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    United States Marine Corps: News

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    AlfaT8
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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  AlfaT8 on Thu Mar 03, 2016 11:49 pm

    KoTeMoRe wrote:
    AlfaT8 wrote:
    KoTeMoRe wrote:Could samone explain to the USMC that the DD funnies and the AVRE's weren't exactly a stellar success in D-day.

    Not to mention this thing looks like it came straight out of D-day, i can only imagine what the guy in a nearby 2S9 Nona-S would do if they saw this thing.

    Target Practice. However this is supposed to be a second line craft. I don't think for the love of God this would go head on underfire. Which should be its only merit actually. So more Space Ballpen idiocy from the USMC.

    That's why i mentioned the amphibious Nona from the airborne, they're more likely to encounter this thing, since they work behind enemy line, not sure if Russian marines could also do so.

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  KoTeMoRe on Thu Mar 03, 2016 11:55 pm

    Militarov wrote:
    KoTeMoRe wrote:
    Militarov wrote:
    KoTeMoRe wrote:
    AlfaT8 wrote:
    KoTeMoRe wrote:Could samone explain to the USMC that the DD funnies and the AVRE's weren't exactly a stellar success in D-day.

    Not to mention this thing looks like it came straight out of D-day, i can only imagine what the guy in a nearby 2S9 Nona-S would do if they saw this thing.

    Target Practice. However this is supposed to be a second line craft. I don't think for the love of God this would go head on underfire. Which should be its only merit actually. So more Space Ballpen idiocy from the USMC.

    Its what we here would call third eshalon vehicle, used purely for supply and disaster relief, wounded evacuation and similar non combat tasks. It would not be near actual combat in ideal situations.

    I agree but the pace of the thing has nothing on a normal CASEVAC/MEDEVAC or AIR-FRP. It's yet another Space Ballpen. But more power to the USMC that can have cash to spare from the US budget.

    When i said medievac i had something of this sort in my mind:



    Transporting light wounded from shore to hospital ships. Well yeah it surely is slow but not much need for it to be fast to be honest. I like the idea in general especially for container towing from casual civilian container ships for military needs to shore. But surely knowing US it will cost couple million USD per piece, but in general disregarding that, i like it.

    It's actually a fourth of the capacity of the current LCAC. While being slower*.



    The craft here is clearly a amphibious mule (Hippo) not exactly the best tool for rapid evacuation. What could be top notch would however be a remote controlled unit.




    Militarov
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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  Militarov on Fri Mar 04, 2016 12:02 am

    KoTeMoRe wrote:
    Militarov wrote:
    KoTeMoRe wrote:
    Militarov wrote:
    KoTeMoRe wrote:
    AlfaT8 wrote:
    KoTeMoRe wrote:Could samone explain to the USMC that the DD funnies and the AVRE's weren't exactly a stellar success in D-day.

    Not to mention this thing looks like it came straight out of D-day, i can only imagine what the guy in a nearby 2S9 Nona-S would do if they saw this thing.

    Target Practice. However this is supposed to be a second line craft. I don't think for the love of God this would go head on underfire. Which should be its only merit actually. So more Space Ballpen idiocy from the USMC.

    Its what we here would call third eshalon vehicle, used purely for supply and disaster relief, wounded evacuation and similar non combat tasks. It would not be near actual combat in ideal situations.

    I agree but the pace of the thing has nothing on a normal CASEVAC/MEDEVAC or AIR-FRP. It's yet another Space Ballpen. But more power to the USMC that can have cash to spare from the US budget.

    When i said medievac i had something of this sort in my mind:



    Transporting light wounded from shore to hospital ships. Well yeah it surely is slow but not much need for it to be fast to be honest. I like the idea in general especially for container towing from casual civilian container ships for military needs to shore. But surely knowing US it will cost couple million USD per piece, but in general disregarding that, i like it.

    It's actually a fourth of the capacity of the current LCAC. While being slower*.



    The craft here is clearly a amphibious mule (Hippo) not exactly the best tool for rapid evacuation. What could be top notch would however be a remote controlled unit.




    It will be cheaper than LCAC even by American prices. And it can move on solid soil too. It goes to container ship, takes cointainer, swims to shore, moves with it to nearby FOB, drops it and goes back. Quite nice when you think about it.

