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    Russian Navy: Status & News #2

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    Austin

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    Post  Austin on Thu Aug 06, 2015 8:39 am

    Russian Navy: Status & News #2 - Page 24 Noise-10
    Russian Navy: Status & News #2 - Page 24 Noise-11
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    Post  GarryB on Sat Aug 08, 2015 1:13 am

    Very bad charts Austin... I mean if they completely withdraw the Akula II from service doesn't it suddenly become undetectable?

    Plus in 2009 how much actual data on the sound emissions from an in service Yasen or Borei class sub did they have actual access to?

    Zero.

    So it is just all estimates.

    But what is the purpose of this chart?

    The purpose is critical because it might just be a boogeyman chart for US naval personel to put the enemy threat in some sort of order, but it might also be an attempt to try to get better funding for ASW forces... in the latter case it might be exaggerated to illicit more funds, while in the former case it might be underestimated to prevent panic... in other words this is the order of quietness, but we can still detect them all easily enough...
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    Post  nastle77 on Mon Aug 10, 2015 9:29 am

    http://www.military-today.com/navy/kara_class.htm



    A single gas-turbine exhaust funnel dominated the large superstructure. On the ship's stern was a helicopter landing pad with a hangar partially recessed below the flight deck. To stow the ASW helicopter the hanger roof hatch and doors had to be opened; the helicopter was pushed in and then lowered to the deck via an elevator.

    The ship's Shtorm (SA-N-3 Goblet) and Rastrub (SS-N-14 Silex) ASW missiles have secondary anti-ship capabilities, the former having a 25-kiloton nuclear warhead available in place of the normal 150-kg HE type. At the height of the Cold War it is believed that all Soviet ships with dual-capable weapon systems had at least 25 per cent of their missiles equipped with nuclear warheads while at sea.


    Trying not to start too many new threads Wink

    These questions about Kara class

    1-Is it true the SAN-3 had nuke warheads ? WHat were they used against a group of aircraft ? another ship ? since its a dual role missile

    2-Did really soviet dual role weapons have 25 % nuke warheads at sea ?

    Can the helicopters on the Kara class be also used for guidance for cruise missiles like the SSN-3a/b of other ships ?
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    Post  GarryB on Tue Aug 11, 2015 5:23 am

    1-Is it true the SAN-3 had nuke warheads ? WHat were they used against a group of aircraft ? another ship ? since its a dual role missile

    Just off the top of my head the SA-N-3 was one of the few naval SAMs not actually based on any land based Soviet SAM... I don't see why it could not be fitted with a nuclear warhead... they were big missiles with big conventional warheads.

    And I suspect when fitted with nukes they would be used against both ground and aerial targets... being command guided of course it could be steered at aerial and ground targets.

    2-Did really soviet dual role weapons have 25 % nuke warheads at sea ?

    I have no idea, I do know that was the western expectation.

    Can the helicopters on the Kara class be also used for guidance for cruise missiles like the SSN-3a/b of other ships ?

    There was a dedicated missile guidance version of the Ka-25 and Ka-32 that had external Yagi antenna mounted on their noses to transmit target data to the missiles.
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    Post  Viktor on Tue Aug 11, 2015 11:42 am

    Nice thumbsup

    Return to the Depths: This Soviet Sub Makes a Massive Comeback

    Russia's Zvezdochka shipyard completed repairs and modernization work on the BS-64 Podmoskovie nuclear submarine after 15 years in the slipway.

    In its sea trials, the BS-64 Podmoskovie ("Suburban Moscow") will cooperate with other nuclear submarines such as the Kashalot ("Cachalot"), Paltus ("Halibut") and the infamous Losharik. Originally laid down in 1982 and in service from 1986 to 1999, the BS-64, the submarine, then known as the K-64, spent nearly 16 years in the dock for repairs and modernization.

