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    F-35 Development and News Thread:

    ahmedfire
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    Post  ahmedfire on Sat Apr 25, 2020 7:10 pm




    The Pentagon will have to live with limits on F-35’s supersonic flights



    WASHINGTON — An issue that risks damage to the F-35’s tail section if the aircraft needs to maintain supersonic speeds is not worth fixing and will instead be addressed by changing the operating parameters  lol1  , the F-35 Joint Program Office told Defense News in a statement Friday.

    The deficiency, first reported by Defense News in 2019, means that at extremely high altitudes, the U.S. Navy’s and Marine Corps’ versions of the F-35 jet can only fly at supersonic speeds for short bursts of time before there is a risk of structural damage and loss of stealth capability.

    The problem may make it impossible for the Navy’s F-35C to conduct supersonic intercepts.

    “This issue was closed on December 17, 2019 with no further actions and concurrence from the U.S. services,” the F-35 JPO statement read. “The [deficiency report] was closed under the category of ‘no plan to correct,’ which is used by the F-35 team when the operator value provided by a complete fix does not justify the estimated cost of that fix.

    “In this case, the solution would require a lengthy development and flight testing of a material coating that can tolerate the flight environment for unlimited time while satisfying the weight and other requirements of a control surface. Instead, the issue is being addressed procedurally by imposing a time limit on high-speed flight.”

    The carrier-launched "C" variant and the short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing "B" version will both be able to carry out all their missions without correcting the deficiency, the JPO said.

    The potential damage from sustained high speeds would influence not only the F-35’s airframe and the low-observable coating that keeps it stealthy, but also the myriad antennas located on the back of the plane that are currently vulnerable to damage, according to documents exclusively obtained by Defense News.

    The JPO had classified the issues for the "B" and "C" models as separate category 1 deficiencies, indicating in one document that the problem presents a challenge to accomplishing one of the key missions of the fighter jet. In this scale, category 1 represents the most serious type of deficiency.

    While it may seem dire that an aircraft procured for flying at supersonic speeds will be unable to do so for extended periods, the F-35 may not need to do it that often.

    For the F-35, as opposed to the F-22 where supersonic flight is baked into its tactics, the ability to fly supersonic is more of a “break glass in case of emergency” feature, said Bryan Clark, an analyst with the Hudson Institute and a retired naval officer.

    “Supersonic flight is not a big feature of the F-35,” Clark said. “It’s capable of it, but when you talk to F-35 pilots, they’ll say they’d fly supersonic in such limited times and cases that — while having the ability is nice because you never know when you are going to need to run away from something very fast — it’s just not a main feature for their tactics.”

    In fact, going supersonic obviates the main advantages of the F-35, Clark said. “It sort of defeats all the main advantages of the F-35,” he explained. “It takes you out of stealthiness, it burns gas like crazy so you lose the range benefits of a single engine and larger fuel tank. When you go into afterburner, you are heating up the outside of your aircraft.”

    That creates all kinds of signatures that can be detected by an adversary, Clark said.

    What if?

    But a retired naval aviator told Defense News last year that the limitations on the afterburner could prove deadly in close-combat scenarios.

    The concept of operations for the F-35 is to kill an enemy aircraft before it can detect the fighter jet, but relying on long-range kills is a perspective that, for historical and cultural reasons, naval aviation distrusts. In the Vietnam War, when air warfare began heavily relying on missiles and moved away from the forward gun, it caused a spike in air-to-air combat deaths.

    The lesson naval aviation took away was to prevent the latest and greatest technology from offsetting the learning of fundamentals, and it was the impetus behind the formation of Top Gun 50 years ago, a naval strike fighter course for training and tactics development.

    “The solution is: ‘Hey, we’ll just limit the afterburner to less than a minute at a time,’ ” a retired naval aviator said when told of the issue. “Which, with what the aircraft is supposed to do and be capable of, that’s a pretty significant limitation.”

    Primarily it would be an issue if the aircraft had to maneuver at high speeds to avoid a missile or survive a dogfight.

    The issue is compounded for the Navy, which must operate forward for months at a time, because any significant issues with coatings or the structure of aircraft would require a depot-level repair. And so a damaged aircraft would remain damaged until its host ship returns to home port, reducing the combat effectiveness of the air wing.