    KoTeMoRe
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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  KoTeMoRe on Fri Mar 04, 2016 12:08 am

    Militarov wrote:
    KoTeMoRe wrote:
    Militarov wrote:
    KoTeMoRe wrote:
    Militarov wrote:
    KoTeMoRe wrote:
    AlfaT8 wrote:
    KoTeMoRe wrote:Could samone explain to the USMC that the DD funnies and the AVRE's weren't exactly a stellar success in D-day.

    Not to mention this thing looks like it came straight out of D-day, i can only imagine what the guy in a nearby 2S9 Nona-S would do if they saw this thing.

    Target Practice. However this is supposed to be a second line craft. I don't think for the love of God this would go head on underfire. Which should be its only merit actually. So more Space Ballpen idiocy from the USMC.

    Its what we here would call third eshalon vehicle, used purely for supply and disaster relief, wounded evacuation and similar non combat tasks. It would not be near actual combat in ideal situations.

    I agree but the pace of the thing has nothing on a normal CASEVAC/MEDEVAC or AIR-FRP. It's yet another Space Ballpen. But more power to the USMC that can have cash to spare from the US budget.

    When i said medievac i had something of this sort in my mind:



    Transporting light wounded from shore to hospital ships. Well yeah it surely is slow but not much need for it to be fast to be honest. I like the idea in general especially for container towing from casual civilian container ships for military needs to shore. But surely knowing US it will cost couple million USD per piece, but in general disregarding that, i like it.

    It's actually a fourth of the capacity of the current LCAC. While being slower*.



    The craft here is clearly a amphibious mule (Hippo) not exactly the best tool for rapid evacuation. What could be top notch would however be a remote controlled unit.




    It will be cheaper than LCAC even by American prices. And it can move on solid soil too. It goes to container ship, takes cointainer, swims to shore, moves with it to nearby FOB, drops it and goes back. Quite nice when you think about it.

    But as a purely engineering/logistical craft we're in agreement. This remote controlled, would be great. Having 5 of these working in loops while the troops perform other duties is VERY nice. However it needs to be sped up and be bigger.

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  Militarov on Fri Mar 04, 2016 12:26 am



    But as a purely engineering/logistical craft we're in agreement. This remote controlled, would be great. Having 5 of these working in loops while the troops perform other duties is VERY nice. However it needs to be sped up and be bigger.

    Well, still a prototype from what i managed to pick around, we shall see what happens in future.

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  max steel on Fri Apr 01, 2016 2:41 pm

    APKWS II deployed on USMC Harriers

    The US Marine Corps (USMC) has begun to field the fixed-wing variant of the Advanced Precision Kill Weapons System II (APKWS) on AV-8B Harrier II aircraft forward deployed to Bahrain as part of Operation 'Inherent Resolve', the US Central Command mission to degrade and defeat the Islamic State.

    The accelerated delivery into theatre - announced by the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) on 30 March - comes just seven months after a formal requirement was raised by Marine Corps headquarters. Fielding of this rapid deployment capability has seen the AV-8B become the first tactical aircraft (TACAIR) platform to integrate APKWS II.

    Developed and manufactured by BAE Systems Information and Electronic Systems Integration, APKWS II is a low-cost precision-guided 2.75-inch rocket that integrates a low-cost Distributed Aperture Semi-Active Laser Seeker (DASALS) guidance section with existing Hydra 70 rocket motors and warheads. Designed as a 'plug and play' kit, the DASALS unit is installed between the Hydra 70 warhead and the rocket motor; the seeker aperture is divided into four elements, with each element placed on the four wings of the guidance section to provide an integrated navigation solution of the weapon.

    The USMC raised the requirement to introduce the fixed-wing APKWS to quickly provide the AV-8B with a low-cost, low-collateral damage, high-precision weapon offering improved weapon-to-target pairing. Two NAVSEA programme offices based at Naval Air Station Patuxent River - AV-8B Harrier Weapon System (PMA-257) and the Direct and Time Sensitive Strike (PMA-242) - have worked together to define a two-phase programme to rapidly release the APKWS II to service on the Harrier II platform: the first phase, which has included the delivery of 80 guidance kits, has expedited fielding of a limited AV-8B fixed-wing APKWS II employment flight envelope capability; the second phase will expand fixed-wing APKWS II employment envelope limits to the maximum extent possible for the AV-8B.

