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    Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

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    Mike E

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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  Mike E on Tue Apr 28, 2015 7:12 am

    Great.... they don't need another rocket of the same class. 

    I really hope the "if a contingency" statement is a joke or something. If the universal-segments as a whole are experiencing problems consistently, then obviously there is a design fault and delays are needed. But if it is just one launch... why bother.
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    George1

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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  George1 on Tue Jun 02, 2015 3:45 am

    Russia’s participation in Baiterek space rocket complex creation is decisive — Kazcosmos

    ASTANA, June 1. /TASS/. Kazakhstan is ready to continue the implementation of the project for the creation of the Baiterek space rocket complex and its further financing even with increases costs, Deputy Chairman of the Aerospace Committee (Kazcosmos) of the Ministry of Investment and Development of Kazakhstan Meirbek Moldabekov told TASS in an interview on Monday. However, he said, it is possible only on the condition of the "preservation of the status of the joint project and the Russian side’s participation in it on a parity basis."

    "We are currently in negotiations with Roscosmos (Russia’s Federal Space Agency) on these two key issues. We expect to hear Roscosmos’ official position tentatively in the first half of June," Moldabekov said.

    Referring to the change in the project cost, he said that it is currently "impossible" to specify the sum. "This requires justified estimates that we don’t have at present. These calculations should be presented by our Russian partners. The feasibility study and a number of expert examinations will be conducted on their basis. Only after that it will be possible to speak of about any specific figures and the sum of the project cost increase," he said.

    According to Moldabekov, "In addition to the issue of funding, the factor of the project joint implementation is equally important." "The degree of interest and participation of Russia in this project is a key issue for the Kazakh side at present," he said.

    According to plans, the Baiterek space rocket complex is to be created on the base of Baikonur spaceport by 2022. Joint proposals between Kazcosmos and Roscosmos to implement the project were approved during the second session of the Kazakh-Russian intergovernmental commission on the Baikonur complex held on November 24, 2014. In his annual address to the people, Nazarbayev said that the state should expand its role in the global space market by 2030 and bring a number of ongoing projects to fruition. This includes constructing the spacecraft assembly and test complex in Astana, establishing the space system for remote sensing and a national space monitoring system and ground infrastructure system for high-precision satellite navigation.

    The Baikonur complex, which includes the launch site, was founded 60 years ago. On June 2, 1955, by the directive of the General Staff of the USSR Armed Forces, the organisational and staff structure of the Research Test Site No 5 was approved. This day is considered Baikonur’s establishment date. In 2014, Baikonur once again received the title of the most used spaceport in the world. Twenty-one rockets were launched from Baikonur in the past year, 19 of which were successful. Cape Canaveral in the United States followed with 18 launches, all of which were successful.
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    sepheronx

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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  sepheronx on Tue Jun 02, 2015 4:19 am

    One rocket class is all that is needed. The idea in Russia seems to be is building of various classes, which is silly and very costly. Bulava vs Liner, Angara and Fenix, etc. Stick to one class and expand it. If another plant needs work, get them to work with the one making the rocket and so both get work and overall costs get reduced rather than two different rockets.
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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  George1 on Sat Jun 06, 2015 12:10 am

    Russia's Soyuz-2.1a rocket to be launched first time after loss of Progress — source

    The launch of the cargo space vehicle Progress is scheduled for early July

    MOSCOW, June 5. /TASS/. A Soyuz-2.1a space rocket is to be launched from the northern Plesetsk space site on Friday for the first time since the loss of the Progress cargo vehicle last April, a source in the space rocket industry told TASS.

    "A launch of the Soyuz-2.1a carrying a military satellite will be carried out from the Plesetsk space site at 18:24 Moscow time, the source said.

    The launch of the cargo space vehicle Progress is scheduled for early July.

    "As far as Progress is concerned, we have already said that the launch of a cargo vehicle is due early July," Komarov said. "And a manned launch from Baikonur will be planned at the end of July."
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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  George1 on Thu Jul 23, 2015 9:22 am

    Russia Plans Proton Rocket Launch for August After Series of Failures

    The first launch of the Proton carrier rocket after the most recent failure is planned for August, head of Russia’s space agency Roscosmos Igor Komarov said.

