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    United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  Russian Patriot on Sun Sep 27, 2009 12:24 pm

    Yuma air station UAS runway completed

    US Marine Corps News

    9/25/2009 By Lance Cpl. Austin Hazard , Marine Corps Air Station Yuma

    Marine Wing Support Squadron 374 finished constructing a new unmanned aircraft systems runway at the Chocolate Mountain Aerial Gunnery Range, Calif., Sept. 21, 2009.

    The runway is the first built specifically for UASs on the station’s ranges and will open up new training opportunities for Marine unmanned aerial vehicle squadrons participating in future Weapons and Tactics Instructor courses.

    MWSS-374, from Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, Calif., built the runway as a pretraining mission before WTI, which the squadron participated in as soon as the project was completed.

    Before the runway was constructed, UAS squadrons were limited to the Tactical Aircrew Combat Training System airfield on the Barry M. Goldwater Range, east of Yuma.

    “The Marine Corps’ main UAS is the RQ-7B Shadow, which needs a runway to land,” said Maj. Chris Coble, Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron 1 UAS division head. “Because of airspace restrictions, we couldn’t get the Shadow out to the Chocolate Mountain range for those exercises, so those Marines were missing out on that training.”

    While the squadrons were still able to train at the TACTS range, the more valuable training takes place at the Chocolate Mountains.

    “It’s good training (at the Goldwater range), but the Chocolate Mountain range is better because it’s an actual live ordnance range,” said Coble. “At the Barry M. Goldwater Range, you cannot employ large ordnance. They’re restricted to inert ordnance. This runway is going to increase our training potential dramatically for VMUs for WTI.”

    Construction of the 75-by-1,000-foot strip began Sept. 14, with 28 MWSS-374 Marines and six heavy construction vehicles assigned to the project.

    Two 50-by-100-foot pads were also built at the center of the runway’s length on each side. These pads will be used for the Shadow’s crossbow-like UAS launcher and the ground support post where the Marines will control the UAS.

    “We started out by knocking down berms, hills – the big stuff – trying to get it pretty much level so we could start building it up,” said Sgt. Kardell Anderson, MWSS-374 project supervisor for the runway. “It’s a pretty simple project. The hardest part is staying within the boundaries. In Iraq, this is what we did most of the time.”

    Once the ground was cleared, Anderson drove a grater to smooth and level the strip.

    With the strip prepared for building, MWSS-374 laid a foundation using rocks from the surrounding area.

    “We used the rock to make a solid sub-base to build up from,” said Chief Warrant Officer 2 Patrick Korn, MWSS-374 heavy equipment platoon commander. “We layered the materials we had and gave them the best product we could.”

    Layers of dirt were added on top of the rocks and packed in. More layers were added until the strip was the desired height. The runway was built up approximately 18 inches higher than the surrounding area to allow for runoff, minimizing future rain damage.

    To finalize the project, the Marines applied a layer of adhesive construction material, better known as “rhino snot,” over the entire strip to bind and protect it from the elements.

    The Twentynine Palms-based VMU-1 will be the first squadron to use the runway in their training during the current WTI.

    The runway, however, is not built to support all unmanned aerial systems. Due to its lightweight, simple construction, the runway cannot support any systems larger than the Shadow, nor can it support any manned aircraft.

    http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/news/2009/09/mil-090925-mcn03.htm


    This means our Far East radars and Air defense must be ready for American spy drones...

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    US Marines identify 'urination' troops

    Post  Russian Patriot on Thu Jan 12, 2012 8:31 pm

    At least two of four US Marines shown in a video appearing to urinate on Taliban corpses have been identified, a Marine Corps official has told the BBC.

    The video, which was posted online, purports to show four US Marines standing over the bodies of several Taliban fighters, at least one of whom is covered in blood.

    The Marines have begun a criminal investigation and an internal inquiry.

    US officials and Afghan officials have condemned the video as "deplorable".

    The origin of the video is not known, but it was originally posted to YouTube.

    The BBC's Steve Kingstone says the official would not confirm the Marines' whereabouts, but reports suggested the unit involved was based at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina - a major military base.

    US media reported that the unit belonged to the 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment.

    That battalion has been deployed to a wide range of combat and peacekeeping situations, from Iraq, Afghanistan and Guantanamo Bay to fighting wildfires in Idaho.

    The unit deployed to Afghanistan in early 2011 and returned in September or October, CNN reported.

    A US Marines spokesman, Lt Col Joseph Plenzler, told the AFP news agency that "we cannot release the name of the unit at this time since the incident is being investigated."
    'Total dismay'

    Earlier, US Defence Secretary Leon Panetta condemned the acts shown in the video and vowed that a full investigation would be carried out by the Marines and the Kabul-based International Security Assistance Force (Isaf).

    "This conduct is entirely inappropriate for members of the United States military," Mr Panetta said in a statement.

