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    Svyatoslavich

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    Post  Svyatoslavich on Fri Mar 16, 2018 2:22 am

    miketheterrible wrote:For one to be kicked out of the UN security Council, Russia also has to vote themselves out.  Which is unlikely.  It would also be unlikely China would vote Russia out cause they know they are in the crosshairs as well.
    Exactly. The US and its vassals are not harrassing China too much because Russia is the "number one" enemy. If Russia falls, the Chinese know they are next and will receive all the blows Russia is taking now from all directions. That is why they help Russia, so this country can continue standing and taking all the blows while China develops, enriches and gets military stronger.
    George1
    George1

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    Post  George1 on Sat Aug 11, 2018 2:02 pm

    George1
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    Post  George1 on Tue Oct 09, 2018 4:32 am

    US Drone Spotted Flying Near Russian Border Second Time in Two Days

    Late last week, a US Northrop Grumman RQ-4 Global Hawk flew around Russia's northwestern borders for eleven hours.

    The latest drone flight, spotted by PlaneRadar, a Russian aviation resource, spotted the US drone taking off from the US airbase at Sigonella, Italy, flying over Greece, through Turkey, through Romania, and into Ukraine, making a loop in the country's east, and then heading southwest around the western and southern coast of Crimea toward Krasnodar, southern Russia.

    The US has stepped up its aerial reconnaissance along Russia's borders considerably in recent years, together with the buildup of NATO forces in the region. On Friday, an RQ-4, also taking off from Sigonella, flew through to the Baltic states, making several loops around the exclave of Kaliningrad, and then spending over three hours looping near the border next to Russia's Leningrad and Pskov regions.

    https://sputniknews.com/military/201810081068708717-us-drone-near-crimea-again/
    George1
    George1

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    Post  George1 on Thu Dec 20, 2018 6:13 pm

    There is an ongoing discussion on Twitter as to whether the state of global politics today can be called another Cold War. Cold War historians (friends & colleagues) on the whole decry such comparisons as historically inaccurate punditry. Let me be the fly in the ointment.

    https://twitter.com/DrRadchenko/status/1075317457861136384
    Nibiru
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    Post  Nibiru on Thu Jan 10, 2019 3:20 pm

    So NATO propaganda peddlers are now openly calling for Russia's dismemberment and even offers "advice" on how to manage problems in the event of such scenario Laughing Laughing Laughing



    Managing Russia's dissolution

    Russia’s ongoing attacks on Ukraine and its persistent subversion of Western states demonstrates that Washington and Brussels have failed to restrain Moscow’s imperial ambitions.

    Engagement, criticism and limited sanctions have simply reinforced Kremlin perceptions that the West is weak and predictable. To curtail Moscow’s neo-imperialism a new strategy is needed, one that nourishes Russia’s decline and manages the international consequences of its dissolution.

    Russia is more fragile than it appears, and the West is stronger than it is portrayed. Under the regime of Vladimir Putin, which will soon enter its third decade, the country has transitioned from an emerging democracy to an unstable authoritarianism.

    Although Moscow has failed to modernize its economy to be globally competitive, the Kremlin excels in one domain — disinformation — through which it portrays the country as a rising power on a level with the U.S.

    In reality, Russia is a declining state that disguises its internal infirmities with external offensives. Russia’s economy is stagnating. According to World Bank statistics for 2017, Russia’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita ranks 62nd in the world.

    Even the defense budget is shrinking and barely reaches a tenth of the U.S. Through a combination of low fossil fuel prices, infrastructural decay, pervasive corruption and Western financial sanctions, state revenues are declining, living standards are falling, social conflicts are intensifying and regional disquiet is mounting.

    Although economic performance alone is insufficient to measure susceptibility to collapse, rising social, ethnic and regional pressures indicate that Russia is heading toward fragmentation.

    Russia has failed to develop into a nation state with a strong ethnic or civic identity. It remains an imperial construct due to its Tsarist and Soviet heritage.

    The unwieldy Russian Federation consists of 85 “federal subjects,” of which 22 are republics representing non-Russian ethnicities, including the North Caucasus and Middle Volga, and numerous regions with distinct identities that feel increasingly estranged from Moscow.

    Instead of pursuing decentralization to accommodate regional aspirations, the Kremlin is downgrading their autonomy. This is evident in the new language law designed to promote "Russification" and plans to merge and eliminate several regions.

    Pressure is mounting across the country, with growing anger at local governors appointed by the Kremlin and resentment that Moscow appropriates their resources. Indeed, regions such as Sakha and Magadan in the far east, with their substantial mineral wealth, could be successful states without Moscow’s exploitation.