    BAIKONUR (Sputnik) – "The next ‘Proton’ launch is planned for August. It will be a commercial launch," Komarov said early on Thursday without specifying what kind of spacecraft the rocket will carry into orbit.

    According to Komarov, both the rocket and the vessel are already going through flight preparation at the Baikonur space center in Kazakhstan.

    On May 16, a Proton-M carrier rocket was to deliver the Mexican MexSat-1 satellite into orbit, but shortly after launching, the rocket lost its telemetry with Earth and later burned up in the atmosphere upon reentry.

    The failed launched was the latest of seven Proton carrier rocket failures over the past five years.

    Komarov said in May that Russia was not planning to give up on the use of Proton-M rockets despite the malfunctions.

    The Proton-M is the largest carrier rocket in Russia's fleet of space launch vehicles. The rocket has lifted dozens of Russian-made and foreign satellites since it was first launched in 2001.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/russia/20150723/1024944921.html#ixzz3ghFtrZsS


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    Mike E

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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  Mike E on Thu Jul 23, 2015 9:56 am

    Hopefully they actually will have solved the issues with this particular model. IIRC it had to do with vibrations destroying the turbopump in the third stage.
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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  Big_Gazza on Thu Jul 23, 2015 2:57 pm

    George1 wrote:
    The failed launched was the latest of seven Proton carrier rocket failures over the past five years.

    I would dispute the accuracy of this statement.  As far as I can tell, the following is the list of all proton failures over the last 25 years:

    16 May 2015 (Mexsat-1)
    15 May 2014 (Ekspress AM4R)
    2 July 2013 (Uragan-M #748-750 Glonass)
    6 August 2012 (Telkom 3 & Ekspress MD2)
    17 August 2011 (Ekspress AM4)
    5 December 2010 (Uragan-M #739-741 Glonass)
    14 March 2008 (AMC-14)
    5 September 2007 (JCSAT-11)
    28 February 2006 (Arabsat-4A)
    25 November 2002 (Astra 1K)
    27 October 1999 (Ekspress-A1)
    5 July 1999 (Raduga #45)
    16 November 1996 (Mars-96)
    19 February 1996 (Raduga #44L)
    27 May 1993 (Gorizont #39L)
    9 August 1990 (Ekran-M #14L)

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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  Svyatoslavich on Thu Jul 23, 2015 11:46 pm

    Big_Gazza wrote:
    George1 wrote:
    The failed launched was the latest of seven Proton carrier rocket failures over the past five years.

    I would dispute the accuracy of this statement.  As far as I can tell, the following is the list of all proton failures over the last 25 years:

    16 May 2015 (Mexsat-1)
    15 May 2014 (Ekspress AM4R)
    2 July 2013 (Uragan-M #748-750 Glonass)
    6 August 2012 (Telkom 3 & Ekspress MD2)
    17 August 2011 (Ekspress AM4)
    5 December 2010 (Uragan-M #739-741 Glonass)
    14 March 2008 (AMC-14)
    5 September 2007 (JCSAT-11)
    28 February 2006 (Arabsat-4A)
    25 November 2002 (Astra 1K)
    27 October 1999 (Ekspress-A1)
    5 July 1999 (Raduga #45)
    16 November 1996 (Mars-96)
    19 February 1996 (Raduga #44L)
    27 May 1993 (Gorizont #39L)
    9 August 1990 (Ekran-M #14L)
    That is an interesting list. Of all the 16 failures in the last 25 years, 6 were in the last 5 years, and more than half (9) in less than one decade (since 2006). The Proton was extremely reliable from the 80's up to the early 2000's, but for some reason (most likely bad quality control in production) it lost its reliability in the last 5 years.
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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  Mike E on Fri Jul 24, 2015 12:27 am

    The issue had to do with vibrations within the rocket, and sensors not picking it up... Said vibrations basically stressed the turbo-pump to the point of failure. I don't know why some launchers went well and others didn't, probably just the quality of the turbo-pump used.
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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  kvs on Fri Jul 24, 2015 1:38 am

    Big_Gazza wrote:
    George1 wrote:
    The failed launched was the latest of seven Proton carrier rocket failures over the past five years.

