Russia Defence Forum

Would you like to react to this message? Create an account in a few clicks or log in to continue.

Military Forum for Russian and Global Defence Issues


+62
lancelot
Nomad5891
Tsavo Lion
Mindstorm
andalusia
PhSt
magnumcromagnon
Nibiru
medo
dino00
George1
Big_Gazza
Visc
ZoA
Hole
Svyatoslavich
Kimppis
ATLASCUB
PapaDragon
ali.a.r
AlfaT8
nomadski
kvs
miketheterrible
Project Canada
OminousSpudd
KiloGolf
franco
Austin
User 1592
Flanky
sepheronx
Vann7
Morpheus Eberhardt
higurashihougi
JohninMK
Karl Haushofer
Werewolf
Kyo
max steel
ExBeobachter1987
whir
par far
Neutrality
macedonian
spetsnaz edy
collegeboy16
Stealthflanker
Firebird
Cyberspec
Regular
gaurav
flamming_python
TR1
Mr.Kalishnikov47
gloriousfatherland
AbsoluteZero
Russian Patriot
Admin
Corrosion
GarryB
Viktor
66 posters

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Werewolf
    Werewolf


    Posts : 5280
    Points : 5477
    Join date : 2012-10-24

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  Werewolf Sun Jul 31, 2016 7:21 am

    If such things happens US is always the first to be accussed. They are known and factually in bed with all major computer companies aswell software developers. Windows 10 does exactly the same thing and monitors everything you type. They are in bed long time with google, apple, microsoft and hundred other companies so if anyone did it it was done via this route.
    GarryB
    GarryB


    Posts : 32146
    Points : 32674
    Join date : 2010-03-30
    Location : New Zealand

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  GarryB Sun Jul 31, 2016 9:45 am

    This is just speculation based on what the west does.

    This article tells you more about the US than it does about Putin or Russia.

    To be honest I really don't think these so called western experts understand Russia or Putin at all... they call them enemy and threat, but at the end of the day when they go against the wests wishes it is generally because of their own interests.

    I can't remember the last time Russia did something against the west in spite for no reason or interest.

    On the other hand the list of the wests nastiness and spite is enormous....
    avatar
    Austin


    Posts : 7618
    Points : 8015
    Join date : 2010-05-08
    Location : India

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  Austin Sun Jul 31, 2016 7:14 pm

    Hillary Officially Accuses Russia Of Hacking DNC As Assange Says She Conspired To "Subvert An Election"

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-07-31/hillary-officially-accuses-russia-hacking-dnc
    kvs
    kvs


    Posts : 11740
    Points : 11891
    Join date : 2014-09-11
    Location : Canuckistan

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  kvs Sun Jul 31, 2016 9:35 pm

    The NSA claimed it would be hacking the "Russian hackers" who supposedly stole the DNC emails. Since Russians
    were never involved with these hacks, this malware attack is 100% the NSA's handiwork. A collection of bitter, lying
    clowns who tear the hair off their asses every day over Russia existing and not bowing to their will.
    sepheronx
    sepheronx


    Posts : 7085
    Points : 7351
    Join date : 2009-08-06
    Age : 32
    Location : Canada

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  sepheronx Mon Aug 01, 2016 12:48 am

    Austin wrote:Hillary Officially Accuses Russia Of Hacking DNC As Assange Says She Conspired To "Subvert An Election"

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-07-31/hillary-officially-accuses-russia-hacking-dnc

    Good for her. It sure isn't getting the minds of Americans off of the content of the leaks.
    kvs
    kvs


    Posts : 11740
    Points : 11891
    Join date : 2014-09-11
    Location : Canuckistan

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  kvs Mon Aug 01, 2016 2:11 am

    All these hacking accusations are utter retardation. Recall the "climategate" "scandal" where the emails of
    atmospheric science researchers were hacked and then some parts were taken out of context and used to
    "discredit" the researchers. Does anyone recall the theft through hacking being the main issue? I don't. All I
    recall was the alleged CONTENT being discussed and the issue of interest.

    Now we have the total opposite response. The serious content of the emails is ignored and the main
    discussion is about the hacking. Of course without any proof the "criminals" are Russia itself and not
    even private Russian citizens. This is obscene, grotesque and sick. F*ck you America and your
    degenerate Orwellian mass media and politicians.
    avatar
    Project Canada


    Posts : 663
    Points : 666
    Join date : 2015-07-20
    Location : Canada

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  Project Canada Mon Aug 01, 2016 5:05 am

    kvs wrote:All these hacking accusations are utter retardation.   Recall the "climategate" "scandal" where the emails of
    atmospheric science researchers were hacked and then some parts were taken out of context and used to
    "discredit" the researchers.   Does anyone recall the theft through hacking being the main issue?  I don't.  All I
    recall was the alleged CONTENT being discussed and the issue of interest.  

