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    DPR Korea Space and Missiles

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    max steel
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    Re: DPR Korea Space and Missiles

    Post  max steel on Sun Jul 10, 2016 3:28 pm

    N. Korea says midair explosion of its missile in June was intentional


    North Korea's main propaganda outlet claimed Wednesday that the recent midair explosion of a ballistic missile was intentional, calling it a test attack on enemy satellites.

    North Korea's Musudan intermediate-range ballistic missile was detected to have burst into pieces midair after flying some 150 km after its launch on June 22.

    North Korea fired off another missile hours later, which soared to an altitude exceeding 1,000 km and flew some 400 km before landing in the East Sea.

    The first missile launch seemed to have ended in failure.

    Still, North Korea's main propaganda website, Uriminzokkiri, claimed Wednesday that the midair explosion of the first missile was carried out by a control device installed in the missile and was not an accident.

    The website also claimed that North Korea could render U.S. spy satellites lumps of scrap metal if Pyongyang detonates an electromagnetic pulse bomb at a high attitude after delivering it via one of its missiles. Laughing

    North Korea has long been believed to be developing electromagnetic pulse weapons that can destroy electronic and electrical devices.

    South Korean analysts said the North's move could be aimed at causing confusion with outside assessment of its missile capability and boasting of its military prowess. lol1

    max steel
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    Re: DPR Korea Space and Missiles

    Post  max steel on Wed Jul 20, 2016 9:58 pm

    North Korea fires submarine-based ballistic missile

    North Korea fired a submarine-based ballistic missile off the country's eastern coast Saturday, according to South Korean officials, drawing condemnation from Seoul and Washington.

    South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff and the U.S. Strategic Command said it appears the missile was successfully launched but failed in its early flight stage.



    The move comes a day after South Korea and the United States agreed to deploy an advanced military defense system that could intercept North Korean missiles following continued weapons testing by Pyongyang in defiance of U.N. resolutions.

    "We strongly condemn North Korea's missile test in violation of U.N. Security Council Resolutions, which explicitly prohibit North Korea's use of ballistic missile technology," said Gabrielle Price, spokeswoman for the U.S. State Department's Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs.

    "These actions, and North Korea's continued pursuit of ballistic missile and nuclear weapons capabilities, pose a significant threat to the United States, our allies, and to the stability of the greater Asia-Pacific," she said.

    "Our commitment to the defense of our allies in the face of these threats remains ironclad."South Korea also strongly condemned what it called North Korea's "provocative behavior," according to the Joint Chiefs.

    The Submarine Launched Ballistic Missile (SLBM) was fired from the seas southeast of Sinpo City at 11:30 a.m. local time Saturday (10:30 p.m. ET Friday), from near the province of South Hamgyong.

    The U.S. Strategic Command said in a statement that its systems detected "the launch of a presumed KN-11 submarine-launched ballistic missile occurred off the coast of Sinpo," and that it's believed the missile "fell" after being tracked over the Sea of Japan, also called the East Sea.
    Defensive measures

    After months of talks, Seoul and Washington were in the final stages of recommending a location in South Korea to install the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system.

    THAAD can intercept incoming ballistic missiles as they enter what is known as their "terminal" phase -- when the missile starts to aim downward, not just in its upward launch trajectory -- at incredible speed and altitude.

    Defensive measures



    After months of talks, Seoul and Washington were in the final stages of recommending a location in South Korea to install the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system.

    THAAD can intercept incoming ballistic missiles as they enter what is known as their "terminal" phase -- when the missile starts to aim downward, not just in its upward launch trajectory -- at incredible speed and altitude.

    It's been used for several years by the U.S. military to protect units in places such as Guam and Hawaii from potential attack, and could thwart the short, medium, and intermediate range missiles that North Korea claims it has.

    Yoo Jeh-seung, the head of South Korea's Defense Policy Office, said it was a "defensive measure" to "protect alliance military forces from North Korea's weapons of mass destruction and ballistic missile threats."

    "It will be focused solely on North Korean nuclear and missile threats and would not be directed towards any third party nations," Yoo said at a joint news conference attended by U.S. and South Korean officials.

    The formal decision to deploy THAAD comes two days after the United States placed sanctions on North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and 10 other officials for alleged human rights abuses. That's in addition to heavy sanctions against the government for nuclear and missile activity.

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    Re: DPR Korea Space and Missiles

    Post  max steel on Wed Jul 20, 2016 10:05 pm

    North Korea Fires Three Ballistic Missiles

    North Korea has fired three ballistic missiles, according to South Korea's military, a week after making threats to take action over the planned deployment of a U.S. anti-missile system in the South.