    “We might have to be operating at sea for eight months, so if you damage something on week one, guess what? It’s damaged for the rest of the deployment,” the aviator said. “And it affects your ability to evade detection by the enemy — you just degraded that asset permanently until you can get it somewhere where it can be fixed, at great expense and time.”

    Other deficiencies

    Three other category 1 deficiencies have also been officially designated as “closed," meaning they have either been fixed or the performance of the aircraft is being accepted as is, the JPO reported.

    The so-called green glow deficiency has been closed out as of last July. Green glow refers to a green light emitted by the helmet-mounted display’s LED lights. That glow obstructs a pilot’s view of an aircraft carrier’s deck lights during landing operations at sea in very low light, such as that experienced at night.

    The issue was closed “as a result of incorporating an improved Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) Helmet Mounted Display (HMD),” the JPO told Defense News.

    “The Generation III F-35 OLED Helmet Display Unit (HDU) significantly reduced the ‘green glow’ experienced by pilots during night operations. The F-35 JPO has taken delivery of the first order of F-35 OLED HDUs to support the U.S. Navy (USN) and U.S. Marine Corps (USMC), and a second order of OLED HDUs has been placed,” the office’s statement read.

    An issue created when the F-35A and F-35B blow a tire, which can result in a severed hydraulic line, will remain uncorrected, the JPO statement said, but it has not come up again since the program switched tires.

    “The DR [deficiency report] was closed under the category of ‘no plan to correct’ based on the fact that the landing gear system design meets all F-35 safety standards,” the statement read. “Issues related to premature bursting of tires were resolved by tire design changes during early F-35 development and no instances of dual hydraulic system loss caused by a tire burst have ever been observed on an F-35.”
    And an issue that forced the F-35 to land in cold weather because of battery trouble has been fixed, the JPO said. The issue was caused by extreme cold entering the plane when the doors to the jet’s nose landing gear were open, setting off alarm bells, according to “for official use only” documents exclusively obtained by Defense News.

    The cold would enter the plane and overwhelm the battery heater blanket, which is installed to keep a 28-volt battery running at peak condition. The battery would not shut down, but because of the cold, the blanket could not heat the battery as quickly as intended, triggering warning lights in the cockpit that the battery was going to fail.

    A software upgrade fixed the problem, the JPO said.

    “This issue was resolved on July 22, 2019 due to improvements in the battery charger’s firmware,” the statement read. “The firmware changes were developed by the battery charger supplier, and integrated and tested by Lockheed Martin and the F-35 Lightning II Joint Program Office.”
    https://www.defensenews.com/air/2020/04/24/the-pentagon-will-have-to-live-with-limits-on-f-35s-supersonic-flights/
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    Post  ahmedfire on Sat Apr 25, 2020 7:13 pm

    Mass production of platforms that has technical issues and expecting to be solved during the operation life time . Rolling Eyes
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    Post  ahmedfire on Mon Apr 27, 2020 8:52 pm

    Five F-35 issues have been downgraded, but they remain unsolved

    kvs
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    Post  kvs on Mon Apr 27, 2020 10:02 pm

    No problem, the NATzO fake stream media will ignore these problems when compared to its rabid libel and smear of anything from Russia.
    And I am sure they will pay off some Russian losers here and there to "corroborate" their propaganda such as we had with the WADA
    farce.

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    Post  magnumcromagnon on Mon Apr 27, 2020 10:20 pm

    kvs wrote:No problem, the NATzO fake stream media will ignore these problems when compared to its rabid libel and smear of anything from Russia.
    And I am sure they will pay off some Russian losers here and there to "corroborate" their propaganda such as we had with the WADA
    farce.


    The Drive smegma-gargles anything F-35 related, and shits on the Su-57 every chance they get....I bet they actually believe PAK-FA was developed by Felons because of the NATO designation.
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    Post  GarryB on Tue Apr 28, 2020 4:21 am

    When your opponent is making a mistake... don't interrupt them.

    If HATO fanboys want to think they are invincible that is actually good... will just make reality a bit more of a shock for them.

    To be honest, it is powerful... if you had asked me before 2014 if the Russians could take and control the entire Crimean region without firing a shot... without a blood bath, I would have been skeptical... if you said Putin is sending troops to help Syria I would not be happy about that either...

    Now you can't call me a HATO fanboy, but realistically I respect the level of organisation and planning needed for such operations and the scope for a screwup and deaths is normally quite high... but also elevated 100% when you have the west doing everything it can to start something that will quickly spiral out of control and create chaos... like they so love to do around the world in places they don't control.

