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    Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

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    Viktor

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Viktor on Fri May 23, 2014 10:35 am

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    Mike E

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Mike E on Sat Sep 27, 2014 7:21 am

    Proton ready to return to flight on a cover-up mission

    For the first time since its failure on May 16, a Russian workhorse rocket will try to deliver a payload into space, this time a hush-hush satellite apparently camouflaged as a civilian payload. 

    A very strange secret mission
    The Proton-M rocket with a Briz-M upper stage is scheduled to lift off on Sept. 28, 2014, at 00:23:00 Moscow Time (4:23 p.m. EDT on Sept. 27). The launch vehicle will be carrying a classified payload known as Olymp ("Olympus") as well as Luch ("Beam"), which belongs to the Russian Ministry of Defense. The spacecraft, developed at ISS Reshetnev in Zheleznogorsk, will likely be inserted into a geostationary orbit 36,000 kilometers above the Equator, where it will provide communications for the Russian military. A Moscow-basedKommersant daily claimed that the satellite would also be used for electronic espionage for the Russian security service, FSB, however the report was widely doubted by observers.
    This web site first broke the story about the existence of the Olymp payload in 2013, even though semi-official reports about a planned launch of a military communications satellite, such as an already known Globus-1 series, had circulated earlier. Still, an apparent introduction of the new name could hint a significant upgrade of the Globus-1 spacecraft or even an entirely new design. As it turned out, a number of prominent Russian space industry contractors had previously reported in their public documents delivering components for the Olymp-K satellite. The companies involved in the project included ISS Reshetnev, Geofizika, LOMO and NPO Kvant.
    Given the fact that the new name had surfaced as Russia was gearing up to host Olympics in Sochi, one could speculate that it was assigned quite recently to a new-generation military satellite. The Soviet space history knows a few examples when the vehicle developed under a numeric code would receive a proper name shortly before reaching launch pad. During the post-Soviet period, the Russian Ministry of Defense have routinely declassified names for past and even current military satellites, while keeping most other details about their missions under wraps. In addition, most Russian military payloads would be officially identified after entering orbit as Kosmos with a number. However, in case of Olymp everything was different.
    At the beginning of 2014, to the surprise of many observers, the Russian civilian space agency, Roskosmos, suddenly announced the upcoming mission carrying a Luch satellite. The Luch, of course, are civilian data-relay satellites and all the existing spacecraft in the Luch constellation have been accounted for. As a result, an apparent decision by Roskosmos to give a new public name to the Olymp satellite could be a late and rather clumsy attempt to camouflage a military payload within a civilian constellation, which might or might not have a similar purpose to its unexpected military cousin.
    In any case, the differences between Olymp and Luch are obvious. Civilian Luch satellites were light enough to share a ride on Proton with another payload, while the spacecraft formerly known as Olymp is launched alone, betraying a much larger size! Moreover, numerous images of each Luch satellite during their development and pre-launch processing were released. Obviously, no visuals of the latest payload have been made available so far. Finally, all Luch satellites had numbers, while the latest spacecraft is carrying none.
    Possibly, the Luch cover-up campaign was a response to an accidental disclosure of the name Olymp, even though the code-name in itself provides no practical information on the purpose of its carrier.

    Preparations for launch
    This mission was previously scheduled to lift off at the end of May 2014 and, following the May 16 accident, it was initially postponed to July 8. On August 26, Roskosmos announced that specialists from GKNPTs Khrunichev had been installing thermal protection layers on the Briz-M stage at Site 92-50 in Baikonur, while the center's personnel was configuring launch pad at Site 81 for the upcoming mission. The statement also said that the Luch spacecraft was developed at ISS Reshetnev.
    On Sept. 4, Roskosmos reported that the launch vehicle, the upper stage, the payload fairing and the spacecraft had undergone autonomous checks and were all ready for integration. The assembly was completed by September 19. Two days later, a fully assembled vehicle was moved to a fueling station for loading the upper stage with propellant and pressurized gases. The launch vehicle was then rolled out to the launch pad No. 24 at Site 81 on September 23.
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    Big_Gazza

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Big_Gazza on Sat Sep 27, 2014 5:42 pm

    Mike E wrote:In any case, the differences between Olymp and Luch are obvious. Civilian Luch satellites were light enough to share a ride on Proton with another payload, while the spacecraft formerly known as Olymp is launched alone, betraying a much larger size!

