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    Russian Navy: Status & News #1

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    Austin

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    Post  Austin Sat May 25, 2013 7:26 am

    Russian Navy To Upgrade Il-38 Patrol Fleet

    Unlike the Sea Dragon, the Novella has a non-exportable electronic reconnaissance module. The core system is based on modern digital computers and features two operator consoles each with two LCD screens and the commander’s “big picture” tactical situation on a large LCD; a highly sensitive magnetic anomaly detector; a high-resolution thermal imager; and various other sensors. Research and development started in the 1980s, leading to a prototype trials aircraft in 2001. The ambitious program suffered repeated delays and several revisions of the original specification, driven by the need to add new technologies that became available over time.

    The decision to upgrade the Il-38s was a hard one for the MoD, which long hesitated whether to outfit a relatively small fleet needing extensive airframe life extension work. The Indian aircraft have received a 40-year life extension. The Il-38N retains the original airplane’s crew of seven, 68-tonne mtow and 5.5- to 8.5-ton internal payload capability for various buoys, torpedoes, mines and depth charges.
    TR1
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    Post  TR1 Sat May 25, 2013 9:07 am

    On the 18th of this month, the flag was lowered from the destroyer Gremyshyy.
    Strike one from my list.
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    Post  GarryB Sat May 25, 2013 10:54 am

    It is good they are doing this, but I am a little disappointed they are not going with a new platform to base it around.

    Got to start somewhere I suppose... Smile
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    Post  TR1 Thu May 30, 2013 10:52 pm

    http://zvezdochka-ru.livejournal.com/25804.html

    Marshall Ustinov @ Zvezdochka.

    http://www.balancer.ru/forum/punbb/attachment.php?item=335679&download=2&type=.jpg

    Rastoporny tied up by Severnaya, where it has been since year 2000. Apparently paperwork for the ships decomm were long drawn up, but not yet sighned.
    Crossing it off my list, the ship is a dead-man.
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    Post  TR1 Thu May 30, 2013 10:55 pm

    http://sdelanounas.ru/blogs/33155/?pid=345612#comments

    On slightly happier note, one of the few truly active 956s, the Nastoichivy, getting ready for Baltic Fleet Day.
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    Post  GarryB Fri May 31, 2013 3:12 am

    I have always found the 956s to be handsome looking vessels.

    From memory they carried something like 2,000 130mm shells.
    Viktor
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    Post  Viktor Fri May 31, 2013 3:26 am

    Do you know, was Ustinov modernized or only repaired ?
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    Post  TR1 Fri May 31, 2013 3:45 am

    Viktor wrote:Do you know, was Ustinov modernized or only repaired ?

    Basically-repair.
    It took so long because it was @ Pier for well over a year while they figured out contract/money I guess.

    Any modernization would only be small (navigation systems, new communication/screens the like), and MAYBE something like new laser/optics that were spotted on Varyag a while back.
    https://www.russiadefence.net/t53-project-1164-atlant-krasina-slava-class#16286

    Btw, I still haven't found any details on that.

    Zvezdochka said no new weapons as of now.
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    Post  TR1 Sat Jun 01, 2013 2:28 am

    http://www.balancer.ru/sites/i/c/ic.pics.livejournal.com/kuleshovoleg/28256301/465944/465944_1000.jpg

    Nice photo of the mighty Severodvinsk!

    http://ic.pics.livejournal.com/bmpd/38024980/637116/637116_original.jpg

    Finally a decent pic of the Gryad Sviazsk.
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    Post  Austin Sat Jun 01, 2013 1:48 pm

    Upon receiving Boreys RF’s Navy to resume strategic submarines patrol in southern latitudes

    “As the Russian Navy receive the Borey class missile submarines, they will not only continue to patrol the Arctic, Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, but will resume execution of combat missions in those regions of the world’s ocean, where in the late 90s of the last century used to be the Soviet Navy, and where they have ceased to appear following the collapse of the Soviet Union," the source said.

    The Russian Navy’s strategic submarines of the Northern and Pacific fleets will patrol in the southern latitudes, the source said.
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    Post  Russian Patriot Fri Jun 07, 2013 11:04 pm


    Russia, Ukraine to Hold Joint Naval Drills on June 19-25

    MOSCOW, June 7 (RIA Novosti) – Some 15 warships and auxiliary vessels will take part in Russian-Ukrainian anti-piracy exercises in the Black Sea on June 19-25, a Russian Black Sea Fleet spokesman has said.

    The Fairway of Peace 2013 drills will focus on joint missions to counter piracy and terrorism threats in the region.

    “The Russian Navy will be represented by the Bora missile hovercraft , the Muromets ASW corvette, the P-60 missile boat and the Turbinist mine sweeper,” Capt.1st Rank Vyacheslav Trukhachev told reporters on Thursday.

    The drills will also involve several Russian Su-24 attack aircraft, a Be-12 ASW plane and a Ka-27PS search-and-rescue helicopter.

    The Fairway of Peace drills were conducted for the first time in 1997. They were held every two years until 2003.

    After a long break caused by the straining of relations between Moscow and Kiev during Viktor Yushchenko presidency in Ukraine, the sides resumed the drills in 2010 with a computer-assisted command post exercise.

