Russia Defence Forum

Would you like to react to this message? Create an account in a few clicks or log in to continue.

Military Forum for Russian and Global Defence Issues


+10
JohninMK
Russian Fighter
airstrike
KoTeMoRe
KiloGolf
AlfaT8
GarryB
max steel
George1
Russian Patriot
14 posters

    United States Marine Corps: News

    George1
    George1

    Posts : 16709
    Points : 17216
    Join date : 2011-12-22
    Location : Greece

    United States Marine Corps: News - Page 3 Empty Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  George1 Wed May 13, 2020 9:29 pm

    New US Marine Corps ACVs Receive Kongsberg MST-30 30mm Combat Modules

    https://bmpd.livejournal.com/4024060.html
    Odin of Ossetia
    Odin of Ossetia

    Posts : 447
    Points : 538
    Join date : 2015-07-03

    United States Marine Corps: News - Page 3 Empty Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  Odin of Ossetia Sat Aug 01, 2020 11:37 pm






    One U.S. Marine Dead, Eight Other U.S. Troops Missing and Two More Seriously Injured, in a Training Exercise Accident off the Coast of California.


    https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/us/1-marine-dead-8-missing-after-training-accident-off-california/ar-BB17pFpo?ocid=SKY2DHP


    One hell of an accident.



    Finty likes this post

    George1
    George1

    Posts : 16709
    Points : 17216
    Join date : 2011-12-22
    Location : Greece

    United States Marine Corps: News - Page 3 Empty Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  George1 Wed Nov 11, 2020 8:36 pm

    The US Marine Corps began to receive new wheeled armored personnel carriers ACV


    On November 4, 2020, the first batch of new ACV armored personnel carriers [18 units] was handed over to the 3rd separate amphibious assault battalion of the 1st US Marine Division at the Twentynine Palms US Marine Corps air-ground combat center in California.

    As previously reported by BMPD colleagues , BAE Systems in June 2018 won the competition for a promising amphibious armored personnel carrier of the United States Marine Corps with an 8x8 wheel arrangement under the ACV (Amphibious Combat Vehicle) program. The ACV (LW-1) armored vehicle selected by the US Marine Corps, presented by BAE Systems in conjunction with the Italian group Iveco, is a variant of the VBA armored personnel carrier created by Iveco - a modification of the SUPERAV armored personnel carrier, made, in turn, on the basis of the Freccia armored personnel carrier purchased by the Italian army.

    In 2018, BAE Systems received a $ 198 million contract for the supply to the US Marine Corps (ILC) for military testing of 30 pre-production ACV vehicles as part of the first phase of the ACV program (ACV 1.1) by September 30, 2019. The start of the transfer of these vehicles to the troops is scheduled for 2020. In February 2020, BAE Systems received a contract worth $ 113.5 million for the supply of 26 more ACV pre-production vehicles to the KMP, all of which are purchased in the ACV-P linear armored vehicle version.

    In total, according to the first phase of the ACV program (ACV 1.1), the US Marine Corps is expected to purchase 204 vehicles in the ACV-P linear armored personnel carrier version with a total cost of $ 1.2 billion, and in the second phase of ACV 1.2 - the purchase of 666 more modified vehicles in the four above options, including AC-30 machines (which are supposed to be purchased up to 150). BAE Systems and Iveco were awarded contracts to develop ACV-30, ACV-C and ACV-R variants in June 2019. In total, the KMP plans to equip six battalions with ACV machines, keeping the upgraded AAV7A1 armored personnel carriers (392 units) on the equipment of four more battalions. The production of ACV vehicles for the US Marine Corps is entirely carried out at the American enterprises of BAE Systems.

    United States Marine Corps: News - Page 3 172
    United States Marine Corps: News - Page 3 259

    https://bmpd.livejournal.com/4183955.html

    Finty likes this post

    George1
    George1

    Posts : 16709
    Points : 17216
    Join date : 2011-12-22
    Location : Greece

    United States Marine Corps: News - Page 3 Empty Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  George1 Sun May 02, 2021 4:52 pm

    US Marine Corps Reduces Manpower Due to Abandonment of Tanks
    Today, 11: 58
    14

    Tank US Marine Corps battalions, bridge companies and law enforcement units are being downsized as part of an overall reorganization of the Armed Forces. Due to the abandonment of tanks, the US Marine Corps (ILC) is reducing its personnel.