    Emerging states will benefit from forging closer economic and political contacts with neighboring countries rather than depending on Moscow, whose federal budget is drastically shrinking. Collapsing infrastructure means that residents of Siberia and Russia’s far east will become even more separated from the center, thus encouraging demands for secession and sovereignty.

    Given Russia’s ailments, an assertive Western approach would be more effective than reactive defense. Washington needs to return to core principles that accompanied the collapse of the Soviet Union by supporting democratization, pluralism, minority rights, genuine federalism, decentralization and regional self-determination among Russia’s disparate regions and ethnic groups.

    While Moscow seeks to divide the West and fracture the EU and North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) by backing nationalist and separatist parties in Europe, Washington should promote regional and ethnic self-determination inside the Russian Federation. This would send a strong signal that the West is fully capable of reacting to Moscow’s subversion.

    The rationale for dissolution should be logically framed: In order to survive, Russia needs a federal democracy and a robust economy; with no democratization on the horizon and economic conditions deteriorating, the federal structure will become increasingly ungovernable.

    To manage the process of dissolution and lessen the likelihood of conflict that spills over state borders, the West needs to establish links with Russia’s diverse regions and promote their peaceful transition toward statehood.
    NATO should prepare contingencies for both the dangers and the opportunities that Russia’s fragmentation will present. In particular, Moscow’s European neighbors must be provided with sufficient security to shield themselves from the most destabilizing scenarios while preparations are made for engaging with emerging post-Russia entities.

    Some regions could join countries such as Finland, Ukraine, China and Japan, from whom Moscow has forcefully appropriated territories in the past. Other republics in the North Caucasus, Middle Volga, Siberia and the far east could become fully independent states and forge relations with China, Japan, the U.S. and Europe.

    Neglecting Russia’s dissolution may prove more damaging to Western interests than making preparations to manage its international repercussions. To avoid sudden geopolitical jolts and possible military confrontations, Washington needs to monitor and encourage a peaceful rupture and establish links with emerging entities.

    The sudden collapse of the Soviet Union should serve as a lesson that far-reaching transformations occur regardless of the Kremlin’s disinformation campaigns or the West’s shortsighted adherence to a transient status quo.

    Janusz Bugajski is a senior fellow at the Center for European Policy Analysis (CEPA) in Washington, D.C. His recent book, co-authored with Margarita Assenova, is "Eurasian Disunion: Russia’s Vulnerable Flanks," (Jamestown, 2016).

    GarryB
    GarryB

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    Post  GarryB on Fri Jan 11, 2019 1:05 am

    HAhahaha... except all claims that the Russians are trying to undermine western democracy always seem to turn out to be british government funded anti russian troll farms or US democrat organisations paid for by the Linkdin developer to fight Russia using tactics suspected to be used by illusory Putin trolls that are never proven to exist... bots turn out to be security guards from scotland or american mothers worried about how fucked up and paranoid the west is getting.

    If Russia actually wanted to destroy the west, then American arrogance has set the stage to divide and break alliances... they just need to will to be censored like so many in the west are clearly so willing to be... note this article is by the Jamestown institute... so no surprises there.
    higurashihougi
    higurashihougi

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    Post  higurashihougi on Fri Jan 11, 2019 2:51 am

    Even the defense budget is shrinking and barely reaches a tenth of the U.S.
    so with the budget 10 times more than Russia and the U.S. armed forces still uses human loader, still uses M16, virtually no supersonic anti ship missile, their submarines are unable to completely break the Arctic ice sheet on their own, RQ-170 were unable to be invisible on Iran radars, F-35 are sitting ducks with air inlet of MiG-21 level, H-bomb still has to be rely on tritium...

    With the budget of 10 times more than Russia, the U.S. managed to facilitate opium manufacture and strengthen Taliban position in Afghanistan, meanwhile Russia together with Syrian people crushed the terrorists one by one and it is clear that Assad won't go anywhere but is the legitimate leader of Syria.

    Now the American taxpayers have to seriously think what their money are being used for.
    GarryB
    GarryB

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    Post  GarryB on Fri Jan 11, 2019 5:26 am

    Indeed the enormous US military budget has led to a huge expansion of Iranian influence in the Middle East because of US action in Yemen and Syria and Iraq and Afghanistan, leading to destabilisation in all those regions, which led to Iranian assistance to those victims of US aggression.
    Nibiru
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    Post  Nibiru on Tue Jan 15, 2019 4:52 am

    Here is a special Vesti episode dedicated to the article above

    kvs
    kvs

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    Post  kvs Today at 6:53 am



    So CNN is basically the Democrat New York mafia.

    Good to see some sanity in the US media. But this commentator is a total outlier. The rest of Fox is much more conformist
    to the Russophobe agenda.

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