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    Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

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    Austin
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    Re: Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

    Post  Austin on Thu Jul 07, 2011 11:33 am

    Russian Helicopter Industry: Up and Away
    Mikhail Barabanov ( MDB )

    The Russian helicopter industry is in rude health, contrasting sharply with many other defense industry branches and the languishing civilian aircraft makers.

    Many defense companies are still undergoing painful restructuring, and only seven civilian aircraft were delivered in 2010. Meanwhile, helicopter output hit a 15-year high in 2010. The JSC Vertolety Rossii (Russian Helicopters) holding company, formed as part of the Oboronprom corporation in 2006, delivered 214 helicopters of all types – three times the 2003 figure and a 150 per cent increase on 2006 (see Table 1). The company’s revenues reached U$ 2.2 bn, a 110 per cent rise on 2006. Its margins remain at a healthy 10-12 per cent.

    Most of that growth had resulted from the long-awaited launch of mass production of new helicopter models for the MoD, as well as strong exports.

    Vertolety Rossii owns the two leading Russian helicopter design bureaus (Mil and Kamov), the five biggest helicopter plants (in Kazan, Ulan-Ude, Rostov-on-Don, Arsenyev and Kumertau) and manufacturers of key components. The only independent Russian helicopter maker is Strela in Orenburg, which makes small numbers of the Ka-226 light helicopters.

    In an effort to leverage all that growth, Vertolety Rossii had planned an IPO on the London and Moscow stock exchanges in 2011, hoping to attract some 500m dollars. The money was to be used to pay off debts and to finance the compulsory buy-out of the minority stakes in its subsidiaries still owned by other investors. But in May those plans were postponed indefinitely as the share offer was undersubscribed. Potential investors are wary since the company, which began operations as a single entity only as recently as 2007, is still very young. There is also a certain amount of caution about the future of the Russian aerospace industry as a whole.

    Vertolety Rossii is clearly one of the most successful of the Russian defense industry corporations created over the past decade. But it has fallen foul of the general reputation of the Russian aerospace sector, which still requires serious reforms. Nevertheless, the company is one of the first Russian industrial groups to have begun reaping substantial dividends from the rapidly growing MoD spending and the ambitious new weapons procurement programs.

    Russian MoD procurement

    After almost a quarter of a century of testing and polishing, the new-generation Mi-28 and Ka-50/52 attack helicopters have finally begun to arrive en mass to the Russian armed forces. The scale of the Mi-28N production program is unprecedented for post-Soviet Russia. Essentially, this is the first new mass-produced Russian military helicopter since the 1980s. In 2005 the MoD signed a nine-year contract for 67 Mi-28N helicopters; 38 were made at the Rostvertol plant in Rostov-on-Don in the five years to 2010, including 15 helicopters in 2010 alone. In 2009 first deliveries of the Mi-28N were made to combat troops stationed in the North Caucasus. In the autumn of 2010 the MoD signed another contract for an additional 30 helicopters to be delivered by 2015, for a total of 97. This means that the production levels achieved in 2010 are set to remain unchanged or even increase. It is safe to expect that Rostvertol will be delivering 14-15 helicopters every year in 2011-2014. Meanwhile, the new 2011-2020 State Armament Program (GPV-2020) has set the target for Mi-28N procurement at 260 helicopters, so production is set to increase after 2014, once new contracts have been signed.

    In 2010 the Progress company based in Arsenyev delivered the first four mass-produced Ka-52 helicopters to the Russian Air Force. Five pre-production helicopters and prototypes were made in 2008-2009. The four helicopters delivered in 2010 were built under a 2009 MoD contract for 36 helicopters. The target for 2011 is for Progress to deliver another 10 helicopters, and maintain that level in 2012-2013. The MoD is expected to buy a total of 120 Ka 52 helicopters under the GPV-2020 program. A modified Ka-52 version and a separate naval version are now in development; up to 30 naval helicopters could be made for the Russian Navy.