    Now we have the total opposite response.   The serious content of the emails is ignored and the main
    discussion is about the hacking.   Of course without any proof the "criminals" are Russia itself and not
    even private Russian citizens.   This is obscene, grotesque and sick.   F*ck you America and your
    degenerate Orwellian mass media and politicians.


    Yes, your thoughts reflect the same frustrations I have in mind. Sometimes I get too fed up with American hypocrisy I just give myself a time off and stop following these kinds of developments for a while. I really wish America will get what it deserves in the very near future.
    avatar
    Austin


    Posts : 7618
    Points : 8015
    Join date : 2010-05-08
    Location : India

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  Austin Mon Aug 01, 2016 10:10 am

    I think with Hillary Clinton winning is all but a certainty as the system is now clearly rigged to make her win , She hating Russia and Putin , Russia-US relations are just bound to go much worse and clearly the next 4-8 years Russia and US wont see eye to eye under hillary on many issues.

    I think we are long at long cold frosty winter in Russia-US relations , Sad i though Obama was worse for Russia but Clinton would be like Terrible many times over.
    avatar
    Project Canada


    Posts : 663
    Points : 666
    Join date : 2015-07-20
    Location : Canada

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  Project Canada Mon Aug 01, 2016 11:29 am

    Austin wrote:I think with Hillary Clinton winning is all but a certainty as the system is now clearly rigged to make her win , She hating Russia and Putin , Russia-US relations are just bound to go much worse and clearly the next 4-8 years Russia and US wont see eye to eye under hillary on many issues.

    I think we are long at long cold frosty winter in Russia-US relations , Sad i though Obama was worse for Russia but Clinton would be like Terrible many times over.

    The only good point i see with the Democrats in power is the acceleration of America's Multiculturalization which is a very favorable scenario long term Very Happy
    avatar
    Austin


    Posts : 7618
    Points : 8015
    Join date : 2010-05-08
    Location : India

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  Austin Wed Aug 03, 2016 10:39 am

    FULL & EXTENDED INTERVIEW: Julian Assange on NBC's "Meet The Press" | July 31,

    avatar
    Austin


    Posts : 7618
    Points : 8015
    Join date : 2010-05-08
    Location : India

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  Austin Thu Sep 15, 2016 4:36 pm

    As Russia reasserts itself, U.S. intelligence agencies focus anew on the Kremlin

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/as-russia-reasserts-itself-us-intelligence-agencies-focus-anew-on-the-kremlin/2016/09/14/cc212c62-78f0-11e6-ac8e-cf8e0dd91dc7_story.html
    franco
    franco


    Posts : 4720
    Points : 4752
    Join date : 2010-08-18

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  franco Mon Sep 19, 2016 10:10 pm

    MOSCOW, September 19 -. RIA Novosti A possible solution to create a single state security ministry will form a "strong fist" of the Russian special services, but a return to the KGB model, in addition to the advantages in the form of an effective management system and operational tasks, has a number of drawbacks, consider experts simplification RIA Novosti on Monday.

    Media reported on plans to build in the Russian Ministry of State Security
    So they commented Post "newspaper Kommersant ", which, citing its own sources told about the plans for a large-scale reform of the security and law enforcement agencies. It was pointed out that on the basis of the FSB may be created by the Ministry of State Security, which will also include the Federal Security Service and the Foreign Intelligence Service.

    Association of Russian secret services under the auspices of "supervedomstva" will help to build a tough and effective control system, but the move would deprive the president of Russia to diversify sources of information on security, says the chief editor of " National Defense " Igor Korotchenko.

    "The possible creation of a centralized Ministry of State Security - is, in fact, a return to the model of KGB of the USSR, when in one big intelligence agencies had intelligence, counterintelligence, and the whole system of internal security in the present, as we know, the Federal Security Service, the Foreign Intelligence Service and Federal Guard Service -.. Independent security services in If you create a single supervedomstva national security can be termed as the possible pros and cons of the possible ", - said Korochenko.

    He said that the advantage is that centralization in the hands of all the areas and tasks to ensure national security, rigid chain of command, a unified personnel policy and agreed solution to all operational tasks. The main drawback of such a centralized model, according to experts, is the reduction of all the information provided by the head of the line security services of the state, to the same source.

    Peskov commented posts on the establishment of the Ministry of State Security
    "Now each of the agencies - the Federal Security Service, the Foreign Intelligence Service and the Federal Security Service - is independent channels exit to the first person of the state with the ability to report directly Accordingly, the President of the Russian Federation has the ability to make certain decisions based on data from three intelligence services, rather than one, as it will be. in the version with the Ministry of State security ", - said the agency.

    According Korochenko, the final choice in favor of a decision is likely to be conditional on "an analysis of external and internal threats and the possibility for their effective neutralization." The expert stressed that the judge about the real plans for the reorganization of the entire security system on the basis of newspaper publication prematurely.

    President of the international anti-terror division veterans association "Alpha" Sergei Goncharov, in turn, said that the establishment of the State Security Ministry have a positive impact on the activities of the Russian secret services and will form the basis of their "strong fist", similar to the KGB.