    During the repairs, the submarine's missile bays were removed and replaced with scientific research facilities. The modernization also added equipment for docking to other submarines.
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    Post  George1 on Wed Aug 12, 2015 6:19 pm

    Security Council: A new edition of the Maritime Doctrine will help to strengthen the position of Russia
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    Post  George1 on Wed Aug 12, 2015 6:47 pm

    The day-by-day story of Kursk submarine tragedy:
    http://rbth.com/multimedia/pictures/multimedia/2015/08/12/timeline-kursk_383011
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    Post  Maximmmm on Wed Aug 12, 2015 11:56 pm

    Bunch of news:

    We got the second buyan out on the black sea: Buyan

    Work has resumed on the 4th 5th and 6th (!) Grigorovitch class frigates. Delivery dates will depend on when the new turbines get in: http://flotprom.ru/2015/%D0%AF%D0%BD%D1%82%D0%B0%D1%80%D1%8C25/

    Podmoskovie has been launched after overhaul: http://flotprom.ru/2015/%D0%97%D0%B2%D0%B5%D0%B7%D0%B4%D0%BE%D1%87%D0%BA%D0%B042/

    People are kicking around the idea of making zaporozhie a museum (which I totally suport): http://flot.com/2015/%D0%9A%D1%80%D1%8B%D0%BC13/
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    Post  Austin on Fri Aug 14, 2015 11:33 am

    Russia's new maritime doctrine

    Russian president Vladimir Putin used the occasion of the Navy Day festivities on 26 July to announce the approval of a new 'Maritime Doctrine-2015' for the Russian Federation. Nikolai Novichkov assesses the key changes.

    The last time Russia issued a maritime doctrine - which codifies the country's naval priorities, strategy, and procurement - was in 2001, so a new document was thus overdue. According to Russian deputy prime minister Dmitry Rogozin there were two main reasons behind changes the 2015 doctrine brings into play: the changed international situation and improvements to Russia's navy since the last doctrine.

    Regional focus

    Maritime Doctrine-2015 divides Russian naval policy between six regions: Atlantic, Arctic, Antarctic, Caspian, Indian Ocean, and Pacific. Within each region the doctrine assesses four naval functions: operations, transport, marine science, and the development of natural resources. The focus of the doctrine is on two of these regions: the Arctic and the Atlantic.

    The national maritime policy in the regions is to be enforced by the navy's strategic and operational units of the Northern, Pacific, Baltic, and Black Sea fleets and the Caspian flotilla.

    Rogozin notes the Atlantic has been emphasised because of NATO expansion, the need to integrate Crimea and the Sevastopol naval base into the Russian economy, and to re-establish a permanent Russian Navy presence in the Mediterranean.

    Meanwhile, the Arctic focus is down to the growth of the Northern Sea Route, the need for free entry into the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and the wealth of the continental shelf.

    To implement the doctrine's provisions related to the Atlantic and Arctic regions, the structure and performance of the Baltic, Black Sea and Northern fleets will be improved. Enhancements to the combat capabilities of the fleets are also planned. For example, the Black Sea Fleet's infrastructure in Crimea and Novorossiysk will be bolstered.

    Shipbuilding strategy

    The 2015 doctrine adds a new section to the mix: shipbuilding. This, the doctrine states, is due to the re-emergence of the Russian shipbuilding sector over the past 10-15 years.

    Admiral Victor Chirkov, commander-in-chief of the Russian Navy states that the navy's priority is to develop and deploy advanced equipment to enable Russia to make up for lost ground (against rivals) and to become superior to them in certain areas. In addition to refitting the fleets, the navy is looking to build up stocks of weaponry and materiel; improve naval command and control (C2); integrate joint force C2 into the various theatres; and improve the navy's basing and support systems.

    Among these, priority will be given to supporting Russia's ballistic missile submarines (SSBNs) and nuclear attack submarines (SSNs) within the Northern and Pacific fleets.

    Additionally, the doctrine seeks to create a general-purpose marine force armed with long-range and high-precision strike systems capable of providing a non-nuclear deterrent.

    The navy's future surface fleet is to be divided between long-range multirole vessels and short-range vessels with modular capabilities. Looking ahead, the service intends to field a multi-service naval strike force capable of quick relocation to threatened areas.

    The doctrine also foresees the introduction of new and innovative technologies such as: artificial intelligence systems, unmanned aerial, surface and underwater vehicles (UAVs, USVs, UUVs), non-lethal weapon systems, and new weapon types such as directed-energy weapons.

    Russia will now look to create a single, integrated, and jam-proof fleet-wide C2 system for use at all levels from the strategic to the tactical. This is intended to be adaptable and to form a single information control complex to enable network-centric command of diverse naval and joint-service assets in any theatre of operations.