    Hillary Clinton was one of several US officials to condemn the video

    The US defence secretary said he had seen the footage, and the Pentagon confirmed that he had spoken by telephone with Afghan President Hamid Karzai.

    Mr Karzai condemned the attacks in strong terms.

    "I find the behaviour depicted in it utterly deplorable. This conduct is entirely inappropriate for members of the United States military," he said.

    In a separate news conference, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton expressed her "total dismay" at the video.

    Mrs Clinton said she shared Mr Panetta's view that such behaviour was inconsistent with the standards "that [the] vast, vast majority of our personnel - particularly our marines - hold themselves to".

    The video did not change the nature of US efforts to secure Afghanistan, she said, saying the US continued to support security and reconciliation efforts that were "Afghan-led and Afghan-owned".


    The Obama administration is in full-on damage limitation mode. The Pentagon issued a swift and strongly worded condemnation of the apparent abuse, and has highlighted the defence secretary's apologetic phone call to President Karzai.

    Clearly, this is an embarrassment for an administration which pledged to project a more sensitive image of US military power. The timing is also problematic, to say the least.

    The best-case scenario for the administration is that an inquiry quickly roots out the wrongdoers. And, of course, that no other videos are out there waiting to be uploaded.

    The US has about 20,000 Marines deployed in Afghanistan, based mostly in Kandahar and Helmand provinces. In total, about 90,000 US troops are on the ground in Afghanistan.

    The Taliban said last week that they were working to set up a political office, possibly in Qatar, that would help to facilitate negotiations with the Afghan government and Nato countries.

    US special envoy Marc Grossman will go to Qatar and Afghanistan next week in support of further talks.

    Taliban spokesman Qari Yousuf Ahmadi told the BBC that this was not the first time Americans had carried out such a "wild action" and that Taliban attacks on the Americans would continue.

    But a different Taliban spokesman, Zabihullah Mujahid, said the video "is not a political process, so the video will not harm our talks and prisoner exchange because they are at the preliminary stage".

    The Taliban are known for applying a ruthless brand of Islamic Sharia law in areas they control and have carried out many suicide bombings and attacks which have killed civilians.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-16538159

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  George1 on Mon Jan 26, 2015 7:25 pm

    US Marine Corps is holding a contest for a new armored vehicle

    The US Marine Corps are studying the results of the request for proposals for the creation of six-wheel floating combat vehicle designed for amphibious and coastal operations.

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  George1 on Wed Mar 11, 2015 11:53 am

    US Marine Corps Hiring Russian, Ukrainian Speakers

    A military contractor is hiring 'role players of Ukrainian and/or Russian ethnicity' for US Marine Corps training.

    GTS (Glacier Technology Solutions LLC) military contractors working directly with the US Marine Corps, assisting them with their immersive simulation training programs, are looking for role players of Ukrainian and/or Russian ethnicity and language skills. Men ranging 18-65 years of age are welcome to apply for what is described as “temporary, part time, on-call work based on need and availability,” the company ad offers.

    The scheduled hours will vary from 8-12 hours per working day at $19 per hour.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/us/20150310/1019303886.html#ixzz3U5oaifI2

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  George1 on Fri Mar 13, 2015 6:24 am

    Marine 3-star defends next-gen amphibious vehicle

    The Marine Corps' top combat gear developer defended the service's next-generation amphibious vehicle on Capitol Hill Wednesday, telling lawmakers it would be preserved above all else — even as looming budget cuts threaten efforts to modernize its ground vehicle fleet.

    The Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 is critical to the service's ability to execute its traditional mission in the years ahead and is now the service's "No. 1 priority" after amphibious modernization took a back seat during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Lt. Gen. Kenneth Glueck, Marine Corps Combat Development Command's commanding general, told the members of the Senate Subcommittee on Seapower.

    "To be the Marine Corps you want and our nation needs, we need to do some vehicle modernization," Glueck said.

    The demand for expeditionary missions requiring amphibious capabilities will only increase in the years to come, he added. The ACV 1.1 will be at the heart of that mission, although some question the vehicle's inability to quickly cross long distances.

    Glueck was repeatedly questioned by lawmakers about how a new round of across-the-board spending cuts, which could hit again in October, would affect the Marine Corps' efforts to modernize its ground fleet.

    He responded by stating there was no current Marine-specific plan because any plan would be dependent on the broader national defense strategy developed under sequestration. That strategy would set forth a joint force plan that the Marine Corps would then work to fit.

    And while all of the services could face another round of tough budget cuts, Glueck and Thomas P. Dee, the deputy assistant secretary of the Navy for expeditionary programs and logistics management, expressed concern the Marine Corps would be hit disproportionately hard, despite its expenditures accounting for only 6 percent of the nation's overall defense budget.

    When asked by Sen. Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, how the service will prioritize vehicle modernization under sequestration as a result, Glueck reemphasized that the ACV 1.1 program will be preserved no matter what.