    Since 2011, the Fairway of Peace drills are held annually and involve warships as well as other naval assets of both navies.

    http://en.rian.ru/military_news/20130607/181552338/Russia-Ukraine-to-Hold-Joint-Naval-Drills-on-June-19-25.html
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    Post  Viktor Sat Jun 08, 2013 1:18 am

    Russian navy is amassing ships in Mediterranean Sea - it would be interesting to know the exact figures if someone has them?
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    Post  Cyberspec Sun Jun 09, 2013 1:40 am

    Viktor wrote:Russian navy is amassing ships in Mediterranean Sea - it would be interesting to know the exact figures if someone has them?

    16 was mentioned in one report (including support vessels)
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    Post  TR1 Thu Jun 20, 2013 2:51 am

    Man, Amur's pace is absolutely terrible.

    Likely mostly the fault of the MOD.

    Nice cats though Very Happy
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    Post  TR1 Thu Jun 20, 2013 7:47 pm

    Zvezodchka is doing well.

    http://flotprom.ru/news/?ELEMENT_ID=146956

    It will repair the rest of the 1164 cruisers after the Ustinov.
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    Post  TR1 Fri Jun 21, 2013 9:25 pm

    http://fleetphoto.ru/photo/00/64/48/64486.jpg
    http://fleetphoto.ru/photo/00/64/48/64485.jpg

    Sviazhsk. Positiv was moved down to Duet for the voyage apparently.
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    Post  Austin Sat Jun 22, 2013 9:13 am

    Moscow Defense Brief 
    http://mdb.cast.ru


    Russian Naval Shipbuilding in 2012

    Dmitry Boltenkov


    The year 2012 brought three important events in Russian naval shipbuilding. Vladimir Monomakh, the third nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine in the Project 955 (Borei class), left the slip dock at the Severodvinsk Machinery Building Company (Sevmash); Yuriy Dolgorukiy, the first sub this class, entered service with the Russian Navy; and Verkhoturye, a Project 667BDRM (Delta IV class) nuclear-powered ballistic missile sub, returned to active service after repairs. Many new ships were laid down at the Russian naval shipyards. Several new combat and auxiliary ships entered service with the Navy. Finally, the Russian MoD substantially stepped up its ship repair program.

    Submarines


    The program of developing a new Russian nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine, armed with new Bulava (SS-N-31) missiles, has entered a new phase. At the end of 2012 the Navy took delivery of Yuriy Dolgorukiy, a Project 955 (Borei class) nuclear missile sub. The flag on the sub was hoisted on January 10, 2013 at a special ceremony attended by President Putin and new Defense Minister Sergey Shoygu. Two separate crews will now take a full combat training course, and Yuriy Dolgorukiy will be fully combat-ready by the end of 2013.1


    Sea trials of the second submarine this class, Aleksandr Nevskiy, are still ongoing. The sub is expected to enter service with the Russian Navy later this autumn after a test-launch of the Bulava SLBM. Incidentally, the Navy Command also wants to see a new automated missile launch control system in action during the test.2 Neither the first nor the second sub in the series made any Bulava launches in 2012. The reason for that has not been made clear. The third boat, Vladimir Monomakh (laid down on March 19, 2006) left the slip dock at the Sevmash shipyard on December 30, 2012.3 It was launched on January 18, 2013, and is currently being completed at the dockside.

    The fourth submarine in the series, Knyaz Vladimir, was laid down on July 30, 2012; it will be built using the modified Project 955A design.4 It has been reported that the fifth and the sixth subs will be laid down in July and November 2013, respectively. They will be named after two great Russian battle commanders, Suvorov and Kutuzov.5 By 2020 the Navy expects to take delivery of a total of eight submarines of this class. That will enable the MoD to replace a large proportion of the nuclear missile subs currently in service with the Northern Fleet, and all of the nuclear missiles subs assigned to the Pacific Fleet. We estimate, however, that since each submarine of this class currently takes seven to eight years to complete, the industry will need to step up the pace very significantly if it is to deliver all these subs by the 2020 deadline.

    Meanwhile, another important program, the Project 885 (Yasen class) nuclear-powered attack submarines, is lagging behind, owing primarily no a large number of experimental weaponry and hardware used in this design.6 The first sub in the series, Severodvinsk, is undergoing trials, which include test launches of the Kalibr-PL (SS-N-30) cruise missile system. In 2012 the submarine fired missiles at targets at sea and on the ground on five separate occasions, from a submerged and surfaced position.7 It is expected that Severodvinsk, which was laid down at the Sevmash back in 1993, will finally enter service with the Russian Navy later this year. Delivery of the upgraded second sub, Kazan, to the Navy is not expected before 2015. The third sub in the series should be laid down in July 2013. The Navy expects to take delivery of eight Project 885 submarines by 20208; that, too will require Sevmash to step up its current pace of production.