    "Frankly, in the days of the Soviet Union, the KGB system was one of the strongest intelligence services of the world - it is recognized by all the If and the truth will be made a fundamental decision to bring under one roof all the law enforcement agencies related to intelligence, we will get a strong fist, which will be clearly. and a clear coordination and unified leadership ", - Goncharov said.

    According to him, the creation of a single ministry is very topical "in the difficult situation in which Russia is now."

    "SVR conducts exploration, FSB - counterintelligence, border guards have a third direction, and one direction, as in days of the KGB, will greatly simplify their operation and eliminate confusion between the heads of these institutions", - the expert said.
    franco
    franco


    Posts : 4720
    Points : 4752
    Join date : 2010-08-18

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  franco Mon Sep 19, 2016 10:18 pm

    Short version is the FSB (Federal Security Service), FSO (Federal Protection Service) and SVR (Foreign Intelligence Service) merge into one Service (Ministry). Basically all the groups from the old KGB back together.

    Further parts of this talk is that the Federal Investigative Committee revert to control of the Ministry of Justice while the EMERCON Ministry would be broken up and divided between the Ministry of Interior (Fire and Rescue Services) and Ministry of Defense (Civil Defense).
    George1
    George1


    Posts : 17227
    Points : 17738
    Join date : 2011-12-22
    Location : Greece

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  George1 Tue Sep 20, 2016 8:45 am

    Is it wise to return in such centralized system as in USSR era?? All modern countries have specialized secret services
    franco
    franco


    Posts : 4720
    Points : 4752
    Join date : 2010-08-18

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  franco Tue Sep 20, 2016 11:40 pm

    Only rumored talk so far.
    avatar
    Austin


    Posts : 7618
    Points : 8015
    Join date : 2010-05-08
    Location : India

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  Austin Thu Sep 22, 2016 6:30 am

    MOSCOW BLOG: Unveiling the KGB school of economic management

    http://www.intellinews.com/moscow-blog-unveiling-the-kgb-school-of-economic-management-106489/
    franco
    franco


    Posts : 4720
    Points : 4752
    Join date : 2010-08-18

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  franco Thu Sep 22, 2016 11:28 pm

    President Vladimir Putin proposed to Sergey Naryshkin to head the Foreign Intelligence Service. The former director of the Foreign Intelligence Service Mikhail Fradkov will soon be promoted to the post of chairman of the Board of Directors of Russian Railways.

    In the Kremlin, Vladimir Putin held a meeting with Naryshkin and Fradkov. "Previous years you headed the State Duma, was the speaker had worked the head of the presidential administration." - He said Naryshkin. "I want to offer you a job in the executive branch, to be more specific -. One of our leading special services I want to offer to lead the Foreign Intelligence Service", - said the president.

    This structure for 9 years as head Fradkov. "It is, as we have established one of the records in the residence time in this post," - said Putin. "During this time of active service made a very big step in the direction of strengthening working in absolutely new conditions", - he praised and thanked Fradkov for his work. "Strictly speaking, you are a famous person:. And the minister were, and the Prime Minister, and now in this very important area their duty in the best possible way - said the president - And like you said, hope that all of your knowledge and skills They will be used for the benefit of the country, for the benefit of the State in the other place. "

    Putin then turned back to Naryshkin: "You are well aware, as well, as we all do, in what situation we are now, how important the success of this service for a stable, secure development of our country, how important it is to time to stop threats arising in relation to Russia, to prevent their proliferation, but rather to act in such a way that they do not occur in the early stages to neutralize these threats, and of work on the positive, I mean cooperation with our partners in the main areas, particularly only the direction of the fight against terrorism, and, of course, through the provision of timely, high-quality, reliable information to the President, the Government of the Russian Federation, so that we can make adjusted, well-informed decisions in the interests of the Russian people. "By-elections in single-mandate Kingisepp district of Leningrad region can pass in 2017 in United Voting Day
    avatar
    Austin


    Posts : 7618
    Points : 8015
    Join date : 2010-05-08
    Location : India

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  Austin Sun Sep 25, 2016 6:40 am

    Women of the CIA: The Hidden History of American Spycraft
    George1
    George1


    Posts : 17227
    Points : 17738
    Join date : 2011-12-22
    Location : Greece

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  George1 Tue Oct 04, 2016 4:11 am

    Suspected Ukrainian Spy Detained in Russia Had No Journalist Visa

    Read more: https://sputniknews.com/military/20161003/1045941375/sushchenko-spy-russia-ukraine.html
    George1
    George1


    Posts : 17227
    Points : 17738
    Join date : 2011-12-22
    Location : Greece

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  George1 Wed Oct 05, 2016 3:15 pm

    Putin presents new chief of Russian foreign intelligence service

    The president has stressed that the security of Russian citizens outside Russia must remain under special control, in particular, in the countries of the Middle East, Africa and Central Asia

    MOSCOW, October 5. /TASS/. Russian President Vladimir Putin has presented Sergey Naryshkin as the newly-appointed chief of the Russian foreign intelligence service (SVR).