    In connection with the maritime doctrine, and amendments in some aspects of force development, the Russian Navy is expected to gain some additional resources because the creation of a well-balanced and equipped naval force is a long-term effort of 30-40 years. Considering this and the duration of ship design/construction work, the conceptual approach to the development of the navy will be an ongoing issue for 45-50 years.

    To take account of the implementation time and existing/forecast resource and technology restrictions, the creation of the new-model navy has been divided into three phases: up to 2020; 2021-2030; and 2031-2050. The content of each phase was outlined by Adm Chirkov for the various elements of the navy.

    Strategic nuclear forces

    Up until 2020 the maritime strategic nuclear force will focus on completing the development and launching of its fourth-generation Borey-class (Project 955/955A) SSBNs, while maintaining its remaining Delta III/IV-class (Project 667BDR/667BDRM) SSBNs in operational service.

    During the 2021-2030 phase work will proceed on replacing the Delta class with fourth-generation SSBNs. Within this second phase Russia will also work on developing a new ship-based (in fact submarine-based) strategic missile system and a fifth-generation SSBN class. The doctrine sets out that series production of the fifth-generation SSBN will then commence in the final 2031-2050 phase.

    General-purpose force


    The general-purpose marine force inventory will include in its first phase the creation of a strategic non-nuclear deterrent force, enhancements to its SSN and diesel-electric submarines (SSKs), the build-up of the inventory and capability of its surface forces, and the creation of the new marine rapid-response force. In the mid term the non-nuclear deterrent will be provided by Yasen-class (Project 885M) SSNs and Oscar-class (Project 885M) nuclear-powered guided missile submarines (SSGNs). Meanwhile, the capability of Russia's non-strategic submarines will be ensured by upgrading its third-generation SSNs and building a new generation of SSKs.

    During the 2021-2030 phase Russia's existing SSN/SSK fleet is planned to be improved by adding unmanned technologies, while construction of a new-generation SSN class is also planned.

    Surface fleet

    In the first phase Russia's Admiral Gorshkov-class (Project 22350) frigates and Steregushchy-class (Project 20380) corvettes and their variants will become the core of the surface force for long- and short-range operations.

    In the mid term a new-generation destroyer featuring advanced strike, air defence and missile defence capabilities will become the navy's main oceangoing ship. Between 2021 and 2030 a new class of modular multirole surface combat ship will be designed and enter series production as the successor to the Project 22350/20380 classes. It is envisaged that these will be armed with novel weapon systems and will carry unmanned vehicles of various sorts.

    The marine rapid-response force is intended to be capable of conducting missions in the maritime, aerial and land domains in any part of the world. For this, new aircraft carriers will be the core of its capability, along with multirole landing ships. Work to design a new class of Russian aircraft carrier is to be completed before 2020, with construction and entry into service planned for the second phase of the doctrine (2021-2030).

    Unlike the heavy aircraft cruisers of the previous generation of Russian aircraft carriers, the new carrier design will be multirole. It is envisaged to be equipped with manned and unmanned combat systems operating in the air, at sea, underwater and possibly in space. The carrier's air groups will include radar surveillance and C2 aircraft, alongside reconnaissance and strike UAVs.

    Naval Aviation

    For the Russian Naval Aviation the focus in the first phase will be the development and serial production of an advanced maritime patrol aircraft (MPA) by 2020.

    Additionally, Russia will look to develop and produce a new shore/ship-based multirole helicopter (to replace the Ka-27) and acquire a ship-based combat helicopter (the Ka-52K). Russia will also seek to develop advanced airborne strike systems.

    The second phase will see the deployment of the new Russian ship-based radar surveillance aircraft, ship-based UAVs, and ship-based strike aircraft. The 2021-2030 period will see the Russian Naval Aviation transition to optionally piloted aircraft, including those derived from existing manned aircraft. Obsolete aircraft are to be replaced by modern, multirole manned and unmanned aircraft. During the 2031-2050 phase naval aviation focus will switch to a new generation of multirole aircraft and UAVs and field a new generation of airborne precision weapon systems.

    Coastal forces

    The first phase of the doctrine concerning Russia's coastal troops and marine force aims to achieve: the completion of development of advance coastal-defence missiles and the issuing of them; and the enhancement of the marine brigade's ability to operate in different climates, including extreme Arctic conditions.

