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    Indian Su-30MKI: News

    Pinto
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    Indian Su-30MKI: News - Page 13 Empty India Wants to Make Russia’s Su-30MKI Air Superiority Fighter Great Again

    Post  Pinto on Sun Nov 10, 2019 4:56 pm

    Indications in recent months suggest that the upgrade program for India’s fleet of Su-30MKI fighters is finally gathering pace. The Indian Air Force (IAF) has so far placed orders for 272 aircraft, of which 50 were delivered by Russia in 2002-2004 and 2007. Another 222 are to be supplied by the HAL Corporation; production under Russian license began at HAL’s Indian facilities in 2004. So far, more than 200 planes have already been delivered, and the Su-30MKI is the most numerous of the multirole fighters currently in service with the IAF.


    Even though the Su-30MKI is one of the most advanced of the Generation 4+ fighters in service with the IAF, the need for its upgrade is becoming ever more obvious. The first of the planes built to the current specification were delivered to India back in 2004. Since then, a lot of new technology has become available in Russia, India, and other markets, including advanced new radars, air-launched missiles and bombs.


    Retrofitting the plane with this new hardware can make it much more capable. In fact, the Su-30 platform itself is extremely well suited for all kinds of upgrades, from fairly conservative to the most radical because the plane has a two-seater cockpit and can accommodate a lot of bulky and heavy additional equipment.


    For a long time, the only thing we knew about the proposed Su-30MKI upgrades was the name of the program: Sukhoi Super 30. There was no information about the technical specifications, timeline or costs. Commentators often confuse Sukhoi Super 30 with another upgrade program that aims to integrate the Su-30MKI with the air-launched version of the BrahMos anti-ship cruise missile. These are in fact two independent and unrelated projects. BrahMos will be installed on only 40-42 planes. The program has already reached a fairly advanced phase of flight-testing to ascertain mechanical compatibility of the BrahMos-A air-launched missile with a reinforced Su-30MKI airframe. Live missile launches are due to commence very shortly. The Sukhoi Super 30 program, on the other hand, will be rolled out to the entire Indian fleet of Su-30MKI fighters; it has yet to begin in earnest, and up until recently, there was very little information about it in the public domain.


    Recently, however, the influential Indian newspaper The Hindu reported that in July 2016 Russia and India held consultations on Sukhoi Super 30, and that they hoped to sign a deal very soon. Another well informed newspaper, The Economic Times, reported that the technical requirements would be finalized by the year’s end, and that the contract would be signed in early 2017. The estimated cost of the program is $7-8 billion. It is therefore clear that the program is still at the very early stages, and that the Sukhoi Super 30 technical specifications have yet to be agreed. One of the central issues in the upcoming discussions will certainly be the use of local suppliers as part of the Indian government’s Make in India industrial policy.


    The Specifics of Indian Procurement Policy :-


    The original Su-30MKI program was implemented at lighting speed, by Indian standards. The upgrade program, however, has been making glacial progress, which is fairly normal for the Indian defense procurement system. After Russia introduced the original Su-30MKI proposal, it took only three years to sign the first contract. The proposal was submitted in December 1993 during a visit to India by representatives of the Irkutsk Aircraft Plant and the Sukhoi Design Bureau; the contract was signed in November 1996. Incidentally, the final technical specifications of the Su-30MKI were very different from the Su-30K Russia had originally tried to sell to India. The differences concerned not just avionics but even the platform itself.


    The Su-30MKI program still remains unprecedented in terms of the time it took to implement. Most of the Indian aerospace programs are very slow. They include, for example, the Mirage 2000 and MiG-29 upgrades. Such upgrades, however, appear to be the best way for the IAF to bolster its fighting ability, especially in view of the budget constraints and the ongoing paralysis of the tender procedures that prevent the IAF from increasing the number of its squadrons to 45. Upgrading the existing planes obviates the need for increasing the already excessive number of various plane models in service with the IAF. Upgrade programs are also cheaper than buying new planes, and they are fully in line with the government’s Make in India policy.


    The languid pace of decision-making on the IAF upgrade programs may be a reflection of India’s fundamental cultural patterns and of the additional red tape introduced by the DPP mechanism. Back in the 2000s, the IAF had a clear superiority over the Pakistani Air Force (PAF) by every possible measure, and it compensated for the Chinese Air Force’s greater numbers by superior technology (thanks primarily to the rapid implementation of the Su-30MKI program). Slow and deliberate decision-making therefore did not pose any major military-political risks, and it did help to keep costs under control. With the existing balance of military power and technology at the time, there was no pressing need for the Indian MoD to rush the procurement of new planes or the upgrades of the existing ones, so its relaxed approach was entirely rational.


