explosion at the site killed hundreds of workers, including Egyptian military engineers. Egyptian-Iraqi missile cooperation included work on extending the range of Scud missiles as well on the Condor-II. As part of the deal, Cairo had always planned to import the means to produce its own version, the Badr-2000. Egypt received some technology from Argentina and started to build its own production facilities, but critical technology was still missing in the late 1980s. Jane's Defence Weekly reported that a 1988 "dummy test" in Argentina, which had included launch preparation and software trials, showed the Condor to have significant technical problems. Its development was not complete when, under pressure from the United States, Argentina decided to cancel its participation in the project in 1990.

    "Fortunately, we engineered the demise of the Condor in Argentina before the cookbook or blueprints were ready," says a U.S. official. Though Argentina is now out of the Condor business, U.S. officials tell the Risk Report that Iraq and Egypt may not be. "In Egypt, the Condor [Badr-2000] has never entirely died, but it is on life support--a nurse monitors the vital signs and some research is being conducted, but full resuscitation is unlikely," says a State Department official. The full extent of Egypt's secret missile cooperation with Iraq before and after the Gulf War is still not known. Cairo has refused requests for information about the Condor-II from the U.N. inspectors in Iraq charged with monitoring Saddam's continuing missile efforts.

    Egypt's main missile priority has now shifted from the Condor/Badr-2000 to the simpler Scud technology, which Egypt is pushing ahead with full vigor. The Scud program is now getting steady infusions of equipment, technology and training. Earlier this year, U.S. intelligence detected several North Korean missile-related shipments to Egypt. According to a CIA (Central Intelligence Agency) report quoted in the Washington Times in June, Pyongyang has made at least seven shipments of materials for Scud-C missiles, including steel sheets and support equipment. The transfers took place in March and April and the CIA was quoted as saying that they "could allow Egypt to begin Scud-C series production."

    Egypt's goal is to build its own version of North Korea's Scud-C, which can fly up to 600 kilometers depending on the payload, and has better accuracy than the Scud-B. This would allow Egypt to hit targets throughout Israel as well as in Libya, Sudan and Syria. According to U.S. officials, Egypt is rapidly approaching success. "It's safe to assume that Egypt has successfully enhanced the range of its Scud," a U.S. official tells the Risk Report.

    By the year 2,000, if Egyptian-North Korean cooperation continues at its present level, Egypt also could gain access to North Korea's more advanced "Nodong" missile. Pyongyang is already sharing Nodong technology with Iran. The Nodong is a medium-range missile that was first tested in 1993 across the Sea of Japan. If Pyongyang does help Cairo build larger missiles such as the Nodong, the U.S. Administration may feel more pressure to intervene. But it is easier for Washington to penalize North Korea, as it did in 1992 for selling missiles to Iran, than to punish Egypt, an ally with close U.S. military ties. A U.S. official admits that "it is easier for us to focus on rogue states like Iran, Iraq and North Korea than to talk about our friends like Egypt or Israel."
    http://www.wisconsinproject.org/countries/egypt/miss.html


    Missile Programs

    Egypt has a highly developed weapons production capacity, second in the Middle East only to Israel. In the early 1960s, President Gamal Abdel Nasser pursued a crash missile production program with German assistance at "Factory 333" in Heliopolis, a few miles east of Cairo. (1) Three rockets were reportedly under development there: the 375-km range al Zafar, the 600-km range al Kahar, and the 1,000-km range al Raid. All three systems were canceled when the West German government put an end to the cooperation in 1966. (2) However, in the early 1970s the Soviet Union supplied Egypt with Frog-7s and Scud-Bs, a few of which were fired against Israel in the Yom Kippur War with little or no effect. (3)

    Egypt is believed to have produced the Scud-B indigenously - perhaps modifying them to extend their range - with some North Korean assistance. (4) An enhanced Scud-C (called "Project T"), with range/payload of 450 km/985 kg, is reported to have been developed and may be in service. (5) In cooperation with the French Société Nationale des Poudres et Explosifs (SNPE), Egypt has developed, produced, and deployed the Sakr-80 rocket as a replacement for the aging Frog missiles. The Sakr factory is responsible for producing the warheads, launchers and fire control systems for the Sakr-80. Various warheads were under development there in early 1988, including an HE armor piercing warhead, an antipersonnel/antimateriel submunition warhead, and an antitank minelet warhead; however, a chemical warhead was not planned. (6) According to press reporting from June 1990, China has signed a protocol with Egypt to help modernize the Sakr missile factory, "enabling it to produce a newer version of Soviet antiaircraft missiles, the surface-to-surface Scud-B and Silkworm and the Egyptian Sakr rockets." (7)