    In 2009-2010 the Kazan helicopter plant delivered the first 10 Ansat-U light training helicopters to the Russian Air Force. Finally, production of the Mi-8 transports, the workhorse of the Russian Army Aviation, resumed in 2008 after a long pause at the plants in Kazan and Ulan-Ude. The modifications now in production are the Mi-8MTV and Mi-8AMTSh. Hundreds are expected to be delivered in the coming years, including more than 50 in 2011.

    Several other models will enter mass production in 2011, including the new Mi-35M attack helicopters, the Ka-226 light helicopters, and the Ka-31 AEW naval helicopters. The first six of the 22 Mi-35M helicopters under a 2009 contract will be delivered by Rostvertol in 2011. The Ka-31 (which was previously made only for exports) and the Ka-226 will be made in Kumertau. Also in 2011 Rostvertol is expected to resume production of the Mi-26 heavy military transports.

    In 2009 the MoD took delivery of 33 military helicopters from the Russian defense industry. In 2010 the figure was 37, with a sharp rise to 109 expected in 2011, according to official statements (see Table 2).

    Table 1. Deliveries by Vertolety Rossii subsidiaries in 2003-2012

    Year 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012(projection)

    Helicopters
    delivered
    72 75 83 94 104 169 183 214 260 300

    Table 2. Helicopter deliveries to the Russian MoD in 2009-2011

    Model 2009 2010 2011
    (projection)
    Ansat-U 6 4 6
    Ka-52 3 4 10
    Mi-8 12 14 60
    Mi-28N 12 15 15
    Total 33 37 109

    The growth reflects the beginning of deliveries under the GPV-2020 program. So far, there have been no problems with the program’s financing. Procurement of new helicopters is one of the top priorities of the program, which fully reflects global military trends. About a thousand helicopters should be delivered to the Russian Air Force by 2020, including 400 in 2011-2015. An additional 100 helicopters will be delivered by 2020 to the Russian Navy. The GPV-2020 also includes mass production of heavily modified versions of the existing helicopters, such as the Mi-28N (the Mi-28MN modification should be launched in 2015) and the Ka-52 attack helicopters, the naval Ka-27M and Ka-29M versions and a carrier-based version of the Ka-52. There are also plans to launch production of the multirole Ka-60 helicopter and the Mi-383 transport.

    Vertolety Rossii already has preliminary commitments from the MoD for at least 100 military helicopters by 2012. Negotiations between the two on long-term contracts for delivery by 2018 are nearly completed. Several were signed in the first half of 2011. It has been reported that contracts for 100 new Ka-60 helicopters for the Army Aviation’s special task forces, for delivery by 2020, and a number of other deals are also in the pipeline.

    The estimate of deliveries for the Russian Air Force in 2011-2020 includes 220 Mi-28N helicopters, 120 Ka-52, 40 Mi-35M, 26 Mi-26, 100 Ka-60 and 30 Ka-226 helicopters, up to 70 Ansat and up to 500 Mi-8 helicopters. Deliveries for the Russian Navy over the same period are expected to include 70 Ka-27M and Ka-29M helicopters, up to 30 Ka-52 and up to 20 Ka-226 units, plus a certain number of the Ka-31.

    Exports

    Exports, the second pillar underpinning the rapid growth of the Russian helicopter industry, still outstripped domestic deliveries in 2010. The situation is expected to change in 2011, once the large MoD contracts start to take effect. Nevertheless, Russian helicopter exports have also shown very respectable growth in recent years. In 2010 deliveries on export contracts were up 30 per cent, thanks largely to the continuing popularity of the industry’s best-selling Mi-8/Mi-17 series.

    These powerful heavy-lifters are relatively cheap and easy to maintain, and still have a large military and civilian market in many parts of the globe. In recent years sales were boosted by the military campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan. The Mi-8/Mi-17 series has earned itself an excellent reputation during operations in these two countries. As a result, the Mi-17 has been chosen as the core model for the fairly large Iraqi and Afghan air forces, which are now being restored to their former strength. The Afghan deliveries are financed by the Pentagon, which signed a contract for 21 Mi-17 units in early 2011. India has signed two large contracts for a total of 139 Mi-17s. China also remains a large customer. The Mi-17 is also entering new markets; contracts have recently been signed with Argentina, Bolivia, Thailand and Kenya.