    The service will "take cuts from other programs to meet the defense strategy" before diverting resources from the procurement of the ACV 1.1, which is first in a line of next-generation amphibious vehicles that could eventually incorporate high-water speed.

    Multiple companies are now vying for the final ACV 1.1 contract with prototypes being tested in Nevada and California. But, it will likely be an eight-wheeled vehicle capable of swimming short shore-to-shore distances while providing Marines better protection than legacy vehicles.

    While critics point out that it still won't travel at a high rate of speed, Glueck argued that nearly any vehicle will likely have to rely on a connector, like the Joint High Speed Vessel, given the long standoff distances now required to protect Navy ships from inexpensive land-based missile technology.

    "We see connectors will be critical in the future for self-deployers and non-self-deployers," he said.

    The development of a vehicle that could hydroplane at a high rate of speed and bridge that distance is technically feasible, Glueck said, but would come at the cost of protection, lethality and its ability to maneuver ashore where most of the mission will occur.

    Dee said the Navy and Marine Corps will continue to look at a high-water speed capability for future iterations of the ACV, but those efforts are likely more than a decade out.

    The immediate plan calls for outfitting six battalions with 200 ACVs by 2023, and modernizing enough AAVs to outfit another four battalions. That would give the service the ability to put 10 battalions ashore during a forcible entry operation.

    Glueck also defended the vehicle against repeated questions from Hirono and the Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., the subcommittee chairman, about the Marine Corps' decision to procure a wheeled ACV, rather than a tracked vehicle.

    Because of advances in technology, including independent suspension, the wheeled ACV will provide improved maneuverability over the tracked AAV, which is more than 40 years old. Even if struck by an improvised explosive device that destroyed several tires, the next generation ACV will be able to drive out of a kill-zone, Glueck said.

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  George1 on Sat Mar 14, 2015 1:20 pm

    Commandant: USMC Modernization Is Ebbing

    WASHINGTON — The US Marine Corps' top general told lawmakers that the service's modernization account is "lower than it has been historically," and at 9 percent of his total budget, it is "one of my greatest concerns."

    In testimony at the Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on Tuesday, Gen. Joseph Dunford defended the service's procurement strategy for the Amphibious Combat Vehicle, discussed potential ammunition shortfall downrange and the possibility of upgrading individual weapons. Dunford fretted his modernization account had fallen below an optimal 12 percent of the service's budget.

    "That is actually is one of my greatest concerns," Dunford said, in response to a question from Sen. Jodi Ernst, R-Iowa. "Today, I think we're doing a pretty good job resetting our capabilities to the fight we had yesterday, but I'm not satisfied we're investing in capabilities we need for the fight tomorrow."

    With top Navy officials who testified, Dunford lamented budget instability and sequestration cuts as the Marine Corps juggles a strategic pivot to the Pacific, its presence — albeit diminished — in Afghanistan and the burgeoning fight against the Islamic State group.

    The Marine Corps has two 25-man teams in Anbar province to train Iraqi forces, troops protecting the US Embassy in Baghdad and V-22 Osprey recovery aircraft on stand-by to support anti-Islamic State airstrikes, "so that if something did happen, we would be in a position to recover aircraft and personnel," Dunford said.

    Asked about potential ammunition shortfalls there, Dunford said supplies would be at risk in a "major contingency," specifically the FGM-148 Javelin Anti-tank Missile and the High Mobility Artillery Rocket System. However, the plan is to replenish stocks from elsewhere in the arsenal.

    "There's been a decision to try to balance risk," Dunford said. "We'll always ensure our units that are forward-deployed have the wherewithal to accomplish the mission, so what we may end up doing is taking risk at home station against a major contingency."

    Ernst asked Dunford about modernization as a means of giving troops an edge, particularly in light of militants plundering M-16s and M-4s from Iraqi weapon stocks.

    "That puts us on an equal playing level with our adversaries on the ground," she said of the thefts. "Is it possible as we look at modernizing our ships and aviation platforms — within a budget, is there room to advance individual weapons systems that put us at a technological advantage?"

    "I agree with your point, but it's not just the weapon, it's the Marine behind the weapon: It's still not a fair fight even if he has the same weapons system we do," Dunford said. "To your point about increased investment in these areas, that is one of the sacrifices we made. To make sure our Marines who are forward-deployed have what we need, we had to take a risk in our capability development."

    Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., questioned the Marine Corps' strategy for one of its key acquisitions priorities, the Amphibious Combat Vehicle. Calling it an "interesting and tortured path" from the canceled Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle (EFV) to an ACV that Marines consider off-the-shelf, Reed asked Dunford, "What are you trying to accomplish by this?"

    The Marine Corps, Dunford said, sought in vain to develop a platform to replace its 40-year-old Amphibious Assault Vehicle (AAV) that could balance protection and ship-to-shore self-deploying capability at the right price.