    Egypt began collaborating with Argentina on the Badr-2000 (which parallels the Argentine Condor II) in 1984. The Badr/Condor was to be an advanced two-stage, solid-fuel, inertially guided ballistic missile, and was described as "state-of-the-art." It was expected to deliver a 700 kg payload over 1,000 km, accurate to within 100 meters. (Cool In late September 1989, Assistant Secretary of State John Kelly testified to the House Foreign Affairs Middle East Subcommittee that Egypt had terminated its cooperation with Iraq on the Condor II. (9) He did not explain when or why the Egyptians withdrew from the project. However, this move followed Egyptian embarrassment over the attempted smuggling, in June 1988, of 200 kg of carbon-carbon material, which is used as a protective coating for ballistic missile warheads. The Egyptian defense minister at the time, Abdel Halim Abu Ghazala, was implicated in the scandal, and was fired in April 1989. (10) Although the Condor II cancellation was a severe set-back to the Egyptian missile program, the collaboration did enhance indigenous capabilities - as did North Korean and other assistance - and provided considerable missile-related technology that undoubtedly has been applied to the Scud improvement program. (11)

    Prior to the 171-nation vote in 1995 extending the NPT, Egypt launched a high visibility campaign to pressure Israel into signing the Treaty. Since the beginnings of its nuclear program in the early 1960s, Israel has fostered a deliberate ambiguity about whether it has developed and deployed operational nuclear weapons and has refused to be a NPT signatory. This ambiguity has allowed Israel to hold a nuclear Sword of Damocles over any potential Arab state threatening it with WMD, while preserving its freedom from NPT constraints. Despite early credible evidence that Israel was intent on becoming a nuclear weapons state and Nasser's vow that, in response, Egypt would "secure atomic weapons at any cost," Egypt has apparently made no significant effort to allocate resources or seek outside assistance in developing a nuclear weapons capability. (12) Nor is there any evidence that Egypt has attempted to develop chemical or biological warheads. Thus, Egypt shows no intention of converting its Scud-Bs and -Cs into WMD.

    Concerning missile proliferation, Egypt, though not a member of the MTCR, does not appear to be exploiting its presumed missile production capacity to market these weapons. Resource constraints may be one explanation for Egypt's modest missile capabilities. Another may be that its missile force has been developed only to the level needed to maintain status as a leader among the Arab states and a negotiator with the West. As the recipient of two billions dollars of U.S. aid annually, Egypt has good reason to choose diplomatic pressure, rather than arming Israel's enemies, to get Israel to sign the NPT as part of the Middle East peace process. Its continuing diplomatic efforts bear this out.
    [quote]

    http://www.fas.org/nuke/guide/egypt/missile/index.html


    http://cns.miis.edu/research/wmdme/egypt.htm
    http://www.wisconsinproject.org/countries/egypt/miss.html
    http://www.nti.org/e_research/profiles/Egypt/Missile/2362_6331.html










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    ahmedfire

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  ahmedfire on Sat Jul 02, 2011 9:31 pm

    Anti tank missiles:

    Sagr : 4000 launcher

    Swingfire : 1000 launcher and 10000 missile

    TOW : 752 launcher with 1300 missile


    (At-5): 72 launcher and 580 missile

    Milan : 250 launcher]

    Kornet : numbers unknown..

    Hot: 3000 missile

    Hell fire : 2000 missile

    RBG : many tybes big numbers..

















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    ahmedfire

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  ahmedfire on Sat Jul 02, 2011 10:00 pm

    Artillery

    m109-a2, a3 : 401

    m109a5 : 200

    155 GH 52 APU : manufactured in egypt after technology transfer from finland .unknown numbers

    D-30: ( home made ) unknown numbers....

    M110A2 : 144

    d-20 : 146

    TYPE 60 : 148

    s-23 : 124

    D-74: unknown numbers

    m-46 : 420

    Type 59-1M : 159

    PLZ45 : unknown numbers...