    Meanwhile, the venerable Mi-24/Mi-35 is having something of a renaissance on the world markets. Exports of the newly built Mi-35P and Mi-35M attack helicopters are on the rise. Brazil has bought 12; Azerbaijan signed a contract for 24 in 2010. Total exports could well reach 100 units. Russia has also begun to offer the Mi-28N and the Ka-52 to foreign customers. The first export contract for 12 Mi-28N helicopters was announced in early 2011. The buyer has not been named, but it may be Kazakhstan.

    Russia also continues to export the Mi-26T, the world’s heaviest transport helicopter, and commercial modifications of the Ka-32. The industry is making Ka-28 ASW and the Ka 31 AEW naval helicopters for India and China. It is hoped that the Ka-226 and the Ansat light helicopters will also attract foreign buyers.

    Prospects

    In an effort to keep the Russian helicopter industry competitive Vertolety Rossii has stepped up the development of new models and upgrade options. Its R&D program until 2020-2025 enjoys generous government support. In April the Russian Ministry of Industry and Trade submitted to the Prime Minister’s Office a draft of the state program for the Russian aerospace industry. The program includes the development of new helicopters, and sets an ambitions target for the wider industry to win 10 per cent of the world market in the civilian sector by 2025. The target for the defense sector is 14 per cent, and 15 per cent for the helicopter industry (the current figure is estimated by the ministry at 13 per cent). Some 5 trillion roubles (U$1.8bn) will be invested by the government into the aerospace sector by 2020 if the program is approved, a tenfold rise on the previous decade.

    In the civilian segment Vertolety Rossii aims to launch by 2015 a deeply upgraded version of the Mi-17 helicopter (designated as the Mi-171M), a version of the Ka-226 helicopter fitted with French engines (Ka-226T), an upgraded version of the Mi-34 light helicopter with a turbine engine replacing the old piston engine (Mi-34S2), the new Ka-62 helicopter (a civilian version of the Ka-60) and the new Mi 38. The Ka-62 and the Mi-38 have already entered the trials program. There are also plans to launch the assembly of the AgustaWestland AW139 medium helicopter in Russia.

    By 2020 the company is planning to develop and launch mass production of three new commercial models: the AHL heavy transport (based on the Mi-46 design), a medium helicopter weighting up to 4.5 tonnes (based on the Mi-54 design) and a light helicopter weighing under 2.5 tonnes.

    In the military segment, by 2015 Vertolety Rossii will launch production of the modified versions of the Mi-28N (designated as Mi-28MN) and the Ka-52 attack helicopters; a carrier-based version of the Ka-52; revamped Ka-27M and Ka-29M naval helicopters; and the new Ka-60 multirole helicopter. By 2020 the company wants to develop and test the new Ka-65 future naval helicopter (with coaxial rotors); a deep upgrade of the Mi-26 heavy transport (designated as the Mi-26M); the Mi-383 transport (military version of the Mi-38); and an unmanned helicopter system.

    A special priority is the program to develop a radically new advanced high-speed helicopter (Perspektivnyi Skorostnoi Vertolyot – PSV project) with a pusher-type propeller. Vertolety Rossii itself says the design will be a “breakthrough”. Similar designs are now being developed in the United States (the experimental X2 and the S-97 attack helicopter design by Sikorsky) and in Europe (the experimental X3 and the X4 design by Eurocopter). In Russia this new technology is viewed as a chance to achieve a major breakthrough in the helicopter industry. Early designs have already been proposed by both Mil (Mi-X1) and Kamov (Ka-92). One of them will be chosen by Vertolety Rossii for further development later in 2011. The Russian Ministry of Industry and Trade is expected to finance work on the early designs to the tune of 400m roubles (U$14m) this year. Later on spending on the program will be ramped up to about 4bn roubles (U$140m) over the next three years.

    The PSV program envisages two types of commercial high-speed helicopters to be developed by 2020 (a medium and a light version), as well as a high-speed attack helicopter (“assault helicopter system” or “fifth-generation attack helicopter”).

