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    China’s law enforcement arms

    higurashihougi
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    Post  higurashihougi Wed Oct 27, 2021 8:17 pm

    The ‘Chaoyang public’ were involved in the police detention of renowned pianist Li Yundi on suspicion of patronising a sex worker

    Public informants play an increasingly vital role in aiding China’s law enforcement arms

    https://www.scmp.com/news/people-culture/social-welfare/article/3153769/explainer-who-are-chinas-chaoyang-public-who?module=perpetual_scroll&pgtype=article&campaign=3153769

    In China, there’s another rising star — the “Chaoyang public”, which the Chinese jokingly refer to as “the fifth largest intelligence agency in the world”.

    The phrase “Chaoyang public” made a recent appearance last week, when the Beijing Chaoyang district police announced that they had detained renowned pianist Li Yundi on suspicion of patronising a sex worker. Prostitution is illegal in China.

    In the notice, the police wrote that they received “a tip-off from the public that some people were resorting to prostitution in a Chaoyang residential compound” and had investigated, leading to Li’s detention.

    There has long been a tradition of “qunfang qunzhi”, or “prevention and governance by the public masses” in China. The phrase was coined by Chairman Mao and other officials in 1949, according to the People’s Daily.

    In Beijing, the tradition has been encouraged in official propaganda for years, using volunteers not only in residential communities but also in cyberspace.

    Starting in 2014, Beijing cyberspace police recruited volunteers to assist in finding internet scams, pornography, online gambling, drug use and stop the spreading of rumours, and by 2015 more than 3,000 people had joined.

    The mysterious term [“Chaoyang public”] first started getting mentioned in official reports in the 2010s. In 2013, Beijing police said in a statement that thanks to tips from the public, they caught Charles Xue Biqun, also known by his alias Xue Manzi, a billionaire venture capitalist and one of the most active investors in the Chinese internet, for using a sex worker.

    Since then, “Chaoyang public” has become a popular phrase when referring to public informants. They went on to help catch one celebrity after another, including Jaycee Chan, the son of Jackie Chan, for smoking pot in 2014. Other busts with help from the public included illegal firework storage areas and unregistered drivers who robbed passengers.

    “The police will protect the privacy of informants, so please don’t ask who they are,” Beijing police said on Weibo. “But police work relies on public support and cooperation. No matter if it’s tips, or check-up on transportation, fire safety and security risks, everybody can be a member of ‘Chaoyang public’.”

    In 2015, the Beijing Youth Daily visited one such community in Chaoyang district, which has more than 200 informants.

    “They are all enthusiastic residents wearing red sleeves, or shop owners. When they are buying food or out walking, whenever they spot something suspicious, they would report it immediately to community police,” the article said.

    There’s even a 24-hour patrol team consisting of 70 people that are alert to everything in the community.

    In 2017, the Beijing police launched a mobile phone application called “Chaoyang Public”, which allows residents to upload pictures and descriptions with one click and allows the police to send alerts and notify people of other cases being investigated.

    According to a 2018 article by the Beijing Municipal Political and Legal Affairs Committee of the Communist Party of China, there are roughly 190,000 volunteers in Chaoyang district that serve to protect public security, which is roughly 5 per cent of the district population. Together, they provide more than 20,000 tips to the police every month.
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    Post  kvs Wed Oct 27, 2021 8:30 pm

    China should dial down on the use of "stukach" espionage. The west can use this as a tool to subvert China. It is very easy for
    assorted meat puppets to give false testimony. They should rely only on validated physical evidence and not claims from this collection
    of neighbourhood spies.

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    Post  GarryB Thu Oct 28, 2021 7:43 am

    Whatever China does do you think it will be accurately reported in the west?

    The South China Morning Post is a Hong Kong newspaper... sounds like an ideal target for western intel services like Reuters and Bellingcat...
    higurashihougi
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    Post  higurashihougi Thu Oct 28, 2021 9:23 am

    GarryB wrote:Whatever China does do you think it will be accurately reported in the west?