    Now, however, the situation is completely different. Pakistan has received up-to-date versions of America’s F-16 fighters and dozens of the Chinese-Pakistani FC-1 planes. What was once India’s complete dominance over the Pakistani Air Force has become a mere superiority. In fact, Pakistan may well achieve near-parity over time if it receives J-10 fighters from China (as well as the J-31, the quasi-5th generation fighter now being developed by the Chinese). Such near-parity between the IAF and the PAF would be completely unprecedented.


    The power balance with the Chinese Air Force is an even greater worry for India. In the 1990s and early 2000s China bought 76 Su-27SK/UBK fighters and 100 Su-30MKK/MK2 fighters from Russia. It quickly built another 105 Su-27SK planes under Russian license, and then launched production of its own clones of these planes without bothering with the license. All of these planes represented early 1980s technology – but now China is about to start receiving the latest Russian Su-35 fighters. It is also working on its own quasi-5th generation fighter programs. As a result, the Chinese Air Force will catch up with the Indian Air Force in terms of technology, while also maintaining its impressive numerical superiority. India’s old defense procurement model, in which seven to 10 years is required merely to prepare a contract, has therefore become obsolete and unsustainable.


    There is a pressing need for speeding up the Su-30MKI program in order to restore the Indian Air Force’s technological superiority over the Chinese. Essentially, India needs to pull off the same trick it did in the mid-1990s, when it responded to China’s mass procurement of Su-27/30 fighters with the original Su-30MKI program. Two decades on, India needs to respond to China’s Su-35 and J-31 jets with the Sukhoi Super 30.


    Upgrade options:-


    The choice of the specific upgrade option will represent some kind of compromise between the price tag, the time frame, and the capability of the upgraded plane. In theory, this leaves a broad variety of technological solutions on the table. The most conservative solution – which is also the cheapest and quickest – would be to roll out to the entire Su-30MKI fleet the improvements already incorporated in the latest versions of the plane. The Su-30MKI is the oldest member of the family that also includes the Malaysian Su-30MKM (the 2007 model), and the Russian Su-30SM (the 2011 model). A conservative upgrade option would include a limited number of additional self-defense systems (similar to the ones used in the Malaysian model), as well as the numerous new missiles and smart bombs that are now being developed as part of the Russian 2020 State Armament Program for the Su-30SM. The conservative approach would essentially bring the Su-30MKI up to the Su-30SM level.


    Meanwhile, the most radical upgrade option would be to develop an equivalent of America’s Silent Eagle fighter. This option would include replacing most of the plane’s systems. Most importantly, its passive phased array radar would be replaced with an active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar. Changes would also be made to the plane’s airframe to reduce its radar cross-section. The obvious drawback of this option is the high cost and the long time it would take to implement.


    Finally, the most realistic option that would deliver great returns in terms of the plane’s capability without costing too much or taking too much time sits somewhere in the middle. It includes a deep upgrade of the plane’s N-011M Bars radar and integration of the latest Russian and Indian-made electronics, optics and infrared systems without modifications to the airframe.


    It would also make sense to implement the Su-30MKI upgrade program in several batches of 50-55 planes, with each successive batch incorporating more complex technology. Such an approach was mentioned as a possibility by Yuri Beliy, chief of the NIIP Tikhomirov company, the developer of the Bars radar. Speaking in an interview, Beliy said that the first phase of the program could include upgrading the Bars radar to give it a greater range, higher resolution, better jamming resistance, and support for new weapons systems. At a later phase, the Bars radar could be equipped with an active phased array. The planes upgraded in the first batch could later be brought to the technical standard of the latest batches without any major difficulties.


    The approach would make it possible to start the program quickly (thereby securing orders for India’s HAL and other local suppliers). It would improve the IAF’s capability in an evolutionary way, and it would be easier on the IAF pilots, who will not have to deal with a quantum leap in the complexity of the upgraded plane’s systems. Such a phased strategy worked well in 2002-2004, when Russia delivered the first 32 Su-30MKI planes. The fighters were supplied in three batches of 10, 12 and 10. Each successive batch included some improvements that were later incorporated in the previous batches, so all 32 planes were eventually brought to the same standard.