    "The reason we are where we are is we simply couldn't reconcile those three things — the cost, the capability and the protection required against the current threat," Dunford said.

    The EFV effort had spent $3 billion in developmental funding before it was canceled in 2011 over poor reliability in operational testing and cost overruns.

    The program has since taken a phased approach to the vehicle that would travel from ship to shore via connector and may at some point in the future pursue a high-speed vehicle that could self-deploy from a ship. The first-phase vehicle would be "optimized for ground protection and mobility ashore," Dunford said.

    "Although we have asked for a vehicle that just provides adequate ground mobility and not necessarily a self-deploying vehicle, all of the individuals in the competitive process have a vehicle that may get pretty close to the second phase," Dunford said.

    Speaking with reporters afterward, Dunford said the biggest difference between phases one and two of the ACV's development will be the ability to self-deploy from a ship. There are 200 in the first phase of procurements, dubbed 1.1, and 400 in the next, called 1.2, but industry's offerings appear to bridge the two.

    "My assessment from being out there is that industry is leaning into our requirements for 1.2 even as they try to deliver 1.1, and I think they're getting pretty close," Dunford said. "It's very possible that 1.1 and 1.2 could merge together."

    The Marine Corps plans to release a request for proposals for the ACV 1.1 this month. It's envisioned as an eight-wheeled vehicle priced at $4 million to $7.5 million each. Transported offshore by connector, it would weigh 58,000 to 63,000 pounds, carry 10 troops and three crew, and be equipped with an MK-19 grenade launcher or M2 heavy machine gun.

    It would have to travel at least 3 nautical miles, negotiate waves of up to two feet, travel at a speed of 5 to 6 knots in calm waters and, on land, keep up with an M1A1 Abrams tank.

    Proposals are due in April, according to the Marine Corps' schedule. The acquisition office plans to award two engineering and manufacturing development contracts of 16 systems each in November 2016, and in 2018, down-select and go to full production.

    SAIC and partner ST Kinetics will offer a version of the Terrex vehicle, originally made in Singapore; Lockheed Martin is partnering with Finnish company Patria to modify its Havoc vehicle; General Dynamics Land Systems is offering a vehicle from its light armored vehicle III family; and BAE Systems' likely offering is based on the Iveco Super AV, according to a Congressional Research Service report.

    The president's fiscal 2016 budget request contains $219 million for the program, and the effort was funded at $105.7 million in 2015.

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  George1 on Wed Apr 08, 2015 2:18 am

    Marine Corps releases ACV 1.1 solicitation

    The Marine Corps on Monday published an updated solicitation for its future amphibious vehicle, which is designed to replace the aging fleet of Amphibious Assault Vehicles in service since the 1970s.

    The solicitation for the Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 outlines the service's requirements for what should be just the first in a line of future amphibious vehicles that will carry Marines ashore and transport them inland.

    ACV 1.1 has met criticism because it will likely be a displacement hull vehicle, meaning it bobs through the water at a low-rate of speed. Some say that makes it ineffective in an age when Navy ships deploying Marines ashore must remain up to 100 miles off shore to guard against shore-based missiles.

    But the Marine Corps has ferociously defended the ACV whose published request for proposal calls for a wheeled vehicle leaders argue is well suited to move quickly across land where the majority of missions will take place.

    Envisioned as an eight-wheeled vehicle costing up to $7.5 million each, it would seat at least 10 Marines and their combat loads and handle 2-foot waves.

    Earlier attempts to replace the AAV failed after immense cost and schedule overruns. Those efforts included the defunct Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle, in development since the 1980s, which could plane across water at a high rate of speed, but ultimately fell victim to budget cuts and program delays.

    Under the updated RFP, the Marine Corps will likely award multiple contracts. Top competitors include SAIC, Lockheed Martin, General Dynamics Land Systems and BAE Systems. The immediate plan calls for outfitting six battalions with 200 ACVs by 2023, and modernizing enough AAVs to outfit another four battalions. That would give the service the ability to put 10 battalions ashore during a forcible entry operation.

    Later versions of the ACV will offer more robust capabilities including more internal capacity and possibly even high water speed as the service once sought in the EFV.

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  max steel on Wed Apr 08, 2015 3:26 pm

    How The Marines Cheaply And Quickly Built Precision Comm-Jamming Tech

    In 2008 the USMC took dealing with the improvised explosive devices threat into their own hands and what they ended up with was a cost effective and highly adaptable jamming and communications intelligence pod that should be a model of how to satisfy future urgent "niche capability" needs.

    It is called the Intrepid Tiger II and it looks very much like a ALQ-167 threat simulation pod used for training by NAVAIR and its "Red Air" contractors. The pod itself is about the same size as a AIM-7 Sparrow air-to-air missile, with various aerials emitting from its tubular body. This configuration makes the pod capable of being deployed aboard the AV-8B Harrier jump-jet and its aerodynamic impact on the jet's performance is so anemic that the aircraft's flight computer does not even need a software update to carry it, it just treats it as an AGM-65 Maverick missile.