    This isn't quite correct.  The original Luch satellites (aka Altair) and the 2nd gen Luch-2 used dedicated Proton launches, but the subsequent Luch-5x series were only half the mass and could therefore share a ride.

    Re this upcoming launch, is this not the same satellite that was originally called Luch-4 and would have had a mass of 3 ton and therefore need to revert to dedicated proton launches? IIRC Luch-4 was cancelled but reconfigured as a testbed for new technologies.  

    Anatoly Zak is fully aware of this past history, yet he deliberately launches into conjecture about military involvement, but it seems reasonable to expect that a new experimental data relay satellite would be kept under tight wraps with little to no public scrutiny?
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    Mike E

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Mike E on Sat Sep 27, 2014 9:24 pm

    Big_Gazza wrote:
    Mike E wrote:In any case, the differences between Olymp and Luch are obvious. Civilian Luch satellites were light enough to share a ride on Proton with another payload, while the spacecraft formerly known as Olymp is launched alone, betraying a much larger size!

    This isn't quite correct.  The original Luch satellites (aka Altair) and the 2nd gen Luch-2 used dedicated Proton launches, but the subsequent Luch-5x series were only half the mass and could therefore share a ride.

    Re this upcoming launch, is this not the same satellite that was originally called Luch-4 and would have had a mass of 3 ton and therefore need to revert to dedicated proton launches? IIRC Luch-4 was cancelled but reconfigured as a testbed for new technologies.  

    Anatoly Zak is fully aware of this past history, yet he deliberately launches into conjecture about military involvement, but it seems reasonable to expect that a new experimental data relay satellite would be kept under tight wraps with little to no public scrutiny?
    In all honesty, I don't know what to think about this... Zak is claiming that it is actually an electronic commutation satellite used for spying etc. "Luch" is a name just to confuse reporters, and so far it has done very well!

    "But it seems reasonable to expect that a new experimental data relay satellite would be kept under tight wraps with little to no public scrutiny?" - Are you suggesting that this could just be secretive public satellite?
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    Mike E

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Mike E on Sun Sep 28, 2014 5:50 am

    Proton-M carrier rocket lifts off from Baikonur

    MOSCOW, September 28 /ITAR-TASS/. The Proton-M carrier rocket, which lifted off from Baikonur space launch facility early on Sunday, has put the Briz-M rocket booster and the Russian relay satellite Luch in the interim orbit, the press service of the Russian Space Agency (Roskosmos) reported.
    First launch of Proton booster after accident due on September 28
    “The Russian satellite is expected to enter the final calculated orbit at 09:26 Moscow time (on Sunday),” the press service said.
    The Luch spacecraft is another satellite of the Luch Multifunctional Relay System which is being developed under the 2006-2015 Russian federal space programme. The Luch relay system is intended to provide the Russian segment of the International Space Station /ISS)/; low-orbiting space devices; boosters and upper stages with communication with ground-based facilities. The previous Luch spacecraft - Luch-5B - was successfully put in orbit on April 28 this year.

    - The spacecraft launched wasn't a "Luch" and is suspected to be military.
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    Big_Gazza

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Big_Gazza on Sun Sep 28, 2014 3:29 pm

    Mike E wrote:"But it seems reasonable to expect that a new experimental data relay satellite would be kept under tight wraps with little to no public scrutiny?" - Are you suggesting that this could just be secretive public satellite?

    I'm simply suggesting that a new large-mass data relay geosat using new technolgies would be a sensitive mission, regardless of who the ultimate user would be, especially if the hardware is mostly of domestic Russian manufacture rather than reliant on western components as the Luch 5x series were. Such a commsat would be a very significant mission for Russian national security, even if it were in fact destined for civilian service.

    I'm also wondering if much of Russia's "bad luck" with launching federal payloads may not be accidental, and that security has been beefed up in preperation for an important national mission. It onvious taht there is a significant 5th column working inside Russia, and I don't discount the fact that there could well be saboteur cell(s) working within Russian aerospace industries. Pay scales are still quite low, and its an unfortunate human trait that people can be tempted to betray their colleagues, friends and nation in order to have their palms laced with dirty silver...
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    Mike E

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Mike E on Sun Sep 28, 2014 6:31 pm

    Big_Gazza wrote:
    Mike E wrote:"But it seems reasonable to expect that a new experimental data relay satellite would be kept under tight wraps with little to no public scrutiny?" - Are you suggesting that this could just be secretive public satellite?

