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    US Naval Strike Fighters

    Isos
    Isos


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    Post  Isos Wed Jan 16, 2019 4:55 pm

    nomadski wrote:Does anyone know , how much fuel  ( internal and external )  can F18 have ? With minimum  useful bomb load of say 500 kg to 1000 kg ? And still be able to be launched from catapaults from carriers  ?  What kind of range will this give F18 ? ( without air refuelling ) . Based on this range , divided by two . Then range of shore to ship missile needs to be designed . Does range of anti- ship missile have to be  long ? Maybe 1000 km ? Or less ?

    With internal fuel it has a smaller range than kh-22 so it can't intercept the bombers, even less likely if it needs to use afterburnzrs to interczpt it before they launch the kh-22.

    With bombs that are bigger than air to air missiles it is even worse.

    Catapult are designed to be ble to launch the jets full loaded.

    Russian missile that are designed to deal with carriers are kh-22/32 firstly. They are launched from 1000km away. Intercepting bombers 1000km away from your carrier is almost impossible because you would need fighters either on the zone (i.e 1000km away AND in the good dirzction) constantly but a hornet even with a combat radius of 1000km (unlikely that it has such range with weapons) will be able to stay there only a couple of minutes or you would need some sort of mig-31 that can detect and intercep at mach 3 something at 1000km away which is still impossible.


    F-35 has the same issue. And the anti ship missiles are going further and faster.
    GarryB
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    Post  GarryB Wed Jan 16, 2019 6:26 pm

    They used to have inflight refuelling tanker aircraft to allow aircraft to loiter for longer periods further away from their carriers but to save money they got rid of their proper tanker aircraft and now rely on buddy buddy tanking which is totally inferior and greaty shortens their range... but means they can have an extra 3-5 fighters on board instead of much more useful larger tanker aircraft...
    Tsavo Lion
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    Post  Tsavo Lion Mon Jan 28, 2019 10:32 pm

    US Naval Strike Fighters - Page 3 ?q=60&url=https%3A%2F%2Fs3.amazonaws.com%2Fthe-drive-staging%2Fmessage-editor%252F1520369426710-blockiii
    http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/19040/navy-to-slash-legacy-f-a-18-hornet-fleet-to-prop-up-beleaguered-usmc-squadrons

    http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/15300/boeing-might-include-stealthy-features-on-overhauled-us-navy-super-hornets
    Finty
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    US Naval Strike Fighters - Page 3 Empty First F-35C Fighters, CMV-22B Deploy with Carl Vinson Carrier Strike Group

    Post  Finty Mon Aug 02, 2021 7:35 pm

    Just stumbled across this... about time!

    https://news.usni.org/2021/08/02/first-f-35c-fighters-cmv-22b-deploy-with-carl-vinson-carrier-strike-group

    First F-35C Fighters, CMV-22B Deploy with Carl Vinson Carrier Strike Group

    The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) departed San Diego Bay Monday afternoon with nearly 6,000 sailors and a crowded flight deck to begin a scheduled deployment to the Indo-Pacific region, marking a key milestone for 21st-century naval aviation.

    Aboard Vinson is Carrier Air Wing 2, the Navy’s first fully integrated air wing to deploy overseas with both the F-35C Lightning II fifth-generation, multi-mission strike fighter and the new CMV-22B Osprey tiltrotor.

    The single-seat F-35C jets, assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron 147 based at Naval Air Station Lemoore, Calif., are the newest jet to expand the wing’s capabilities to project air power at sea. The CMV-22B, flown by the “Titans” of Fleet Logistics Multi-Mission Squadron 30, will extend the air wing’s legs, expanding the logistical resupply reach for the carrier and strike group.

    The Osprey, with its short takeoff and landing capabilities, provides Vinson and Carrier Strike Group 1 with the carrier-on-board or COD mission that has long been provided by the Navy’s aging C-2 Greyhound turboprop airplane.

    The presence of the Osprey in the carrier air wing as the COD aircraft also exponentially expands the resupply distance and time. A carrier-version of the Marine Corps’ MV-22B Osprey, the CMV-22B, can take off and land like a helicopter but fly like an airplane at higher altitudes, with faster speed and at longer range. It can haul needed spare parts, including the F-35C’s replacement F135 jet engine, if needed, from either a cargo ship at sea or a shoreside facility, as Vinson practiced back in March with the CMV-22B.