    During the system's rapid design phase, engineers made use of off the shelf parts in order to bring the program's costs down and shorten the urgently needed pod's developmental time-span. The first eight pods cost about a million dollars each, which is a bargain considering that anything with the words "new" and "military" next to it usually has an appalling price tag. When you look at what the Corps gets for that million bucks, Intrepid Tiger II is an all-out steal.

    The Intrepid Tiger II pod works by actively monitoring for enemy communications at certain bandwidths and then selectively jams frequencies that are being used by the bad guys once they start talking. This capability allows for a secondary communications intelligence ability, so the pod can be used to actually eavesdrop on the enemy's chatter as well as disrupting it. The pod can also actively jam known bandwidths that are commonly used to initiate IEDs, such as those used by cellular phones or garage door openers.

    What makes this pod even more tactically potent is that it can either be used in automated modes set by the pilot in the aircraft that is carrying it or its information can be data-linked to a ground station for exploitation in real time. This means that the pod can be remotely controlled and the intelligence it gathers can be listened to and analyzed by experts who are fluent in local dialects. They can also gauge the effect of Intrepid Tiger's pinpoint jamming and change disruption methods to get the best effects in real time. Needless to say, having a ground station with experts in jamming and linguistics providing "virtual over-watch" for a bunch of Marines moving through a high-threat area on the ground is a godsend for commanders.

    Eventually this remote ground station will be downsized into a unit that is the size of a hardened laptop computer, thus a couple of well trained Marines in a moving Humvee could listen in on enemy chatter and make their communication go black at will.

    How The Marines Cheaply And Quickly Built Precision Comm-Jamming Tech

    Out of the need to suppress insurgent planted IEDs and jam their communications in Afghanistan has blossomed into a new set of possibilities for the Intrepid Tiger program. Because it uses new "open architecture" software, the system can be rapidly adapted with new capabilities and hardware, all at low cost. New variations will have electronic intelligence capability, used for locating radars and other threatening emitters, and its communications jamming capability will be replaced with hardware capable of jamming and even hacking air defense nodes and radar systems.

    The USMC sees the pod's growth potential as a way to deploy surgical jamming when their EA-6B Prowlers or the Navy's E/A-18G Growlers are not available, which is a common situation when a portion of a Marine Air Group is deployed aboard an amphibious assault ship. These pods, and their associated ground or ship based interfaces, could potentially give not just the Marines, but the Navy and the USAF the ability to deploy a cheap and scalable intelligence gathering and electronic warfare option with tactical aircraft units around the globe. This would give individual units the ability to fight without the need of supporting low-density, high-demand assets such as dedicated high-end surveillance and jamming aircraft.

    The system is so capable, even at this early stage of its career, that many say it is better at jamming enemy communications and IEDs than the EA-6B Prowler, which carries the AN/USQ-113 communications jammer. This system is much more powerful than the Intrepid Tiger but it is also much less surgical in nature. Metaphorically, the AN/USQ-113 is a cluster bomb, while the Intrepid Tiger is a laser guided rocket. It is even referred to as "precision jamming" by the Marine Corps.



    http://foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com/how-the-marines-cheaply-and-quickly-built-precision-com-1577979656/all

    A nice US military website . Funny comment sections though .

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  GarryB on Thu Apr 09, 2015 4:00 am

    they are proud of a programme they didn't fuck up... good for them... Rolling Eyes


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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  max steel on Tue Jun 16, 2015 5:13 pm

    US Marines: Our Sniper Rifles Are Outdated on the Battlefield sniper lol1


    For years, US Marine Corps snipers have been deployed to the battlefield with equipment that they say is outdated, including a sniper rifle that cannot perform at the needed range, leading to setbacks in combat.
    The Marine Corps is notorious for fielding outdated equipment – some of which can be as many as 30 years old. When the United States invaded Iraq in 2003, Marine snipers carried the M40A1 sniper rifles, many of which were introduced shortly after the end of the Vietnam War.



    The Marines currently use a newer variant of the M40 as its primary sniper rifle – and it still shoots roughly the same distance it did 12 years ago: 1,000 yards.

    Active and former Marine Corps snipers say their weapons are inferior to that of other American military branches, and they do not match what the Taliban and the so-called Islamic State carry either.

    "It doesn't matter if we have the best training," one anonymous reconnaissance sniper told the Washington Post. "If we get picked off at a thousand yards before we can shoot, then what’s the point?"That feeling is shared by Sergeant Ben McCullar, who led a sniper team in Afghanistan and served as an instructor at the Marine Corps' main sniper school in Quantico, Virginia, before leaving the service.