    In 2012 Russia also re-launched the previously frozen Project 677 (Lada class) new conventional submarine program. The first sub this class St Petersburg9, entered trials in 2004. After a recent upgrade the sub made a better impression on Navy representatives, but the completion of its trials program, including deep diving, was postponed until after it had been reassigned to the Northern Fleet in 2013-2014.10 There have also been some reports about the propulsion unit options being considered for the second and third submarines in the series, which are to be built at Admiralty Shipyards in St Petersburg. The second boat Kronstadt, may be equipped with new lithium-ion batteries, with an expected completion date in 2015. The third boat Sevastopol, may be equipped with an air-independent propulsion (AIP) system currently being developed by the Rubin Central Naval Technology Design Bureau. Its completion is tentatively scheduled for 2016.11

    There have been no reports about Russia’s plans for Project 677 subs beyond the third submarine. Many expect the program to be shut down to free up the resources for developing a ‘fifth-generation’ conventional sub, which is currently on the drawing board at Rubin.12
    In 2012 Russia also continued a program to build six Project 06363 (Improved Kilo class) diesel-electric submarines for the Black Sea Fleet. The third sub this class Staryy Oskol, was laid down at the Admiralty Shipyards on August 17, 2012.13 The first sub this class Novorossiysk should be launched later in 2013; the fourth should be laid down before the year’s end.

    Russia also continued to develop special-purpose submarines; most of them are deepwater research submarines and submersibles. On December 20, 2012 Sevmash resumed the construction Belgorod, a Project 949A (Oscar II class) nuclear-powered cruise missile submarine, which was mothballed in an unfinished state some years ago. Belgorod will now be completed using a new design which has been designated as Project 09852; once finished, the nuclear submarine will be used as a carrier vehicle for manned deepwater submersibles.14

    One final thing to say with regard to submarines is that the Russian program to dispose of old nuclear-powered submarines has all but reached completion, releasing significant resources. This has enabled Russia to ramp up the program of repairs for the subs still in service. Previously that program was mostly limited to merely restoring the Navy’s submarines to seaworthiness. Now it includes medium-grade repair projects and upgrades.

    Surface ships


    On February 1, 2012 workers at the STX France shipyard in Saint Nazaire cut first metal for Vladivostok, the first of the Mistral-class amphibious assault ship ordered by the Russian MoD.15 The official ceremony of laying down the ship was held on February 1, 2013.16 Vladivostok is scheduled to leave the building dock in September this year.17 Meanwhile, in August 2012 the Baltiyskiy Plant in St Petersburg began to assemble the stern part of the ship; under the contract with the French, 20 per cent of the ship will be made in Russia. The official ceremony to lay down the stern part of the hull was held on October 1, 2012.18 In the summer of 2013 the assembled stern section19 will be shipped to Saint Nazaire.20 The second ship this class (BPC Russe on French) Sevastopol, should be laid down later this year.21 The Russian Navy expects to take delivery of the two ships in 2014-2015; both will be assigned to the Pacific Fleet. In addition to the amphibious assault ships, the Russian Navy has also placed an order with France’s STX Lorient for four assault-landing boats.22


    Another two Mistral-class ships were initially supposed to be laid down at Russian shipyards in 2016; now, however, it is not clear whether Russia still intends to go ahead with those plans.23


    Two frigate programs were under way in the country in 2012. As part of the first program, the Severnaya Verf shipyard in St Petersburg is building Project 22350 (Admiral flota Sovetskogo Soyuza Gorshkov class) frigates; the tentative plan is to have six such frigates built by 2020. The first ship this class was laid down in 2006; it has now left the slip dock and is expected to enter a trials program in late 2013.24 The second ship, Admiral flota Kasatonov is still on the ways in St Petersburg. The third ship Admiral Golovko was laid down on February 1, 2012.25 The fourth ship Admiral Isakov should be laid down later this year.26 Once completed, the frigates will be assigned to the Northern and Pacific fleets. For now, however, the program is facing serious difficulties because of delays with their main Poliment-Redut SAM weapon system, currently being developed by the Almaz-Antey Air Defense Concern.

    The second series of new frigates, Project 11356R (Admiral Grigorovich class) is being built at the Yantar shipyard in Kaliningrad. A total of six ships are to be built; all of them will be assigned to the Black Sea Fleet in 2014-2016. Three Project 11356R frigates of the first batch are now on the ways. Admiral Grigorovich was laid down on December 18, 2010; Admiral Essen on July 8, 2011; and Admiral Makarov on February 29, 2012. The first ship of the second batch, Admiral Butakov, was to be laid down in November 2012, but that has now been postponed until later in 2013. Admiral Grigorovich should be launched this summer, and enter service with the Russian Navy in late 2014.27 The Project 11356R program is not facing nearly as many technical problems as Project 22350 because this particular design has already been tried and tested; six of these frigates have already been delivered to the Indian Navy.28


    After several years of trials, in November 2012 the second Project 11661K Dagestan missile ship (small frigate) entered service with the Russian Navy. It was laid down back in 1992 at the Zelenodolskiy shipyard and was initially destined for export. Unlike the first ship this class Tatarstan, which entered service in 2002, Dagestan is equipped with the Kalibr-NK (SS-N-30) long-range cruise missiles, which enable it to take out ground targets at long distances. This is the Russian Navy’s first surface ship equipped with this type of weaponry.29 Both of the project 11661K ships have been assigned to the Caspian Flotilla.