    When the Su-30MKI specifications were being drawn up, the Indian military came up with an extremely well-balanced set of requirements for the new plane. Those requirements were at the cutting edge of – but not beyond – the Russian defense industry’s capability at the time, and could be implemented at a reasonable cost and within reasonable deadlines. It is to be hoped that a similarly well-balanced solution will be found for the Sukhoi Super 30 program.

    http://idrw.org/india-wants-to-make-russias-su-30mki-air-superiority-fighter-great-again/
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    Post  ahmedfire on Sun Apr 05, 2020 11:47 pm

    Why India is going to use ASRAAM  instead of R-73 on SU-30

    Question


    EXCLUSIVE: IAF Arming Su-30s With ASRAAMs, May Standardise Missile Across Fleet
    Isos
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    Post  Isos on Mon Apr 06, 2020 12:36 am

    ahmedfire wrote:

    Why India is going to use ASRAAM  instead of R-73 on SU-30

    Question


    EXCLUSIVE: IAF Arming Su-30s With ASRAAMs, May Standardise Missile Across Fleet

    Unlikely to happen. Sukhoi already said no. If india goes for ASRAAM, Russia can just double the prices of spare part and make the mki useless.

    They should better buy some datalink to connect their fleet instead of useless british missiles.
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    Post  GarryB on Mon Apr 06, 2020 3:29 am

    R-73 is not a new missile, though it is rather capable.

    It wont be long before its replacement appears in the Russian AF, which will probably be the 9M100 missile that is a cross services missile, used in the Army and Air Force as a short range self defence missile on the S-350 SAM, in the navy on the Redut air defence system as a fire and forget IIR guided CIWS missile, and of course by the Air Force as a short range air to air missile and anti missile missile for aircraft, helicopters, heavy drones (smaller drones will likely use Verba or Igla-S) and bombers (PAK DA is supposed to carry these AAMs for self defence from aircraft and missiles (SAM and AAM)).

    Perhaps they have jumped the gun or are they trying to force the Russians to release the missile early as a counter offer?

    They didn't accelerate the Il-476 or Il-106 to counter the C-17 purchase nor the Mi-28NM programme to counter the Apache deal... so I guess Indian aircraft will get ASRAAM instead.

    So likely to happen but not to Indias benefit...
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    Post  jhelb on Mon Apr 06, 2020 11:15 am

    GarryB wrote:so I guess Indian aircraft will get ASRAAM instead.
    That story is a year old and that reporter like several Indian reporters are on the payroll of US and EU.

    More importantly, how will those Indians integrate a European missile on the Su 30MKI without Russian assistance? They don't have that kind of know how.

    Do those Indians even realize how stupid they sound when they make such idiotic claims? Can't even design a AESA radar for their fighter nor a decent Air to Air missile and yet with their screwdriver tech they will integrate ASRAAM with Su 30MKI.

    No wonder some of the biggest asshats posting on this forum are also from India.
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    Post  ahmedfire on Mon Apr 06, 2020 1:05 pm

    Perhaps they have jumped the gun or are they trying to force the Russians to release the missile early as a counter offer?

    Or they prefer the western A-A missiles like Meteor ,Python,Derby and ASRAAM.
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    Post  magnumcromagnon on Mon Apr 06, 2020 2:34 pm

    ahmedfire wrote:
    Perhaps they have jumped the gun or are they trying to force the Russians to release the missile early as a counter offer?

    Or they prefer the western A-A missiles like Meteor ,Python,Derby and ASRAAM.

    When they prefer Western products usually cronyism and kickbacks are involved, you wouldn't believe how many bribery and corruption cases have been publicized in India over the last 50 years. There seems to be a major bribery case every 8 years at least.
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    Post  GarryB on Tue Apr 07, 2020 6:00 am

    That story is a year old and that reporter like several Indian reporters are on the payroll of US and EU.

    It is OK... the R-73 is a good missile and I am sure they will continue to buy some simply because they will be much cheaper than ASRAAM and will still be fine for the majority of targets they need to engage... I mean shooting down cheap drones would not require ASRAAM and they certainly wont use bigger heavier more expensive missile types... so having some R-73s and even some R-60s if they still use them makes sense...

    More importantly, how will those Indians integrate a European missile on the Su 30MKI without Russian assistance? They don't have that kind of know how.

    They probably don't have the authority to integrate things on their own... most contracts don't allow the customers to fiddle with the systems because there is so much there they can break... so Russia will know when they want to integrate the ASRAAM because they will likely get the job to do it.

