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    Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

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    Viktor

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Viktor on Sat Dec 28, 2013 11:03 am

    Very Happy cool 



    They did it after all .... no delay, just launch  russia  Very Happy  Very Happy 

    Russia’s new carrier-rocket Soyuz-2.1v to blast off at 10 am GMT

    and within an hour or few ... three more satellites placed in orbit .... after all Russian military set a task to place 6 military satellites in orbit by the end of 2013 

    and thiese thee are the last ones (so mission accomplished as planned for 2013) - congrats to Russia !!!  cheers  cheers 

    Soyuz-2.1v rocket places satellites into interim orbit - Russian Defense Ministry
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    Viktor

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Viktor on Tue May 06, 2014 4:00 pm

    Success  thumbsup 

    Rocket "Soyuz-2.1a" military satellite was successfully launched from Plesetsk
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    gaurav

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  gaurav on Thu May 08, 2014 6:44 pm

    The persona-2 satellite failed in Orbit.
    The russian space web is upgrading the information.

    persona -2 failed ??


    Persona-2 fails in orbit?

    In July 2013, NII TP design bureau published a press-release stating that Persona No. 2 was undergoing flight testing. The company congratulated its staff with the successful commissioning of the communication gear onboard the satellite. However shortly thereafter, the spacecraft was apparently lost, prompting Russian air and space defense forces, VKO, to take out of retirement a previous-generation Kobalt-M satellite and launch it on May 6, 2014. However, given the short life span of Kobalt-type spacecraft, it would be only a temporary solution to the problem of inadequate high-resolution imaging capabilities available to the Russian military in a midst of the Ukrainian crisis.

    According to Jonathan McDowell, an astrophysicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and a space flight historian, available radar data shows that following its initial orbit correction maneuver on June 9, 2013, the spacecraft conducted very small engine burns on July 9, September 11, October 20 and November 4. Combined they resulted in the reduction of the satellite's perigee by around two kilometers. However after November 4, 2013, any movements of the satellite, if any, were too small to distinguish them from observational errors. The lack of maneuvers does not necessarily means that the satellite was dead, because its orbit as high enough for a stable flight during a prolonged period of time.


    Can some one with details on Russian space program may be on russian forums put some light on this matter.
    This is a serious matter because the satellite itself costs around 300 m usd and the souyuz 2.1 b launch vehicle another 40 m usd.


    This was the costliest launch of Russian space vehicle and it failed second time
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    Viktor

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Viktor on Fri May 23, 2014 10:35 am

    Nice  thumbsup 

    From Plesetsk launch vehicle "rumble" with three military satellites
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    Mike E

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Mike E on Sat Sep 27, 2014 7:21 am

    Proton ready to return to flight on a cover-up mission

    For the first time since its failure on May 16, a Russian workhorse rocket will try to deliver a payload into space, this time a hush-hush satellite apparently camouflaged as a civilian payload. 

    A very strange secret mission
    The Proton-M rocket with a Briz-M upper stage is scheduled to lift off on Sept. 28, 2014, at 00:23:00 Moscow Time (4:23 p.m. EDT on Sept. 27). The launch vehicle will be carrying a classified payload known as Olymp ("Olympus") as well as Luch ("Beam"), which belongs to the Russian Ministry of Defense. The spacecraft, developed at ISS Reshetnev in Zheleznogorsk, will likely be inserted into a geostationary orbit 36,000 kilometers above the Equator, where it will provide communications for the Russian military. A Moscow-basedKommersant daily claimed that the satellite would also be used for electronic espionage for the Russian security service, FSB, however the report was widely doubted by observers.
    This web site first broke the story about the existence of the Olymp payload in 2013, even though semi-official reports about a planned launch of a military communications satellite, such as an already known Globus-1 series, had circulated earlier. Still, an apparent introduction of the new name could hint a significant upgrade of the Globus-1 spacecraft or even an entirely new design. As it turned out, a number of prominent Russian space industry contractors had previously reported in their public documents delivering components for the Olymp-K satellite. The companies involved in the project included ISS Reshetnev, Geofizika, LOMO and NPO Kvant.
    Given the fact that the new name had surfaced as Russia was gearing up to host Olympics in Sochi, one could speculate that it was assigned quite recently to a new-generation military satellite. The Soviet space history knows a few examples when the vehicle developed under a numeric code would receive a proper name shortly before reaching launch pad. During the post-Soviet period, the Russian Ministry of Defense have routinely declassified names for past and even current military satellites, while keeping most other details about their missions under wraps. In addition, most Russian military payloads would be officially identified after entering orbit as Kosmos with a number. However, in case of Olymp everything was different.
    At the beginning of 2014, to the surprise of many observers, the Russian civilian space agency, Roskosmos, suddenly announced the upcoming mission carrying a Luch satellite. The Luch, of course, are civilian data-relay satellites and all the existing spacecraft in the Luch constellation have been accounted for. As a result, an apparent decision by Roskosmos to give a new public name to the Olymp satellite could be a late and rather clumsy attempt to camouflage a military payload within a civilian constellation, which might or might not have a similar purpose to its unexpected military cousin.
    In any case, the differences between Olymp and Luch are obvious. Civilian Luch satellites were light enough to share a ride on Proton with another payload, while the spacecraft formerly known as Olymp is launched alone, betraying a much larger size! Moreover, numerous images of each Luch satellite during their development and pre-launch processing were released. Obviously, no visuals of the latest payload have been made available so far. Finally, all Luch satellites had numbers, while the latest spacecraft is carrying none.
    Possibly, the Luch cover-up campaign was a response to an accidental disclosure of the name Olymp, even though the code-name in itself provides no practical information on the purpose of its carrier.