    The South China Morning Post is a Hong Kong newspaper... sounds like an ideal target for western intel services like Reuters and Bellingcat...

    The “Chaoyang public” is actually quite famous in China and it is mentioned in a number of mainland China newspapers, of course they simply narrated that the local people of Chaoyang inform and assist the police in arresting criminals.

    "Chaoyang public" is actually one variant of the classic model of cooperation between the authorities and local people in maintaining the security and manage the local issues.


    Last edited by higurashihougi on Thu Oct 28, 2021 9:30 am; edited 1 time in total
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    Post  higurashihougi Thu Oct 28, 2021 9:29 am

    @Garry: the same info, from Global Times.

    https://www.globaltimes.cn/page/202110/1237042.shtml

    After Chinese pianist Li Yundi was reportedly detained for soliciting prostitute in Beijing on Thursday, a new intelligence force was unveiled -- the residents of Chaoyang in Chinese capital who reported Li to the police, with netizens jokingly calling them a mysterious intelligence force could match four famous intelligence, the CIA, MI6, KGB and Mossad.

    The police statement on Li's detention issued by Chaoyang branch of Beijing Public Security Bureau read that "The Chaoyang branch received reports from the public that there was an active prostitution ring operating in a community within Chaoyang..."

    "The Chaoyang branch received reports from the public" is a typical start of a police statement, and people who offer tip-offs are dubbed as Chaoyang masses.

    According to public information, Chaoyang residents have lodged police reports ensnaring entertainers who used drugs, solicited prostitutes or conducted organized gambling.

    Fong Jo-Ming, son of Jackie Chan and Taiwan-born entertainer Kai Ko were detained in 2014 by Chaoyang police according to reports made by members of the public.

    Sharp eyes and vigilance of the people of Chaoyang were demonstrated as early as 1974 in the case of catching spies from the former Soviet Union, according to an article published in the People's Daily on January 23, 1974.

    Soviet diplomats usually met with their sources secretly in Chaoyang which was suburb then, but local residents knew each other well and immediately noticed the strange figures despite of their disguise.

    A more recent case revealed by the police was in 2017 when a 71-year-old "auntie" surnamed Wang helped police catch a prostitution gang. Wang first noticed a young man who moved into the apartment of an old neighbor, the man, who was apparently loitering for no reason would frequently interact with a range of different men.

    The men would go up to his apartment only to leave soon after. The young man lived alone but ordered food for several people.

    Wang reported the strange situation to the police, who found the apartment to be a prostitution den housing six sex workers while the man solicited "customers." The gang was broken up with three detained for criminal violations and 12 under administrative detention.

    Aside from retired "aunties" and "uncles" in residential compounds, water and power reading takers, delivery people , house cleaner and even rental agents can be informants for police. In many cases drugs are detected by water reading takers or delivery people.

    Those typical cases shed light on how the people of Chaoyang work with police to safeguard security and order of society. Chaoyang district, the largest urban district of Beijing, is home to 140,000 Chaoyang masses who cooperate with the police. Xinhua reported in 2018 that Chaoyang masses reported 8,300 valuable tip-offs to Chaoyang police, leading police to crack 370 cases and detain more than 250 suspects.
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    Post  sundoesntrise Thu Oct 28, 2021 9:41 am

    higurashihougi wrote:The ‘Chaoyang public’ were involved in the police detention of renowned pianist Li Yundi on suspicion of patronising a sex worker

    Public informants play an increasingly vital role in aiding China’s law enforcement arms

    scmp.com/news/people-culture/social-welfare/article/3153769/explainer-who-are-chinas-chaoyang-public-who?module=perpetual_scroll&pgtype=article&campaign=3153769

    In China, there’s another rising star — the “Chaoyang public”, which the Chinese jokingly refer to as “the fifth largest intelligence agency in the world”.