    I'm simply suggesting that a new large-mass data relay geosat using new technolgies would be a sensitive mission, regardless of who the ultimate user would be, especially if the hardware is mostly of domestic Russian manufacture rather than reliant on western components as the Luch 5x series were.  Such a commsat would be a very significant mission for Russian national security, even if it were in fact destined for civilian service.

    I'm also wondering if much of Russia's "bad luck" with launching federal payloads may not be accidental, and that security has been beefed up in preperation for an important national mission.  It onvious taht there is a significant 5th column working inside Russia, and I don't discount the fact that there could well be saboteur cell(s) working within Russian aerospace industries.  Pay scales are still quite low, and its an unfortunate human trait that people can be tempted to betray their colleagues, friends and nation in order to have their palms laced with dirty silver...
    Got it.... So far I haven't heard if this will replace or only complement the Luch series, but hopefully we will find out sooner rather than later.

    By the standards of other countries, Russia rocket industry is extremely reliable when it comes to launches. Sabotage in something as monitored as a rocket would be found before, if not after the failure. Most of the time the problem is something very simple, like a bug in the hardware that controls the engine flow rate etc.
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    Big_Gazza

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    Military satellites

    Post  Big_Gazza on Mon Sep 29, 2014 8:44 am

    Mike E wrote:
    Big_Gazza wrote:
    Mike E wrote:"But it seems reasonable to expect that a new experimental data relay satellite would be kept under tight wraps with little to no public scrutiny?" - Are you suggesting that this could just be secretive public satellite?

    I'm simply suggesting that a new large-mass data relay geosat using new technolgies would be a sensitive mission, regardless of who the ultimate user would be, especially if the hardware is mostly of domestic Russian manufacture rather than reliant on western components as the Luch 5x series were.  Such a commsat would be a very significant mission for Russian national security, even if it were in fact destined for civilian service.

    I'm also wondering if much of Russia's "bad luck" with launching federal payloads may not be accidental, and that security has been beefed up in preperation for an important national mission.  It onvious taht there is a significant 5th column working inside Russia, and I don't discount the fact that there could well be saboteur cell(s) working within Russian aerospace industries.  Pay scales are still quite low, and its an unfortunate human trait that people can be tempted to betray their colleagues, friends and nation in order to have their palms laced with dirty silver...
    Got it.... So far I haven't heard if this will replace or only complement the Luch series, but hopefully we will find out sooner rather than later.

    By the standards of other countries, Russia rocket industry is extremely reliable when it comes to launches. Sabotage in something as monitored as a rocket would be found before, if not after the failure. Most of the time the problem is something very simple, like a bug in the hardware that controls the engine flow rate etc.

    I wish I could be as confident... There have been a number of failed proton launches that were put down to hardware failures for which a suspicious person could easily come up with sinister causes:

    Proton fail 05-12-2010 (Glonass x3) - vehicle was lost due to excessive fuel loaded to upper stage, which resulted in too much weight and an inability to reach orbit. What was the history behind this fault fuel load calculation? Could the launch-pad technicians have been given a deliberately incorrect fuel load instruction?

    Proton fail 17-08-2011 (Express AM4) - Briz-M upper stage software bug. Deliberate hack?

    Proton fail 06-06-2012 (Telkom-3/Express MD2) - Briz-M upper stage shut down 4 minutes earlier than planned on its fourth burn. Apparently caused by a piping failure.

    Proton partial-fail 08-12-2012 (Yamal-402) - Briz-M upper stage shut down 4 minutes earlier than planned on its fourth burn. Apparently caused by excessive temperature of the propellant line due to excessive engine start frequency and solar heating. (Sounds like a bona fide design issue).

    Proton fail 02-07-2013 (Glonass x3) - vehicle lost control immediately on launch. Fault was traced to yaw sensors installed upside down. Human error blamed during rocket assembly, but how can we be sure that these were not tampered with while the launcher was in storage?

    Proton fail 15-5-2014 (Express AM4R) - Proton third stage vernier (steering) engine failure at T+542 seconds due to turbo-pump pipe leak (or bearing failure?).