    Between 2021 and 2030 the doctrine plans the introduction of a highly mobile amphibious combat vehicle for the coastal troops so that they can support the marines' operations. The marines are also earmarked to begin receiving unmanned platforms during this period, possibly armed with directed-energy weapons or powered by alternative energy sources.

    Long term

    The direction of the final 2031-2050 phase is currently being analysed, according to Adm Chirkov. However, it is envisaged that during this final phase the following will be undertaken: series production of new-generation submarines; ongoing series production of the new aircraft carrier class; the start of series production of the new multirole ship class; the creation of a new generation of multirole unmanned systems; and the arming of coastal defence troops with new-generation unmanned missile systems capable of striking air, surface, sub-surface and space targets.

    Long-term plans (by 2050) also call for a transition to modular combat platforms for both surface ships and submarines.

    Nikolai Novichkov is a JDW Correspondent, reporting from Moscow
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    Post  Austin on Wed Aug 19, 2015 2:42 am

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    Post  artjomh on Thu Aug 20, 2015 8:09 am

    Oxidizer (N2O4) spill reported today in Vilyuchinsk during loading of a disposed R-29 SLBM.

    http://militarynews.ru/story.asp?rid=1&nid=386503

    Missile was reported to be shipping for decommissioning without warhead when a spill was discovered. No casualties reported (or expected) at this time.
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    Post  medo on Tue Aug 25, 2015 11:41 am

    http://politikus.ru/army/56592-minoborony-rf-zakupilo-tri-morskih-zrpk-pancir-m.html

    Russian MoD buy 3 naval Pantsir-M complexes.
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    Post  franco on Fri Aug 28, 2015 6:08 pm

    Russian - Chinese Naval Exercise 2015 Photos

    http://bmpd.livejournal.com/1450152.html

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    Post  JohninMK on Thu Sep 03, 2015 5:35 pm

    Not sure if this is the correct place for this item but it seems to fit. My highlight

    Conducting a routine scientific study of ocean environments, a lone Russian research vessel has attracted a lot of attention from the Pentagon. Despite the fact that it’s moving through international waters, the Yantar is being monitored by US Navy ships, aircraft, and even reconnaissance satellites. Last May, the Russian Navy christened its latest oceanographic research vessel. Built for deep sea research and rescue operations, it’s currently conducting operations in the Atlantic Ocean.

    "The Yantar is equipped with a unique on-board scientific research complex which enables it to collect data on the ocean environment, both in motion and on hold," said Alexei Burilichev, head of the deepwater research department at the Russian Defense Ministry. "There are no similar complexes anywhere."

    But despite the Yantar’s peaceful purpose, its presence has put the US military on high-alert. Senior defense officials speaking to Fox News say they have been monitoring the vessel since it was first spotted by satellites in the North Atlantic, believing it to be a spy ship. Now that it’s nearing its destination of Cuba, officials have raised panic over the fact that the Yantar is 300 miles off the coast of a US submarine base in Kings Bay, Georgia. Never mind that the ship’s location is in international waters and part of an ordinary sea route to Cuba.

    According to the Washington Free Beacon, Pentagon officials believe that the ship’s research equipment is being used to surveil the seafloor for sensors, and may even be cutting underwater communication cables. "It seems more likely they’d use their underwater sensors to map out defenses to prepare for future operations, and to avoid, blind, or destroy the sensors," Steffan Watkins, an intelligence analyst who monitors Russian ship movements, told the Free Beacon.

    No justification was offered for those claims, and officials gave no indications that any cables were, in fact, severed. The Pentagon would surely notice that kind of damage immediately. These suspicions seem to be based entirely on the fact that the Yantar contains gear capable of cutting cables, but as the Free Beacon points out, those are “used to rescue submarines if they become entangled” in underwater obstacles.

    This could in fact be a case of the US military projecting its own actions onto others.

    When asked by Fox News if the US used scientific research vessels to conduct covert reconnaissance missions, an anonymous senior defense official gave an interesting response.

    "Of course we do," he said, "what do you think all those 'oceanographic ships' are doing, studying whales?"


    US intelligence will likely continue to monitor the Yantar as it continues its operations.