    Officials haven’t detailed where the carrier strike group will deploy other than to the Indo-Pacific region to support global maritime security operations. “It’s all dependent on where we’re needed in the world,” Vinson‘s spokeswoman, Lt. Cmdr. Miranda Williams, said in a San Diego Fox5 news segment Monday morning.

    Vinson left its pier at Naval Air Station North Island in Coronado, Calif., and headed out to sea to join other ships in the strike group based in San Diego or Hawaii for the deployment. They include guided-missile cruiser USS Lake Champlain (CG-57) and a half-dozen guided-missile destroyers: USS Higgins (DDG-76), USS O’Kane (DDG-77), USS Chafee (DDG-90), USS Dewey (DDG-105), USS Stockdale (DDG-106) and USS Michael Murphy (DDG-112).

    Aboard Vinson are more than five dozen aircraft assigned to CAW-2.

    Along with the “Argonauts” of VFA-147, the air wing includes the “Bounty Hunters” of VFA-2, which fly the F/A-18F Super Hornet; the “Stingers” of VFA-113 and “Golden Dragons” of VFA-192, both of which fly the F/A-18E Super Hornet; the “Gauntlets” of Electronic Attack Squadron 136, which fly the F/A-18G Growler; the “Black Eagles” of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 113, which fly the E-2D Hawkeye; the “Blue Hawks” of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 78, which fly the MH-60R Seahawk; the “Black Knights” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 4 flying the MH-60S Seahawk; and the “Titans” of Fleet Logistics Multi-Mission Squadron 30 flying the Osprey, according to U.S. 3rd Fleet.

    Vinson returned to San Diego in September 2020 in a homeport shift following a 17-month overhaul in at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility in Bremerton, Wash., where the ship went through a scheduled $367 million dry-docking and overhaul and upgrades throughout the carrier to include modernization to accommodate the F-35C.
    Finty
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    Post  Finty Thu Sep 30, 2021 8:38 pm

    https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/42529/the-navy-has-received-its-first-block-iii-f-a-18-super-hornets

    oeing has announced the delivery of the first two operational F/A-18E/F Super Hornet fighter jets in the Block III configuration to the U.S. Navy. That service will now use these aircraft to help complete an ongoing test and evaluation program for these updates, as well as support the development of new tactics, techniques, and procedures to go with them. The Navy expects to begin sending improved Super Hornets to actual frontline units before the end of the year.

    The Navy received this pair of Block III F/A-18E/Fs, the first of 78 new-production jets the service currently has on order, earlier this month, according to Boeing. The company had already delivered two test jets with some of the Block III improvements to the Navy last year. The service is set to put a significant portion of its existing 540 Super Hornets through an upgrade program to bring them up to this standard, as well.





    “The fleet needs capabilities to keep its edge,” Navy Captain Jason “Stuf” Denney, the service’s program manager for both the F/A-18 and EA-18G Growler aircraft, said in a Boeing press release. “Getting the first operational Block III in our hands is a great step forward in supporting our capability and readiness goals.”


    NAVY HALTS PLANS TO GIVE ITS SUPER HORNETS CONFORMAL FUEL TANKS (UPDATED)
    By Joseph Trevithick
    Posted in THE WAR ZONE
    GET YOUR FIRST LOOK AT THE NAVY'S BLOCK III F/A-18 SUPER HORNET TEST JET
    By Joseph Trevithick
    Posted in THE WAR ZONE
    THIS IS THE MOST INCREDIBLE SUPER HORNET FOOTAGE WE HAVE EVER SEEN
    By Thomas Newdick and Tyler Rogoway
    Posted in THE WAR ZONE
    LAWMAKERS ARE SKEPTICAL ABOUT THE SERVICES' FOCUS ON NEXT GENERATION FIGHTERS OVER EXISTING DESIGNS
    By Joseph Trevithick
    Posted in THE WAR ZONE
    NAVY’S AVIATION BOSS LAYS OUT BIG VISION FOR DRONE-PACKED CARRIERS OF THE FUTURE
    By Thomas Newdick
    Posted in THE WAR ZONE
    The complete Block III package includes a diverse array of improvements over the Navy’s existing Super Hornets. The jets have new, highly customizable, wide-area, touchscreen multifunction displays, including in the front and rear cockpits on two-seat F/A-18Fs. The aircraft also have the open-architecture Distributed Targeting Processor-Networked (DTP-N), which gives the aircraft’s mission computer more processing power and networking capability, as well as the Tactical Targeting Network Technology (TTNT) data link. Block III Super Hornets have certain features to help reduce the jet’s radar signature, as well. You can read more about the entire package in detail in this past War Zone feature.