    I would dispute the accuracy of this statement.  As far as I can tell, the following is the list of all proton failures over the last 25 years:

    16 May 2015 (Mexsat-1)
    15 May 2014 (Ekspress AM4R)
    2 July 2013 (Uragan-M #748-750 Glonass)
    6 August 2012 (Telkom 3 & Ekspress MD2)
    17 August 2011 (Ekspress AM4)
    5 December 2010 (Uragan-M #739-741 Glonass)
    14 March 2008 (AMC-14)
    5 September 2007 (JCSAT-11)
    28 February 2006 (Arabsat-4A)
    25 November 2002 (Astra 1K)
    27 October 1999 (Ekspress-A1)
    5 July 1999 (Raduga #45)
    16 November 1996 (Mars-96)
    19 February 1996 (Raduga #44L)
    27 May 1993 (Gorizont #39L)
    9 August 1990 (Ekran-M #14L)

    This list includes the pure sabotage case of July 2, 2013. One or more of the key sensors were hammered backwards. This
    is not QC, this is deliberate. This begs the question how many of the other "QC" cases were sabotage as well.
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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  Big_Gazza on Fri Jul 24, 2015 9:46 am

    kvs wrote:
    Big_Gazza wrote:
    George1 wrote:
    The failed launched was the latest of seven Proton carrier rocket failures over the past five years.

    I would dispute the accuracy of this statement.  As far as I can tell, the following is the list of all proton failures over the last 25 years:

    16 May 2015 (Mexsat-1)
    15 May 2014 (Ekspress AM4R)
    2 July 2013 (Uragan-M #748-750 Glonass)
    6 August 2012 (Telkom 3 & Ekspress MD2)
    17 August 2011 (Ekspress AM4)
    5 December 2010 (Uragan-M #739-741 Glonass)
    14 March 2008 (AMC-14)
    5 September 2007 (JCSAT-11)
    28 February 2006 (Arabsat-4A)
    25 November 2002 (Astra 1K)
    27 October 1999 (Ekspress-A1)
    5 July 1999 (Raduga #45)
    16 November 1996 (Mars-96)
    19 February 1996 (Raduga #44L)
    27 May 1993 (Gorizont #39L)
    9 August 1990 (Ekran-M #14L)

    This list includes the pure sabotage case of July 2, 2013.  One or more of the key sensors were hammered backwards.  This
    is not QC, this is deliberate.   This begs the question how many of the other "QC" cases were sabotage as well.

    Yes, I still believe that the loss of the 3x Glonass in 2013 was an act of sabotage. I simply do not accept that the yaw sensor module could be installed upside down by error. Does anyone know if there has been any public announcements in this matter, or has anyone been arrested?

    Its noticeable that we have had 1 failure per year since 2010, and I suspect that a large part of the problem may be the loss of experienced engineers as they reach the end of their productive careers. Space industry has been starved of funds since 1991, and the brain drain has been detrimental to Russias' capabilities given that the Russians tend to emphasis the importance of skilled individuals within the organisation rather than a rigorous and prescribed systems-based approach like that of NASA.
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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  Big_Gazza on Fri Jul 24, 2015 9:51 am

    Mike E wrote:The issue had to do with vibrations within the rocket, and sensors not picking it up... Said vibrations basically stressed the turbo-pump to the point of failure. I don't know why some launchers went well and others didn't, probably just the quality of the turbo-pump used.

    Actually, the sensors did pick up the vibrations, and the telemetry proved the cause of the failure.  Shutdown of the failing turbopump is not an option however this would lead to certain payload loss.  There is no option but to let the engine run and hope she holds together.

    The actual cause of the failure was a design error - specifically the material specification of a bearing was inadequate. Under certain abnormal operating conditions (they were not specific) the bearings softened and distorted, leading to vibration. The cause was suspected on previous failures, and the vibr sensors added to monitor and confirm the diagnosis.
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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  George1 on Wed Jul 29, 2015 3:31 am

    Russia may use new Angara carrier rocket in Sea Launch project — space firm

    At least two options are being discussed to adapt the floating Sea Launch platform and the Angara carrier rocket, the chief designer said


    MOSCOW, July 28. /TASS/. Russia’s promising Angara-A3 medium-class carrier rocket may be used in the Sea Launch project instead of the Russian-Ukrainian Zenit rocket, the chief designer of the Khrunichev Space Center, which is the Angara developer, told TASS on Tuesday.