    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/us/20150904/1026566646.html#ixzz3kiIcHqM0


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    Post  kvs on Thu Sep 03, 2015 11:37 pm

    JohninMK wrote:Not sure if this is the correct place for this item but it seems to fit. My highlight

    Conducting a routine scientific study of ocean environments, a lone Russian research vessel has attracted a lot of attention from the Pentagon. Despite the fact that it’s moving through international waters, the Yantar is being monitored by US Navy ships, aircraft, and even reconnaissance satellites. Last May, the Russian Navy christened its latest oceanographic research vessel. Built for deep sea research and rescue operations, it’s currently conducting operations in the Atlantic Ocean.

    "The Yantar is equipped with a unique on-board scientific research complex which enables it to collect data on the ocean environment, both in motion and on hold," said Alexei Burilichev, head of the deepwater research department at the Russian Defense Ministry. "There are no similar complexes anywhere."

    But despite the Yantar’s peaceful purpose, its presence has put the US military on high-alert. Senior defense officials speaking to Fox News say they have been monitoring the vessel since it was first spotted by satellites in the North Atlantic, believing it to be a spy ship. Now that it’s nearing its destination of Cuba, officials have raised panic over the fact that the Yantar is 300 miles off the coast of a US submarine base in Kings Bay, Georgia. Never mind that the ship’s location is in international waters and part of an ordinary sea route to Cuba.

    According to the Washington Free Beacon, Pentagon officials believe that the ship’s research equipment is being used to surveil the seafloor for sensors, and may even be cutting underwater communication cables. "It seems more likely they’d use their underwater sensors to map out defenses to prepare for future operations, and to avoid, blind, or destroy the sensors," Steffan Watkins, an intelligence analyst who monitors Russian ship movements, told the Free Beacon.

    No justification was offered for those claims, and officials gave no indications that any cables were, in fact, severed. The Pentagon would surely notice that kind of damage immediately. These suspicions seem to be based entirely on the fact that the Yantar contains gear capable of cutting cables, but as the Free Beacon points out, those are “used to rescue submarines if they become entangled” in underwater obstacles.

    This could in fact be a case of the US military projecting its own actions onto others.

    When asked by Fox News if the US used scientific research vessels to conduct covert reconnaissance missions, an anonymous senior defense official gave an interesting response.

    "Of course we do," he said, "what do you think all those 'oceanographic ships' are doing, studying whales?"


    US intelligence will likely continue to monitor the Yantar as it continues its operations.


    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/us/20150904/1026566646.html#ixzz3kiIcHqM0



    Good job. Russia needs to be proactive in undermining America's pathological imperial ambitions. The US has mined the whole
    sea floor with sensors to detect Russian submarines (but spews propaganda about them being noisy). Russia needs
    to tag every piece of spy junk that the US has polluted the oceans with and then have a plan to rapidly take them out
    of action.
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    Post  Big_Gazza on Fri Sep 04, 2015 12:25 am

    kvs wrote:Good job.  Russia needs to be proactive in undermining America's pathological imperial ambitions.  The US has mined the whole
    sea floor with sensors to detect Russian submarines (but spews propaganda about them being noisy).   Russia needs
    to tag every piece of spy junk that the US has polluted the oceans with and then have a plan to rapidly take them out
    of action.

    More to the point, I'd like to see Russia install acoustic noise generators near the US hydrophone nodes and blanket them with shit 24-7 & 365 days a year. Then adopt a sanctimonious "what, us?" attitude when the orcs complain....
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    Post  franco on Fri Sep 04, 2015 7:48 am

    Zvezda shipyard in the Far East to do upgrades and refits of 6 nuclear submarines. Would assume a mix of 949A SSGN and 971 SSN of which the Pacific Fleet has 5 each.

    http://tass.ru/en/russia/818879
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    Post  zg18 on Fri Sep 04, 2015 10:56 am

    "Yantar" oceanographic ship in visit to Havana harbor

    Russian Navy: Status & News #2 - Page 24 COD8sy7WIAAL_S9

    Very Happy
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    Post  GarryB on Fri Sep 04, 2015 7:45 pm

    Thanks Morpheus.... interesting to see Ataka/Shturm on Gibka... perhaps they will use it on small vessels where guided missiles (ATGM and MANPADs) can share the same mount, or is this a dedicated version of Gibka?