    Of course I have been pleasantly surprised at the transformation of the Russian military... and to be honest the real motivating factor was Kosovo. When Kosovo declared independence then Russia opened its borders to South Ossetia and Abkhazia and normalised relations... before then SO and ABkhazia were dependent on Georgia, but the change in policy from Russia led to them becoming rather more independent... the Georgian overreaction led to the use of Russian forces and the realisation there were serious problems that needed to be addressed... first and foremost their C4IR capacity was gone... you can't fight a war if you don't know where you are and you don't know where the enemy is and also what enemy your are facing.

    Having long range accurate cruise missiles means nothing if you can't find target coordinates to send the missiles to.

    Syria has shown they are now a capable force that can work together as a team and get the job done. Their pilots have gotten real war experience of dropping real weapons on real targets...
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    Post  JohninMK on Tue Apr 28, 2020 12:15 pm

    Worth copying into here in full, its truly amazing stuff. In essence, the F-35B/C can't fly fast to escape for long or turn hard to avoid an incoming missile without heat damage or worse, melting the tail boom!! Better still they downgrade its seriousness by adding pilot warnings in software. Which the USAF Generals accept, thinking about their careers post retirement!

    This is mind boggling stuff and by the sound of it they can't correct it so are having to change its role from less an F-16 to more an A-10. The export customers must be really pleased at this, especially those without a real fighter in their fleet and their leaders having no future role in the US MIC to compensate them.


    The Pentagon’s F-35 program has verified it won’t be fixing a defect in the US Navy’s version of the plane, which limits its ability to fly at supersonic speeds for any length of time. The issue could limit the airplane’s effectiveness in combat, although that itself may be a rarity, given how the Pentagon seems intent on using it.

    The F-35 has a problem with its tail that limits its ability to fly faster than the speed of sound under certain conditions, unless the pilot wants to risk damaging the jet. The Pentagon’s F-35 Joint Program Office (JPO) has recently clarified that it won’t be spending time fixing the design defect, but will instead limit the jet’s missions so that it doesn’t have to do so.

    “The [deficiency report] was closed under the category of ‘no plan to correct,’ which is used by the F-35 team when the operator value provided by a complete fix does not justify the estimated cost of that fix,” the JPO told Defense News in a statement on Friday.

    “In this case, the solution would require a lengthy development and flight testing of a material coating that can tolerate the flight environment for unlimited time while satisfying the weight and other requirements of a control surface,” the JPO noted. “Instead, the issue is being addressed procedurally by imposing a time limit on high-speed flight.”

    The problem has been observed in the B and C models of the F-35 since 2011, when the jet began experiencing “thermal damage” on its horizontal tail and tail boom, including “bubbling [and] blistering” of the stealth coating that shields the plane from enemy radars, Sputnik reported in June 2019, citing JPO documents obtained by Defense News.

    However, the problem only occurred when the plane was pushed to its extremes, flying at 50,000 feet and when sprinting at full afterburner between Mach 1.3 and Mach 1.4. The solution adopted by the Department of the Navy, which uses both the vertical takeoff/landing F-35B and the carrier-based F-35C, is to simply order its pilots not to fly at such speeds.

    The issue is especially problematic for the carrier-based fighters, which might not return to an airfield for months at a time, as the problem - rated as Category 1, the most serious level, by the Pentagon - is one that requires a machine shop in order to fix.

    F-35 Program Executive Officer Vice Adm. Mat Winter told Defense News in June that the problem wasn’t considered serious since testers couldn’t replicate it, and engineers were getting by with a spray-on coating that provides additional heat protection.

    According to Hudson Institute analyst Bryan Clark, those limitations aren’t really a big deal, because the plane rarely has to do any of those things anyway.

    “Supersonic flight is not a big feature of the F-35,” Clark told Defense News. “It’s capable of it, but when you talk to F-35 pilots, they’ll say they’d fly supersonic in such limited times and cases that — while having the ability is nice because you never know when you are going to need to run away from something very fast — it’s just not a main feature for their tactics.”

    Pentagon planners have for years been reconsidering the F-35’s battlefield role, moving past the early expectations that the tiny stealth jet would accompany its larger air superiority cousins, the F-22 Raptors, into combat as ground strike aircraft. Now, it seems the Lightning II’s greatest asset, aside from its stealth, are its huge antenna suite and the wealth of information it can scoop up about enemy locations, movements and communications.