    "With an average engagement of 800 yards, you’re already ruling out a lot of our weapons," McCullar was quoted as saying by the Post.
    During McCullar’s most recent deployment to Afghanistan in 2011, he and his fellow snipers often found themselves in situations where they needed better rifles.
    '
    "Sometimes we could see the [Taliban] machine gunners, and we really couldn't engage them," McCullar told the newspaper. He added that if Marines had different weapons, such as a.300 Winchester Magnum or a.338, their accuracy would be much improved.The.300 Win Mag fires 300 yards farther than the Marines' M40, which uses a lighter.308-caliber bullet. The Army adopted the.300 Win Mag as its primary sniper rifle cartridge in 2011.

    In a statement, the Marine Corps Systems Command said it has "evaluated several options for replacing the M40 series sniper rifle; however, the weapon continues to meet our operational requirements."The M40 is built by Precision Weapons Section, a component of the Marine Corps that is exists only to build and repair the Marines' precision weapons and is primarily staffed by Marine armorers.

    According to Chris Sharon, a former chief sniper school instructor at Quantico, there has been a reluctance to cut the M40 program because it could mean the death of the Precision Weapons Section.HK G 36 guns are pictured at a show room of arms manufacturer Heckler & Koch 's company headquarters in Oberndorf, Germany.

    Sharon says the solution is the Precision Sniper Rifle (PSR) system, in which services purchase directly from a private arms manufacturer.
    "It's not that expensive," Sharon told the Post. "You could buy and maintain two PSRs for one M40. … All of our NATO allies have a.338 rifle, and we're the only ones still shooting.308."

    In its most recent upgrade, the Marine Corps went from M40A5 to the M40A6, which still shoots the same distance.
    "You have to look at those programs and ask who's driving the bus on this?" Sharon said.All active and former snipers who spoke to the Post expressed concern about the next conflict and how Marine snipers will stack up against their enemies.

    "We make the best snipers in the world. We are employed by the best officers in the military. And we are the most feared hunters in any terrain," said an anonymous Marine sniper instructor. "But the next time we see combat, the Marines Corps is going to learn the hard way what happens when you bring a knife to a gunfight."


    http://sputniknews.com/us/20150616/1023407071.html#ixzz3dGINr2ND

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  George1 on Thu Sep 17, 2015 10:34 pm

    US Marines Need Better Management for Supplies Stored in Norway

    The US Marine Corps needs to improve its cost estimate reliability and oversight of inventory systems for equipment forward-positioned in Norway, a Government Accountability Office (GAO) report said.

    WASHINGTON (Sputnik) — Marine Corps documented its cost estimates, but the documentation did not include the source data used to develop the estimates or the calculations performed and estimating methodologies used, the GAO pointed out.

    “Marine Corps cost estimates for sustaining the equipment to support a Marine Air Ground Task Force capability [in Norway]… may not be fully reliable, in that they do not fully meet the four general characteristics for reliable cost estimating,” the report, issued on Thursday, said.

    Marine Corps officials stated they were drafting guidance for developing cost estimates for budget plans for fall 2015, but this guidance will not address the four general characteristics for reliable cost estimating — that they be accurate, well-documented, credible and comprehensive, the report explained.

    “Without ensuring that this guidance fully addresses those characteristics, the Marine Corps will not be positioned to know whether its budget proposals will meet the goal of sustaining equipment for a Marine Air Ground Task Force capability [in Norway],” it warned.

    The Marine Corps relies upon the Norwegian Equipment Information Management System (NEIMS) for data needed to manage its equipment inventory due to limitations in its own system, the GAO acknowledged.

    However, the “reliance on two different information systems, one of which is owned and operated by a foreign government, creates several management challenges and risks to data reliability for the Marine Corps,” the report pointed out.

    It results in a time lag in the accuracy of information in the Marine Corps system until it is manually updated with information from the Norwegian system — a time-consuming process that introduces a vulnerability to errors, the GAO explained.

    “Additionally, relying on the Norwegian system for management information makes the Marine Corps vulnerable to any weaknesses that may exist within the Norwegian system,” the report added.

    The US Government Accountability Office is an independent, nonpartisan agency that works for Congress and investigate show the federal government spends taxpayer money.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/military/20150918/1027168725.html#ixzz3m3O46Ot6


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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  George1 on Tue Sep 22, 2015 6:34 pm

    Lockheed Martin Unveils New Amphibious Combat Vehicle for US Navy



    The US Marine Corps established the ACV program to replace its aging fleet of Amphibious Assault Vehicles, which have been in service since the 1970s.

    NEW YORK (Sputnik) — A new Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV) produced for the US Navy was revealed at a trade show in the state of Virginia, defense contractor Lockheed Martin said in statement on Tuesday.

    "The armored, eight-wheel-drive vehicle is designed to transport up to 13 Marines, transition seamlessly between land and water, and provide high levels of blast protection," Lockheed Martin stated.

    Tests conducted on the vehicle have shown that in the event the ACV traveled over an Improvised Explosive Devices and lost a wheel, it would still be able to drive and escape the blast zone.