    I have seen patrol boats with three tube launchers mounted on the main bridge superstructure, but this is a much more elegant and practical solution for engaging targets... surface, sea, and air targets near the vessel.

    Does anyone know if it is a universal mount (ie ATGM - Shturm, Ataka, Krisantema, MANPADs - Igla, Igla-S, Verba).
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    Post  Morpheus Eberhardt on Sat Sep 05, 2015 5:05 am

    GarryB wrote:Thanks Morpheus.... interesting to see Ataka/Shturm on Gibka... perhaps they will use it on small vessels where guided missiles (ATGM and MANPADs) can share the same mount, or is this a dedicated version of Gibka?

    I have seen patrol boats with three tube launchers mounted on the main bridge superstructure, but this is a much more elegant and practical solution for engaging targets... surface, sea, and air targets near the vessel.

    Does anyone know if it is a universal mount (ie ATGM - Shturm, Ataka, Krisantema, MANPADs - Igla, Igla-S, Verba).

    Garry,

    I think this configuration is called Gibka-M6 (according to the Raketnaya Tekhnika). The Gibka-M5 is another configuration that combines 2 missiles from the 9M120-1 missile family with 4 MANPADS.

    I don't really know how quickly the configurations can be converted to one another; conversion probably requires changing just the launch adapter.

    The main link with more images is http://rbase.new-factoria.ru/missile/wobb/gibka/gibka.shtml

    Edit: Here is another link: http://www.kbm.ru/en/production/ptrk/539.html
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    Post  Guest on Tue Sep 15, 2015 12:58 pm





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    Post  PapaDragon on Wed Sep 16, 2015 10:49 am


    Satellite image of Kamchatka sub base:

    Russian Navy: Status & News #2 - Page 24 CG9saXRsaWZlLnJ1L3dwLWNvbnRlbnQvdXBsb2Fkcy8yMDE1LzA5L3J5YmFjaGl5X2FyZWEtNjAweDM0MC5qcGc_X19pZD02NzgxMQ==

    http://www.sdelanounas.ru/blogs/67811/
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    Post  George1 on Thu Sep 17, 2015 6:38 pm

    Undersea Hybrid Warfare: Russia Fields World's Largest Deep-Sea Fleet

    Russia has powerful undersea hybrid warfare capabilities, American writer and filmmaker Steve Weintz reveals.

    During the Cold War the USSR had developed its own clandestine underwater systems — nuclear powered mini-subs — following in the footsteps of the United States; contrary to all expectations, these systems survived the collapse of the Soviet Union and even received further funding during the 1990s, American writer and filmmaker Steve Weintz points out.

    In 1968, the US created the NR-1, a nuclear-powered four-man mini-sub, which was able to dive over 3,000 feet and stay underwater for weeks. It was "a marvel of American ingenuity," Steve Weintz underscored.

    These clandestine underwater systems were considered crucial for undersea warfare.

    "With its primacy in titanium metallurgy and skill in nuclear technology, the Soviet Union built several competitors to the NR-1. The Russian Federation inherited these assets along with the Ministry of Defense branch (GUGI, or Main Directorate Deep Sea Research) that supervised those programs," the writer pointed out in his article for the National Interest.

    "Even as the United States lost the NR-1's capabilities to retirement, Russia bolstered its deep-sea… activities," Weintz underscored.

    The writer called attention to the fact that in 2012, Russia's deep-sea research underwater vessel placed a Russian flag on the ocean floor some 13,200 ft below the North Pole.

    "The "research sub" was in fact one of Russia's secret deep-sea assets, the nuclear-powered mini-sub the Losharik," Weintz noted.

    "No other submarine is the subject of so much speculation and interest as the elusive and Top Secret Losharik (AS-12). She is a deep-diving special missions /engineering boat (read 'spy sub') operated by the Russian Navy on behalf of GUGI (Main Directorate Deep Sea Research)," a naval blogger, cited by Weintz, suggested.

    The US author emphasized that with the Losharik and the Nelma minisubs and bathyscaphes Rus and Consul, the GUGI operates the world's largest manned deep-sea fleet.

    "Combined with its growing submarine-rescue fleet and Naval Spetznaz outfits, Russia now fields a very powerful undersea hybrid warfare capability," Steve Weintz elaborated.