    One notable example of the F-35’s capabilities was a November 2019 drill in which a US Air Force F-35A used its wide array of sensors to pinpoint a simulated enemy radar station, feeding information about its location to a US Army HIMARS rocket launcher unit, which destroyed the radar.

    This is much as US Air Force Chief of Staff General David Goldfein mused in February 2019, when he told guests at the Brookings Institute think tank that the F-35 would likely function as the “quarterback” of a future air campaign, “calling audibles in real time,” Air Force Magazine reported. That future air campaign, against “near peer” rivals such as China and Russia, would likely feature F-15E Strike Eagles and F-16 Falcons as the primary attack aircraft, filling the role for which the F-35 was once envisioned.

    A big part of the reason the F-35 has taken a back seat in the ground strike field is that due to another design error, its internal weapons bays can’t carry that many munitions - it was big news last May when maker Lockheed Martin announced it had found a way to fix six missiles inside the jet. The notorious “beast mode” option exists, in which the plane’s external weapons mounts are filled to the brim with munitions, but at that point, stealth is clearly no longer a concern.

    However, one retired naval aviator told Defense News last June that cutting down on supersonic flight was “a pretty significant limitation.”

    “If you want to use it on the first or second day [of a conflict], it has to be stealthy, so you can’t hang a lot of external stores, which means you have to use internal fuel and internal weapons,” the aviator noted. “And that means you have to launch fairly close in, and you’ve got to be close enough to do something to somebody. And that usually means you are in a contested environment.”

    “So you’re saying that I can’t operate in a contested environment unless you can guarantee that I’m going to be however far away from the thing I’m trying to kill,” the aviator added. “If I had to maneuver to defeat a missile, maneuver to fight another aircraft, the plane could have issues moving. And if I turn around aggressively and get away from these guys and use the afterburner, it starts to melt or have issues.”


    https://sputniknews.com/military/202004271079114315-no-plan-to-correct-us-navys-f-35s-wont-get-fix-for-speed-limiting-defect/
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    Post  GarryB on Wed Apr 29, 2020 3:06 am

    So they are saying with its limitations that instead of using it as a fighter that they are going to use F-16s and F-15s as fighters and the F-35 as some sort of mini JSTARS type platform???

    First of all that means the naval F-35 will rely on the F-18 remaining the fighter... so the F/A-18 which is a fighter and a strike aircraft will become a fighter and the F-35 will be a stealthy JSTARS?

    So why would they need 3,500 F-35 JSTARS?

    Next step would be to cut numbers of F-35s to probably 1,500 or perhaps even 750, and to put the F-15 and F-16 back in to production again... hahahaha
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    Post  JohninMK on Wed Apr 29, 2020 12:42 pm

    GarryB wrote:So they are saying with its limitations that instead of using it as a fighter that they are going to use F-16s and F-15s as fighters and the F-35 as some sort of mini JSTARS type platform???

    First of all that means the naval F-35 will rely on the F-18 remaining the fighter... so the F/A-18 which is a fighter and a strike aircraft will become a fighter and the F-35 will be a stealthy JSTARS?

    So why would they need 3,500 F-35 JSTARS?

    Next step would be to cut numbers of F-35s to probably 1,500 or perhaps even 750, and to put the F-15 and F-16 back in to production again... hahahaha

    It seems F-15 and F-22 with F-16 as multirole.

    The numbers of F-35 have been falling. Also the F-15 is back in production for the USAF, ultimately replacing the 200 or so F-15C/D with the F-15EX with only the front seat used. The Saudis and Qataris paid for the R&D.
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    Post  ahmedfire on Wed Apr 29, 2020 3:19 pm

    Next step would be to cut numbers of F-35s to probably 1,500 or perhaps even 750, and to put the F-15 and F-16 back in to production again... hahahaha

    I felt the same lol1 lol1
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    Post  kvs on Sat May 02, 2020 5:49 pm

    Amazing corruption in the US MIC.   So the F-35 cannot fly at supersonic speeds.   What!?  It is not even about it flying at over
    Mach 2.  It can't even exceed Mach 1 without damage and there apparently is no fix.   Thus, this is not a technical hangup but
    a gross design flaw.