    The phrase “Chaoyang public” made a recent appearance last week, when the Beijing Chaoyang district police announced that they had detained renowned pianist Li Yundi on suspicion of patronising a sex worker. Prostitution is illegal in China.

    In the notice, the police wrote that they received “a tip-off from the public that some people were resorting to prostitution in a Chaoyang residential compound” and had investigated, leading to Li’s detention.

    There has long been a tradition of “qunfang qunzhi”, or “prevention and governance by the public masses” in China. The phrase was coined by Chairman Mao and other officials in 1949, according to the People’s Daily.

    In Beijing, the tradition has been encouraged in official propaganda for years, using volunteers not only in residential communities but also in cyberspace.

    Starting in 2014, Beijing cyberspace police recruited volunteers to assist in finding internet scams, pornography, online gambling, drug use and stop the spreading of rumours, and by 2015 more than 3,000 people had joined.

    The mysterious term [“Chaoyang public”] first started getting mentioned in official reports in the 2010s. In 2013, Beijing police said in a statement that thanks to tips from the public, they caught Charles Xue Biqun, also known by his alias Xue Manzi, a billionaire venture capitalist and one of the most active investors in the Chinese internet, for using a sex worker.

    Since then, “Chaoyang public” has become a popular phrase when referring to public informants. They went on to help catch one celebrity after another, including Jaycee Chan, the son of Jackie Chan, for smoking pot in 2014. Other busts with help from the public included illegal firework storage areas and unregistered drivers who robbed passengers.

    “The police will protect the privacy of informants, so please don’t ask who they are,” Beijing police said on Weibo. “But police work relies on public support and cooperation. No matter if it’s tips, or check-up on transportation, fire safety and security risks, everybody can be a member of ‘Chaoyang public’.”

    In 2015, the Beijing Youth Daily visited one such community in Chaoyang district, which has more than 200 informants.

    “They are all enthusiastic residents wearing red sleeves, or shop owners. When they are buying food or out walking, whenever they spot something suspicious, they would report it immediately to community police,” the article said.

    There’s even a 24-hour patrol team consisting of 70 people that are alert to everything in the community.

    In 2017, the Beijing police launched a mobile phone application called “Chaoyang Public”, which allows residents to upload pictures and descriptions with one click and allows the police to send alerts and notify people of other cases being investigated.

    According to a 2018 article by the Beijing Municipal Political and Legal Affairs Committee of the Communist Party of China, there are roughly 190,000 volunteers in Chaoyang district that serve to protect public security, which is roughly 5 per cent of the district population. Together, they provide more than 20,000 tips to the police every month.

    This is a targeted arrest. Has anyone checked this person's Chinese social media accounts for reasons this takedown took place?

    The first word that comes up when thinking of China is whores. Whores everywhere. Whores, Whores, Whores. I believe that China has the biggest number of whores per capita in the world. Whores at the KTV, whores in shady apartments, whores on social media/dating apps

    Likewise whoring is relatively socially accepted. 'going to the KTV'  might as well be rebranded going to the whorehouse. We all know what takes place there.

    So yeah this dude soliciting prostitutes is just a phony charge. Whores are part of Chinese culture, as are mistresses and second wives (unofficial of course) for rich business men and Party officials.

    He did something wrong and had to. Put in place. Simple as.

    As for this system, it's nothing new. For instance, it's Chinese law that every company over the size of five has at least on CCP member who is mandated to write reports about coworkers and developments within the company. That includes the personal opinions of individuals. This stasi like structure is in my opinion more effective than AI and their surveillance network
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    Post  sundoesntrise Thu Oct 28, 2021 9:47 am

    Just want to make clear bytheway that traditional Chinese culture is pretty prude. It's still not uncommon for Chinese girls to preserve their virginity until marriage. There has been a sexual revolution in the last 15 years but it now seems that Xi JinPing and his main ideologue Wang Huning (read his books!) want to stop the Western/Jewish perversion of their young people

    But whores are a different matter. According to St. Augustine and Fransisico de Assisi every society needs whores as a means for the bottom 20 percent of the male population to blow off steam. A lesser evil. Whores are abundant in China
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    Post  higurashihougi Thu Oct 28, 2021 1:06 pm

    You can see mistresses, second wives and prostitution in almost everywhere, both in the West and the East. We have mistresses of Louis XIV the Sun King and the male favourites of Ekaterina II the Great.