    The downsized Marines are now being asked to relocate or end their military careers earlier than planned. More than 450 Marines have been affected by the restructuring of the Armed Forces, which began last year. The reform should make the ILC more expeditionary to counter new threats.

    The Marines had to explore new career areas, retire early or transfer to army tank units.

    USMC Manpower and Reserve spokeswoman Yvonne Carlock said 69 tank battalions have been transferred from the Marine Corps to the Army. Another 259 people were transferred to other units of the ILC. About 60 percent of them chose to become specialists in the field of intelligence, logistics or cyberspace. An additional 128 Marines have taken advantage of early retirement programs.


    https://en.topwar.ru/182610-iz-za-otkaza-ot-tankov-korpus-morskoj-pehoty-ssha-sokraschaet-lichnyj-sostav.html

    Finty likes this post

    George1
    George1

    Posts : 16709
    Points : 17216
    Join date : 2011-12-22
    Location : Greece

    United States Marine Corps: News - Page 3 Empty Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  George1 Wed Jun 02, 2021 4:12 pm

    U.S. Marine Corps disbanded its last tank battalion

    26 May 2021

    For a long time historical 1-th tank the battalion was the pride of the United States Marine Corps. However, the inexorable time turned out to be merciless to this military unit. Commandant General of the Marine Corps David Berger began restructuring the corps. The closure of the Twentynine Palms center in California was followed by the disbandment of the last active Marine armored battalion.

    The California-based 1st Marine Tank Battalion was first deployed at the start of World War II. As part of the 1st Marine Division, a tank battalion was deployed to Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands.

    The decision to eliminate (disband) the last US ILC tank battalion fits into the new vision of the Marine Corps as more mobile and lighter, ready for war with such potential US rivals as China and Russia. Since General Berger took over as Commandant of the United States Marine Corps, the Marines have begun to cut spending in a number of ways. In March 2020, Berger announced the need to reduce tanks.

    In the 14 months that have passed since the corps commandant's statement, almost all of the Marine Corps tanks have been transferred to the American army. By 2023, KMP plans to complete the transfer process. Earlier in May 2021, the 2nd Marine Tank Battalion, based at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina, was disbanded. When it was disbanded, the commander of the 2nd Marine Division, Major General Francis Donovan, emphasized that the 2nd Tank Battalion had passed a glorious battle path from Iceland in 1941 to Afghanistan today, and was the pride of the 2nd Marine Division.

    The tanks that were in service with the Marines are transferred to the army, and the Marine Corps tankers were offered three options for further self-determination: the first option is to continue serving as part of tank crews in army units, the second option is to change their military specialty within the Marine Corps, the third option - early departure from military service.

    Currently, as noted by the Marine Corps personnel and reserve representative, Major General Jordan Cochran, 151 tankers have applied for transfer to other positions within the corps, 121 people want to retire early, 12 people want to retire. 89 officers in the officer corps demanded a transfer to other units of the Marine Corps, 2 people asked for early resignation and 2 people were going to retire. Nobody asked for a transfer to army units.

    The last commander of the 1st Tank Battalion, in his farewell speech, expressed the hope that the armored units would someday return to the Marine Corps.

    I sincerely hope that if the need for tankers ever arises again, the fighting spirit that has been inherent in our battalion for most of a century will be resurrected and inspire the next generations of Marines, as it was on November 1, 1941.
    - Lt. Col. Benjamin Adams emphasized during the ceremony.

    https://en.topwar.ru/183372-korpus-morskoj-pehoty-ssha-rasformiroval-svoj-poslednij-tankovyj-batalon.html

    PapaDragon and Finty like this post

    JohninMK
    JohninMK

    Posts : 9360
    Points : 9467
    Join date : 2015-06-16
    Location : England

    United States Marine Corps: News - Page 3 Empty Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  JohninMK Mon Aug 23, 2021 1:19 pm

    Assume this is aimed at the US Marines not the Army.