    Do those Indians even realize how stupid they sound when they make such idiotic claims? Can't even design a AESA radar for their fighter nor a decent Air to Air missile and yet with their screwdriver tech they will integrate ASRAAM with Su 30MKI.

    Don't know about the Su-30MKI but the Su-35 is supposed to be plug and play... in other words it is built to specific hard ware standards and so if you follow those standards it should be fine. It will of course be a HATO design so probably not designed to exact standards but a software driver would be used to tell the aircraft what the missile is and how it works and what information it needs from the radar and IRST and also what information the missile can provide to the system like a video signal of the target from its imaging IR seeker and any datalink it might need to work...

    Would be interesting what the Russians might learn integrating the missile... Twisted Evil

    Or they prefer the western A-A missiles like Meteor ,Python,Derby and ASRAAM.

    Perfectly possible, but their kill rate with these missiles is zero at the moment isn't it?

    The last engagement between Pakistan and India involved a strike by M2Ks with one MiG-21 confirmed by everyone to have been shot down, but I don't remember any reports of the M2Ks doing that well and considering they are multirole aircraft why did they need MiG-21 fighter cover especially when the MiG-21 does not carry any of those western wonder weapons...

    When they prefer Western products usually cronyism and kickbacks are involved, you wouldn't believe how many bribery and corruption cases have been publicized in India over the last 50 years. There seems to be a major bribery case every 8 years at least.

    Don't be silly... there is no corruption in the west... I am sure you are just mistaking consultation fees as bribes...

    Hope it does not cost too many Indian pilots their lives...
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    Post  jhelb on Tue Apr 07, 2020 11:47 am

    GarryB wrote:
    Perfectly possible, but their kill rate with these missiles is zero at the moment isn't it?

    Python 5 has too many fins for its enhanced maneuvering. It causes aerodynamic problems like flutter on the aircraft.

    ASRAAM's finless design uses thrust vectoring. Very clean with Longer range.


    GarryB wrote:Hope it does not cost too many Indian pilots their lives...

    Those piss-ant Hindus will give up without a fight. Laughing Laughing Cowardice is in their DNA.

    Look what happened this week. Indian government had banned the export of Hydroxychloroquine so that people in India suffering from Covid-19 can be treated.

    Y'day Trump Threatened India with consequences if they do not export Hydroxychloroquine to USA. Guess what happened. India resumed export within 24 hrs

    https://www.newsweek.com/india-narendra-modi-set-supply-hydroxychloroquine-us-donald-trump-threatens-retaliation-1496490


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    Post  JohninMK on Tue Apr 07, 2020 11:56 am

    "
    Would be interesting what the Russians might learn integrating the missile"

    Nailed it there Garry. Those Western countries are really keen to hand over their interface specifications. Shocked

    They would show both sides of the connection. They'd find low cost Russian missiles on their F-16 next Laughing
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    Post  GarryB on Tue Apr 07, 2020 12:27 pm


    Python 5 has too many fins for its enhanced maneuvering. It causes aerodynamic problems like flutter on the aircraft.

    ASRAAM's finless design uses thrust vectoring. Very clean with Longer range.

    Funny... I doubt you could have too many fins on a missile... for the Python 5 they are the control surfaces that stabilise the missile in flight (so it does not fly tail first) and also enable the missile to manouver to follow a target so they are quite essential.

    The R-73 uses thrust vectoring AND control fins... the thrust vectoring means the missile can turn very very hard on launch and together with high off boresight angles for its seeker you would be very hard pressed to outmanouver this missile.

    The ASRAAM uses the minimum of fins and relies on thrust vectoring which means when the rocket motor burns out its ability to chase targets drops to minimum which very much limits its ability to chase down targets.

    Ironic the R-73 is the best of both worlds in that it can still manouver with fins after the motor runs out and it probably has a greater actual effective range than either the Python 5 or the ASRAAM... it is a very potent missile... but someone clearly believes the infomercial regarding the European missile...

    Look what happened this week. Indian government had banned the export of Hydroxychloroquine so that people in India suffering from Covid-19 can be treated.

    Y'day Trump Threatened India with consequences if they do not export Hydroxychloroquine to USA. Guess what happened. India resumed export within 24 hrs

    Russian railways international gave in to US sanctions regarding making rail lines in Iran... it is not about bravery or cowardice... it is about dollars and how much it could cost them... they might have resumed export but they might also have tripled the price...