    The president has stressed that the security of Russian citizens outside Russia must remain under special control, in particular, in the countries of the Middle East, Africa and Central Asia.

    "Of course, the security of our citizens abroad must remain under special control, in particular, in such regions as the Middle East, Africa and some countries of Central Asia," Putin said presenting Naryshkin to his subordinates.

    "Today the situation in the world has special demands for the quality and efficiency of the SVR’s work. There is the need to be able to act proactively and use nonstandard and unconventional solutions," he said at the headquarters of the Foreign Intelligence Service in Moscow.

    He also stressed that there is the need to "find out and analyze all external threats and define the key strategic tendencies of development of the international situation, to make contribution in enhancing Russia’s economic, technological and defense potential."

    Putin said he expects that Naryshkin "use all his experience and broad-based knowledge to work efficiently and bring the work of the Service to a higher level."

    The president wished Naryshkin and the SVR "success in the responsible work on maintaining security and interests of the motherland.".

    Sergey Naryshkin was the speaker of Russia's lower house of parliament, the State Duma, before his appointment to the post. He has replaced Mikhail Fradkov who now will be nominated as the head of the Russian Railways Company board of directors.


    More:
    http://tass.com/politics/904319
    avatar
    Austin


    Posts : 7618
    Points : 8015
    Join date : 2010-05-08
    Location : India

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  Austin Sat Oct 15, 2016 8:50 am

    CIA Prepping for Possible Cyber Strike Against Russia
    avatar
    Austin


    Posts : 7618
    Points : 8015
    Join date : 2010-05-08
    Location : India

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  Austin Thu Nov 03, 2016 4:15 pm

    Latin America is Russia’s Natural Ally and Partner

    http://mdb.cast.ru/mdb/5-2016/item4/article1/

    Interview with former External Intelligence Service officer, Lt. Gen. (rtd.) Nikolay Leonov

    Lt. Gen. Nikolay Leonov is a retired officer of the Russian External Intelligence Service. He graduated from the Moscow State Institute of International Relations and holds a PhD in History. He joined the KGB in 1958 and served with the agency's First Main Directorate (PGU, specializing in external intelligence). He was posted to Latin America in 1953. In 1971 he became deputy head, and in 1973 head of the PGU information and analysis department. In 1983 he was promoted to deputy chief of the PGU. In 1991 he became the director of the KGB Analytical Department before retiring later that year. Leonov was a member of parliament from the Rodina (Motherland) bloc in 2003-2007. He has authored several books and articles about Latin America's political history and Russian politics.


    Back in the early 1990s you said that if ever America elected a president who could abandon prejudice and withstand pressure from the Cuban immigrants (whose votes are so important in Florida) - that president would embrace Cuba and never let it go. Now we've seen Barack Obama paying an historic visit to Cuba. Is that the fulfillment of your old prediction, or something else?


    No, that is a logical development of America's relations with Latin America, because Washington's old dream of turning that region into its own back yard has crumbled. That dream had existed since the early 19th century, when the so-called Monroe Doctrine was proclaimed, the doctrine of “America for Americans”. That was interpreted by Washington as “America for the United States”, or course. It was a system that masqueraded as “pan-Americanism”; in other words, it claimed that all the countries in the Americas were united by their shared interests, that they were equal, and that they were essentially the same. But as Latin Americans used to say at the time, it was “a union of the shark and the sardines”.

    The system of pan-Americanism itself was carefully constructed in Washington. They would regularly organize pan-American conferences in various countries, attended by all the heads of state with their ministers and aides. But Washington always played the role of the conductor in an orchestra. It always formulated the key principles that were then rubber-stamped by the conferences. Those principles then informed the national policies of the countries involved. The structures of the Pan-American Union and its successor, the Organization of American States, were always in Washington. Each country was represented at these structures by a special ambassador. Even the budget of these structures was usually maintained by the United States.

    That is why the Latin American states never had policies of their own; they just talked a lot about their history. Their financial systems were linked to the U.S. financial centers, so it was impossible for them to pursue an independent course. Actually, this is why the Americans established military dictatorships and police states in these countries: that made it easier to control them. There was not even a pretence of democracy there. That's why we've seen such barbaric dictators as Somoza or Trujillo in Latin America.

    Of course, there have been patriotic upsurges and attempts to regain independence in various Latin American states ever since Latin America became an independent entity some time in 1821. Such attempts have never ceased. There has always been a dream of independence and freedom, something every normal person and every nation aspires to, and that dream had never died in Latin America, either.