    "So far, this idea remains. We should wait for some decisions, after which it will be possible to have a serious talk about something," Alexander Medvedev said.

    At least two options are being discussed to adapt the floating Sea Launch platform and the Angara carrier rocket, the chief designer said.

    "For example, we keep the A-3 [rocket] unchanged but we adjust and change the equipment earlier installed on the platform. According to the other option, we keep the equipment unhanged but in this case it will be necessary to change the Angara-3 configuration considerably. We’re not forcing the events and are simply considering both options concurrently," he said.

    Sea Launch Company was established in 1995 by US Boeing, Russia’s Energiya Rocket and Space Corporation, the Norwegian shipyard Kvaerner (now Aker Solutions) and the Ukrainian Yuzhnoye design bureau and Yuzhmash production association.

    Sea Launch declared its bankruptcy in 2009 and in 2010 the Russian enterprise assumed the leading role in the project. However, the company announced the suspension of launches in the summer of 2014.

    Russia’s Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) Head Igor Komarov said earlier Sea Launch could be rebased from California to Brazil but the prospects of the project remained uncertain over litigation with Boeing.


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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  Project Canada on Thu Aug 20, 2015 1:56 am

    Russia plans to create reusable rocket for satellite launches?

    the translator is pretty bad, but that is my impression from what was translated, anyone who speaks Russian can verify?


    Roscosmos plans to establish a repeated the rocket ship to formulate satellites in orbit. A new rocket will include cruise the first stage, which after separation from one-time of the second stage of commits a return to the area of the launch.

    Роскосмос планирует создать многоразовую ракету-носитель для выведения спутников на орбиту. Новая ракета будет включать крылатую первую ступень, которая после отделения от одноразовой второй ступени совершает возврат в район старта.

    http://ria.ru/science/20150820/1195965375.html

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    Russia to Revive Its Reusable Space Shuttle Program

    Post  kvs on Thu Aug 20, 2015 5:24 am

    Project Canada wrote:Russia plans to create reusable rocket for satellite launches?

    the translator is pretty bad, but that is my impression from what was translated, anyone who speaks Russian can verify?


    Roscosmos plans to establish a repeated the rocket ship to formulate satellites in orbit. A new rocket will include cruise the first stage, which after separation from one-time of the second stage of commits a return to the area of the launch.

    Роскосмос планирует создать многоразовую ракету-носитель для выведения спутников на орбиту. Новая ракета будет включать крылатую первую ступень, которая после отделения от одноразовой второй ступени совершает возврат в район старта.

    http://ria.ru/science/20150820/1195965375.html


    Yes, the plan is to develop a winged first stage that would fly back to base. This would save a lot of money since the first stage
    is the largest and has the most expensive rocket engines. They are planning to spend 12.5 billion rubles on development and
    the design should be ready by 2025.

    The winged first stage concept is an old one and the Angara was supposed to have the Baikal booster variant:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baikal_%28rocket_booster%29

    The article is not clear whether the project is something totally new. But the original article (http://izvestia.ru/news/590165)
    speculates it is a revival of Khrunichev's MRKC project which had a shuttle-like first stage

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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  George1 on Thu Aug 20, 2015 4:38 pm

    Russian Space Agency Mulls New, Reusable Carrier Rocket

    Russia’s space agency Roscosmos is planning to construct a new reusable launch vehicle to carry satellites into orbit at a lower cost, the Russian Izvestia newspaper reports.


    MOSCOW (Sputnik) – The new carrier rocket will have a winged first stage that will be capable of returning back to the launch site after separating from the expendable second stage.

    The project draft has been created as part of Russia’s 2016-2025 space program. According to Izestia, Russia could spend over 12 billion rubles (around $180 million) on the creation of the reusable first stage before 2025.

    The newspaper cites space experts as saying that satellite launches could become much cheaper with the use of renewable launchers as they would allow to save millions of dollars on engines installed on the first stage of the rocket. The cost of the engines used on the current expendable launch vehicles is $10-70 million.