    Uncle Scumbag waving his stick now looks like the meaty sort of stick.
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    Post  JohninMK on Sat May 02, 2020 9:50 pm

    kvs wrote:Amazing corruption in the US MIC.   So the F-35 cannot fly at supersonic speeds.   What!?  It is not even about it flying at over
    Mach 2.  It can't even exceed Mach 1 without damage and there apparently is no fix.   Thus, this is not a technical hangup but
    a gross design flaw.

    Uncle Scumbag waving his stick now looks like the meaty sort of stick.
    That's a bit harsh.

    Doesn't affect the F-35A, only the B and C Very Happy
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    Post  GarryB on Sun May 03, 2020 6:19 am

    Most fighter planes have never flown at top speed... it takes time and burns a lot of fuel and really offers no major benefit, but climbing and accelerating to mach 1.5 or so is an excellent way of extending the reach and speed of your air to air missiles and air to ground missiles... for a plane like an Su-35 accelerating and climbing before launching a missile attack means better reach and extended no escape zone for its missiles... if the F-35 can't do that then it is in serious trouble.

    The whole concept of the F-22 was that it would fly high at supersonic speeds making it a very difficult target... you can either remain subsonic and shoot up at the supersonic target making your missile much shorter range to intercept the faster moving target after a climb, or you accelerate and climb and burn lots of fuel to get your missile up to the target... the point is that you are firing arrows at a target on the top of a hill so they have the range advantage.

    If you are only flying subsonically however even if you climb to altitude you are not getting the full benefit of extended range...

    New missiles even more so if they are scramjet powered because high altitude and high speed launch will greatly improve their range and performance.... something the F-35 will clearly not be able to do...

    If they are using them to replace JSTARS aircraft then they probably already have more than they need, though their allies will still be using them as faulty fighters... when they cut production from 3,500, to 1,500, and then to 750, and then to the 189 produced like they did with the F-22... then this will likely bode well for real HATO fighters like the Typhoon and Rafale and Gripen...
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    Post  ahmedfire on Wed May 13, 2020 8:56 pm

    F-35 Faces Parts Problems After Turks Expulsion

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    Post  JohninMK on Thu May 14, 2020 12:49 am

    The F-35 Lightning II’s Block 4 upgrade, which will allow the stealth aircraft to carry nuclear weapons, has been delayed by at least nine months. The F-35 is slated to become the primary nuclear strike aircraft for several US allies. Meanwhile, costs for the program have soared above $1.6 trillion.

    According to a new report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO), a congressional watchdog agency, the F-35’s planned Block 4 upgrade has been delayed by nine months, pushing the plane’s full-rate production decision back to sometime between September 2020 and March 2021.

    While Block 4 will integrate a number of new weapons into the F-35’s repertoire, such as Naval Strike Missile, the Meteor and SPEAR missiles and several laser-guided bombs, by far the most consequential weapon is the B61 nuclear gravity bomb, which is small enough to fit inside the F-35’s internal weapons bay.

    Via the F-35 Block 4, NATO partners who wield US nuclear weapons thanks to nuclear sharing agreements will be able to continue to carry out nuclear strikes. With the Panavia Tornado exiting service with most European partners, a delay in fielding the F-35 Block 4 could leave a gap in NATO’s nuclear capabilities, especially for the Italian, Dutch and Belgian air forces.


    https://sputniknews.com/military/202005131079296398-f-35s-nuclear-weapons-upgrade-delayed-as-program-costs-top-16-trillion/
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    Post  ahmedfire on Fri May 15, 2020 1:10 pm

    Trump On F-35: ‘We Should Make Everything’ In US Very Happy

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    Post  kvs on Fri May 15, 2020 3:30 pm

    ahmedfire wrote:

    Trump On F-35: ‘We Should Make Everything’ In US Very Happy


    Thanks to 40 years of offshoring, there is a lack of technological competence in the USA which will create a short term disaster for
    any re-shoring of production chains. Just like we see with the US nuclear industry where human capital disappeared to retirement
    and could not be restored with the wave of a wand (or is that dick?).

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    Post  ahmedfire on Fri May 15, 2020 9:07 pm


    More bugs Very Happy


    Swiss Internal Report Flags F-35 Afterburner Issue



    A department in the Swiss government tasked with defense procurements has flagged a problem with the F-35 jet - the engine’s afterburner causes overheating at the aircraft’s rear.