    Preparations for launch
    This mission was previously scheduled to lift off at the end of May 2014 and, following the May 16 accident, it was initially postponed to July 8. On August 26, Roskosmos announced that specialists from GKNPTs Khrunichev had been installing thermal protection layers on the Briz-M stage at Site 92-50 in Baikonur, while the center's personnel was configuring launch pad at Site 81 for the upcoming mission. The statement also said that the Luch spacecraft was developed at ISS Reshetnev.
    On Sept. 4, Roskosmos reported that the launch vehicle, the upper stage, the payload fairing and the spacecraft had undergone autonomous checks and were all ready for integration. The assembly was completed by September 19. Two days later, a fully assembled vehicle was moved to a fueling station for loading the upper stage with propellant and pressurized gases. The launch vehicle was then rolled out to the launch pad No. 24 at Site 81 on September 23.
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    Big_Gazza

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Big_Gazza on Sat Sep 27, 2014 5:42 pm

    Mike E wrote:In any case, the differences between Olymp and Luch are obvious. Civilian Luch satellites were light enough to share a ride on Proton with another payload, while the spacecraft formerly known as Olymp is launched alone, betraying a much larger size!

    This isn't quite correct.  The original Luch satellites (aka Altair) and the 2nd gen Luch-2 used dedicated Proton launches, but the subsequent Luch-5x series were only half the mass and could therefore share a ride.

    Re this upcoming launch, is this not the same satellite that was originally called Luch-4 and would have had a mass of 3 ton and therefore need to revert to dedicated proton launches? IIRC Luch-4 was cancelled but reconfigured as a testbed for new technologies.  

    Anatoly Zak is fully aware of this past history, yet he deliberately launches into conjecture about military involvement, but it seems reasonable to expect that a new experimental data relay satellite would be kept under tight wraps with little to no public scrutiny?
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    Mike E

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Mike E on Sat Sep 27, 2014 9:24 pm

    Big_Gazza wrote:
    Mike E wrote:In any case, the differences between Olymp and Luch are obvious. Civilian Luch satellites were light enough to share a ride on Proton with another payload, while the spacecraft formerly known as Olymp is launched alone, betraying a much larger size!

    This isn't quite correct.  The original Luch satellites (aka Altair) and the 2nd gen Luch-2 used dedicated Proton launches, but the subsequent Luch-5x series were only half the mass and could therefore share a ride.

    Re this upcoming launch, is this not the same satellite that was originally called Luch-4 and would have had a mass of 3 ton and therefore need to revert to dedicated proton launches? IIRC Luch-4 was cancelled but reconfigured as a testbed for new technologies.  

    Anatoly Zak is fully aware of this past history, yet he deliberately launches into conjecture about military involvement, but it seems reasonable to expect that a new experimental data relay satellite would be kept under tight wraps with little to no public scrutiny?
    In all honesty, I don't know what to think about this... Zak is claiming that it is actually an electronic commutation satellite used for spying etc. "Luch" is a name just to confuse reporters, and so far it has done very well!