    Many of these failures seem to due to sloppy manufacturing, testing and QA procedures. Its interesting to note that the Bulava SLBM is experiencing similar problems, ie multiple failures unrelated to design issues but due to supply chain issues. The causes of these failures should be correctable, but in the meantime, the failure rate of 1 per year over the last half decade is causing damage to proton commercial success which was once very impressive. I REALLY hate to see Elon "SpaceX is exceptional" Musk profiting from Protons current rut....
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    coolieno99

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  coolieno99 on Thu Oct 02, 2014 5:36 am

    Mike E wrote:Proton-M carrier rocket lifts off from Baikonur

    MOSCOW, September 28 /ITAR-TASS/. The Proton-M carrier rocket, which lifted off from Baikonur space launch facility early on Sunday, has put the Briz-M rocket booster and the Russian relay satellite Luch in the interim orbit, the press service of the Russian Space Agency (Roskosmos) reported.
    First launch of Proton booster after accident due on September 28
    “The Russian satellite is expected to enter the final calculated orbit at 09:26 Moscow time (on Sunday),” the press service said.
    The Luch spacecraft is another satellite of the Luch Multifunctional Relay System which is being developed under the 2006-2015 Russian federal space programme. The Luch relay system is intended to provide the Russian segment of the International Space Station /ISS)/; low-orbiting space devices; boosters and upper stages with communication with ground-based facilities. The previous Luch spacecraft - Luch-5B - was successfully put in orbit on April 28 this year.

    - The spacecraft launched wasn't a "Luch" and is suspected to be military.

    It could be.


    "The focus of this text is on the successful launch of the Proton, however the most important this mission is the payload. The Olimp satellite is an improved version of the Luch series, and there are two important milestones in this mission. The completion of the Russian Satellite Data Relay Network with worldwide coverage and the possible test of some key technologies in aiming at future ELINT missions from geostationary orbit. ELINT in GEO is something new for Russia which has always used LEO missions series Tselina"

    João Dallamuta · FAE Business School

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Russia_launches_Proton_M_rocket_after_accident_999.html
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    Mike E

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Mike E on Thu Oct 02, 2014 6:05 am

    coolieno99 wrote:
    Mike E wrote:Proton-M carrier rocket lifts off from Baikonur

    MOSCOW, September 28 /ITAR-TASS/. The Proton-M carrier rocket, which lifted off from Baikonur space launch facility early on Sunday, has put the Briz-M rocket booster and the Russian relay satellite Luch in the interim orbit, the press service of the Russian Space Agency (Roskosmos) reported.
    First launch of Proton booster after accident due on September 28
    “The Russian satellite is expected to enter the final calculated orbit at 09:26 Moscow time (on Sunday),” the press service said.
    The Luch spacecraft is another satellite of the Luch Multifunctional Relay System which is being developed under the 2006-2015 Russian federal space programme. The Luch relay system is intended to provide the Russian segment of the International Space Station /ISS)/; low-orbiting space devices; boosters and upper stages with communication with ground-based facilities. The previous Luch spacecraft - Luch-5B - was successfully put in orbit on April 28 this year.

    - The spacecraft launched wasn't a "Luch" and is suspected to be military.

    It could be.


    "The focus of this text is on the successful launch of the Proton, however the most important this mission is the payload. The Olimp satellite is an improved version of the Luch series, and there are two important milestones in this mission. The completion of the Russian Satellite Data Relay Network with worldwide coverage and the possible test of some key technologies in aiming at future ELINT missions from geostationary orbit. ELINT in GEO is something new for Russia which has always used LEO missions series Tselina"

    João Dallamuta · FAE Business School

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Russia_launches_Proton_M_rocket_after_accident_999.html
    Thanks for the added info... There seems to be an information war over the payload, some say its an upgrade, others say it is completely new...

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    Russian Military Satellite

    Post  Austin on Mon Oct 20, 2014 4:55 pm

    Russia to have 9 new military satellites by 2020

    http://en.itar-tass.com/russia/755238

    The data transfer speed will grow to 8 megabits per second, and up to 100 Mbit/s on some directions




    MOSCOW, October 20. /TASS/. The throughput capacity of Russia’s military satellite communications system will quadruple by 2020 due to the replenishment of the orbital group with nine spacecraft, Deputy Chief of the General Staff Maj.-Gen. Khalil Arslanov said.

    “The orbital group of military-purpose communications satellites will be replenished with nine modern spacecraft by 2020,” Arslanov, who is also head of the Russian armed forces’ Main Communications Department, said.