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  max steel on Sat Apr 16, 2016 11:11 pm

    The “vast majority” of U.S. Marine Corps aircraft can’t Fly

    USMC Air star-level leadership has mismanaged their forces. What the Marines did last year is to use a lot of time, energy and money to convert a combat-capable squadron at Yuma MCAS to a useless squadron that MAY be deployed next year to....JAPAN, and then to complain about it. Now this year the Air Force at Hill is going to do a similar thing, and also complain about it. USAF may deploy an F-35 squadron "OVERSEAS" to...Alaska!....Just think about how fortunate we'll be to have these worthless aircraft salted away in Japan and Alaska. Out of the way.

    More money for USMC would be misspent on more useless faulty F-35 pre-production prototypes which would help convert another squadron from combat-capable to useless except as a basis for PR news releases on successful this and successful that, usually including sensor fusing, but never including actual combat.The Marine Corps has sent Congress an unfunded priorities list for fiscal year 2016 totaling $2.1 billion, the bulk of which would go toward the purchase of six additional Lockheed Martin-manufactured F-35B Joint Strike Fighters,

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Look at USMC aviation in the current age of budget cuts (good luck, of course, getting other nations to see it that way) .

    The inventory: “Out of 276 F/A-18 Hornet strike fighters in the Marine Corps inventory, only about 30% are ready to fly, according to statistics provided by the Corps. Similarly, only 42 of 147 heavy-lift CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters are airworthy.”

    The dollars: “U.S. military spending has dropped from $691 billion in 2010 to $560 billion in 2015. The cuts came just as the planes were returning from 15 years of war, suffering from overuse and extreme wear and tear. Many highly trained mechanics in the aviation depots left for jobs in the private sector.”

    The result: “Cannibalization, or taking parts from one multi-million dollar aircraft to get other multi-million dollar aircraft airborne, has become the norm.” A lot more ugliness in that report.

    To get one Hornet flying again, Marines at Beaufort stripped a landing gear door off a mothballed museum jet. The door, found on the flight deck of the World War II-era USS Yorktown, was last manufactured over a decade ago.

    “Imagine taking a 1995 Cadillac and trying to make it a Ferrari,” Sgt. Argentry Uebelhoer said days before embarking on his third deployment. “You're trying to make it faster, more efficient, but it's still an old airframe … [and] the aircraft is constantly breaking.”

    Maintaining the high-performance Hornets is a challenge with 30,000 fewer Marines, part of a downsizing that has been ongoing since 2010.

    “We don't have enough of them to do the added work efficiently. We are making it a lot harder on the young marines who are fixing our aircraft,” said Maj. Michael Malone of Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron 31.

    Sometimes it takes the Marines 18 months to get parts for early model F-18 jets whose production was halted in 2001.

    “We are an operational squadron. We are supposed to be flying jets, not building them,” said Lt. Col. Harry Thomas, Commanding Officer of VMFA-312, a Marine Corps F/A-18 squadron based at Beaufort.

    The cuts include those made by the Obama administration as well as the sequestration cutbacks agreed to by Congress.

    Asked about the Marines’ concerns on Friday, White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest put the onus on Congress to right the problem – and said Republicans have blocked spending reforms that would have helped military readiness. He said Republicans “championed” the sequester cuts.

    Lt. Col Thomas, call sign “Crash,” deployed to the Pacific with 10 jets last year. Only seven made it. A fuel leak caused his F/A-18 to catch fire in Guam. Instead of ejecting, he landed safely, saving taxpayers $29 million.

    Thomas has deployed eight times in all, including six to Iraq and Afghanistan. Right now only two of his 14 Hornets can fly. His Marines deploy in three months.

    “We are supposed to be doing the type of maintenance like you would take your car to Jiffy Lube for replacing fluids, doing minor inspections, changing tires, things of that nature, not building airplanes from the ground up,” he added.

    The aircraft shortage means pilots spend less time in the air.

    “This last 30 days our average flight time per pilot was just over 4 hours,” said Thomas.

    Ten years ago, Marine Corps pilots averaged between 25 and 30 hours in the air each month, according to one pilot. “This is the worst I’ve seen it,” he added. Another pilot who asked to remain nameless told Fox News that Chinese and Russian pilots fly more hours each month than Marine Corps pilots.

    Marine Corps F/A-18 Hornets are supposed to have a shelf life of 6,000 hours, but they are being refurbished to extend the life to 8,000. There is talk that some aircraft might be pushed to 10,000 hours while the Marine Corps waits for the 5th-generation Joint Strike Fighter, which is slated to replace the F-18, but has been plagued by cost overruns.