    Caesar
    @Ninja998998
    ·
    23h
    American experimental Bell model 209 cobra attack chopper with retractable landing gear


    United States Marine Corps: News - Page 3 E9ZNubnXMAAzcXu?format=jpg&name=360x360

    United States Marine Corps: News - Page 3 E9ZNubnXsAY0uu0?format=jpg&name=360x360
    GarryB
    GarryB

    Posts : 30914
    Points : 31440
    Join date : 2010-03-30
    Location : New Zealand

    United States Marine Corps: News - Page 3 Empty Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  GarryB Tue Aug 24, 2021 6:12 am

    Would wonder how much drag this actually reduces for the aircraft... especially when considering the increase in weight and complication caused by the retractable landing gear.

    In terms of landing safety the Hind actually went the other way with later models using fixed undercarriage as such a set up helps spread the impact effect of a crash landing or heavy landing and eliminates the error of landing with your wheels up.

    You sure it was not released in times for April 1st one year?
    Finty
    Finty

    Posts : 356
    Points : 362
    Join date : 2021-02-10
    Location : Great Britain

    United States Marine Corps: News - Page 3 Empty Five Reasons The Marine Corps Is The Future Of U.S. Ground Combat

    Post  Finty Wed Sep 15, 2021 2:08 am

    Article from 2018 but basically still relevant...

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/lorenthompson/2018/06/21/five-reasons-the-marine-corps-is-the-future-of-u-s-ground-combat/?sh=3e6e747c1136

    The Marine Corps is gearing up to conduct combat exercises with its information warriors. Doesn't sound like the leathernecks of yore, does it? As America's military transitions from the global war on terror to great-power competition with near-peers like Russia and China, the Marines are rethinking what they need to deter or defeat in the future. One area where they need to bolster skills is protection of battlefield networks, because Russia and China are able to conduct cyber attacks and electronic warfare.

    So the Marines are putting more emphasis on information operations in their preparations for combat, because if your communications are jammed or your intelligence data is corrupted in wartime, fighting effectively could be hard. The latest Marine Operating Concept (the Corps' plan for fighting and winning future wars) is heavily focused on securing and exploiting the electromagnetic spectrum.

    Once you get beyond that innovation, though, what you find is a service returning to its roots: maneuver warfare, amphibious operations, "every Marine a rifleman." And with good reason. The operational environment of the future looks better suited to the agile, expeditionary strengths of the Marine Corps than it does to the ponderous, industrial-age traditions of the Army. The Marines have made rising China the pacing threat for their plans, while the Army is focused mainly on Russia in Europe. The White House cares more about China.

    Because the Marine Corps and Navy are so much better prepared for combat in the Western Pacific than the Army and Air Force are -- at least, once you get away from the Korean Peninsula -- there is a case to be made that the Marines will dominate U.S. ground combat operations in the future. They certainly look poised to be called on more frequently than the Army for missions like crisis response and regional deterrence.

    In fact, if Washington scales back its military presence in Korea and U.S. relations with European NATO nations stay on their present vector, the Army might have trouble finding things to do in the years ahead. Not so the Marine Corps, which will be forward deployed near every potential flashpoint in the global littorals where 80% of the world's population and the vast preponderance of its commerce are found. Here are five reasons why the Marine Corps is likely to be the face of U.S. ground combat operations in the future.

    An identity that matches what national strategy requires today. The Marine Corps is a naval expeditionary force focused on maneuver warfare and amphibious operations. What that means in practical terms is that the Marines are postured for fast foreign deployment, and they are based at sea rather than depending on land bases. They defeat enemies by throwing them off balance, using the sea as a maneuver space to surprise and deceive. Because their bases are mobile and positioned near trouble spots, they will almost always be the first foreign troops that respond. The Marine Corps is thus uniquely prepared for a world of unpredictable threats and fluid relations.


    Training that focuses on basic warfighting skills and adaptability. Expeditionary warfare requires self-sufficiency, so Marines are trained to operate in austere conditions with minimal assistance from other services. Their combat units combine ground, air, logistical and command elements in an integrated structure focused on the support of infantry. Whatever their combat specialties may be, all Marines receive basic infantry training so that they can operate flexibly in fast-moving campaigns. Marine warfighting doctrine delegates responsibility to the lowest levels within combat units, and encourages initiative among junior personnel. U.S. Marines thus tend to be more resilient than the warfighters of other nations.