    They would show both sides of the connection. They'd find low cost Russian missiles on their F-16 next

    Well there is Venezuela and Pakistan and now Turkey with F-16s that could do with upgrades... imagine a 14 ton thrust Al-41 in the F-16... or an 18 ton thrust later model engine... I am sure Kret could whip up an electronic suite... AESA radar and all new digital Russian electronics....
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    Post  jhelb on Tue Apr 07, 2020 1:32 pm

    GarryB wrote:
    Russian railways international gave in to US sanctions regarding making rail lines in Iran... it is not about bravery or cowardice... it is about dollars and how much it could cost them... they might have resumed export but they might also have tripled the price...

    Russia did not yield to US pressure, else today we would have been flooded with coronavirus patients exported by US and EU. Re Russian railways the project in Iran was not viable. Moreover Iran could not make arrangements for payment. So Russia cannot be compared to India, ever.

    India on the other hand recently got its ass kicked twice first by China at Doklam, Bhutan and last year by Pakistan.

    And here is more evidence of India's cowardice spelt out by one of their foremost strategic analyst. Bite by kilometer-size bite, China is eating away at India’s Himalayan borderlands for decades. India has lost nearly 2,000 sq. km to PLA encroachments over the last decade.

    https://www.japantimes.co.jp/opinion/2017/06/19/commentary/world-commentary/countering-chinas-high-altitude-land-grab/#.XoyBnXLhVPZ

    Can you imagine China trying to do something similar with Russia? They tried once in the 60s. But were convincingly defeated by Russia.
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    Post  ahmedfire on Tue Apr 07, 2020 11:35 pm

    Perfectly possible, but their kill rate with these missiles is zero at the moment isn't it?

    Yes .

    I guess Indians need IIR seekers which R-73 lacks .

    AFAIK , IR sees only the exhaust from the engine but IIR sees a complete picture of the aircraft just like a normal picture but in the IR mode and can even detect the slightly heated areas on the aircraft body and zoom on to the target and will be less foolded by flares and locking onto the sun which one of the tricks to avoid heat-seeking missiles .

    Of course Russians developed R-74M/M2 with IIR seeker but i'm not sure it's ready for export or not .
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    Post  GarryB on Wed Apr 08, 2020 6:37 am

    Yes .

    I guess Indians need IIR seekers which R-73 lacks .

    AFAIK , IR sees only the exhaust from the engine but IIR sees a complete picture of the aircraft just like a normal picture but in the IR mode and can even detect the slightly heated areas on the aircraft body and zoom on to the target and will be less foolded by flares and locking onto the sun which one of the tricks to avoid heat-seeking missiles .

    Of course Russians developed R-74M/M2 with IIR seeker but i'm not sure it's ready for export or not .

    Yeah, I know all about IIR WVR missile seekers... they were supposed to make the missiles into Hittiles... they certainly jack up the price... but recently in Syria the Americans used their AIM-9X which has an IIR seeker and it missed... it was fooled by the flares launched by a Syrian Su-22...

    R-73 seems to still get kills when used properly... and it is probably much cheaper than ASRAAM.

    I remember the panic in the 1990s... all through the 80s they were talking about new missiles to replace Sparrow/Skyflash and Sidewinder and they had ASRAAM and AMRAAM programmes but they thought it was going to be expensive and Soviet fighters are rubbish with their robot pilots who didn't know how to dogfight... and then the cold war ended and they got to fly against German pilots in MiG-29s and got their asses handed to them and in the ensuing panic demanded the AMRAAM programme be be focussed on as a top priority because going against the Russians with R-73 and helmet mounted cueing systems would be suicide... one all at the very best, so they decided the solution was not to get within dogfight range or even use AMRAAM at dogfight ranges.

    The original agreement was that the British would develop the WVR missile... ASRAAM, while the Americans would develop the BVR missile AMRAAM and all of NATO would use ASRAAM for WVR and AMRAAM for BVR combat, but as usual the Americans broke the deal and upgraded their Sidewinders.

    They did the same with the FN FAL rifle and M14 rifle and 7.62 x 51mm cartridge...


    Last edited by GarryB on Thu Apr 16, 2020 5:54 am; edited 1 time in total
    Isos
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    Post  Isos on Wed Apr 08, 2020 9:01 am

    IIR is stil using IR so flares used correctly, between the plane and the chasing missile will hide the plane.

    Western flares tends to through the flares away from the aircraft while the russian's flares are launched in the same direction.
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    Post  GarryB on Thu Apr 09, 2020 4:30 am

    IIR is stil using IR so flares used correctly, between the plane and the chasing missile will hide the plane.