    Arslanov said the data transfer speed will grow to 8 megabits per second, and up to 100 Mbit/s on some directions.

    On Monday, Russia’s Signal Troops mark their 95th anniversary.
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    Viktor

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Viktor on Thu Jan 22, 2015 9:03 pm

    After US space shutle orbiting for years around the globe it was on the Russians to prove that they could kill it Laughing Laughing Laughing

    Kosmos-2499: Is it a spy or an assassin... or both?
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    George1

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  George1 on Tue Feb 03, 2015 12:07 pm

    Russia to Launch Two Military Satellites This Month

    In early February, a new light-class Soyuz-2.1v rocket will take a new-generation military spacecraft into space. Another launch is slated for the end of the month.

    MOSCOW (Sputnik) – Two military satellites are scheduled to be launched this month from the Plesetsk space center in northern Russia, a space industry source told RIA Novosti Tuesday.

    “The first launch of 2015 has been tentatively scheduled for early February,” the source said. “A new light-class Soyuz-2.1v rocket with the Volga booster, designed by the Progress space design bureau, will for the first time take a new-generation military spacecraft to orbit.”

    During the second launch, slated for late February, a medium Soyuz-2.1a rocket will orbit another military satellite, the source said.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/military/20150203/1017700227.html#ixzz3Qg9s9SRn
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    Viktor

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Viktor on Tue Feb 03, 2015 10:31 pm

    Most likely first of the new generation EW satelites Shoigu announced at the end of 2014 to be launched in the Q1 of 2015.
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    Rmf

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Rmf on Fri Feb 06, 2015 12:20 am

    russia does have launchers ready, but satelite production is suffering due to western sanctions.
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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Rmf on Sun Mar 01, 2015 12:16 am

    military payload , bars-m , no film return capsules for russia anymore, all 10 launches planned from plesetsk in 2015 are military.
    http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/organizations/roscosmos/first-bars-m-spy-satellite-russian-military-heads-sky/
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    George1

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  George1 on Sun Mar 01, 2015 2:47 pm

    At 6:01 a.m. EST (14:01 MSK, 1101 GMT) Friday, a Soyuz-2-1a rocket lifted off from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome in the town of Mirny, north of Moscow, Russia, carrying the first Bars-M spy satellite for the Russian military. As is typical for classified Russian military missions, the launch was not broadcast.

    Limited information has been made available, but the payload has not been kept a complete secret. Bars-M is a cartography satellite, designed to map the Earth from above to keep Russian military maps as up-to-date as possible. This particular series of mapping satellites will use digital imaging and, evidently, downlink the footage instead of using the old film-return technique to bring the maps back. Older cartography satellites relied on the ability to parachute spent film back to Earth for review and use.

    Bars-M began its life in the 1990s as simply “Bars” and was created to be a replacement for the Kometa (Yantar-1KFT) satellites. The Kometa spacecraft were film-return satellites that the USSR developed in the 1970s and used, through the transition from USSR to Russia, from the 1980s to 2005. Each Kometa carried a TK-350 topographic camera TK-350 and a KVR-1000 high resolution camera in order to create large topographic maps. They used a Yantar bus module, which has been around since the 1960s and which was used recently on the Lotos-S satellite, and a Zenit-based film return capsule that could be re-used a few times.

    Each Kometa could orbit for about 45 days before returning the film capsule, which meant the Soviet Union needed to launch them somewhat regularly in order to maintain accurate maps. According to a report from SEN, “The USSR tried to launch at least one orbital cartographer per year, however during the post-Soviet economic collapse of the 1990s, such missions became more and more infrequent.”
    Soyuz 2-1A prior to launch as seen on Spaceflight Insider

    Soyuz 2-1A prior to launch. Photo Credit: Russian Space Web

    Accurate maps are no minor concern for soldiers in a combat zone. According to SEN, “Russian military maps were quickly growing obsolete. According to veterans of wars in Chechnya, inaccurate maps further complicated a nightmare scenario of urban warfare in this breakaway Russian republic.”

    Thus the Bars project was born. It would be built on the Yantar bus as well, and would employ “topographic electro-optical imaging system consisting of a wide-angle and high-resolution camera and a set of laser altimeters,” according to Spaceflight101. However, in the early 2000s, the project halted due to issues with both funds and technical details. The delay “led to a decade-long gap in operational space-based cartography capabilities,” according to the same report.