    Technology that surpasses enemy gear and fits the moment. Although the Marine Corps claims only 7% of the defense budget and receives a fraction of what the Army does for equipment, it has invested wisely. Its MV-22 Osprey is the world's only operational tilt-rotor, combining the vertical agility of a helicopter with the speed and range of a fixed-wing plane. Its F-35B fighter is the world's only stealthy tactical aircraft capable of landing on a dime, without a runway. Its Amphibious Combat Vehicle (awarded to BAE Systems this week) will be the most capable ship-to-shore fighting vehicle ever built. So Marines have options for assaulting and defeating hostile forces that other services lack.

    A warrior culture that emphasizes bravery and self-sacrifice. Anyone who volunteers for military service knows they might have to die for their nation. However, awareness of that fact seems closer to the surface in Marine Corps culture than in the other services. Marines are taught to be tough, exhibiting physical and moral courage in the most harrowing circumstances. Although Marine formations are scalable and tailorable to tactical challenges, combat training focuses on small units that, as the Corps puts it, are led by warfighters "biased to action." The end result is highly disciplined killers who can respond to any contingency across the spectrum of conflict.

    A leadership that is politically adept but principled. Marines tend to operate more effectively in political jobs than warfighters hailing from other military services. It is no coincidence that the Secretary of Defense and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff both come from the smallest of the four military services under the Department of Defense. The Marine Corps seems to have done a better job than the Army of training its general officers for sensitive joint assignments, and as a result Marine thinking permeates the senior leadership of the national defense establishment. This presumably influences how warfighting options are assessed when conflicts arise.

    To summarize, the competencies, training, technology, culture and influence of the Marine Corps make it more likely to be the preferred choice in future ground combat campaigns than the Army. If prolonged occupation of other countries is required then the superior numbers of the Army's active and reserve components might make it a crucial contributor to any campaign. But at the moment domestic political sensibilities seem to be trending away from long-term occupations, just as they are trending away from support for European defense. Nation building is not a franchise for the future, nor is the protection of allies who seem unwilling to help themselves.

    However, there is one facet of Marine Corps preparedness that needs to be addressed if the service is to achieve its full potential in support of future military operations. A military organization that relies on warships for its bases needs an adequate number of warships. At the moment, the Marine Corps is several ships short of the 38 amphibious vessels it would need to lift two full expeditionary brigades, and that's before items like wartime attrition are taken into account. The Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments has calculated the Marines actually need 40 "amphibs" -- 11 large-deck, 29 small-deck -- to meet future operating requirements, and that is probably the right number.

    Those ships are purchased and operated by the Navy, which has to balance the demands of amphibious warfare against the competing needs of surface warfare, undersea warfare, and naval aviation communities (not to mention the Navy's contribution to the nuclear triad). President Trump has provided a fiscal framework for eventually getting to 38 amphibious warships, but at the rate they are being built, that will take a long, long time. Considering how indispensible the Marine Corps is likely to be in the future operating environment, it seems there is a convincing case to be made for accelerating the pace at which warships suitable for amphibious warfare are purchased and put to sea.
    GarryB
    GarryB

    Posts : 30914
    Points : 31440
    Join date : 2010-03-30
    Location : New Zealand

    United States Marine Corps: News - Page 3 Empty Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  GarryB Wed Sep 15, 2021 10:57 am

    Odin of Ossetia wrote:
    One U.S. Marine Dead, Eight Other U.S. Troops Missing and Two More Seriously Injured, in a Training Exercise Accident off the Coast of California.


    https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/us/1-marine-dead-8-missing-after-training-accident-off-california/ar-BB17pFpo?ocid=SKY2DHP


    One hell of an accident.

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/marines-accident-california-vessel-aav-san-clemente-island-presumed-dead/

    Follow up article to that news report says the search was called off for the missing 7 marines and one sailor, so the death toll is 9 dead assuming the injured pulled through...

    RIP.