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    ahmedfire

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  ahmedfire on Sat Jul 02, 2011 10:03 pm

    from bright star operations:

    Bright Star Teams Guard with Egyptians

    Bright Star is a biennial multi-national exercise that involves more than a dozen allied, coalition or partner nations in Egypt.

    "For more than 23 years, since 1983, the success of Bright Star demonstrates to enemies around the world, as well as allies, that we can deploy a division headquarters, deploy an Army headquarters, conduct an airborne operation from halfway around the world, and insert an infantry company on the ground," said Lt. Gen. R. Steven Whitcomb, commander of the Third Army and U.S. Army Central (USARCENT), the 42nd Division's higher headquarters for the training exercise, "and you can interface and interact with conventional forces almost routinely."

    This year's exercise will include a large-scale battle simulation exercise, meant to challenge senior leaders and staff in the command and control of combat forces operating jointly.

    "All of us know that a command post exercise exerts pressure on the generals, colonels, lieutenant colonels and majors because it is a brain exercise," Lt. Gen. Whitcomb said to the combined American and Egyptian staff. "So challenge each other, learn from each other."

    The computer-generated battlefield is based on fictitious nations in conflict and a coalition of nations responding to restore security and an internationally recognized border. The 42nd Infantry Division commander and staff will control a fictitious force of more than 110,000 troops for the command post exercise.

    "There is no better expert on warfare in this maneuver box that we are conducting operations in than the Egyptians. This is their territory, they know how to fight this fight and we ought to learn from them," said Lt. Gen. Whitcomb.

    Nearly three dozen Egyptian officers from the Egyptian 9th Armored Division will complement the 42nd Division staff for the exercise. Joint training began almost immediately after the division's deployment as members of the Egyptian staff learned about the Army's military decision-making process and techniques for the command and control of combat forces.

    "We question each other and learn from each other," Lt. Gen. Whitcomb said, "and that is the real value of Bright Star."

    The training in Egypt completes nearly a year of planning, training and coordination for the leaders and staff of the 42nd Division. Soldiers trained with Third Army leaders and Egyptian training officers throughout 2007, including numerous site and staff visits, hosting the Egyptian and USARCENT leaders in New York in March.

    "We came with a plan," said 42nd Division Chief of Staff Col. Carl Pfeiffer. "We are here to demonstrate to the Egyptians that we are willing to work, partner and listen to them as we work through the (training) scenario."

    "Our report card here is when our Egyptian partners write a letter to Lt. Gen. Whitcomb," Col. Pfeiffer continued, "and tell him that they enjoyed working with the 42nd Infantry Division."

    Many members of the 42nd Division deployed to Cairo are veterans of Operation Iraqi Freedom, having served with the headquarters in Tikrit, Iraq, in 2005. Much of the training sessions and mission planning involved applying lessons learned from that deployment to the control of thousands of troops in the simulated combat environment.

    Part of the cooperative training included discussion and comparison of the two unit's capabilities and techniques for battle command. The two division commanders, Maj. Gen. El Araby El Suray from the Egyptian 9th Armored Division and Brig. Gen. Paul Genereux from the 42nd Infantry Division both led discussions among the joint staff.

    "I can not be more pleased in the cooperative effort I'm seeing between our two staffs," Brig. Gen. Genereux said. "My goals for this mission were to safely deploy our command post and train alongside the Egyptian 9th Armored, achieving real unity in our two organizations for the exercise. Ninety percent of what I wanted to achieve in http://www.minnesotanationalguard.or...tem=1184Bright Star, we have already done."

    "They [the Egyptians] are taking our products to get synchronized with us," Col. Pfeiffer said. "That is unusual, but of all the units I've worked with in this part of the world, this unit [the Egyptian 9th Armored Division] is the best, by far."

    "It is great to have the 42nd Infantry back in theater again," said Lt. Gen. Whitcomb in his remarks to the combined U.S. and Egyptian staff members.