    Multiple wives are accepted custom in certain culture, region, or historical era, but even in countries where only monogamy is officialy accepted, the powerful and rich people are always able to have multiple ways to achieve sex slaves and multiple mistresses.

    In the worlds where some people are powerful and dominate over everyone, and the majority are powerless and vulnerable, somebody is going to sell their body to have three meals a day, somebody is aiming to be the mistresses of powerful figures to have a good future, somebody is going to sell their daughters into arranged marriages, and somebody is going to have a huge harem.
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    Post  The-thing-next-door Thu Oct 28, 2021 5:41 pm

    higurashihougi wrote:You can see mistresses, second wives and prostitution in almost everywhere, both in the West and the East. We have mistresses of Louis XIV the Sun King and the male favourites of Ekaterina II the Great.

    Multiple wives are accepted custom in certain culture, region, or historical era, but even in countries where only monogamy is officialy accepted, the powerful and rich people are always able to have multiple ways to achieve sex slaves and multiple mistresses.

    In the worlds where some people are powerful and dominate over everyone, and the majority are powerless and vulnerable, somebody is going to sell their body to have three meals a day, somebody is aiming to be the mistresses of powerful figures to have a good future, somebody is going to sell their daughters into arranged marriages, and somebody is going to have a huge harem.

    You watch too much anime.

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    Post  sundoesntrise Fri Oct 29, 2021 1:02 am

    It's just US liberal perversion rubbing off

    It's a mix of sexual deviancy and moral relativism.
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    Post  TMA1 Fri Oct 29, 2021 3:25 am

    Sick of it. Our politicians that we voted for are the cause and we only have our greed and graff to blame for the decline of the west. I dont trust the leadership in China one bit and loathe the growing might in China. That said it is our fault that this happened. Now we have to triage and find out how to fix the mess we are in.
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    Post  sundoesntrise Fri Oct 29, 2021 4:59 am

    They were never your politicians to start with. Nor did voting at any point in time really matter - aside from 2016 of course and we all know what happened after that.

    Consider it part of the 5 stages of grief. And never forgot who is responsible for this.

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    Post  GarryB Fri Oct 29, 2021 12:18 pm

    It was all very simple... when truth and justice stopped being the American way you turned to lies and revenge, so of course you ended up in a mess and are leading the entire west with you.

    All the talk about Trump being Putins puppet was amusing... what the US needs is Putin in charge.... he is pro Russia and pro Russians but that does not mean he wants to see all other countries collapse and suffer to make Russia feel better about its problems... in many ways he is more idealised American than Americans.

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    higurashihougi
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    Post  higurashihougi Sun Oct 31, 2021 1:38 pm

    The-thing-next-door wrote:You watch too much anime.

    Prostitutes, mistresses, multiple wifes (official or non-official), courtesans, sugar datings, sexual abuse from superiors,... are not exclusive to anime and are not exclusive to a certain country or region.

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    Post  The-thing-next-door Sun Oct 31, 2021 4:11 pm

    higurashihougi wrote:
    Prostitutes, mistresses, multiple wifes (official or non-official), courtesans, sugar datings, sexual abuse from superiors,... are not exclusive to anime and are not exclusive to a certain country or region.

    Perhaps, but the level of prevalence you implied most certainly is exclusive to anime.

    It seems that your understanding of the world is distorted by your excessive viewing of the genre.

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