    The Military Intelligence Service (SRM) reported what it calls a “serious” problem with the F-35B and F-35 jets, to the Swiss Federal Department of Defense (DDPS) which compiled an internal report.

    “The F-35B and F-35C jets suffer from serious problems when using afterburning. Post combustion, an excessive increase in heat at the rear of the aircraft has been observed,” wrote PageSuite, citing the DDPS document.

    A jet engine’s afterburner component provides an increase in thrust for supersonic flight, take-off and in combat situations.

    The heat from afterburner exhaust causes the F-35 B/C jets to experience “bubbling and blistering” of its radar-absorbent material (RAM) and of horizontal tail surfaces and boom.

    Sensitive sensors buried inside the skin of the rear tail surfaces are also susceptible to damage.

    The US military reportedly faced the same problem in 2011: F-35B and F-35C flying near their maximum service ceiling of 50,000 feet damaged themselves using their afterburners to attain speeds of Mach 1.3 and 1.4.

    Following the incident, the Marines instituted a policy requiring F-35B pilots not to engage afterburners for more than 80 seconds cumulatively at Mach 1.3, or 40 seconds at Mach 1.4. Navy F-35C pilots have 50 seconds at Mach 1.3 to ration. Three minutes of non-afterburning flight to cool down the tail area was suggested to “reset” the afterburner allowance.

    While Switzerland is not looking at the “troubled” versions of the jet under its $8 billion procurement project, it is unsure whether the F-35A, is free from the problem. The F-35A is pitted against Eurofighter Typhoon, Dassault Rafale, Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet and Saab's JAS-39E/F Gripen to replace the Swiss Air Force’s ageing Northrop F-5 Tiger IIs.

    “Are these difficulties known by B and C also present in model A, which the Swiss army could buy? We are entitled to question the supersonic capabilities of the F-35A, the version intended for the US Air Force and most export customers,” the SRM questioned in the internal report.

    When asked about the problem, manufacturer Lockheed Martin said: “The heat emitted by the afterburner does not present any problem for the F-35A, whose afterburner does not have the same characteristics as the models B and C. The capacity of the F-35A in afterburner or in supersonic flight is therefore not questioned.”
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    Post  ahmedfire on Sat May 16, 2020 8:27 pm

    USAF abandons 80% mission capability rate goal after F-22, F-35 and F-16 fail to hit target



    USAF abandons 80% mission capability rate goal after F-22, F-35 and F-16 fail to hit target
    The US Air Force (USAF) has abandoned mission capability rate goals for its Lockheed Martin F-22s, F-35s and F-16s, after none of the fighters hit the target.

    In September 2018, former US secretary of defense James Mattis ordered the USAF and US Navy (USN) to increase mission capable rates for those aircraft and Boeing F/A-18s to more than 80% by the end of September 2019. The mission capability rate is the percentage of aircraft that are able to perform at least one mission over a period of time.

    USAF chief of staff nominee General Charles Brown says the service has dropped that readiness goal.

    “The Office of the Secretary of Defense determined the fiscal year 2019 80% mission capable rate initiative is not an FY2020 requirement,” he said in written testimony sent to the US Armed Services Committee and released on 7 May. “As a result, the air force returned to allowing lead commands to determine the required [mission capability] rates to meet readiness objectives.”

    After initially making rosy projections about the F-35 reaching 80% mission capability, the Department of Defense (DoD) gradually walked back its forecast. In July 2019, it said F-35s and F-22s would fail to meet the goal. Nevertheless, F-16s were supposed to hit 80% mission capability by September 2019. In the end, not one of the USAF’s fighters achieved the mark.

    The F-16’s mission capable reached a high of 75% in June 2019, F-22s reached a high of 68% in April 2019 and F-35s hit a high of 74% in September 2019, says Brown in his testimony. The USN reported in September 2019 that its fleet of F/A-18s surpassed the 80% mark.

    “From April 2018 to February 2020, overall readiness increased 16%, and pacing-unit readiness – those units required in the first 30 days of Combatant Command war plans – increased 35%,” he adds.

    Despite improvements, the end goal was not reached for a variety of reasons, says Brown.

    “Maintaining ageing aircraft is an extremely difficult and expensive task, while new, technologically advanced weapons systems present their own challenges,” he says. “We developed and are now implementing a Strategic Sustainment Framework that will both improve materiel readiness and set the conditions for long-term cost reduction by developing multiple sources of supply, enhancing our repair network capabilities and capitalising on conditions-based maintenance, plus other commercial best practices.”