    Carrier rockets of the Russian Soyuz family of expendable launch systems are the most frequently used in the world, according to the European Space Agency (ESA). Soyuz rockets are currently the only launch vehicle transporting people to the International Space Station (ISS).

    The Proton-M is the largest carrier rocket in Russia's fleet of space launch vehicles. The rocket has lifted dozens of Russian-made and foreign satellites since it was first launched in 2001.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/russia/20150820/1025949973.html#ixzz3jMk6uSNl


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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  George1 on Fri Aug 21, 2015 1:11 am

    kvs wrote:
    Project Canada wrote:Russia plans to create reusable rocket for satellite launches?

    the translator is pretty bad, but that is my impression from what was translated, anyone who speaks Russian can verify?


    Roscosmos plans to establish a repeated the rocket ship to formulate satellites in orbit. A new rocket will include cruise the first stage, which after separation from one-time of the second stage of commits a return to the area of the launch.

    Роскосмос планирует создать многоразовую ракету-носитель для выведения спутников на орбиту. Новая ракета будет включать крылатую первую ступень, которая после отделения от одноразовой второй ступени совершает возврат в район старта.

    http://ria.ru/science/20150820/1195965375.html


    Yes, the plan is to develop a winged first stage that would fly back to base.   This would save a lot of money since the first stage
    is the largest and has the most expensive rocket engines.   They are planning to spend 12.5 billion rubles on development and
    the design should be ready by 2025.  

    The winged first stage concept is an old one and the Angara was supposed to have the Baikal booster variant:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baikal_%28rocket_booster%29

    The article is not clear whether the project is something totally new.   But the original article (http://izvestia.ru/news/590165)
    speculates it is a revival of Khrunichev's MRKC project which had a shuttle-like first stage


    and this will be unmanned, right?


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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  PapaDragon on Fri Aug 21, 2015 1:36 am

    George1 wrote:
    kvs wrote:
    Project Canada wrote:Russia plans to create reusable rocket for satellite launches?

    the translator is pretty bad, but that is my impression from what was translated, anyone who speaks Russian can verify?


    Roscosmos plans to establish a repeated the rocket ship to formulate satellites in orbit. A new rocket will include cruise the first stage, which after separation from one-time of the second stage of commits a return to the area of the launch.

    Роскосмос планирует создать многоразовую ракету-носитель для выведения спутников на орбиту. Новая ракета будет включать крылатую первую ступень, которая после отделения от одноразовой второй ступени совершает возврат в район старта.

    http://ria.ru/science/20150820/1195965375.html


    Yes, the plan is to develop a winged first stage that would fly back to base.   This would save a lot of money since the first stage
    is the largest and has the most expensive rocket engines.   They are planning to spend 12.5 billion rubles on development and
    the design should be ready by 2025.  

    The winged first stage concept is an old one and the Angara was supposed to have the Baikal booster variant:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baikal_%28rocket_booster%29

    The article is not clear whether the project is something totally new.   But the original article (http://izvestia.ru/news/590165)
    speculates it is a revival of Khrunichev's MRKC project which had a shuttle-like first stage


    and this will be unmanned, right?

    Yes it will be unmanned. What you see in that pic is just a first stage, after separating from rest of the rocket it returns and lands automatically.
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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  kvs on Sat Aug 29, 2015 2:53 am



    The above is a German concept but you will note the high level of similarity. Looks like Russia will bring the concept to life.
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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  George1 on Mon Sep 07, 2015 1:24 am

    New Life for Old Buddy: Russia Tests Renewed Soyuz-MS Spacecraft



    A new, modified version of Russia’s workhorse spacecraft, the Soyuz-TMA-MS (or Soyuz-MS), is undergoing tests in the production facilities of Rocket and Space Corporation Energia; before being finally installed in the manned spacecraft, all the modern avionics will be initially tested on Progress cargo spacecraft in October.

    “At this stage, the spacecraft is undergoing all the technical examination before being sent to the launch pad. A little over half a year is left before its first take off,” said Aleksandr Gordyaev, the head of the sector of the Soyuz project department of Energia that oversees the spacecraft.