    "But it seems reasonable to expect that a new experimental data relay satellite would be kept under tight wraps with little to no public scrutiny?" - Are you suggesting that this could just be secretive public satellite?
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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Mike E on Sun Sep 28, 2014 5:50 am

    Proton-M carrier rocket lifts off from Baikonur

    MOSCOW, September 28 /ITAR-TASS/. The Proton-M carrier rocket, which lifted off from Baikonur space launch facility early on Sunday, has put the Briz-M rocket booster and the Russian relay satellite Luch in the interim orbit, the press service of the Russian Space Agency (Roskosmos) reported.
    First launch of Proton booster after accident due on September 28
    “The Russian satellite is expected to enter the final calculated orbit at 09:26 Moscow time (on Sunday),” the press service said.
    The Luch spacecraft is another satellite of the Luch Multifunctional Relay System which is being developed under the 2006-2015 Russian federal space programme. The Luch relay system is intended to provide the Russian segment of the International Space Station /ISS)/; low-orbiting space devices; boosters and upper stages with communication with ground-based facilities. The previous Luch spacecraft - Luch-5B - was successfully put in orbit on April 28 this year.

    - The spacecraft launched wasn't a "Luch" and is suspected to be military.
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    Big_Gazza

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Big_Gazza on Sun Sep 28, 2014 3:29 pm

    Mike E wrote:"But it seems reasonable to expect that a new experimental data relay satellite would be kept under tight wraps with little to no public scrutiny?" - Are you suggesting that this could just be secretive public satellite?

    I'm simply suggesting that a new large-mass data relay geosat using new technolgies would be a sensitive mission, regardless of who the ultimate user would be, especially if the hardware is mostly of domestic Russian manufacture rather than reliant on western components as the Luch 5x series were. Such a commsat would be a very significant mission for Russian national security, even if it were in fact destined for civilian service.

    I'm also wondering if much of Russia's "bad luck" with launching federal payloads may not be accidental, and that security has been beefed up in preperation for an important national mission. It onvious taht there is a significant 5th column working inside Russia, and I don't discount the fact that there could well be saboteur cell(s) working within Russian aerospace industries. Pay scales are still quite low, and its an unfortunate human trait that people can be tempted to betray their colleagues, friends and nation in order to have their palms laced with dirty silver...
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    Mike E

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Mike E on Sun Sep 28, 2014 6:31 pm

    Big_Gazza wrote:
    Mike E wrote:"But it seems reasonable to expect that a new experimental data relay satellite would be kept under tight wraps with little to no public scrutiny?" - Are you suggesting that this could just be secretive public satellite?

    I'm simply suggesting that a new large-mass data relay geosat using new technolgies would be a sensitive mission, regardless of who the ultimate user would be, especially if the hardware is mostly of domestic Russian manufacture rather than reliant on western components as the Luch 5x series were.  Such a commsat would be a very significant mission for Russian national security, even if it were in fact destined for civilian service.

    I'm also wondering if much of Russia's "bad luck" with launching federal payloads may not be accidental, and that security has been beefed up in preperation for an important national mission.  It onvious taht there is a significant 5th column working inside Russia, and I don't discount the fact that there could well be saboteur cell(s) working within Russian aerospace industries.  Pay scales are still quite low, and its an unfortunate human trait that people can be tempted to betray their colleagues, friends and nation in order to have their palms laced with dirty silver...
    Got it.... So far I haven't heard if this will replace or only complement the Luch series, but hopefully we will find out sooner rather than later.

    By the standards of other countries, Russia rocket industry is extremely reliable when it comes to launches. Sabotage in something as monitored as a rocket would be found before, if not after the failure. Most of the time the problem is something very simple, like a bug in the hardware that controls the engine flow rate etc.
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    Military satellites

    Post  Big_Gazza on Mon Sep 29, 2014 8:44 am

    Mike E wrote:
    Big_Gazza wrote:
    Mike E wrote:"But it seems reasonable to expect that a new experimental data relay satellite would be kept under tight wraps with little to no public scrutiny?" - Are you suggesting that this could just be secretive public satellite?

    I'm simply suggesting that a new large-mass data relay geosat using new technolgies would be a sensitive mission, regardless of who the ultimate user would be, especially if the hardware is mostly of domestic Russian manufacture rather than reliant on western components as the Luch 5x series were.  Such a commsat would be a very significant mission for Russian national security, even if it were in fact destined for civilian service.