    “Our aviation readiness is really my No. 1 concern,” Marine Corps Commandant Gen. Robert Neller told Congress last month. “We don’t have enough airplanes that we would call ‘ready basic aircraft."

    Col. Sean Salene oversees nine helicopter squadrons at Marine Corps Air Station New River in North Carolina.

    “Unlike previous wars, we did not have a period of time afterwards where we did not have tasking,” said Col. Salene. “There was no time to catch our breath.”

    Maj. Matt Gruba, executive officer of HMH-461, a Super Stallion squadron at New River took Fox News reporters inside one of the large helicopters, which has sent thousands of fully loaded Marines into combat over the past three decades.

    Inside, hundreds of small wires cover every surface of the helicopter except the hard non-skid deck. It’s up to the Marine maintainers to inspect each one. One failure could be catastrophic, as happened in 2014 when a Navy MH-53E Sea Dragon crashed off the coast of Virginia after a fire engulfed the aircraft due to faulty fuel lines.

    "It would be easy to miss some small minute detail, some small amount of wear [which] could potentially, eventually cause a fire,” Gruba said

    Lt. Gen. Jon M. "Dog" Davis is the Marine Corps' deputy commandant for aviation, tasked with getting his aircraft back in the air.

    Davis ordered the Corps to refurbish all of the old CH-53E helicopters to their pre-war condition, including fixing the chafing wires and jerryrigged fuel lines that were repaired in theater.

    "The biggest thing is right now after 15 years of hard service, of hard fighting and deploying around the world, is we don't have enough airplanes on the flight line,” Davis said.

    The cuts have not sat well within the military leadership. Former Defense Secretary Robert Gates told Fox News’ Bret Baier in a recent interview that he felt betrayed when told to cut billions from the budget after having already done so.

    “I guess I’d have to say I felt double-crossed. After all those years in Washington, I was naïve,” he said.

    And last week, the Army’s top officer, Gen. Mark Milley, said cuts could mean more American troops could lose their lives.

    “If one or more possible unforeseen contingencies happen, then the United States Army currently risks not having ready forces available to provide flexible options to our national leadership. ... And most importantly, we risk incurring significantly increased U.S. casualties,” Milley testified last week on Capitol Hill.

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  Militarov on Mon May 09, 2016 3:40 am

    The Marine Corps’ first two Kaman K-MAX Helicopters arrived at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma:








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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  George1 on Sun May 15, 2016 12:14 pm

    U.S. Marine Corps has ordered to Bell Helicopter 12 UH-1Y Venom and 16 AH-1Z Viper helicopters



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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  KoTeMoRe on Sun May 15, 2016 12:22 pm

    Militarov wrote:The Marine Corps’ first two Kaman K-MAX Helicopters arrived at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma:








    Ugly as sin, welcome to the 60's America!

    Before you guys make any remark I know that Kaman's line of business is the contrarotating rotors chopper since the 50's...It was a joke.

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  Militarov on Sun May 15, 2016 8:36 pm

    [quote="KoTeMoRe"]
    Militarov wrote:The Marine Corps’ first two Kaman K-MAX Helicopters arrived at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma:




    Before you guys make any remark I know that Kaman's line of business is the contrarotating rotors chopper since the 50's...It was a joke.

    Great potential for umanned variant tho Smile

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  GarryB on Mon May 16, 2016 11:17 am

    It looks ugly but is a lot simpler than the very complex system that Kamov use for the same effect.

    The twin main rotor design is very efficient and effective... of course what ever you do do not approach one of these helicopters from the side with the rotors going... Wink

    For unmanned models if it is a small aircraft then the design Kamov uses is actually rather better... it is only when you get aircraft that are more than 10 tons in weight that the engineering becomes complex and would require enormous expense in developing... there is a reason only Kamov make coaxial rotor helos that big...


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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  max steel on Wed Jun 01, 2016 12:46 am

    USMC studies fleet-wide weaponisation of C-130Js and MV-22Bs

    The US Marine Corps (USMC) is looking to expand its fleet of weaponised Lockheed Martin KC-130J Hercules turboprop aircraft that are capable of extended endurance multi-sensor imagery reconnaissance and close air support (CAS) in low-threat scenarios.

    10 of the USMC's planned fleet of 79 KC-130Js have been modernised with the Harvest Hercules Airborne Weapons Kit (HAWK) package that includes a roll-on/roll-off dual-screen fire-control console mounted in a removable platform in the aircraft's cargo compartment, a Lockheed Martin AN/AAQ-30 target sight sensor mounted under the port-side wing fuel tank, and a Common Data Link.