    "It’s going to be more lethal, it’s going to be faster and our troops inside are going to be better protected," US Marine Corps Capabilities Development Directorate Director William Mullen said.

    The US Marine Corps established the ACV program to replace its aging fleet of Amphibious Assault Vehicles, which have been in service since the 1970s.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/military/20150922/1027359463.html#ixzz3mVe0QeWz


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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  George1 on Wed Oct 28, 2015 11:24 pm

    New US Marines Combat Vehicle Faces Risks From Fast Track Development - GAO

    The US Marine Corps Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV) development program presents risks of discovering deficiencies after some systems have already been built, a Government Accountability Office (GAO) report warned.

    WASHINGTON (Sputnik) – The ACV program relies heavily on future plans to increase ACV amphibious capability gradually, in three planned increments known as ACV 1.1, 1.2, and 2.0, but exactly how this capability will be attained has not yet been determined, the report said.

    "(T)he Marine Corps is pursuing an accelerated program schedule that presents some risks, including plans to hold the preliminary design review after the start of development — a deviation from best practices," the report, issued on Wednesday, warned.

    This fast track schedule could delay access to necessary information about whether the design performs as expected, the GAO warned.

    "Moreover, GAO believes that …conducting development testing and production at the same time …could leave the program at greater risk of discovering deficiencies after some systems have already been built, potentially requiring costly modifications," the report continued.

    These deviations could potentially increase program risk. GAO said.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/military/20151029/1029261217/us-marines-combat-vehicle.html#ixzz3pvJsySgl


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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  max steel on Sun Nov 01, 2015 4:15 pm

    STRAIGHT OUTTA BATTLESHIP


    Marines Are Building Robotic War Balls



    After watching Battleship even I had a thought how about making similar anti-ship weapons the one aliens used.





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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  George1 on Wed Nov 25, 2015 6:33 pm

    US Marines Select Bids for New 'Swimming' Assault Vehicles

    The US Marine Corps awarded separate contracts to BAE and SAIC worth a total of $225 million to build competing prototypes for the service’s long-awaited next-generation Amphibious Combat Vehicle.

    BAE's contract is for $103.8 million, while SAIC's is for $121.5 million.

    Each company will build 16 eight-wheeled vehicles to be tested over the next two years to replace the Marine Corps' aging Vietnam-era amphibious assault vehicle. The service will then pick a winner in 2018 to deliver 204 vehicles by 2020, Defense News reported.

    BAE and SAIC beat out three other manufacturers competing for contracts to build prototypes, including Lockheed Martin, General Dynamics Land Systems and Advanced Defense Vehicle Systems.

    According to John Garner, Advanced Amphibious Assault program manager, being able to operate well in water and on land were equal to requirements to carry personnel, as well as protection, he said, "so the intent was to balance the capabilities," Defense News reported.

    "We did have individual emphasis areas that would give extra credit, so to speak, all the other things being equal, and those emphasis areas were weighted toward the amphibious capabilities of the vehicle because there were some very capable ground vehicles out there, but fundamentally this vehicle has to be an amphibious vehicle," Garner said.

    The Marines are to start receiving prototypes in January 2017 and will test them for swimming, blast resistance, ground mobility, and personnel carriage.

    Deepak Bazaz, BAE's director of new and amphibious vehicles, said the company designed its prototype not as a land vehicle tailored to marine operations, but the other way around, starting with an amphibious vehicle.

    SAIC's vehicle offered improved traction and blast-mitigating seats that further protect occupants.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/us/20151125/1030763737/us-marines-amphibious-combat-vehicle.html#ixzz3sXrt7KyR


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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  AlfaT8 on Tue Dec 29, 2015 8:17 pm

    Killer Dog Soldiers: Google’s Useless War Robots Rejected by US Marines

    Two four-legged battlefield robots designed by Google's Boston Dynamics were to become ultimate comrades-in-arms for American troops – capable of carrying kits and crossing rough terrain – but have now been turned out by the US military as being loud and ineffective chunks of metal.

    Both models — the Legged Squad Support System (LS3) and Spot — produced in cooperation with the Pentagon’s DARPA research division, failed to achieve their main goals of becoming irreplaceable assistants for Marines, according to Defense One.

    http://sputniknews.com/military/20151230/1032473852/googles-robots-rejected-marines.html

    About time someone put this robot hype down.

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  max steel on Fri Jan 15, 2016 10:24 am

    12 feared dead in military CH-53 collision off Hawaii coast


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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  KiloGolf on Fri Jan 15, 2016 3:48 pm

    Two Marine Corps CH-53s Missing Off The Coast Of Oahu (Updated)

    Details remain very scarce, but two Marine Corps helicopters have reportedly been lost off of Oahu, according to the Marine Corps Times and other sources. A fiery debris field and an empty life raft were found in the area. The Coast Guard is executing a search and rescue effort about two and a half miles off the North Shore of the island.