    The engineers are testing the wielding of approaching and orientation thrusters, pressure leaks and hundreds of butt joints.

    The outward appearance of the Soyuz hasn’t changed much since it was first launched in November 1966. However, the interior has been constantly re-equipped with modernized avionics.

    The Soyuz is not reuseable; a new one is built for each flight and is docked to the ISS. The old one is piloted by the crew returning to Earth; the central crew cabin separates from the other two compartments (these burn up in the atmosphere), and makes a ballistic re-entry, parachutes deploying to slow it down before touchdown on Earth.

    The development of the previous manned version, the Soyuz TMA-M, which is now on a mission to the International Space Station (ISS), was primarily aimed at upgrading its digital computer and telemetry transmission system.

    Earlier Soyuz craft were fitted with an analog telemetry system. The new solution is more compact, and has an advanced TsVM-101-class computer.

    The modernization saw the replacement of the original 36 obsolete instruments with 19 newly designed ones, necessitating corresponding updates to the on-board control system and thermal control system.

    The new craft is easier to manufacture, and its total empty weight is 70 kg less than that of the predecessor.

    The Soyuz TMA-MS will be equipped with more efficient solar panels featuring photovoltaic converters. The docking and attitude control thrusters would be rearranged for reliably linking the ship to the ISS even if one of the thrusters failed, and safely return to Earth if two thrusters failed.

    Unlike previous versions of the craft, the Soyuz-MS will be equipped with a GLONASS/ GPS satellite navigation system, an advanced control radio link with a satellite communication channel, and the Kurs NA automated docking system, which is two times lighter than the previous one and consumes three times less power.

    The old command radio link will be replaced with a unified command/telemetry system which will make it possible to receive telemetry via satellite and control the vehicle when it is not within sight of Russian ground stations.

    It will provide the crew with uninterrupted updates on the trajectory parameters without relying on ground tracking equipment. The communications system will utilize Luch relay satellites for constant direct contact with ground control.

    GLONASS/GPS receivers will be able to send exact coordinates to Mission Control via the Kospas/Sarsat system after parachute deployment and after touchdown, allowing teams on the ground to find the crew much faster.

    The modernization program makes Soyuz, which is currently the main mean of transporting crews to and from the ISS, more reliable and safe to operate, improves structural commonality, and replaces obsolete equipment and components.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/science/20150906/1026652714/russia-modernized-soyuz-spacecraft-test.html#ixzz3l0IG94XW


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    George1

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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  George1 on Wed Oct 28, 2015 3:28 pm

    Launch of Russia’s new series cargo spaceship Progress-MS postponed till Dec 21

    The postponement was caused by the necessity to complete all the work linked with the Progress cargo spacecraft’s failed launch that took place this April

    MOSCOW, October 27. /TASS/. The launch of Russia’s new series Progress-MS cargo spacecraft that was originally planned for November 21 has been postponed for a month - until December 21, President of the Rocket and Space Corporation Energia (RKK Energia) Vladimir Solntsev told TASS on Tuesday.

    "The launch will be postponed for a month," he said. Asked by TASS if the specific date - December 21 - was meant, Solntsev replied: "Yes."

    The postponement was caused by the necessity to complete all the work linked with the Progress cargo spacecraft’s failed launch that took place this April, as well as to conduct additional checks for avoiding similar incidents in the future.

    The Progress M-27M cargo spacecraft was launched on April 28 from the Baikonur space center Russia leases from Kazakhstan on a Soyuz carrier rocket. The rocket took the spacecraft to a higher orbit than required to dock with the International Space Station (ISS). After a few unsuccessful attempts to get control of the spacecraft, experts gave up the idea. The Progress was taking food, oxygen and other cargos to the ISS crew.

    The Progress M-27M spacecraft lost the near-Earth orbit and burned in dense atmosphere above the Pacific Ocean at 05:04 a.m. Moscow Time [02:04 UTC] on Friday, May 8, Russian Federal Space Agency Roscosmos told TASS. "The spacecraft entered dense atmosphere at the 160th coil above the central part of the Pacific," Roscosmos said then.