    Details of the new Strategic Sustainment Framework were not disclosed.

    F-35s and F-22s are notoriously difficult to maintain because of complex designs and stealth body coatings, which must be periodically preserved by hand. In particular, the relatively new F-35 remains plagued with design and production problems resulting in some 873 deficiencies, according to the DoD’s most-recent Office of the Director of Operational Test & Evaluation report, released to the US Congress on 30 January.
    magnumcromagnon
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    Post  magnumcromagnon on Sat May 16, 2020 8:48 pm

    ahmedfire wrote:

    USAF abandons 80% mission capability rate goal after F-22, F-35 and F-16 fail to hit target





    USAF abandons 80% mission capability rate goal after F-22, F-35 and F-16 fail to hit target
    The US Air Force (USAF) has abandoned mission capability rate goals for its Lockheed Martin F-22s, F-35s and F-16s, after none of the fighters hit the target.

    In September 2018, former US secretary of defense James Mattis ordered the USAF and US Navy (USN) to increase mission capable rates for those aircraft and Boeing F/A-18s to more than 80% by the end of September 2019. The mission capability rate is the percentage of aircraft that are able to perform at least one mission over a period of time.

    USAF chief of staff nominee General Charles Brown says the service has dropped that readiness goal.

    “The Office of the Secretary of Defense determined the fiscal year 2019 80% mission capable rate initiative is not an FY2020 requirement,” he said in written testimony sent to the US Armed Services Committee and released on 7 May. “As a result, the air force returned to allowing lead commands to determine the required [mission capability] rates to meet readiness objectives.”

    After initially making rosy projections about the F-35 reaching 80% mission capability, the Department of Defense (DoD) gradually walked back its forecast. In July 2019, it said F-35s and F-22s would fail to meet the goal. Nevertheless, F-16s were supposed to hit 80% mission capability by September 2019. In the end, not one of the USAF’s fighters achieved the mark.

    The F-16’s mission capable reached a high of 75% in June 2019, F-22s reached a high of 68% in April 2019 and F-35s hit a high of 74% in September 2019, says Brown in his testimony. The USN reported in September 2019 that its fleet of F/A-18s surpassed the 80% mark.

    “From April 2018 to February 2020, overall readiness increased 16%, and pacing-unit readiness – those units required in the first 30 days of Combatant Command war plans – increased 35%,” he adds.

    Despite improvements, the end goal was not reached for a variety of reasons, says Brown.

    “Maintaining ageing aircraft is an extremely difficult and expensive task, while new, technologically advanced weapons systems present their own challenges,” he says. “We developed and are now implementing a Strategic Sustainment Framework that will both improve materiel readiness and set the conditions for long-term cost reduction by developing multiple sources of supply, enhancing our repair network capabilities and capitalising on conditions-based maintenance, plus other commercial best practices.”

    Details of the new Strategic Sustainment Framework were not disclosed.

    F-35s and F-22s are notoriously difficult to maintain because of complex designs and stealth body coatings, which must be periodically preserved by hand. In particular, the relatively new F-35 remains plagued with design and production problems resulting in some 873 deficiencies, according to the DoD’s most-recent Office of the Director of Operational Test & Evaluation report, released to the US Congress on 30 January.
    How exceptional of them! lol1 Razz Embarassed
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    Post  ahmedfire on Sat May 16, 2020 10:15 pm

    They are collecting the past mistakes . That's normal when the corruption and lobbies decide which weapons the US should build   Laughing
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    Post  ahmedfire on Wed May 20, 2020 1:35 pm

    F-35 crashes at Eglin AFB, pilot successfully ejected and in stable condition. 2nd crash at base in four days

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    Post  ahmedfire on Wed May 20, 2020 1:37 pm

    This is about half billion loss in one week !
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    Post  magnumcromagnon on Wed May 20, 2020 3:32 pm

    ahmedfire wrote:This is about half billion loss in one week !

    A F-22 and a F-35 crashed in the same week... Cool

    F-35 Development and News Thread: - Page 21 Keep-calm-and-be-a-flying-turd
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    Post  AlfaT8 on Wed May 20, 2020 5:29 pm

    The hell is going on over there?
    I could understand the F-35s, but what's up with the F-22, that aircraft should be solid by now, or do they just age that badly?

    What's next, a B-2?


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