    Whereas Simón Bolívar was one of the fathers of the idea of Latin America's independence, at the other end of that historical period we have the figure of Fidel Castro. Out of all the patriots born in Latin America in more than 200 years, he lived to see his dream come true. All the others fought for it, including Salvador Allende, Augusto Sandino, and others - let's recall Hugo Chavez, for example. But the only person who remains a symbol of these 200 years of struggle for independence, and who has seen his work bear fruit is, of course, Fidel Castro. That is how the whole world sees Fidel Castro - and I don't just mean the patriotic world, but everybody, from the Pope to Barack Obama, who has paid a visit to Havana after all. So, the idea of independence has basically triumphed.

    As for relations within this community of nations in the Western hemisphere, and the Monroe Doctrine, let us also mention that very recently, in 2011, these nations established a new organization, the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC). All the countries south of the Rio Grande, i.e. south of the United States, are members. The United States and Canada have not been invited. So we now essentially have a completely independent political organization that is guided by Latin America's interests alone.
    Back in 2013, when they gathered to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the storming of the Moncada Barracks (Cuban National Rebellion Day), there was no longer a single country in the region with a non-democratic government. To a greater or lesser extent, all these countries were democracies. Cuba and all the heroes have played a great historical role in that achievement. Of course, the Sandinistas fought for their own country, and Hugo Chavez for his own. So Latin America has finally made this giant historical leap, albeit a belated leap, that lasted for more than 200 years.

    In the political sense, Obama clearly had no other choice but to pay that visit to Cuba. And for all our criticism of Obama, I think he did the right thing. The Americans did everything they could to suppress that upsurge of the patriotic movement. And now, after all these years, they have publicly recognized that their policy has failed. That requires a lot of courage - even though he has not actually apologized for anything.

    Nevertheless, to recognize the failure of the old policy - that takes political and personal courage. So, that chapter is now closed. Latin America has become a completely new factor in international politics.

    What are the long-term prospects of Cuba's evolution now that its relations with the United States have begun to get back to normal, and in view of the Castro brothers' inevitable departure in whatever shape or form? Will this process not lead to a complete dismantling of Cuban Socialism?


    Many people know that, consciously or subconsciously, I always express a Cuban, or a pro-Cuban, position - and I'm proud of that. Over the past 60 years, whenever people ask me questions or advice about Cuba, my position has been unchanged. So, don't you worry: even during the most difficult period in the early 1990s, when the Soviet Union broke up along with the entire Socialist bloc, when Cuba was “one step away from the gallows”, as some put it - I always insisted that there's no reason to worry. Things will be hard for Cuba - very hard. Maybe it will be extremely painful for its people - but they will not fall.

    The funny thing is, there have been regimes that did not fall, but then quickly surrendered to the United States, such as Angola. They gave away their oil to the United Stares, and for that they were pardoned. The Cubans, however, have not surrendered anything - have they?


    They have not, that is absolutely correct. Even now there are medical schools in Cuba that train thousands of doctors from Latin American and African countries free of charge. Even now! Some thought that it was all over. So when people ask me whether I think Cuba will survive, I always bring up the subject of the quality of the leaders of the Cuban revolution. I am talking about the political and human qualities of these people; they do not fit any of the standards we are accustomed to. There is a Marxist saying that a leader merely expresses the aspirations of the people - but a leader also brings to the table his huge personal experience, energy, and intellect...

    So the Castro brothers, and their allies - they have essentially changed the cultural DNA of the Cubans? They have turned ordinary Latin Americans into a completely new kind of people?


    The Cubans are so different that - well, I have only read about it, I don't have first-hand experience - but even those of them who have emigrated to the United States, who have lived there for a long time, and then for some reason began to commit crimes (I am talking theft, banditry, etc) - these Cubans, when they are taken into custody, they behave completely differently with the police than other U.S. citizens. They stand up straight.

    So, of course, the mentality of the national leader, some of it is passed on to the people. The leader plays a major role, and in the case of Fidel, the world reacts to his clear and transparent behavior; no-one in the whole world has ever caught him out lying, or making unfulfilled promises. No-one has ever caught him plundering the national wealth, secretly buying up assets in Panama or elsewhere. This is a person who does not have luxury government palaces. This is a man who has spent his whole life wearing a soldier's uniform - well, he's now swapped the uniform for a tracksuit. He is extremely modest and undemanding in his personal life. And he has a great reputation. He has spent 70 years in politics, and hasn't lost an ounce of respect among his own people, despite the hugely difficult path that people has travelled.

    There was an interesting barbed exchange between Obama and Raúl Castro. Obama said to him, “you have only one party”. To which Raúl replied, “You also have only one party”. To this Obama said, “No, we have two”. And Raúl said, “Well, if you want, we can also set up two parties - a party of Fidel and a party of Raúl, so we will also have two.”

    So there are two prominent leaders in Cuba, who also happen to be brothers. What about trust? What about the problem of the transition of power? How is that transition being prepared? Will it be smooth, or is there a danger of the country running into trouble?