    There are doubts about the feasibility of some of Vertolety Rossii’s projects. The market for models such as the Ka-60/62, Mi-38 or Mi-34S2 may be far too small, so their commercial success is uncertain. The future light and medium helicopter projects also seem very difficult to pull off. The AHL heavy transport project may prove too costly, unless foreign partners are brought in. But the PSV project, which the company regards as one of its top priorities, looks quite promising.

    The helicopter industry is one of the few Russian industries that are truly competitive internationally. Vertolety Rossii seems in a good position to retain its competitive edge thanks to its large sales and generous government support. Delivering the 2010 annual report to the Russian Duma, Prime Minister Vladimir Putin said that government financing of the Russian aerospace industry in 2009-2011 was over 270bn roubles (U$9bn), and that this financing had “facilitated progress in all the areas on which the future of our civilian and military aerospace industry depends”.

    Compiled by CAST

    GarryB
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    Re: Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

    Post  GarryB on Fri Aug 12, 2011 2:24 am



    Note engine power is wrong...

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    Mi-26TZ Fuel Tanker Version

    Post  Cyberspec on Tue Sep 20, 2011 8:25 am

    Mi-26TZ successfully tested during recent exercise, where it refueled various armoured vehicles on the march...this was the first such exercise in the post Soviet period




    Arrow http://www.aex.ru/news/2011/9/16/88402/

    - Work on the Mi-26TZ started back in 1988
    - First flight of serial machine in 1996
    - It can carry 14000 lt of fuel + 1000 lt of lubricants.

    In the past, the Soviet Army used the Mi-6 in the same role

    Mi-6TZ in East Germany



    interesting old footage showing tank being refueled from a helicopter (start of video)



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    Re: Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

    Post  Pervius on Mon Sep 26, 2011 6:55 pm

    It would be cheaper to put a fuel bladder on a 463L pallet and push it out of the back of a C-130 low on the deck near the tanks. If your Team is good you don't even need parachutes on it.


    A Helicopter flying fuel tank is just about the poorest battle field planning you could come up with. How fast would that chopper get out there? How fast would it take it to get back to a fueling spot?

    I guess if they plan on all their air bases being blown away..it might be handy. But by then Russia wouldn't have control of its airspace and the pilot of that chopper would be flying a suicide mission.


    I think it'll be worthless on the battlefield. Even if Russia pushed forth halfway across America with their Tanks, they wouldn't need that chopper. There'd be enough civilian trucks to commandeer to run fuel. Incognito. Free.

    What's the purpose of this chopper again?

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    Re: Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

    Post  Cyberspec on Tue Sep 27, 2011 12:49 am

    The benefits of a heli-tanker are obvious IMO.

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    Re: Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

    Post  GarryB on Tue Sep 27, 2011 3:52 am

    It would be cheaper to put a fuel bladder on a 463L pallet and push it out of the back of a C-130 low on the deck near the tanks. If your Team is good you don't even need parachutes on it.

    The Russians don't have any C-130s in service... Razz Razz


    Besides a helicopter with the lifting capacity of a C-130 can deliver the same payload, though over shorter distances and lower speeds, but with much better accuracy and lower trauma.

    The Russians know all about pushing loads out of aircraft with parachutes... they invented airborne forces... and before you say some American officer talked about the potential idea in 1917 talk is cheap. The Russians were dropping 10,000 man forces with equipment by aircraft in the early 1930s. After seeing it the Germans and the US and British Started their own airborne force development programs.


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    Re: Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

    Post  Cyberspec on Wed Sep 28, 2011 7:32 am

    Mi-26TZ at the just finished exercise Centre 2011



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    Russian flight safety authority Rosaviatsia denies it has any plans to temporarily ground the nation’s fleet of Mil Mi-8T helicopters

    Post  Russian Patriot on Fri Oct 28, 2011 2:27 am



    Russian flight safety authority Rosaviatsia denies it has any plans to temporarily ground the nation’s fleet of Mil Mi-8T helicopters

    11:25 26/10/2011
    MOSCOW, October 26 (RIA Novosti)
    Tags: Mi-17, Mi-8, Rosaviatsia, Moscow, Russia





    Russian flight safety authority Rosaviatsia denies it has any plans to temporarily ground the nation’s fleet of Mil Mi-8T helicopters, the watchdog said on Wednesday following media reports that a ban was being considered.