    I'm also wondering if much of Russia's "bad luck" with launching federal payloads may not be accidental, and that security has been beefed up in preperation for an important national mission.  It onvious taht there is a significant 5th column working inside Russia, and I don't discount the fact that there could well be saboteur cell(s) working within Russian aerospace industries.  Pay scales are still quite low, and its an unfortunate human trait that people can be tempted to betray their colleagues, friends and nation in order to have their palms laced with dirty silver...
    Got it.... So far I haven't heard if this will replace or only complement the Luch series, but hopefully we will find out sooner rather than later.

    By the standards of other countries, Russia rocket industry is extremely reliable when it comes to launches. Sabotage in something as monitored as a rocket would be found before, if not after the failure. Most of the time the problem is something very simple, like a bug in the hardware that controls the engine flow rate etc.

    I wish I could be as confident... There have been a number of failed proton launches that were put down to hardware failures for which a suspicious person could easily come up with sinister causes:

    Proton fail 05-12-2010 (Glonass x3) - vehicle was lost due to excessive fuel loaded to upper stage, which resulted in too much weight and an inability to reach orbit. What was the history behind this fault fuel load calculation? Could the launch-pad technicians have been given a deliberately incorrect fuel load instruction?

    Proton fail 17-08-2011 (Express AM4) - Briz-M upper stage software bug. Deliberate hack?

    Proton fail 06-06-2012 (Telkom-3/Express MD2) - Briz-M upper stage shut down 4 minutes earlier than planned on its fourth burn. Apparently caused by a piping failure.

    Proton partial-fail 08-12-2012 (Yamal-402) - Briz-M upper stage shut down 4 minutes earlier than planned on its fourth burn. Apparently caused by excessive temperature of the propellant line due to excessive engine start frequency and solar heating. (Sounds like a bona fide design issue).

    Proton fail 02-07-2013 (Glonass x3) - vehicle lost control immediately on launch. Fault was traced to yaw sensors installed upside down. Human error blamed during rocket assembly, but how can we be sure that these were not tampered with while the launcher was in storage?

    Proton fail 15-5-2014 (Express AM4R) - Proton third stage vernier (steering) engine failure at T+542 seconds due to turbo-pump pipe leak (or bearing failure?).

    Many of these failures seem to due to sloppy manufacturing, testing and QA procedures. Its interesting to note that the Bulava SLBM is experiencing similar problems, ie multiple failures unrelated to design issues but due to supply chain issues. The causes of these failures should be correctable, but in the meantime, the failure rate of 1 per year over the last half decade is causing damage to proton commercial success which was once very impressive. I REALLY hate to see Elon "SpaceX is exceptional" Musk profiting from Protons current rut....
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    coolieno99

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  coolieno99 on Thu Oct 02, 2014 5:36 am

    Mike E wrote:Proton-M carrier rocket lifts off from Baikonur

    MOSCOW, September 28 /ITAR-TASS/. The Proton-M carrier rocket, which lifted off from Baikonur space launch facility early on Sunday, has put the Briz-M rocket booster and the Russian relay satellite Luch in the interim orbit, the press service of the Russian Space Agency (Roskosmos) reported.
    First launch of Proton booster after accident due on September 28
    “The Russian satellite is expected to enter the final calculated orbit at 09:26 Moscow time (on Sunday),” the press service said.
    The Luch spacecraft is another satellite of the Luch Multifunctional Relay System which is being developed under the 2006-2015 Russian federal space programme. The Luch relay system is intended to provide the Russian segment of the International Space Station /ISS)/; low-orbiting space devices; boosters and upper stages with communication with ground-based facilities. The previous Luch spacecraft - Luch-5B - was successfully put in orbit on April 28 this year.

    - The spacecraft launched wasn't a "Luch" and is suspected to be military.

    It could be.


    "The focus of this text is on the successful launch of the Proton, however the most important this mission is the payload. The Olimp satellite is an improved version of the Luch series, and there are two important milestones in this mission. The completion of the Russian Satellite Data Relay Network with worldwide coverage and the possible test of some key technologies in aiming at future ELINT missions from geostationary orbit. ELINT in GEO is something new for Russia which has always used LEO missions series Tselina"

    João Dallamuta · FAE Business School

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Russia_launches_Proton_M_rocket_after_accident_999.html
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    Mike E

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Mike E on Thu Oct 02, 2014 6:05 am

    coolieno99 wrote:
    Mike E wrote:Proton-M carrier rocket lifts off from Baikonur