    I am of course keeping an eye on Cuba. I once said Russia is my mother, but Cuba is my elder sister. So I keep an eye on her, watch her grow and mature. I know very well that the Cuban leaders, including Fidel Castro, have long thought hard about a change of leadership. He raised that issue back at the time when we were talking about stagnation. They are now drafting a new constitution. Its key features have already been announced at Communist Party congresses, and they will substantially change Cuba. For example, there is a new rule whereby no senior official - be that president, or prime minister, or head of the legislature - can hold office for more than two five-year terms. This new constitution will probably be approved within the next few months.

    So, this is one of the changes they are introducing: two five-year terms, and that's it. Obviously, there will be a new leadership. And Raúl keeps saying that Cuba's revolutionary government, the government that led the revolution and that has managed to withstand half a century of this monstrous siege - this government will be stepping down. They are saying this openly, without any equivocation or ambiguity. A new generation will come to power - a generation that was not involved in the revolution and does not know what life was like in the past. Some 75 per cent of Cuba's population were born after the revolution.

    Miguel D?­az-Canel seems likely to be the one to succeed Raúl Castro. Of course, Castro's job will be split in two. Raúl Castro will continue to lead the party, this already seems to have been decided. He was re-elected as first secretary of the Communist Party of Cuba at the latest congress. So, he will remain at the helm of the party. D?­az-Canel, however, will be the head of state. I am sure there will also be a new head of government. I can think of some likely names, but I don't want to name them because it has not been decided yet. Nevertheless, the party has clearly set out some parameters that were also discussed here in Russia during the socialist era.

    What is the outlook for Russian-Cuban relations - politically, economically, and militarily?


    The Cubans still retain a sense of gratitude to the Soviet Union and to Russia, to the Russian people, and to all our peoples. The emotional ties will remain very strong for a long time to come. But much depends on us. We keep worrying, for example, that in the Eastern European countries and in the Baltic states people show disrespect for our soldiers buried there, desecrate memorials, etc. This is a big problem for us, especially when talking about war graves. In Cuba, on the other hand, there are graves of 70 Soviet soldiers. They did not die in a war, but in the line of duty. And the Cubans have very diligently gathered all their remains; they have built a wonderful memorial in a park near Havana.

    Well, that is the cultural and historical side of things. What about current politics and the economy?


    The whole of Cuba is armed with our weapons, and as for the weapons they make themselves, they got the license from us. So there are very close ties in the defense industry. They have their own upgrade programs for that weaponry. They are replacing engines, etc, but the weapons systems are basically Russian-made. So defense cooperation is ongoing, and I don't see it ending any time soon. There may be some problems initiated by Russia itself, as has often been the case in the past. But if we miss these opportunities, the Chinese will be there. The Chinese have weapons systems that are roughly comparable to our own.
    As for the economy, the situation depends on our own capabilities. The Cubans are waiting for us with open arms.

    But Russia has very little to offer these days, isn't that right?


    Exactly. There are some proposals for Russian participation in upgrading the Cuban railways. We are talking about the tracks, the signaling system, etc. We have already done a lot in this area. We are also talking about the trains themselves, of course. Our own technological capability is very limited. But the Cubans have always given us preferential treatment. I remember well the difficult period in the 1990s, when I visited Cuba on several occasions with business delegations.

    Igor Sechin, who served as deputy prime minister at the time, led the Russian-Cuban intergovernmental commission. He once took a whole plane - he could do that, in his position - he filled that plane with Russian businessmen, and took them all to Havana. He said to them, look at the opportunities! Why don't you invest?


    But no-one has made any investments. Some of them ran into trouble with the Cubans, who can be quite tough. They welcome everybody, they offer the best terms, but they are not going to give you something for nothing, as our businessmen have come to expect. So, the ball is entirely in our court.

    Only a decade ago it seemed that the whole of Latin America was veering sharply to the left. There were only one or two center-right strongholds left. But now the left and the leftist populist trends are waning in Latin America. It is very clear in Brazil, for example. The same is true of Argentina, and there are protests in Venezuela. Do you think a right-wing wave is rising?


    Of course. It would be foolish to deny this. But these left-wing and right-wing waves, they follow one another in Latin America very regularly. As a rule, they have a clear socio-economic underpinning. There was a time in the late 20th and early 21st century when the United States paid very little attention to Latin America. The United States was busy picking apart what was left of the Soviet Union and the former Soviet bloc. They then became bogged down in the Middle East.

    Then the first [global economic] crisis arrived in 2008-2009, followed by the second wave in 2013, which is still ongoing. And looking at how these waves of crisis affect the Latin American countries, we notice immediately one common element: someone always has to pay the price.

    So there are good reasons for this right-wing shift happening now?


    It is clearly a consequence of the severe crisis that has struck the economy. Mauricio Macri has come to power in Argentina by winning an election. This has been a first for a right-wing president in Argentina; previously, the only way they came to power was by military coup.