    In 2012 Russia continued to build Project 20380 (Steregushchy class) corvettes. On February 1, 2012 the Severnya Verf shipyard laid down its fifth ship this class Gremyashchiy30, which first will be built to the modified Project 20385 design. Its launch has been scheduled for 2015.31 On May 30, 2012 Severnaya Verf launched its fourth Project 20380 corvette Stoykiy, which will enter service with the Russian Navy in November 2013.32 The third corvette Boykiy, which was laid down in July 2005, began sea trials in the autumn of 2012, and was delivered to the Russian navy in May 2013.33 The second Project 20385 corvette is to be laid down at Severnaya Verf on July 28, 2013.34


    The Amurskiy shipbuilding plant in Komsomolsk-on-Amur continued, at a fairy sluggish pace, the construction of its first Project 20380 ship Sovershennyy, which was laid down in 2006. In 2012 the upper deck section of the ship arrived by sea from the Sredne-Nevskiy shipbuilding plant in St Petersburg35, but the completion date for Sovershenny has yet to be set. Nevertheless, the Amurskiy shipbuilding plant laid down its second Project 20380 corvette Gromkiy, in April 2012.36


    Other large combat ships being built for the Russian Navy include a Project 11711 Admiral Gren large tank landing ship, which was laid down in December 2004 and launched on May 18, 2012. The future of the Project 11711 class is unclear. According to latest reports, Admiral Gren is being completed using a simplified design. Upon completion, which is not expected before 2014, it will be used as a military transport, and there are no plans to build any more of these ships.37


    In June and December 2012 the Russian Navy took delivery of Volgodonsk38 and Makhachkala, the second and third Project 21630 (Buyan) small artillery ships (gunboats), which were built at the Almaz shipyard in St Petersburg. Both will be assigned to the Caspian Flotilla.39 The first ship in the Project 21630 class Astrakhan, was delivered to the Navy back in 2005, but the construction of the second and third ship remained on hold for almost five years, and resumed only recently.

    On August 29, 2012 the shipyard in Zelenodolsk laid down Zelenyy Dol, the fourth Project 21631 (Buyan-M) small missile ship (guided missile corvette). The Navy has signed a contract for a total of five. The fifth ship this class Serpukhov, was laid down at the same shipyard on January 25, 2013. The first three ships, Grad Sviyazhsk, Uglich, and Velikiy Ostyug, which were laid down in 2010-2011, are still under construction.40 The Project 21631 ships are armed with the Kalibr-NK missile system, and will be assigned to the Caspian Flotilla in 2013-2015. Meanwhile, in January 2013 the Navy announced another contract for three modified Project 21631 small missile ships, with an option for another two.41


    The industry also continues to build assault landing boats for the Russian Navy. Three Project 21820 (Dyugon class) high-speed amphibious landing craft – Denis Davydov, Lieutenant Rimskiy-Korsakov, and Warrant Officer Lermontov – have been laid down at the Yaroslavskiy shipbuilding plant.42 Another boat of this class Ivan Kartsov, is being built at the Vostochnaya shipyards in Vladivostok for the Pacific Fleet. It is unlikely, however, that any more boats of this series will be laid down due to problems with the Project 21820 design that have recently come to light.43 In 2013 the Caspian Flotilla will take delivery of three smaller Project 11770 (Serna class) high-speed landing craft that are now being built at the Volga plant in Nizhniy Novgorod.44


    The Sredne-Nevskiy shipbuilding plant in St Peterburg continues to build the first of the new Project 12700 (Aleksandrit class) minesweepers, an 800 t ship with a fiberglass hull. A fully formed seamless hull of the minesweeper was removed from the matrix in December 2012.45


    The industry continues to build Project 21980 (Grachonok class) anti-sabotage boats. The second and third boats in the series, designated as P-191 and P-349, entered service with the Black Sea Fleet in 2012.46 Another two boats are being built in Zelenodolsk; both are to be completed before the end of 2013. A further three boats were laid down in 2012 at the Vostochnaya shipyards in Vladivostok.47 The sixth Project 21980 boat was laid down in Zelenodolsk on May 7, 2013.48 A total of about 20 are expected to be built over the coming years.
    Apart from the Russian Navy, the industry was building numerous ships and boats for the FSB Border Service’s Coast Guard. For more details, please see a separate article in this issue.


    Special-purpose and auxillary ships

    On October 30, 2012 the Admiralty Shipyards launched a new Project 21300S Igor Belousov large submarine rescue ship, which was laid down back in December 2005. The main cause of the delay is that the initial developer of the ship’s deepwater diving complex (Lazurit Central Design Bureau) failed to deliver on its promises, and the Navy had to look for another supplier. In the end the MoD bought the complex in Britain, with Russia’s Tetis group acting as main contractor. The ship’s entry into service is now scheduled for 2014. The Navy also plans to place an order for another three Project 21300S ships.49 Meanwhile, the Admiralty Shipyards is building Bester-1 rescue submersible for Igor Belousov.50


    On December 25, 2012 the Russian Navy unit in Temryuk (Azov Sea) took delivery of an Project 11982 Seliger special trials ship built by Yantar. The ship will be used for various technology tests, deepwater research, and S&R operations.51 The second ship in the series will be laid down in 2013; once completed, it will enter service with the Baltic Fleet.52 On December 5, 2012 a Project 22010 Yantar oceanographic research ship, which will be used for deepwater research, was launched at the Yantar shipyard. The ship carries a whole range of unmanned autonomous submersibles, as well as Rus, Konsul, and Mir-type manned submersibles. It will undergo a comprehensive program of trials in 2013-2014, and enter service with the Northern Fleet in 2014. Several more Project 22010 ships may be built at some later point.53