    “There was a high surf advisory in effect. Rescuers are facing 10-foot waves that were expected to rise. KHON TV in Honolulu reports witnesses in the area heard a loud boom over the water and saw a big flare in the sky. Rescuers have spotted a fire and a debris field, including an empty life raft, but no signs of survivors as of 8:30 a.m. EST.”

    http://foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com/two-marine-corps-helicopters-missing-off-the-coast-of-o-1753136484

    very bad news No

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  Militarov on Thu Mar 03, 2016 1:51 pm



    Apparently experimental vehicle which is supposed to take shipping containers on open sea and then transport it to the beach without need of docks for resupply.

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  KoTeMoRe on Thu Mar 03, 2016 1:58 pm

    Could samone explain to the USMC that the DD funnies and the AVRE's weren't exactly a stellar success in D-day.

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  AlfaT8 on Thu Mar 03, 2016 5:21 pm

    KoTeMoRe wrote:Could samone explain to the USMC that the DD funnies and the AVRE's weren't exactly a stellar success in D-day.

    Not to mention this thing looks like it came straight out of D-day, i can only imagine what the guy in a nearby 2S9 Nona-S would do if they saw this thing.

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  KoTeMoRe on Thu Mar 03, 2016 5:30 pm

    AlfaT8 wrote:
    KoTeMoRe wrote:Could samone explain to the USMC that the DD funnies and the AVRE's weren't exactly a stellar success in D-day.

    Not to mention this thing looks like it came straight out of D-day, i can only imagine what the guy in a nearby 2S9 Nona-S would do if they saw this thing.

    Target Practice. However this is supposed to be a second line craft. I don't think for the love of God this would go head on underfire. Which should be its only merit actually. So more Space Ballpen idiocy from the USMC.

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  Militarov on Thu Mar 03, 2016 5:34 pm

    KoTeMoRe wrote:
    AlfaT8 wrote:
    KoTeMoRe wrote:Could samone explain to the USMC that the DD funnies and the AVRE's weren't exactly a stellar success in D-day.

    Not to mention this thing looks like it came straight out of D-day, i can only imagine what the guy in a nearby 2S9 Nona-S would do if they saw this thing.

    Target Practice. However this is supposed to be a second line craft. I don't think for the love of God this would go head on underfire. Which should be its only merit actually. So more Space Ballpen idiocy from the USMC.

    Its what we here would call third eshalon vehicle, used purely for supply and disaster relief, wounded evacuation and similar non combat tasks. It would not be near actual combat in ideal situations.

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  KoTeMoRe on Thu Mar 03, 2016 6:01 pm

    Militarov wrote:
    KoTeMoRe wrote:
    AlfaT8 wrote:
    KoTeMoRe wrote:Could samone explain to the USMC that the DD funnies and the AVRE's weren't exactly a stellar success in D-day.

    Not to mention this thing looks like it came straight out of D-day, i can only imagine what the guy in a nearby 2S9 Nona-S would do if they saw this thing.

    Target Practice. However this is supposed to be a second line craft. I don't think for the love of God this would go head on underfire. Which should be its only merit actually. So more Space Ballpen idiocy from the USMC.

    Its what we here would call third eshalon vehicle, used purely for supply and disaster relief, wounded evacuation and similar non combat tasks. It would not be near actual combat in ideal situations.

    I agree but the pace of the thing has nothing on a normal CASEVAC/MEDEVAC or AIR-FRP. It's yet another Space Ballpen. But more power to the USMC that can have cash to spare from the US budget.

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  Militarov on Thu Mar 03, 2016 6:42 pm

    KoTeMoRe wrote:
    Militarov wrote:
    KoTeMoRe wrote:
    AlfaT8 wrote:
    KoTeMoRe wrote:Could samone explain to the USMC that the DD funnies and the AVRE's weren't exactly a stellar success in D-day.

    Not to mention this thing looks like it came straight out of D-day, i can only imagine what the guy in a nearby 2S9 Nona-S would do if they saw this thing.

    Target Practice. However this is supposed to be a second line craft. I don't think for the love of God this would go head on underfire. Which should be its only merit actually. So more Space Ballpen idiocy from the USMC.

    Its what we here would call third eshalon vehicle, used purely for supply and disaster relief, wounded evacuation and similar non combat tasks. It would not be near actual combat in ideal situations.

    I agree but the pace of the thing has nothing on a normal CASEVAC/MEDEVAC or AIR-FRP. It's yet another Space Ballpen. But more power to the USMC that can have cash to spare from the US budget.

    When i said medievac i had something of this sort in my mind:



    Transporting light wounded from shore to hospital ships. Well yeah it surely is slow but not much need for it to be fast to be honest. I like the idea in general especially for container towing from casual civilian container ships for military needs to shore. But surely knowing US it will cost couple million USD per piece, but in general disregarding that, i like it.

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