    Beyond all that, this program has rolled in two other updates that had previously been in the works for future Navy Super Hornets, these being an improved satellite communications (SATCOM) system and the integration of a podded infrared search and track (IRST) system. In addition, Navy Block II Super Hornets that will be upgraded are set to go through a Service Life Modification (SLM) process first, extending their expected lifespan from 6,000 to 10,000 total flight hours.



    BOEING
    An infographic showing components of the Block III package, as well as other planned upgrades for the Navy’s F/A-18E/F Super Hornets.

    The original plan had been to include range-extending conformal fuel tanks (CFT) to the Navy’s Super Hornets as part of the Block III package. However, the service uncovered unspecified issues when it sent the test jets to fly from the deck of an actual carrier last year. Boeing subsequently received a stop-work halting continued testing of the CFTs in January and it is unclear when, if ever, they might eventually make their way onto Block III jets. You can read more about what we know of the issues with the CFTs and the impacts that it might have on the Navy’s future plans for its carrier air wings here.



    BOEING CAPTURE
    A Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet fitted with conformal fuel tanks during testing.

    Regardless, the remaining Block III and other associated upgrades for the Navy’s Super Hornets are set to help ensure that those jets can continue to be an important part of the Navy’s carrier air wings going forward. Boeing says that the use of open-architecture systems, such as DTP-N, also opens up pathways for the rapid integration of new and updated functionality for various systems on the jets as time goes on.

    “The hardware upgrades are complete. Today we are maximizing the open hardware and software and developing the apps to keep Block III ahead of future threats,” Jen Tebo, Boeing’s Vice President of F/A-18 and EA-18G programs, said in the press release regarding the delivery of the first operational upgraded jets. ”We are giving Navy pilots the tools to make the fastest and most informed decisions possible now and in the future.”

    Boeing has already demonstrated how the TTNT link can be used to support future manned-unmanned teaming. Artificial intelligence-driven capabilities to improve pilots’ decision-making abilities are another possibility, Tebo had told reporters during a roundtable last week.

    Tebo also noted that Boeing is leveraging work done on the Block III configuration to help with future updates to the EA-18G and to support the development of a future fighter to meet emerging Navy requirements as part of that service’s Next Generation Air Dominance (NGAD) program. “If you think about where the capabilities are going in the future, it’s certainly around the airframe, certainly around the survivability piece, stealth technology piece. But the meat and potatoes in the future are really going to be around the networking and the mission systems, and this sets up the Super Hornet to be the risk-reducer and the bridge to get to Next Gen Air Dominance,” she said at the roundtable.



    BOEING
    From top to bottom: an F/A-18E Super Hornet, an F/A-18F Super Hornet, and an EA-18G Growler.

    How the Navy’s NGAD program evolves may have an impact on any future F/A-18E/F plans, and the service already wants to stop buying new Super Hornets, a shift in focus that has drawn skepticism from members of Congress. As it stands now, the Navy has around 540 Super Hornets, in total, but it’s unclear how many of those will ultimately be brought up to the Block III standard.

    For its part, Boeing says it expects to be delivering improved jets into the 2030s, with these aircraft coming from one of three lines. One is for new production Super Hornets incorporating the Block III features, while the other two will put existing Navy jets through the SLM and then the Block III upgrade process.

    Boeing is also now offering Block III Super Hornets, or at least jets with some of the elements of this package, to foreign customers, such as Canada and India. The Super Hornets that Kuwait recently received, the last of which were delivered this month, had included components — such as the new cockpit displays — that are now going into Block III jets, as well.

    Regardless, the Navy sees Super Hornets as a key component of its carrier air wings for years to come, and the units flying these jets are set to start receiving a significant boost in capability in the coming months with the arrival of aircraft in the Block III configuration.
    Isos
    Isos


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    Post  Isos Thu Sep 30, 2021 10:06 pm

    F-35 is crying...
    George1
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    Post  George1 Tue Feb 27, 2024 4:14 pm


    Sponsored content


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