    MOSCOW, September 28 /ITAR-TASS/. The Proton-M carrier rocket, which lifted off from Baikonur space launch facility early on Sunday, has put the Briz-M rocket booster and the Russian relay satellite Luch in the interim orbit, the press service of the Russian Space Agency (Roskosmos) reported.
    First launch of Proton booster after accident due on September 28
    “The Russian satellite is expected to enter the final calculated orbit at 09:26 Moscow time (on Sunday),” the press service said.
    The Luch spacecraft is another satellite of the Luch Multifunctional Relay System which is being developed under the 2006-2015 Russian federal space programme. The Luch relay system is intended to provide the Russian segment of the International Space Station /ISS)/; low-orbiting space devices; boosters and upper stages with communication with ground-based facilities. The previous Luch spacecraft - Luch-5B - was successfully put in orbit on April 28 this year.

    - The spacecraft launched wasn't a "Luch" and is suspected to be military.

    It could be.


    "The focus of this text is on the successful launch of the Proton, however the most important this mission is the payload. The Olimp satellite is an improved version of the Luch series, and there are two important milestones in this mission. The completion of the Russian Satellite Data Relay Network with worldwide coverage and the possible test of some key technologies in aiming at future ELINT missions from geostationary orbit. ELINT in GEO is something new for Russia which has always used LEO missions series Tselina"

    João Dallamuta · FAE Business School

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Russia_launches_Proton_M_rocket_after_accident_999.html
    Thanks for the added info... There seems to be an information war over the payload, some say its an upgrade, others say it is completely new...

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    Russian Military Satellite

    Post  Austin on Mon Oct 20, 2014 4:55 pm

    Russia to have 9 new military satellites by 2020

    http://en.itar-tass.com/russia/755238

    The data transfer speed will grow to 8 megabits per second, and up to 100 Mbit/s on some directions




    MOSCOW, October 20. /TASS/. The throughput capacity of Russia’s military satellite communications system will quadruple by 2020 due to the replenishment of the orbital group with nine spacecraft, Deputy Chief of the General Staff Maj.-Gen. Khalil Arslanov said.

    “The orbital group of military-purpose communications satellites will be replenished with nine modern spacecraft by 2020,” Arslanov, who is also head of the Russian armed forces’ Main Communications Department, said.

    Arslanov said the data transfer speed will grow to 8 megabits per second, and up to 100 Mbit/s on some directions.

    On Monday, Russia’s Signal Troops mark their 95th anniversary.
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    Viktor

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    Russian Space-based ASAT

    Post  Viktor on Sun Nov 02, 2014 11:51 am

    Russian Federation is testing something big in space ....  thumbsup  thumbsup

    I would go for the ASAT.

    Kosmos-2499: Is it a spy or an assassin... or both?
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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  kvs on Sun Nov 02, 2014 2:04 pm

    Viktor wrote:Russian Federation is testing something big in space ....  thumbsup  thumbsup

    I would go for the ASAT.

    Kosmos-2499: Is it a spy or an assassin... or both?

    They just have to demonstrate to the chauvinist moron leadership of NATO that they have the ability for ASAT.
    I recall all of the awe at the fact that China took out a satellite with a missile (leaving yet more debris hazard in
    LEO) and I got the impression that people actually thought Russia could not do the same.   The Bulava, RS-24 and
    other launches are not just for testing, they are to remind Russia's foaming at the mouth enemies that Russia has
    the capacity to inflict serious harm to them and their ambitions.
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    Viktor

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Viktor on Sun Nov 02, 2014 2:32 pm

    kvs wrote:
    Viktor wrote:Russian Federation is testing something big in space ....  thumbsup  thumbsup

    I would go for the ASAT.

    Kosmos-2499: Is it a spy or an assassin... or both?

    They just have to demonstrate to the chauvinist moron leadership of NATO that they have the ability for ASAT.
    I recall all of the awe at the fact that China took out a satellite with a missile (leaving yet more debris hazard in
    LEO) and I got the impression that people actually thought Russia could not do the same.   The Bulava, RS-24 and
    other launches are not just for testing, they are to remind Russia's foaming at the mouth enemies that Russia has
    the capacity to inflict serious harm to them and their ambitions.

    I remember actually reading somewhere that Russia was the primarily reason why China has that capability in the first place.
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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Mike E on Sun Nov 02, 2014 7:27 pm

    Viktor wrote:Russian Federation is testing something big in space ....  thumbsup  thumbsup

    I would go for the ASAT.