    Russia is also pressing ahead with a program of auxiliary fleet refresh; as part of that program, the industry is developing new ocean-going and inshore support ships. It has been reported that some 80 harbor support ships of various classes are to enter service with the Russian Navy by 2016. These include harbor tugboats, harbor diving boats, versatile modular repair and rescue platforms, and floating cranes.54
    In 2012 the Severnaya Verf shipyard won a contract to build three Project 23120 support sea-going vessels, with delivery dates in 2014-2016. Project 23120 is the military version of civilian support and replenishment ships used in offshore oil and gas exploration.55

    The first ship of this class Elbrus was laid down on November 14, 2012.56 Meanwhile, the Zvezdochka shipyard in Severodvinsk is building Academic Kovalev, the second Project 20180 support and weapons transport ship. It was laid down on December 20, 2011, and should be delivered to the Navy in 2014. The third ship Academic Aleksandrov in the Project 20180 class was laid down on December 20, 2012; delivery is expected in 2016.58 A total of six Project 20180 ships of various modifications are to be built in the coming years.59


    Finally, the industry is building a large number of harbor and sea-going tugs for the Russian Navy. It has also resumed the construction of floating docks after a pause of several years. A Project 22570 Sviyaga floating transport dock, was laid down on November 30, 2012 in Zelenodolsk. Its delivery is scheduled for 2015.60

    Exports


    In 2012 the main customers of the Russian naval shipbuilding industry were India, Vietnam and Algeria.

    The Admiralty Shipyards was building a series of six Project 06361 (Improved Kilo class) submarines for the Vietnamese Navy. The first sub in this class ?Q-182 Hà Nội was launched on August 28, 2012; the second HQ-183 Hồ Chí Minh, on December 28. The Hà Nội began sea trials in early December 2012, and will be delivered to the customer this August.61 The third and the fourth subs in the series were laid down in March and October 2012, respectively. On October 26, 2012 the Vietnamese Navy also took delivery of two Project 10412 (Svetlyak class) patrol boats (HQ-266 and HQ-267) built at the Vostochnaya shipyard.62 In 2012 Vietnam placed an order for a second pair of modified Project 11661E (Gepard-3.9 class) small frigates63, to be delivered in 2016 and 2017; both ships will be built in Zelenodolsk. Vietnam also continues to build, with Russian assistance, a series of 10 Project 12418 (Tarantul v class) light guided missile corvettes. The first two ships this class is expected to enter service in late 2013.64


    The following programs were under way in 2012 for the Indian Navy:


    On April 4, 2012 the Indian Navy held an official ceremony to enter into service the INS Chakra, a Project 971I (Improved Akula class) nuclear-powered attack submarine (ex K-152 Nerpa). It is possible that the second Project 971 sub, which is currently on the ways at the Amursk shipbuilding plant, will also be delivered to India upon completion.65


    The Vikramaditya aircraft carrier, which Russia has modified from former Admiral flota Sovetskogo Soyuza Gorshkov heavy aircraft-carried cruser for the Indian Navy, completed trials in the Barents Sea in the summer and autumn of 2012. On the whole, the trial was a success, but a problem emerged with the boilers of the main power plant, and the carrier was not delivered to the customer in December 2012, as originally scheduled. The ship has been brought to Severodvinsk, where the problem is being remedied; the delivery date has been pushed back to late 2013.66


    Russia continued to build a second series of Project 11356 (Talwar class) frigates for India. Two ships were delivered to the Indian Navy in 2012: Teg on April 27, and Tarkash on November 9. The third frigate Trikand, is to follow in June 2013. India is now negotiating a contract for another three Project 11356 frigates to be built in Russia.68


    On January 26, 2013 the Zvezdochka shipyard delivered Project 877EKM (Kilo class) INS Sindhurakshak submarine to the Indian Navy after completing mid-life repairs and upgrades. This has been the fifth Indian sub his class to undergo repairs at Zvezdochka.69
    On July 10, 2012 the Admiralty Shipyards completed the mid-life repair of a Project 877EKM submarine for the Algerian Navy.70

    The Severnaya Verf shipyards continued a project to upgrade and repair the Project 1159TM (Koni class) Rais Kellich frigate and the Project 1234EM (Nanuchka II class) Salah Rais guided missile corvette, under a contract with Algeria. This is a second pair of Algerian Navy warships to be repaired in Russia. They will be followed by the repair and upgrade of another two ships, Rais Corfo frigate and Rais Ali corvette.71
    To summarize, the Russian shipbuilding industry has obviously picked up the momentum in recent years. There were 48 ships, boats and submarines being built for the Russian Navy as of May 2013, with another 15 being repaired and about 550 undergoing maintenance.72