    South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff said in a statement that the missiles were launched from the western city of Hwangu early Tuesday and fired between 500 and 600 kilometers toward the Sea of Japan. The statement said South Korea is closely monitoring the North's actions.

    Last week, North Korea threatened to take "physical action" after the United States and South Korea announced they would deploy the Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense — THAAD — on the Korean peninsula to counter Pyongyang's ongoing nuclear and ballistic missile development programs.

    General Thomas Vandal, the chief of staff for U.S. Forces in Korea, said in making the formal announcement in Seoul this month, "North Korea's continued development of ballistic missiles and weapons of mass destruction, in opposition to its commitments to the international community, require our alliance to ensure that we retain the ability to defend ourselves in the face of this threat."

    Following North Korea's last nuclear test and launch of a long-range rocket using ballistic missile technology in February, Washington and Seoul began formal consultations to discuss the feasibility of deploying THAAD.

    The missile defense system is designed to intercept and destroy ballistic missiles during their final, or terminal, phase of flight. It has so far proven effective against short and medium-range ballistic missiles.

    Last month, Pyongyang launched a partially successful test of an intermediate-range Musudan missile. Although the missile flew approximately 400 kilometers before falling into the sea, there were indications the North Korean military had developed, or is close to developing, the capability to reach U.S. military bases in Asia and the Pacific.


    North Korea Says Missile Launch Was Mock Nuclear Attack on U.S. Defense System

    North Korea’s ballistic missile tests yesterday were a dress rehearsal for a nuclear attack on South Korean and US ports and airfields, the country’s state run media has claimed.

    In its latest claim that it is now nuclear capable, the Korean Central News agency said the three missile tests were mock attacks on a planned US missile defence system in South Korea.

    “The drill was conducted … under the simulated conditions of making pre-emptive strikes at ports and airfields in … South Korea where the US imperialists’ nuclear war hardware is to be hurled,” reported the Korean Central News Agency.


    “And it once again examined the operational features of the detonating devices of nuclear warheads mounted on the ballistic rockets … Kim Jong Un expressed great satisfaction over the successful drill.”

    The three missiles were launched from Hwangju, south of Pyongyang, between 5:45am and 6:40am. Seoul time Tuesday. One flew 500 kilometres (311 miles) and another 600 kilometres (373 miles) before crashing into the sea off the country’s east coast, according to a South Korean military statement, which said the third missile’s trajectory was still being examined.

    The U.S. Strategic Command also confirmed the North’s “launch of two presumed Scud tactical ballistic missiles, followed by the presumed launch of a Nodong intermediate-range ballistic missile approximately an hour later.”

    Photos published online today by the North’s ruling party newspaper Rodong Sinmun show the country’s young dictator Kim Jong Un looking up at soaring missiles and sitting at a desk with a large map showing the possible missile trajectories from the North to the South’s southern coast.

    The Scuds have all of South Korea within range, and the more powerful Nodong — also called Rodong — is capable of reaching Japan. Patriot missile defences already stationed in South Korea are able to counter the relatively low-tech Scuds.

    Pyongyang has sought to master technology to miniaturise a nuclear warhead to mount on its rockets. Most experts believe that Pyongyang is not yet capable of mounting nuclear warheads on its rockets. U.S. aircraft carriers and submarines often visit South Korean southern ports, including Busan, Ulsan and Jinhae, for missions.

    The Joint Chiefs of Staff office in Seoul condemned the launch and said the Scud missiles’ flight distances were “long enough to hit any targets in South Korea.”

    The Nodong missile is said to have a range of over 1,300 kilometres, putting most of Japan within range.

    United Nations Security Council resolutions bar ballistic-missile activities by North Korea. The test came six days after South Korea picked Seongju, about 180 kilometres south of Seoul, as the site for an advanced US missile-defence system. Seoul and Washington have agreed to deploy the system, known as Thaad (Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense) before the end of 2017 to better protect the South from North Korean missiles. Pyongyang responded by threatening “physical counteraction.”

    “North Korea’s ballistic-missile launches today have something to do with its warning” last week to take action against the planned Thaad deployment in the South, a Joint Chiefs of Staff spokesman told a press briefing on Tuesday.

    He said the South is closely watching the North’s moves. The missile-defence battery is designed to detect and destroy incoming North Korean missiles, but Beijing strongly opposes its deployment in South Korea because the system’s powerful radar can scan not only North Korean but also Chinese territory.

    George1
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    Re: DPR Korea Space and Missiles

    Post  George1 on Wed Sep 07, 2016 2:17 pm

    The launches of North Korean missiles "Hwaseong"











    http://bmpd.livejournal.com/2109914.html


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