    (Lt. Col. Richard Goldenberg serves with the 42nd Infantry Division headquarters)
    Minnesota National Guard Articles
    http://www.minnesotanationalguard.org/press_room/e-zine/articles/index.php?item=1184
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    ahmedfire

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  ahmedfire on Sat Jul 02, 2011 10:17 pm

    ohhh ,,damn I took many hours to make that thread.. What a Face

    notes : it's posible i forgot somethings..

    egypt produce on her land most of land forces weapons( around 90 % ) , so we can depend on ourselves...

    Pictures doesn't include all weapons ,so reading the above words will be better to make an actual picture for egyptian land forces.. Suspect

    egyptian land forces is the biggest in the middle east (enclode turkey and israel )

    ...........

    Egyptians









    Waiting for your opinions.... welcome
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    GarryB

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  GarryB on Sun Jul 03, 2011 6:36 am

    Impressive. Smile

    Quite a mix of equipment.
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    ahmedfire

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  ahmedfire on Sun Jul 03, 2011 3:33 pm

    GarryB wrote:Impressive. Smile

    Quite a mix of equipment.

    thnx Very Happy

    your opinion on this power ?
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    GarryB

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  GarryB on Mon Jul 04, 2011 3:38 am

    Regarding its power it is hard to say without a fight.

    Military forces are really only tested in battle.

    Have read terrible stories of units who work brilliantly in training but totally fail in real combat.

    I am reminded of reports of the new integration of female recruits into the US Army in the 1990s where the media was keen to find out how they were fitting in.

    One example I remember reading about was the result of quotas for female staff led to women winning positions in Logistics units despite not meeting the criteria on strength.

    The requirements were not gender based and were based on the physical ability to actually do the job... ie lifting heavy stuff. Unfortunately in their drive to get women into the service to look nongender biased the Army decided to use quotas, so if a logistics unit had a quota for 10 female cadets and only 10 applied they got the positions no matter what their results were.

    During the tests for the media the women did very well till it was revealed they were moving empty boxes because they couldn't cope with the real thing.

    When it came to doing it for real the men did the work the women weren't capable of doing.

    Not a bash at women... I have heard of lots of similar tricks being used to pass exercise requirements with all male units too.

    It is only in real combat where you can cheat and the truth comes out... good equipment makes it easier, but you need competent commanders and leadership too.
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    ahmedfire

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  ahmedfire on Mon Jul 04, 2011 5:58 pm

    I get your point ,but my question was about the combination of these equipments,in acase of well trained soldiers ...

    about war,we have agood experience from several wars,specially 1973 war and destroying barlief line,It is not a mere line, but it is the strongest defense line in the recent history. It starts from Suez Canal to 12 km depth in Sinai peninsula. The report also says that 17 of the 20 projects are expected to meet all of their "key user requirements", one fewer than last year's report. Thirteen key user requirements on seven projects are considered to be "at risk". These include a problem identified in October last year with the Typhoon's maximum required speed at 36,000ft (11,000m) because of an "acoustic vibration within the engine intake which is causing the intake to resonate at very high speeds", and could have "potential long-term fatigue implications

    On the 6th of October, the Egyptian Air Force bombed all command and strategic Israeli targets in Sinai using 240 planes. In the ensuing confrontation, the Egyptians brought down 50 Israeli planes in three days — this was never admitted by Israel. The Egyptian Air Force also destroyed or damaged around a quarter of the Israeli Air Force during the war... The second and third armies then crossed the Suez Canal and broke through the Barlief Line under the cover of cannon fire

    with mig 21 we beated the phantom !!! with T-55 and T-54 destroy M60 and centurion Smile

    barlief line








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    GarryB

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  GarryB on Tue Jul 05, 2011 1:30 am

    You have a range of equipment with a good range of capabilities.

    Properly used it should be effective.
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    ahmedfire

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  ahmedfire on Wed Jul 06, 2011 6:05 pm

    Is that real ??

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    GarryB

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  GarryB on Thu Jul 07, 2011 6:54 am

    Looks like an American tank with its turret front painted black, with a remote control unit suggesting it is remote controlled.

    Remote controlled tanks are not new, though I would suggest it is a fairly pointless modification for this vehicle unless it is fitted with an autoloader for the main gun.
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    ahmedfire

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  ahmedfire on Fri Jul 08, 2011 10:19 pm

    i found one here

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    ahmedfire

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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

    Post  ahmedfire on Tue Jul 12, 2011 12:26 am


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    Re: Egyptian Ground Forces

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