    The Mi-8 and its updated variant, the Mi-17, is the most widely produced helicopter in history, and hundreds remain in service throughout the world, particularly in Russia and the former Soviet Republics.

    Recent media reports claimed that the Interstate Aviation Committee (MAK), a CIS flight safety authority, had issued a recommendation to the Mil Moscow Helicopter Factory, the design authority for the Mi-8, that the machine should have modifications to protect passengers from parts of the engine which could break up in an accident.

    “There is no discussion of a temporary grounding of the Mi-8,” Rosaviatsia said, and declined further comment.

    RIA Novosti was unable to obtain comment from MAK, or Mil in Moscow.

    The Mi-8 is a utility helicopter often used in passenger transport roles, particularly in Russia’s oil and gas industry and the armed forces.

    http://www.en.ria.ru/mlitary_news/20111026/168125578.html

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    Re: Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

    Post  GarryB on Fri Oct 28, 2011 6:07 am

    A grounding of Mi-8s would have a similar effect to grounding all Boeings in the East.

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    Re: Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

    Post  Austin on Fri Feb 17, 2012 9:56 am

    Acording to latest AW&ST , Mi-17 is gaining lots of ground due to its sturdiness , reliability ,payload and cost

    http://www.zinio.com/reader.jsp?issue=416210762&e=true

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    Re: Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

    Post  Austin on Fri Feb 17, 2012 9:58 am

    check pics of IAF latest Mi-17V5

    http://livefist.blogspot.in/2012/02/photos-iaf-to-induct-new-mi-17-v5.html

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    Re: Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

    Post  George1 on Fri May 04, 2012 11:51 pm

    Mi-38 ready for serial production 'soon', with certification in 2015



    Russian Helicopters' Kazan factory is building a third prototype of a new model, the Mil Mi-38, which fits between the 36-passenger Mi-17 and the 82-passenger heavylift Mi-26.

    The aircraft is designed to carry up to 40 passengers with a maximum take-off weight of 15.6t and payload of 6t carried internally or by sling.

    Development has been held up by delays to a new Klimov engine, though this will be powering the third prototype, with Pratt & Whitney power having got the first two aircraft flying for evaluation by Russian Helicopters' Mil design bureau in Moscow.


    http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/mi-38-ready-for-serial-production-soon-with-certification-in-2015-371299/

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    Re: Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

    Post  George1 on Sat May 05, 2012 6:09 am


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    Tnx but no

    Post  flamming_python on Tue May 08, 2012 2:25 am

    It's a nice helo - we just don't need it. And if we can't get the Europeans in on its production and so on, we won't find many other people who need it either. Perhaps in 10 years time or so, if we can find a lot of common components with our other helicopter projects, incorporate more composite and high-tech materials into its design and raise its capabilities to the point where it would offer a significant improvement over the Mi-8 series, at a decent enough value.

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    Re: Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

    Post  GarryB on Tue May 08, 2012 8:56 am

    7 ton external load capacity is better than the 4 ton external load capacity of the Mi-8/-17.

    And it is cleared to have an operational ceiling much higher than the Mi-8/-17 series too.

    It is a step into higher quality as well as higher performance, though I agree that the Mi-17 is still very useful and is still selling very well.

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    Re: Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

    Post  Austin on Tue May 08, 2012 9:00 am

    I think Mi-38 is at its beginning of life and Mi-8/17 at the end of its design optimisation , right now it might look like Mi-17 variants are close to Mi-38 parameters but the gap will grow when Mi-38 starts to evolve like Mi-8 did and then Mi-38 will start getting better.

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    Re: Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

    Post  George1 on Thu May 24, 2012 8:31 pm

    http://sdelanounas.ru/blogs/17738/

    New Mi-26

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    Re: Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

    Post  Sujoy on Thu Jun 14, 2012 5:42 pm

    VOICE OF RUSSIA

    Pentagon to buy 12 more Russian MI-17s

    The Pentagon has told the U.S. Congress about its decision to buy 12 additional Mi-17 helicopters from the Russian company "Rosboroneksport" for the Afghan army.