    Finty likes this post

    Hole
    Hole

    Posts : 4642
    Points : 4630
    Join date : 2018-03-24
    Age : 45
    Location : Merkelland

    United States Marine Corps: News - Page 3 Empty Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  Hole Wed Sep 15, 2021 8:17 pm

    The MV-22 can transport less then a Mi-8 but costs 5 times more. And it can only transform from heli to plane mode when the weather is fine.
    The F-35B is as stealthy as a Cadillac and can haul less warload in VTOL mode then a UH-1 heli.
    The ACV has been in development since the middle of the 90´s (in one form or another). Not much to show, except large bills for the taxpayer.

    And the Marines got rid of their tanks. No heavy artillery. They can only fight lightly armed enemies.

    Another important point: they need ships to get close to the shore, so the enemy shouldn´t have coastal defence missiles like Bal and Bastion.
    Finty
    Finty

    Posts : 356
    Points : 362
    Join date : 2021-02-10
    Location : Great Britain

    United States Marine Corps: News - Page 3 Empty Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  Finty Wed Sep 15, 2021 11:54 pm

    Hole wrote:The MV-22 can transport less then a Mi-8 but costs 5 times more. And it can only transform from heli to plane mode when the weather is fine.
    The F-35B is as stealthy as a Cadillac and can haul less warload in VTOL mode then a UH-1 heli.
    The ACV has been in development since the middle of the 90´s (in one form or another). Not much to show, except large bills for the taxpayer.

    And the Marines got rid of their tanks. No heavy artillery. They can only fight lightly armed enemies.

    Another important point: they need ships to get close to the shore, so the enemy shouldn´t have coastal defence missiles like Bal and Bastion.

    Harsh but food for thought. They'll presumably have to get better at EABO and supporting the Army and its big guns that way.

    On another note admit I was surprised by the speed of their tank transfer; despite being aware of the plans, I didn't find out until yesterday that of their approx 430 tanks, over 300 have been transferred.
    GarryB
    GarryB

    Posts : 30914
    Points : 31440
    Join date : 2010-03-30
    Location : New Zealand

    United States Marine Corps: News - Page 3 Empty Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  GarryB Thu Sep 16, 2021 6:41 am

    Well for the Marines they also have the problem that their new LCS were a total failure and are being scrapped... something to do with their transmission not allowing them to operate at more than 16 knts and them not really knowing what to do with them... together with their new Zumwalt destroyers being terrible failures too... they made three of 32 they were going to make... but again they were too ambitious... they wanted a powerful long range gun that could perform some missions they use million dollar cruise missiles for, but they stuffed it all up.

    The new gun system was supposed to provide fire support for landing forces on the cheap that could hit point targets out to several hundred kms with excellent precision for the price of an artillery shell instead of a million dollar cruise missile.

    The problem was that the ammo for the gun ended up costing 800K per shot and was still unable to reach the range and accuracy specs required.

    They managed to make an artillery gun as expensive to use as a cruise missile... which was an important new feature of the ship...

    Not to mention the Ford class CVN.

    Too ambitious, and clearly sure that if you spend enough money you can solve any problems... without actually trying to actually solve any problems... you just change the parameters of the system and pretend it was never supposed to do that in the first place....

    But no body is getting fired, money continues to disappear... no media interest, no public backlash... and the rich keep getting richer despite being totally incompetent.

    Wouldn't be so bad if all this stuff was making the US actually safe like a land based IADS network might, but they aren't doing that...

    Finty likes this post

    RTN
    RTN

    Posts : 488
    Points : 465
    Join date : 2014-03-24
    Location : Fairfield, CT

    United States Marine Corps: News - Page 3 Empty Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  RTN Thu Sep 16, 2021 10:49 am

    GarryB wrote:The new gun system was supposed to provide fire support for landing forces on the cheap that could hit point targets out to several hundred kms with excellent precision for the price of an artillery shell instead of a million dollar cruise missile.
    What dose a typical Russian Rocket Artillery regiment, brigade comprises of?

    Sponsored content

    United States Marine Corps: News - Page 3 Empty Re: United States Marine Corps: News

    Post  Sponsored content


      Current date/time is Sat Oct 16, 2021 11:29 pm