    Russian Navy: Status & News #1 - Page 23 Img_04
    1. http://www.redstar.ru/index.php/newspaper/item/7014-prioritet-silnyiy-flot.
    2. http://vpk-news.ru/news/14292.
    3. http://www.sevmash.ru/rus/news/1566-l-r-.html.
    4. http://flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=119073&sphrase_id=2484410.
    5. http://interfax.ru/politics/news.asp?id=284781.
    6. http://ria.ru/interview/20120831/733747023.html.
    7. http://ria.ru/defense_safety/20130103/917050964.html#ixzz2HqnoYQMH.
    8. http://flotprom.ru/news/?ELEMENT_ID=134728.
    9. http://www.itartass.spb.ru/news/8862/.
    10. http://topwar.ru/20437-zavershayuschie-glubokovodnye-ispytaniya-golovnoy-podvodnoy-lodki-sankt-peterburg-proekta-677-pereneseny-na-2013-god.html.
    11. http://ria.ru/arms/20120921/755636809.html#ixzz2Ijh9oUrE.
    12. http://flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=144186.
    13. http://flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=119896&sphrase_id=2484828.
    14. http://bmpd.livejournal.com/411659.html.
    15. http://www.rg.ru/2012/02/02/mistrali-site.html.
    16. http://flotprom.ru/news/?ELEMENT_ID=136579.
    17. http://www.itar-tass.com/c9/551964.html.
    18. http://flotprom.ru/news/?ELEMENT_ID=123815.
    19. http://flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=136721.
    20. http://flotprom.ru/news/?ELEMENT_ID=129193.
    21. This means that the Russian Navy will now have a ship and a submarine with the same name. The existing Sevastopol non-nuclear submarine will probably have to be renamed.
    22. http://www.flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=144591.
    23. http://lenta.ru/news/2012/12/21/mistral1/.
    24. http://flotprom.ru/news/?ELEMENT_ID=129749.
    25. http://flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=129195.
    26. http://flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=129195.
    27. http://flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=130510.
    28. http://flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=133249.
    29. http://flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=130823.
    30. http://lenta.ru/news/2012/01/30/frigate/.
    31. http://vpk-news.ru/articles/13231.
    32. http://lenta.ru/news/2012/05/30/stoykiy/.
    33. http://flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=143738.
    34. http://www.flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=144562.
    35. http://bmpd.livejournal.com/353558.html.
    36. http://www.amurshipyard.ru/?p=911#more-911.
    37. http://flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=112457&sphrase_id=2500519.
    38. http://www.flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=115940.
    39. http://www.navy.ru/news/navy/?ELEMENT_ID=131874.
    40. http://flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=135690.
    41. http://izvestia.ru/news/543695.
    42. http://flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=135131.
    43. http://izvestia.ru/news/543448.
    44. http://flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=132502&sphrase_id=2500701.
    45. http://flotprom.ru/news/?ELEMENT_ID=133919.
    46. http://bmpd.livejournal.com/388350.html.
    47. http://bmpd.livejournal.com/231563.html.
    48. http://www.flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=144529.
    49. http://flotprom.ru/news/?ELEMENT_ID=133324.
    50. http://flotprom.ru/news/?ELEMENT_ID=131076.
    51. http://www.navy.ru/news/navy/?ELEMENT_ID=133901.
    52. http://flotprom.ru/news/?ELEMENT_ID=131785.
    53. http://ria.ru/defense_safety/20121205/913533757.html.
    54. http://www.navy.ru/news/navy/?ELEMENT_ID=134272.
    55. http://www.nordsy.spb.ru/sv2/news.php?id=130&lev1=1.
    56. http://flotprom.ru/news/?ELEMENT_ID=128527.
    57. http://flotprom.ru/news/?ELEMENT_ID=100841.
    58. http://bmpd.livejournal.com/412036.html.
    59. http://flotprom.ru/news/?ELEMENT_ID=132267.
    60. http://www.zdship.ru/press-center/news-events/648/.
    61. http://bmpd.livejournal.com/425866.html#comments.
    62. http://flot.com/news/navy/?ELEMENT_ID=126997.
    63. http://flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=141600.
    64. http://flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=141600.
    65. http://flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=108589&sphrase_id=2498359.
    66. http://ria.ru/forces/20121030/907927877.html.
    67. http://flotprom.ru/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=143692.
    68. http://ria.ru/defense_safety/20121112/910447600.html.
    69. http://zvezdochka-ru.livejournal.com/12326.html.
    70. Admiralteyets newspaper, December 28, 2012.
    71. http://flotprom.ru/news/?ELEMENT_ID=129396.
    72. http://www.vpk-news.ru/articles/14206.
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    Post  Viktor Mon Jun 24, 2013 9:06 pm

    Aleksandr Nevskiy 

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    Post  Viktor Tue Jun 25, 2013 4:23 pm

    In pictures. Landing craft project 21820 "Denis Davydov

    Russian Navy: Status & News #1 - Page 23 9qk4yx

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    Post  Viktor Tue Jun 25, 2013 4:40 pm

    1st Mistral for Russia - Vladivostok

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    Post  Viktor Mon Jul 01, 2013 9:07 pm

    Oscar class Smolensk in Zvezdochka shipyard in modernization (2013/2014 - finishing date)

    along with other excellent pictures

    http://zvezdochka-ru.livejournal.com/

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    Post  TheArmenian Tue Jul 02, 2013 6:23 am

    KASHTAN performance v/s RAM

    Russian Navy: Status & News #1 - Page 23 02-3190547-kashtan-m-2
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    Post  TR1 Wed Jul 03, 2013 7:14 am

    Russian Navy: Status & News #1 - Page 23 Attachment.php?item=340282&download=2&type=

    2 of em on the 21631s.
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    Post  George1 Thu Jul 04, 2013 6:31 am

    Russian military shipbuilding: an update

    June 26, 2013 by Dmitry Gorenburg

    The cover article of the brand new issue of Moscow Defense Brief (subscription required) from the Center for Analysis of Strategies and Technologies, examines developments in Russian military shipbuilding in 2012, written by Dmitry Boltenkov. Since the article is not publicly available, I thought it might be useful to provide a brief summary. Part 1 covers submarines and surface ships. Part 2, coming soon, will cover auxiliary ships, export contracts, and provide some analysis.