    "Let's hope the US Navy is on the case," he added.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/military/20150917/1027156925.html#ixzz3m2QRc3hh
    kvs
    kvs

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    Post  kvs on Thu Sep 17, 2015 6:57 pm

    George1 wrote:Undersea Hybrid Warfare: Russia Fields World's Largest Deep-Sea Fleet

    Russia has powerful undersea hybrid warfare capabilities, American writer and filmmaker Steve Weintz reveals.

    During the Cold War the USSR had developed its own clandestine underwater systems — nuclear powered mini-subs — following in the footsteps of the United States; contrary to all expectations, these systems survived the collapse of the Soviet Union and even received further funding during the 1990s, American writer and filmmaker Steve Weintz points out.

    In 1968, the US created the NR-1, a nuclear-powered four-man mini-sub, which was able to dive over 3,000 feet and stay underwater for weeks. It was "a marvel of American ingenuity," Steve Weintz underscored.

    These clandestine underwater systems were considered crucial for undersea warfare.

    "With its primacy in titanium metallurgy and skill in nuclear technology, the Soviet Union built several competitors to the NR-1. The Russian Federation inherited these assets along with the Ministry of Defense branch (GUGI, or Main Directorate Deep Sea Research) that supervised those programs," the writer pointed out in his article for the National Interest.

    "Even as the United States lost the NR-1's capabilities to retirement, Russia bolstered its deep-sea… activities," Weintz underscored.

    The writer called attention to the fact that in 2012, Russia's deep-sea research underwater vessel placed a Russian flag on the ocean floor some 13,200 ft below the North Pole.

    "The "research sub" was in fact one of Russia's secret deep-sea assets, the nuclear-powered mini-sub the Losharik," Weintz noted.

    "No other submarine is the subject of so much speculation and interest as the elusive and Top Secret Losharik (AS-12). She is a deep-diving special missions /engineering boat (read 'spy sub') operated by the Russian Navy on behalf of GUGI (Main Directorate Deep Sea Research)," a naval blogger, cited by Weintz, suggested.

    The US author emphasized that with the Losharik and the Nelma minisubs and bathyscaphes Rus and Consul, the GUGI operates the world's largest manned deep-sea fleet.

    "Combined with its growing submarine-rescue fleet and Naval Spetznaz outfits, Russia now fields a very powerful undersea hybrid warfare capability," Steve Weintz elaborated.

    "Let's hope the US Navy is on the case," he added.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/military/20150917/1027156925.html#ixzz3m2QRc3hh

    God what drivel. This clown should go back to making "quality" Hollywood movies. The Losharik was nowhere near the North Pole when
    the flag was planted on the Lomonosov ridge. A shelf extension of Russia.

    The USSR "copied" the USA and its stupid designs like the Space Shuttle because it was always on the defensive in terms of warfare development.
    Naturally in US propaganda the USSR was the menace under every bed ready to pounce at any moment. In reality it was the USA that was ready
    to pounce at the drop of a pin. Russia does not have to parrot the Americans like the USSR and has developed an asymmetric response strategy.
    A good start is neutralizing the US deep sea spy network.
    max steel
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    Post  max steel on Fri Sep 18, 2015 5:32 pm

    Russia Northern Fleet Warships Hit All Air Targets During Drills


    Russian Navy destroyers Admiral Ushakov and Vice-Admiral Kulakov held successful weapons training exercises against fictional air threats during drills in the Barents Sea, Russia's Northern Fleet press service head said Friday.

    The command post drills, involving warships and submarines, commenced in northwestern Russia on Monday. The exercises involve nuclear- and diesel-powered submarines, coastal missile and artillery units, naval aviation forces from the Northern Fleet, and logistical assistance.

    "Combat exercises have been carried out by the gun crews of AK-130 universal caliber automatic cannon of the Admiral Ushakov destroyer, of AK-100 installed on Vice-Admiral Kulakov and the AK-630 small-caliber anti-aircraft artillery from both ships," Capt. 1st Rank Vadim Serga said.

    He added that all the Progress cruise missiles (NATO reporting name SS-N-3 Shaddock), used as the targets, were hit successfully by naval artillery.
    Fourteen warships, four submarines and 10 support vessels are participating in the drill while naval aviation of the Northern Fleet will carry out 20 missions using four types of aircrafts. The drills will continue until the end of the week.

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