    Kosmos-2499: Is it a spy or an assassin... or both?
    I have no clue to be honest... Space-based ASAT systems have never really been attempted before, and one now would be quite the shocker (more so to the West).
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    sepheronx

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  sepheronx on Sun Nov 02, 2014 8:01 pm

    Russia, more specifically USSR had asat capabilities. But where missiles attached to MiG-31's. What China did is nothing amazing as it was a shotgun effect from a large missile.
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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Viktor on Sun Nov 02, 2014 8:04 pm

    Mike E wrote:
    Viktor wrote:Russian Federation is testing something big in space ....  thumbsup  thumbsup

    I would go for the ASAT.

    Kosmos-2499: Is it a spy or an assassin... or both?
    I have no clue to be honest... Space-based ASAT systems have never really been attempted before, and one now would be quite the shocker (more so to the West).


    Take another guess Very Happy

    LINK
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    Mike E

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Mike E on Sun Nov 02, 2014 10:36 pm

    Viktor wrote:
    Mike E wrote:
    Viktor wrote:Russian Federation is testing something big in space ....  thumbsup  thumbsup

    I would go for the ASAT.

    Kosmos-2499: Is it a spy or an assassin... or both?
    I have no clue to be honest... Space-based ASAT systems have never really been attempted before, and one now would be quite the shocker (more so to the West).
    Take another guess  Very Happy

    LINK
    Completely forgot about that one...  Embarassed But it was never actually used in space, was it?

    Seph, that is like how the US used to do it before the SM-3 (via plane which launches an ASAT missile).

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Vann7 on Thu Nov 06, 2014 4:59 pm


    Major problem with the China way of intercepting satellites is that US have Thousands of them in Orbit.. So China will go bankrupt after the 20-30 rocket launched to intercept one satellite each. The real practical way to shut down enemy satellites in case of a major war.. is militarization of space.. to have battle stations in space with satellites armed with hundreds of mini missiles each that can intercept satellites.. the advantage in space for such system is the no gravity ,significantly help the design of any interceptor ,because they dont require powerful boosters to defeat stationary targets in orbit..Any cheap rocket grenade with fragmentation explosives will be enough to neutralize any satellite .
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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Viktor on Thu Nov 06, 2014 6:17 pm

    Vann7 wrote:
    Major problem with the China way of intercepting satellites is that US have Thousands of them in Orbit.. So China will go bankrupt after the 20-30 rocket launched to intercept one satellite each. The real practical way to shut down enemy satellites in case of a major war.. is militarization of space.. to have battle stations in space with satellites armed with hundreds of mini missiles each that can intercept satellites.. the advantage in space for such system is the no gravity ,significantly help the design of any interceptor ,because they dont require powerful boosters to defeat stationary targets in orbit..Any cheap rocket grenade with fragmentation explosives will be enough to neutralize any satellite .


    US has about 250 satellites and thats it and there is no need to shoot down all of them to criple US abilities to wage war.
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    Mike E

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Mike E on Thu Nov 06, 2014 9:36 pm

    Viktor wrote:
    Vann7 wrote:
    Major problem with the China way of intercepting satellites is that US have Thousands of them in Orbit.. So China will go bankrupt after the 20-30 rocket launched to intercept one satellite each. The real practical way to shut down enemy satellites in case of a major war.. is militarization of space.. to have battle stations in space with satellites armed with hundreds of mini missiles each that can intercept satellites.. the advantage in space for such system is the no gravity ,significantly help the design of any interceptor ,because they dont require powerful boosters to defeat stationary targets in orbit..Any cheap rocket grenade with fragmentation explosives will be enough to neutralize any satellite .


    US has about 250 satellites and thats it and there is no need to shoot down all of them to criple US abilities to wage war.
    Yep, plus only a select few of those satellites are military, and even less are reconnaissance... 

    China would go bankrupt? They probably already have hundreds of these missiles, and I wouldn't be surprised if they (or Russia for that matter) could destroy them via technology. 

    Battle is space would be a complete disaster, ever heard of the Kessler effect? The ship that would fire the missile would be completely destroyed within hours unless it de-orbits.

    What is up with your recent posts?
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    Viktor

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

    Post  Viktor on Thu Jan 22, 2015 9:03 pm

    After US space shutle orbiting for years around the globe it was on the Russians to prove that they could kill it Laughing Laughing Laughing

    Kosmos-2499: Is it a spy or an assassin... or both?

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    Re: Russian Military Satellites: News & Development

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