    Submarines

    Construction of Borei-class (project 955) submarines progressed significantly in 2012. The navy took delivery of the Yury Dolgoruky, the first sub of this class, at the end of 2012. After some training exercises, the sub is expected to enter regular service by the end of 2013. The second sub, the Alexander Nevsky, is expected to be commissioned in the fall. The third sub, whose construction started in 2006, was launched in January 2013, while construction of the fourth started in July 2012. Two more subs are to be laid down this year. Given the 7-8 year construction times on these submarines, it seems unlikely that all eight will be completed by the 2020 target date.  2023 seems to be a more realistic goal. Furthermore, the lack of new tests on the Bulava missile in 2012 is concerning, though additional tests are expected this autumn — most likely using a new automated missile launch control system.

    The Yasen-class (project 885) nuclear attack submarines are being built far more slowly, with the first submarine in the class (the Severodvinsk, which was laid down back in 1993) currently undergoing tests and expected to enter the fleet later this year. The Kazan (the second submarine of this class) will be commissioned in 2015 at the earliest, with the third to be laid down in July. Again, the chances of all 8 contracted subs being completed by 2020 is virtually nonexistent.

    Diesel submarines are also being built, including the recently restarted, but still troubled, Lada class. The first sub in this class, the St. Petersburg, entered sea trials in 2004. Problems with its propulsion systems have prevented its commissioning and led the project to be suspended indefinitely several years ago. The project was restarted in 2012, but the St. Petersburg still has not been commissioned. Construction on the two other subs in this class that were laid down before the suspension has resumed and they are expected to be ready for sea trials in 2015 and 2016, respectively. MDB reports that  the second boat may be equipped with new lithium-ion batteries, while the third may have air-independent propulsion. It seems unlikely that any more subs of this class will be built, which means the navy will get three essentially different boats, each with its own maintenance needs. This is precisely the sort of the thing the Russian military has been trying to get away from. The hope is that a fifth-generation conventional sub currently being designed by Rubin Design Bureau will soon be ready for construction, obviating the need for the Lada class. In the meantime, the navy will have to depend on old and new Kilo-class submarines. The first of a set of six improved Kilos is expected to be launched later this year. Two more are under construction and another is to be laid down by the end of 2013. All six are expected to be in service by 2016.

    Surface ships

    The first of the two Mistral-class ships ordered from France is currently under construction, with the second to be laid down sometime in 2013. Both ships are to be completed and delivered to Russia by the end of 2015. Boltenkov reiterates that both will be assigned to the the Pacific Fleet. Furthermore, he notes that the Russian Navy has ordered four assault-landing boats from STX L’Orient in France. The fate of the third and fourth Mistral-class ships, which were to be built entirely in Russia starting in 2016, remains unresolved.

    Two types of frigates are being built for the navy. The first of the Admiral Gorshkov class (project 22350) frigates is expected to enter sea trials in late 2013. Two others are under construction, with a fourth to be laid down later this year. Two more ships of this class have been ordered, with hopes of completion by 2020. MDB reports that the project is facing serious delays with its primary Poliment-Redut SAM weapon system, which is being developed by Almaz-Antey (a company that has had many problems successfully completing the development of new weapons systems in recent years). The second type of frigate (project 11356R) is essentially the Talwar class previously built for the Indian Navy. This is an updated version of the Soviet Krivak class. Russian defense industry is much better at building updated versions of tried and tested designs than at building something completely new. It’s therefore not surprising that construction on these ships is proceeding quite quickly, with three ships already under construction and another to be laid down this year. The first ship of this class, the Admiral Grigorovich is expected to be launched this summer and to enter service in 2014.

    The navy is also receiving some smaller combat ships. Construction on various versions of the Steregushchiy class (projects 20380 and 20385) of corvettes continues, with two in service, one in sea trials, one expected to begin sea trials later this year, three under construction and another to be laid down in July. Severnaya Verf is building these ships in about three years, while Amur shipyard is taking much longer. Various sources indicate that contracts have been signed to build another 10 of these corvettes, which would bring the total number in service to 18 by the time the program is complete.

    Several types of ships are being built expressly for the Caspian Flotilla. The Dagestan missile ship, equipped with Kalibr-NK long-range cruise missiles, was commissioned into the Caspian Flotilla in November 2012. No further ships of this type are planned, however. Two Buyan-class (project 21630) small artillery ships were commissioned into the flotilla in 2012. An updated version of this class (project 21631), to be armed with Kalibr-NK cruise missiles, has been ordered. Five ships are now under construction with an estimated completion date of 2015. A contract for three more of these ships was signed in January 2013. The Caspian Flotilla is also expected to receive three Serna class (project 11770) high speed air-cavity landing craft this year, built according to an existing late Soviet design.