    The HAWK weapons comprise four AGM-114P Hellfire II laser-guided air-to-surface missiles mounted on the port-side refuelling pylon, and MBDA GBU-44/E Viper Strike and Raytheon Griffin A air-to-surface missiles launched from a ramp-mounted 10-round rack and a pressurised dispenser dubbed the 'Derringer Door'. A sideways-firing Mk 44 30 mm cannon has been deferred to a later Block III upgrade.

    The 2016 instalment of the corps' aviation plan calls for providing the HAWK configurations to all its C-130Js and enhancing the service's Bell-Boeing MV-22B Osprey tiltrotor aircraft with a similar weapons package. USMC spokeswoman Captain Sarah Burns confirmed that the corps is studying further weaponisation of both fleets.

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  Militarov on Wed Jun 08, 2016 4:53 pm



    Marine firefighters put out a fire during a fire response training scenario at MCAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii.

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  max steel on Mon Jun 27, 2016 9:17 pm

    Marines May Protect Tanks With Active and EW Protection Systems, Much Like Ship Self-Defense

    Marine Corps is partnering with the Army to test out the Israeli Trophy Active Protection System (APS). The Army is leasing four systems and will experiment with their Stryker combat vehicle and M1A2 tanks. The Marine Corps is currently modifying some of its M1A1 tanks to install mounts for the Trophy system, and the service will later work with the Army to test the protective system on the Marine tanks against anti-tank guided missiles and RPGs, he told USNI News after the hearing.

    The Trophy system has both an active and a soft component. When sensors detect an incoming threat, the active system fires small rounds to deflect the threat, Walsh said, noting that “when they’re going that fast, it doesn’t take much to deflect them away.”

    The soft side uses jammers in the same way ship and aircraft self-protection systems do.

    “The anti-ship missiles are getting better and better, so the Navy’s having to continue to put better capabilities on the ships to be able to defeat it,” he said, with the Marine Corps now seeing those same advances in anti-tank technologies.

    “I think that’s the side we’re really going to benefit from the Navy capabilities, because the Navy has some very good EW (electronic warfare) capabilities. So getting into our warfare centers and working with the Navy on how to get better at electronic warfare capabilities, that’s the soft side of it.”

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Marines To Pair Laser Weapon With Stinger Missile For Mobile Ground Unit Protection



    The Marine Corps is moving towards a future in which small dispersed units can protect themselves from incoming enemy drones with laser weapons and from missiles and aircraft with Stinger missiles, with both weapons netted into a detection system and mounted atop Humvees, Joint Light Tactical Vehicles and other combat vehicles.

    Lt. Gen. Robert Walsh, deputy commandant of the Marine Corps for combat development and integration, said a Ground-Based Air Defense (GBAD) Directed Energy On-The-Move concept demonstrator with the Office of Naval Research is nearing the start of Phase 3, moving from firing a 30-kilowatt laser at a target from atop a stationary ground vehicle to firing while on the go. Upon completion of the ONR program, around 2022, the GBAD DE OTM system would transition into a program of record in the Marine Corps and likely reside alongside the Stinger missile system as a ground unit self-protection system – giving those units a much-needed upgrade after operating with the Stinger for decades.

    Walsh said the Marines operated in a permissive environment in Iraq and Afghanistan for 15 years, “but when we see near-peer competitors, the development that’s going on in Russia and China, it is really waking us up to what we’re going to have to do in the future,” noting the concepts of operations and requirements for future systems are already evolving rapidly to keep up.

    “So we look at our air defense capability as certainly a weak area that we have not upgraded in a long time because we haven’t had to deal with that in the operating environment we’ve been in,” he told the audience at the second-annual Directed Energy Summit, cohosted by Booz Allen Hamilton and the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessment.

    In the short term, the Marines are fielding the new Ground/Air Task Oriented Radar (G/ATOR) to detect incoming threats and the Common Aviation Command and Control System (CAC2S) to integrate all the data into a single operating picture. That data will be pushed to the the Direct Air Support Center (DASC), who could in turn give low-altitude air defense (LAAD) batteries specific information about incoming threats.


    “Get them the feed so they can see it, now they know the target is coming and they can shoot it with a Stinger, compared to now where the Marines send someone out with binoculars to look for threats in the air, Walsh told reporters after his conference presentation.