    Now they have won an election because the economic situation was bad enough for the Argentine people to want change. They've got change all right; Macri is now pursuing such a radical neo-liberal course that the Argentine's pips are beginning to squeak. I can't predict now what's going to happen at the next election in four years' time, because the people are very unhappy. And if the international economic climate begins to improve, including prices for Argentine exports such as meat and corn, then I think it will be very difficult for Macri to hold on to power. He is a very untypical figure, not even a proper Latin American - he is an Italian, basically a foreigner.

    Incidentally, the man leading the opposition in Venezuela, Henrique Capriles, is also a foreigner. His mother was a Polish Jew who fled Poland during the war and settled on the island of Cura?§ao. There she gave birth to the present leader of the Venezuelan opposition, who then moved to Venezuela from that island. So, essentially, he's not a native Venezuelan. To him, Bolivar and all these traditions mean absolutely nothing.

    He has nothing in common with people like Evo Morales, who is a Bolivian Indian, whose forefathers had suffered at the hands of the Spanish and the Americans alike for generations, and who is a Latin American through and through. So that's why there is such a wave now. That wave will last for as long as the global market instability lasts. As soon as the markets stabilize, things will get back to where they were, no doubt about it.

    Hugo Chavez created a counterbalance to CNN. He decided to set up his own TV company that would broadcast to all the Latin American states, and serve as a united platform for all our national ideas. He called that company TeleSUR. I think Cuba is one of the shareholders. It's a completely different company. It pursues a patriotic, national, and generally anti-American course. And, of course, Macri is now saying that the company should be banned from broadcasting in Argentina. He is supposed to be a neo-liberal, but he wants to stifle freedom of information; it comes very naturally to him. I am generally astounded by the discrepancy between the neo-liberals' words and their deeds.

    What are Russia's prospects in Latin America, given the current right-wing shift?


    Regardless of the shifts, Russia must not be viewed as some kind of leftist, revolutionary country. Russia has changed its foreign-policy course for a variety of reasons. Russia is a socially-oriented state of an entirely non-revolutionary type. That is why we are not some kind of bogeyman that can bring revolutionary contagion to Latin America.

    The problems lie in an entirely different area. For Russia, Latin America is a natural ally, or even partner. Because in those places where we have not had an historical presence, we have always remained a welcome partner, if not an ally.

    So you are saying these countries have some kind of illusions about Russia?


    These aren't just illusions. Take Cuba, for example. Its revolution would have died, were it not for the Soviet Union. It would have been crushed, no doubt about it. We came there with entirely humanistic ideas, which were dictated by global development goals. This is why many regard us as their natural partner and ally. When Hugo Chavez came to power, he started replacing the Venezuelan army's weaponry with Russian systems; that was part of the same trend. The Sandinistas also turned to us for help. Everyone who wants to protect their national wealth turns primarily to us. So they are open to cooperation with us, it's just a matter of our own capabilities. Much to my regret, Latin America remains a peripheral region for us. We are busy with matters much closer to home, such as Turkey or Syria, as if that were where the world ends, or where our border lies. But the world is much bigger than that. And the Latin American countries would genuinely be glad to see us.

    You have already mentioned the Chinese. How successful are China's attempts at penetrating Latin America, including Cuba?


    I am not a Sinologist. China has its own rich history and its own mindset. Everyone I have talked to in Latin America says that China is not an ideological or political power; it is an economic power. So they don't care who rules in Argentina, Cristina Fernández [de Kirchner] or Mauricio. What's important to them is that their economic interests are protected and not restricted in any way.
    Yes, the Chinese are present everywhere. They can do a lot, no doubt about it. Their influence is growing. But they are not shouting it from the rooftops. They always try to work quietly.

    Back in the early 2000s I predicted that the main clash of the 21st century would be between China and the United States. China is distracted by various minor regional problems, but it continues to grow at a breakneck pace. What is now going on in the South China Sea is just the early warning signals; the monster will yet show its full might.

    What do you think are the prospects for ending the war between the Colombian government and the FARC rebels? And what about the outlook for Russian-Colombian relations?


    I was in Havana at the signing of the peace deal between the Colombian government and the rebels. The Cubans showed themselves to be real peacemakers, without empty rhetoric. They put in place all the conditions for the representatives of those warring factions to sit down and discuss terms. There were a lot of terms, incidentally.

    The first basic principle is that the rebels will disarm, and they have also asked the government to ensure the disarmament of the various paramilitary organizations that were spreading terror at the behest of the Colombian oligarchs and some large companies. The third basic principle is that the rebels should be integrated into normal civilian life. I saw everyone swear to this with my own eyes.
    I have no doubt that both sides want peace. The only other option is an endless war of attrition. Various casualty figures have been cited. Most people put the number of casualties at 250,000 people. That is a monstrous figure, of course. I have been to Colombia, and I've spoken to senior officers in the Colombian army. I asked them a simple question: Why can't you, the Colombian army, simply demolish the rebels, physically occupy their territory, and end this war? One of the lieutenant colonels told me in all honesty: “You see, while the civil war is going on, while we are engaged in an armed struggle against the rebels, we are on double pay — because we are at war. If we sign a peace deal and the war ends, we will revert to our normal pay.”