    Finally, the navy is building a number of specialized surface ships, including the Admiral Gren (project 11711) large tank landing ship, which has been under construction since 2004 and was finally launched in May 2012. Completion will be no earlier than 2014 and initial plans to build another 4-5 of these ships have been shelved. Four Dyugon class (project 21820) high speed amphibious landing craft are also under construction, though Boltenkov reports that problems with the design mean that no more ships of this type will be built once these four are completed. The first ship of the Aleksandrit class of minesweepers (project 12700) is under construction as well, with three more expected to be built in the near future. Two Grachonok class (project 21980) anti-sabotage boats were commissioned in 2012, with two more expected to be completed by the end of 2013 and another four currently under construction. A total of about 20 are expected to built in the next few years.

    Auxiliary ships

    The Russian Navy is getting a number of new support ships in the near future. These include three Project 23120 9000 ton ocean-going logistics ships, the first of which was laid down at Severnaya Verf in November 2012. The ships are similar to civilian offshore hydrocarbon exploration ships and are to be delivered at a rate of one a year in 2014-16. The navy is also expecting to receive six Project 20180 support and weapons transport ships. Two of the ships are currently under construction, with delivery expected in 2014 and 2016. The ships, being built at the Zvezdochka shipyard, are modified versions of the Zvezdochka salvage tug commissioned in 2010. The Igor Belousov (project 21300S) large submarine rescue ship, which was laid down in December 2005 in response to the Kursk disaster, was finally launched in October 2012 after a long delay caused by the failure of a Russian design bureau to provide a deepwater diving complex for the ship. In the end, the navy has settled on a British design that is being built in Russia. The ship is due to be commissioned in 2014, with another three ships of this type likely to be ordered in the near future. In addition, the navy has ordered a large number of harbor support ships and tugboats, with around 80 expected to enter service by 2016.
    Exports

    Russian shipyards continue to have a thriving export business. The biggest customers in 2012 were India, Vietnam and Algeria. Vietnam has ordered six Improved Kilo class (project 06361) submarines from the Admiralty Shipyards. The first two submarines of this order were launched in 2012, while subs three and four were laid down last year. The first sub is expected to be delivered this year. The Vietnamese navy took delivery of two Svetlyak class (project 10412) patrol boats in October 2012. It also ordered two modified Gepard class (project 11661E) frigates, to be delivered in 2016 and 2017. These are in addition to two similar frigates delivered in 2011. Both ships are to be built in Zelenodolsk. Vietnam is also building, under license, a series of ten Tarantul V class (project 12418) corvettes, with the first two ships expected to be commissioned this year.

    Contracts with the Algerian navy are for modernization of existing ships, rather than the construction of new ones. These include the mid-life overhaul of a Kilo class (project 877EKM) submarine at the Admiralty Shipyards, which was completed in July 2012, and the ongoing modernization of a Koni class (project 1159TM) frigate and Nanuchka II class (project 1234EM) corvette at Severnaya Verf. Further surface ship modernization orders are expected once the current pair are finished.

    India remains the most important foreign military customer for Russian shipyards. In 2012, the Indian navy inducted the INS Chakra, an improved Akula class nuclear-powered attack submarine that was leased to India for a ten-year period. There is some speculation that a second submarine of the same type may be leased to India in the future. Yantar shipyard completed a second series of Talwar class (project 11356) frigates for the the Indian navy, with two ships delivered in 2012 and a third in June 2013. Negotiations are currently under way for another set of three frigates to be built. In January 2013, the Zvezdochka shipyard completed the mid-life overhaul of a Kilo class (project 877EKM) submarine for the Indian navy. This was the fifth Indian diesel submarine to be modernized at this plant. Finally, the long-term effort to modernize the former Admiral Gorshkov aircraft carrier for the Indian navy, which was due to be handed over in 2012, hit another snag because of problems with the main power plant, causing at least a one year delay in the project.

    Analysis

    Based on Boltenkov’s summary and my own past research, it seems to me that the Russian shipbuilding industry has improved in recent years but remains in relatively poor shape overall. Yantar Shipyard in particular has been reported to be in fairly poor shape due to a lack of investment. On the other hand, the Severnaya Verf, Sevmash, and Zvezdochka shipyards are in relatively good condition. Russian shipyards are good at building ships that they have been building for some time, such as the Talwar (modified Krivak) class frigates and improved Kilo class submarines. The implementation of new designs, on the other hand, has led to numerous problems and delays regardless of the type of ship and the shipyard building it. The construction of Admiral Gorshkov class frigates, Lada class submarines, and Admiral Gren amphibious ships have all been affected by construction delays and other problems. Construction of nuclear-powered submarines is proceeding, but at a much slower pace than hoped for by the Ministry of Defense. Frequent changes in requirements have resulted in a number of ship classes that have been cancelled after only one or two ships, which will have a negative impact on maintenance. Finally, the goal of renewing the Russian navy’s fleet of larger surface combat ships still seems a long way off, with a design for a new class of destroyers still several years away from completion.
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    Post  Viktor Fri Jul 05, 2013 12:55 pm

    3 new subs scheduled to enter RuAN in 2013


    - Alexander Nevsky / Borei Class

    - Vladimir Monomakh / borei Class

    - Severodvinsk / Yassen Class

    That would leave Russian navy with 3 Borei and 1 Yassen by the end of 2013.

    LINK

    Sponsored content

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    Post  Sponsored content


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