    Roscosmos found out that the incident was caused by the "contingency separation" of the third stage of the Soyuz rocket and the Progress spaceship due to depressurisation of the rockets’ fuel tanks that resulted from a specific design linkage of a Soyuz-2.1a carrier rocket and the space freighter.

    "A design peculiarity in the joint use of the spaceship and the rocket related to the frequency-dynamic characteristics of the linkage between the spaceship and the rocket’s third stage is the cause for the damage done to the spaceship as a result of the emergency separation of the carrier rocket’s third stage and the transport spacecraft," Roscosmos said following the investigation of the incident.


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    max steel

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    Proton Launcher Faces Hardships In Market

    Post  max steel on Thu Nov 05, 2015 9:02 pm

    Proton Launcher Faces Hardships In Market


    After dominating the commercial launch market - along with the Ariane 5 - for years, a confluence of factors has contributed to declining sales of Proton launches. A series of launch failures, changing launch market dynamics, and a spat between the West and Russia have reduced the appeal of the Proton to commercial launch operators. As a result, ILS has reduced staff and expenses so that the company can support two to three launches per year, rather than the seven or eight it usually conducts.

    Once considered a reliable choice for carrying satellites into orbit, the Proton has experienced a number of failures in recent years. Since December 2010, six Proton rockets have failed to place their payload into the correct orbit. This has caused problems for satellite operators that rely on the Proton to carry satellites into orbit so they can generate revenue. It has also raised doubts about the reliability of the Proton. Some customers have turned away from the launch vehicle. Even those willing to buy Proton launches will need to pay higher insurance rates, further reducing Proton's competitiveness in the market.

    The launch market has also experienced change recently. Satellite operators have been purchasing smaller satellites than in the past. While this trend may not last in the long -term, it is taking away opportunities for Proton launches. These smaller satellites can be carried into orbit on Falcon 9 and Ariane 5 vehicles. The Proton is more competitive in the large satellite market. Additionally, new players in the industry, such as SpaceX, are increasing the competitive pressure on the Proton in the commercial market.

    Another threat that the Proton faces is the development of a new heavy launch vehicle in Russia. The Russian government is developing a modular launch vehicle family called Angara. The heaviest version of the Angara, the Angara 5, will eventually replace the Proton for both Russian government launches and commercial launches operated by International Launch Services (ILS). One advantage the Angara has over the Proton is its use of cleaner-burning fuels.

    Finally, a spat between the U.S. and Western Europe with Russia over Ukraine has led to both sides reconsidering cooperation in space. Although sanctions on either side have yet to directly affect launches, the ongoing conflict has caused some Western satellite operators to reconsider doing business with Russian companies. This has further eroded Proton's expected market share.

    Despite hardships facing the Proton, production will continue for a few more years, albeit at a much lower level than in the past. The Proton continues to have commercial contracts in its launch manifest that need to be fulfilled. Additionally, the Russian government will continue to use the Proton to carry military and civil payloads into orbit. Launch rates will gradually decline through 2020 as the Proton is superseded by the newer Angara 5.


    Last edited by max steel on Tue Nov 10, 2015 10:27 am; edited 2 times in total
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    magnumcromagnon

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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  magnumcromagnon on Wed Nov 11, 2015 1:31 am

    Carrier rocket "Soyuz" production. Weapons 2015. News


    Austin

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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  Austin on Thu Nov 12, 2015 1:35 pm

    Khrunichev Center has signed a contract for five Intelsat launches "Proton-M"

    MOSCOW, November 11 - RIA Novosti. Khrunichev Center has signed a contract with a leading global satellite operator Intelsat five rocket launch vehicle (LV) "Proton-M" from Baikonur until 2023.

    "International Launch Services, a subsidiary of the Space Center. MV Khrunichev, and Intelsat, the world's leading satellite communications operator, signed a contract for five launch rocket" Proton-M "from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in the period until 2023" - said in the release of the Center Khrunichev.

    To launch satellites into orbit as part of the target pH will be used booster "Briz-M". The rocket heavy class "Proton-M" and designed and produced by Federal State Unitary Enterprise "State Research and Production Space Center. MV Khrunichev".
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    George1

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    Re: Russian Launch Vehicles and their Spacecraft: Thoughts & News

    Post  George1 on Fri Nov 27, 2015 11:59 pm



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