    The contract for the Bars-M satellites, the upgrade and reboot of the unfinished Bars, was signed in 2007 and included an expected first launch by 2012. TsSKB Progress, or Progress State Research and Production Space Centre, was contracted to develop a satellite bus different from the familiar Yantar. TsSKB-Progress operates under the jurisdiction of Roscosmos and is based in Samara, Russia. Leningrad Optical Mechanical Association (LOMO) developed and built the imaging system payload. Yet technical difficulties prevented it from being completed when desired, pushing that first launch to today, about three years late.

    So far, the Russian military has ordered at least six satellites in this line. Each has a life expectancy of five years.

    http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/organizations/roscosmos/first-bars-m-spy-satellite-russian-military-heads-sky/
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    Viktor

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    4 new satellites in orbit ..... Nice

    Post  Viktor on Tue Mar 31, 2015 6:27 pm

    4 new satellites in orbit ..... Nice  thumbsup


    2015 March 31: A Rockot booster launched three Gonets-M satellites comprising Block No. 14 of the Gonets-D1M network and a classified military payload. According to the official media, the Rockot/Briz-KM lifted off on March 31, 2015, at 16:48 Moscow Time. The Russian Ministry of Defense confirmed the on-time launch and the presence of the fourth military payload onboard the launch vehicle. The payload section separated from the second stage of the launch vehicle at 16:53 and the spacecraft were expected to reach its orbit at 18:45 Moscow Time.

    The mission was previously planned for March 3, 2015, however, around one day before a scheduled liftoff, the rocket had to be removed from the launch pad and returned to the assembly building for additional checks of engines on the first or second stage of the booster. The inspections were apparently triggered by recent ICBM tests.

    LINK
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    max steel

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    Russia To Build Submarine-Detecting Satellite

    Post  max steel on Wed Apr 08, 2015 10:42 pm

    Russia To Build Submarine-Detecting Satellite dunno

    Russia could build a satellite for the detection and tracking of submarines from space, a defense industry spokesman said on Thursday.

    Vladimir Boldyrev, of the Kosmonit science and technology center, said the group had developed a space satellite module that could carry out remote sensing of the sea and "detect submerged submarines."

    "Hopefully, it will be tested in space as early as 2011," he said, adding that work on the module started over a decade ago.

    He offered no indication as to when the new satellite would enter service with the Russian Armed Forces.

    Boldyrev added that the dual-use module would be used for both defense and civilian purposes, in particular, providing meteorological data.


    2010 ARTICLE : http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Russia_To_Build_Submarine_Detecting_Satellite_999.html
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    Viktor

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    Russian Military Satellites

    Post  Viktor on Fri Jun 05, 2015 6:13 pm


    Vann7

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Vann7 on Sun Jun 07, 2015 5:42 am



    I really hope that Mr Putin and all the Russians for once in their life ,
    realize that the west will never accept them as equals ,they Americans don't
    accept strong competition .

    It was a mistake to depend on western technology for their satellites , and any other technology.
    Russia needs to develop 100% of their technology for space and military at home at very least.
    But also its COmputers needs to be made in Russia too.. and internet too.. Because the west
    will never lift sanctions ..
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    Viktor

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Viktor on Tue Jun 23, 2015 8:18 pm

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    George1

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  George1 on Wed Jun 24, 2015 9:36 am

    Does anyone has any knowledge in Kondor military satellite?


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    max steel

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  max steel on Mon Jun 29, 2015 11:59 pm

    Cosmos-2506 - new Persona reconnaissance satellite



    On June 23, 2015 at 19:44 MSK (16:44 UTC) Space and Air Defense Forces successfully launched a Soyuz-2.1b launcher from the launch pad No. 4 of the launch complex No. 43 of the Plesetsk test site. The satellite delivered into orbit was designated Cosmos-2506. It is believed to be a new Persona optical reconnaissance satellite.




    The satellite was registered by NORAD as an object 40699 and was given international designation 2015-029A. It is expected to perform a transfer to a sun-synchronous circular orbit with apogee of about 720 km in a few days. Previous launch of a Persona satellite, Cosmos-2486, took place on June 7, 2013.
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    George1

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  George1 on Thu Aug 27, 2015 4:08 am



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