    Well the difference is substantial... like the difference between a thermal imager and a PIR in the corner of the room. The PIR detects the presence of IR radiation... normally body heat. With a thermal imager you get an image of the field of view so you can identify objects in view.

    For a PIR a flare would activate it, but for a thermal imager the flare would be a visible spot... not as bright as we see it because it gives off a lot of visible light, but the TI can't see that light... only the fact that it is rather hot.

    For an IR guided missile it was locked on a pattern of hot spots that make up the target... when the target releases flares it sees lots more hot spots and the intent is to get it to follow the flare hotspots and ignore the aircraft hot spots... which are less intense because most are not as hot as a flare.

    For an IIR guided missile it can see the aircraft as an object... in fact one of the sales pitches suggested the pilot could select the part of the aircraft to target from the wings or tail or cockpit canopy... the aircraft releasing flares should in theory, just mean it starts releasing a stream of visible dots or heat spots... but it is not locked on heat spots... it is locked on an aircraft.

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    Post  Isos on Thu Apr 09, 2020 9:00 am

    I mean if the flares are BETWEEN the aircraft and the attacking missile then it will be affected. IIR is still using IR frequency but with better and different processing allowing to record like a camera. But flares will still produce a huge and brightful image and if they are between the aircraft and the missile then the missile can loose the track.

    If the missile comes from the sides then it will always see the fighter and most likely hit, if it's not affected by its evasive maneuvres.
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    Post  GarryB on Thu Apr 09, 2020 2:06 pm

    No, that is not how thermal imagers work... what is super bright and over powering is the light... IIR doesn't see normal visible light... otherwise Shtora could just be a simple flare launcher or fixed flares.

    An IIR sees objects based on the temperature they are... so a burning flare the size of a golf ball might burn really bright and look basket ball or bigger in size to a camera or TV screen, but to that thermal imager it is a golf ball sized dot coloured the colour representing that temperature... if they assign blue to represent temperatures over 800 degrees C then it will be a blue dot... releasing a hundred flares means 100 blue dots the size of golf balls.

    Shtora is like a lamp that operates in the IR frequencies... it actually generates light in the IR wavelengths so it is like trying to see a candle in the middle of a 5 million candle power spot light... that sounds like what you want to suggest a flare does to a thermal imager... it does not.

    With old first generation image intensification scopes that magnify light a camera flash or bright light will damage the scope. Shining a very bright light at a second gen scope will make it turn off or create a bright halo so you can't see in that direction... Proper IR lights are not cheap and would have serious problems overwhelming an imaging system.


    The Shtora shines bright IR radiation at an ATGM launcher like Milan or TOW or HOT or Faggot or Konkurs. These ATGMs use an IR sensor to detect a flare in the back of the missiles to locate them in the field of view... when it detects them it calculates their distance from the centre of the view and generates the flight corrections needed to move the missile from where ever it is to the centre of the view (where the crosshairs are)... and it sends those commands down the wire to the missile. Pointing a TOW missile at a T-90 with Shtora activated defeats the TOW missile because to guide the missile it has to gather it... find the IR spot of the missile in the field of view and manouver it to the centre of the field of view... as the missile approaches the target the sensor has to look at the target and with Shtora on shining two very bright IR lamps at the IR sensor in the launcher the IR sensor loses sight of the missile... like looking for a candle in the beam of a spotlight, so it can no longer determine where the missile is in its field of view... the missile will veer off because they are totally unstable, but the launcher wont see that and the missile will just fly in to the ground and miss the target.

    Would not work if the IR missile tracking sensor used an IIR sensor but they don't because IR sensors are cheaper and simpler than IIR and it didn't need an IIR sensor before Shtora.
    ahmedfire
    ahmedfire

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    Post  ahmedfire on Wed Apr 15, 2020 6:40 pm

    Did Soviets/Russians Used Air Combat Maneuvering Instrumentation pod before ?

    That one was early used by US and west but i didn't see any photo of Russian aircraft using ACMI pod, any alternatives ?

    Indonesia equipping Su-30s with ACMI pods; plans to reverse-engineer C-705 missile
    GarryB
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    Post  GarryB on Thu Apr 16, 2020 6:04 am

    Not that I am aware of...


    The S-400 radars provided fairly detailed information regarding the Syrian shootdown of the Russian Intel aircraft and the location and actions of the Israeli aircraft involved in the incident... so I suspect they are able to track targets and understand air to air interactions fairly well without needing individual aircraft to carry external sat nav transponders to locate them and track their movements.

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