    The transaction’s amount is estimated at being worth $218 million.

    Earlier this year the Pentagon ordered 12 helicopters from the Russian company.

    According to the authorities, the Mi-17 is cheaper than American counterparts and easier to teach Afghan pilots to fly.

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    Mi-8 first flight 50 years ago!

    Post  TR1 on Thu Aug 02, 2012 9:13 am

    http://www.armstass.su/?page=article&aid=109160&cid=25

    50 years ago the Mi-8 first flew!
    Hurrah!

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    Re: Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

    Post  TheArmenian on Thu Aug 02, 2012 9:37 am

    The Magnificant 8: A great review in 2 parts of the Mi-8 by "Wing of Russia"




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    Re: Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

    Post  flamming_python on Sun Aug 05, 2012 8:40 pm

    Another legendary design of Russian engineering that has literaly served across generations. Huzzah!

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    Re: Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

    Post  GarryB on Mon Aug 06, 2012 9:36 am

    Awesome workhorse that spawned the Mi-24 family and ultimately the Mi-28 family and also of course the Mi-9, Mi-17, and of course the boat hulled Mi-14 family.

    The most produced military helo in the world!

    (and thanks for the vids)


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    Re: Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

    Post  Dima on Mon Aug 06, 2012 10:05 pm

    Thanks for the links guys.

    I wish the Mi-38 also have a great future.

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    Re: Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

    Post  Austin on Sun Oct 28, 2012 4:16 pm

    Seems like Russia has string of bad luck with Indian military competition these days first it was MMRCA then Mi-28N Loss and now Mi-26 looses to Chinook

    Boeing's Chinook Wins Indian Heavy Copter Fight


    I am not sure of Ka-226 would win the LOH deal it could be Fennec , seems like political decision in India to keep Russians out and share the deal with US since US took the MMRCA loss more personally.

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    Re: Mi-8/17, Μi-38, Mi-26: News

    Post  Mindstorm on Sun Oct 28, 2012 5:21 pm



    Austin wrote:Seems like Russia has string of bad luck with Indian military competition these days first it was MMRCA then Mi-28N Loss and now Mi-26 looses to Chinook

    Boeing's Chinook Wins Indian Heavy Copter Fight


    I am not sure of Ka-226 would win the LOH deal it could be Fennec , seems like political decision in India to keep Russians out and share the deal with US since US took the MMRCA loss more personally.



    While i share the selection by part of India of AH-63D Block 3 over Mi-28NE on the basis that Mi-28NE is still a not "mature" product with some sub-systems and lines of productions still not established i find this one a titanic mistake.

    The reasons -which i had pointed out already some months ago- is that the technical requirements for the tender has been put, by Indian DoD, within some "controlled" thresholds to allow CH-47F to participate (so to prevent Mi-26T2 to win in absence of competition, dictating so ,effectively, the final economic and temporal terms of the tender).

    Naturally those requirements have created this absurd situation ,where both CH-47F and Mi-26T2 has been found compliant with those technical qualifications .
    Naturally at this point the selection was doomed in favour of CH-47F because obviously ,within those limits, it would have resulted the lowest bidder ; at this point effectively Indian tender's Committee had both hands tied by the same terms established by the tender.


    The problem leading to this enormous mistake for Indian Armed Forces is to fail to formally declare that Mi-26T2 sit in a category completely of its own, the other option possible would have been to force any eventual competitor in the tender to offer a product with the same volumetric and payload capabilities of Mi-26T2 .

    15 Mi-26T2 and 15 Ch-47F offer COMPLETELY DIFFERENT tactical/substrategic airlift and transportation capabilities !!
    In no way in this universe it could ever be the same and ,therefore, the decision to establish lower bidder on those premises result simply destitute of any rational grounding.


    The fault for this mess cannot even be given strictly to the Selecting Committee, in facts by allowing CH-47F to pass the technical trials on the basis of parametrical requirements designed "ad hoc" to let it to participate, Indian DoD has not only damaged in perspective its Armed Forces and Indian taxpayers( offering to them by far the less "bang for the bucks"), but also the good name it had gained with MMRCA tender.

    A very bad story here.....



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