    So what were the Colombian politicians thinking?


    It sometimes happens that the politicians are subordinate to the military; nothing can be done about it, the military simply dictate their will. So the situation is, of course, intolerable not just for the people themselves but also for the army, for the rebels, and for the country's political image. Colombia is a huge country. We actually had difficulties with Colombia over Venezuela. We support Venezuela, but Venezuela has differences with Colombia. They have border disputes, economic disputes, etc. They wage propaganda wars against each other from time to time.

    We somehow need to make sure that we are not seen as a party that wants to stoke local conflicts. The diplomats have a lot of work to do, because these problems must be resolved by diplomats. Colombia is a powerful country. It has a large population and a vast potential. It has access to two oceans.

    What is the likelihood of armed conflicts in Latin America?


    Latin America has made some real progress. First, it has declared itself a nuclear weapons-free zone. Now they have banned wars between themselves. And when they did it, journalists expressed doubts, pointing out that there were still many unresolved conflicts in the region. Then representatives of Peru and Chile spoke up. They said that there were indeed unresolved conflicts, including maritime borders, fishing rights, etc. But we have decided that these conflicts will be resolved through arbitration, they said.
    It is known than after that statement, the Peruvians essentially told Russia that they were not going to buy tanks because a) they have undertaken commitments, and b) tanks are an offensive weapon. This will not help our chances at the tribunal because it will make us look aggressive, they said. So they have agreed to buy trucks, but not helicopters or tanks.

    Of course, it is not easy to relinquish war and threats. But this trend is now clear, although they have spent a lot of time trying to reach this point. We have reconciliation in Colombia - but do you remember how long the Contras and the Sandinistas fought each other in Nicaragua? They spent a very long time cutting each other's throats. And in the end, they brought in excavators to dig up a huge hole in central Managua. They brought two truckloads of weapons - the Contras brought one truck and the Sandinistas brought another truck - and they dumped the weapons into that hole, and put a cross on top of it as a symbol of the nation's unity. There was a time when Chile and Argentina endlessly fought each other over some peaks in the Andes. That was as recently as in the early 20th century.

    That went on until the two presidents agreed to collect all the cannon deployed on their southern border, melt them into a pillar of peace, and put that pillar on their current border. People want peace, but politicians sometimes plunge them into war. Some of these wars have been absolutely stupid. Take, for example, the war between El Salvador and Honduras, the co-called Football War. A real war broke out after a football game, and thousands of people were killed.
    avatar
    Austin


    Posts : 7618
    Points : 8015
    Join date : 2010-05-08
    Location : India

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  Austin Sat Nov 05, 2016 7:08 am

    US Military Hackers Claim Penetration of Russian Infrastructure

    Read more: https://en.ria.ru/us/201611051047089422-usa-penetration-russian-infrastructure/

    US military hackers have penetrated Russia's electric grid, telecommunications networks and Kremlin's command systems, making them vulnerable to attack by secret American cyber weapons, according to a series of reports by a major US television network.
    avatar
    par far


    Posts : 2764
    Points : 3009
    Join date : 2014-06-26

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  par far Mon Nov 14, 2016 5:25 pm

    Mossad has started hiring Russians, hopefully the Russian intelligence is ready, I don't know the budget of Russian intelligence but hopefully it is increased.
    avatar
    Austin


    Posts : 7618
    Points : 8015
    Join date : 2010-05-08
    Location : India

    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  Austin Sun Dec 11, 2016 6:10 pm

    Trump stuns ex-CIA boss with Russian hack denial

    http://money.cnn.com/2016/12/09/technology/trump-russia-hackers-cia/index.html

    European nations rely on Russia for nearly a third of their crude oil and natural gas, according to the European Union. Hayden said the United States could become Europe's gas supplier.

    "You want to go long? A response could be a declaratory American national policy to wean our European allies off of Russian gas," he said. "I can think of nothing that pulls the choke collar on Vladimir's chain more than: 'We're taking your only hole card away from you.' It's going to take us 10 years, but it's going to happen."

    Meanwhile, U.S. government hackers could "hack away at the infrastructure used by the Russian criminal gangs" to shut them down.

    Hayden's favorite American approach is to undermine the Russian government's surveillance state by giving Russian citizens high-tech communication tools to hide from their own government.

    "I find this most intriguing. Just go all out, shoving by whatever means possible, anonymizing tools into the Russian cyberspace. Nothing more threatens Vladimir Putin than not being able to track his own citizens."

    Some options already exist. Internet browsers like the Tor Browser, originally developed by the U.S. Navy, offer anonymity for browsing websites.

    Sponsored content


    Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion - Page 8 Empty Re: Russian Intelligence Services: News & Discussion

    Post  Sponsored content


      Current date/time is Mon Jan 17, 2022 11:00 pm