    “But the laser would tie right into that,” Walsh said, noting that the GBAD DE OTM laser system could be installed alongside the Stinger launcher, giving the LAAD batteries the option of using the laser for smaller threats – Group 1 through 3 unmanned aerial vehicles, for now – or using the missile for high-altitude UAVs, cruise missiles or manned aircraft.

    “Eventually if you could transition away from the missiles to go directed energy-only, we would do that” if the laser technology improved sufficiently, he added.

    The Army is also pursuing a mobile laser weapon, and Walsh said that though their efforts are separate for now, “once we see where we’re coming out of that, working closely with the Army, we see ourselves paralleling into a joint program of record on this.” The hope is that this joint program could push the Marines’ current 30kw laser into something smaller and more powerful, enabling it to take on larger UAVs and eventually rockets, artillery, mortars or even larger threats.

    The Army is also pursuing a larger base-defense laser weapon. The Marine Corps will not participate in that development program, as the service is focused on mobile systems for dispersed ground units, but if the Army succeeded in fielding a program the Marines could consider buying the system for stationary forward operating bases as needed, he said.

    On the aviation side, Walsh said there is already directed energy as a self-protection tool included in the Directed Infrared Countermeasures (DIRCM) system on the CH-53 to fight off incoming threats. DIRCM will eventually be fielded on the H-1 helicopters and V-22 Ospreys. For offensive purposes, Walsh said the KC-130Js will be outfitted for the Harvest Hawk weapons capability and adding in directed energy weapons may be a natural follow-on.

    Walsh said that DIRCM is fielded now, counter-UAV lasers are getting close and counter-artillery lasers are farther out, but all the technologies are maturing well. What he’d like to see next is a field exercise to “get comfortable with the technology, and I think everything is moving to how quickly can we get out there and use it. And I would push, from my standpoint with the commandant would be, let’s look at what the Navy did with Ponce,” Walsh said, referring to the USS Ponce (AFSB(I)-15), the converted afloat forward staging base that hosts the Navy’s Laser Weapon System (LaWS).

    “Now, people will say that’s a different environment, it’s over water, it’s not over land where you might have collateral damage and things like that,” Walsh told reporters.

    “We could work through those things, and the Navy’s kind of broken some trail on that already with Ponce, so I think we’d be willing to get that out, obviously experiment with it, and then get it out there and field it and see where we go.”

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  max steel on Tue Aug 02, 2016 11:54 pm

    A Marine Corps pilot has died in a training flight


    A Marine Corps pilot was killed Thursday when an F/A-18C Hornet went down during training near Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, California, Marine officials announced today.

    The pilot and aircraft were attached to 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Marine spokesman Maj. Christian Devine said.

    The identity of the pilot has not been released, pending a 24-hour period following notification of family members.

    Officials said the cause of the crash is under investigation.

    Speaking at a think tank event in Washington, D.C., on Friday, the Corps' top aviation officer, Lt. Gen. Jon Davis, offered thoughts and prayers for the families of the pilot, adding that he didn't have all the details about the incident.

    While Marine officials have testified this year that readiness challenges have resulted in significant reductions in flight hours for Marine pilots across nearly every aviation platform, Davis said he did not believe that was a contributing factor in the tragedy.

    "I track [flight hours] each week. This particular unit was doing OK," he said. He said he did not believe that reduced flight hours had made squadrons less safe, but he said the Corps was "not as proficient as we should be" in its aviation component.

    This is the second fatal Hornet crash for the Marine Corps in the last 12 months. In October 2015, a Marine pilot was killed when a 3rd MAW F/A-18C aircraft attached to Marine Attack Fighter Squadron 232 crashed near Royal Air Force airfield Lakenheath in England during a flight from Miramar to Bahrain.

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  airstrike on Tue Sep 13, 2016 9:03 am

    US Marine corps. amphibious assault vehicle to get upgrades

    http://echelon-defense.com/2016/09/13/us-marine-corps-amphibious-assault-vehicle-to-get-upgrades/

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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  George1 on Wed Oct 12, 2016 7:53 am

    US Marines to Train on New F-35s Before They Deploy

    Read more: https://sputniknews.com/military/201610121046240516-marines-train-f35s-before-deployment/


    US Marines Special Ops in Iraq to Launch New Surveillance Drone

    Read more: https://sputniknews.com/military/201610121046240170-us-marines-fly-new-drone/


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    Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  Sponsored content Today at 4:55 am


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