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    Algeria's Succession Crisis

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    ATLASCUB

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    Post  ATLASCUB on Fri Mar 01, 2019 8:37 pm

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-47420485
    https://www.rt.com/newsline/452764-algerians-protest-extend-rule/
    https://edition.cnn.com/2019/03/01/africa/algeria-protests-intl/

    Algiers, Algeria (CNN)Security forces fired tear gas Friday as demonstrators staged one of Algeria's biggest protests in decades, days before ailing President Abdelaziz Bouteflika is set to run formally for a fifth term.
    Protesters are demanding that the 81-year-old leader withdraw from the April 18 election. A sea of protesters filled multiple streets in the capital, Algiers, and other cities across the North African country in what's considered one of the largest displays of public discontent since the 1954-1962 war of independence from France.

    Succession always a problem...

    Easy to exploit.
    George1
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    Post  George1 on Sat Mar 02, 2019 1:06 am

    ATLASCUB wrote:https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-47420485
    https://www.rt.com/newsline/452764-algerians-protest-extend-rule/
    https://edition.cnn.com/2019/03/01/africa/algeria-protests-intl/

    Algiers, Algeria (CNN)Security forces fired tear gas Friday as demonstrators staged one of Algeria's biggest protests in decades, days before ailing President Abdelaziz Bouteflika is set to run formally for a fifth term.
    Protesters are demanding that the 81-year-old leader withdraw from the April 18 election. A sea of protesters filled multiple streets in the capital, Algiers, and other cities across the North African country in what's considered one of the largest displays of public discontent since the 1954-1962 war of independence from France.

    Succession always a problem...

    Easy to exploit.

    Yes but Bouteflika's succesion is an ogoing subject last years for them. My opinion is that Bouteflika should have paved the way for the man that will replace him, after all he incapable of exercising power
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    ATLASCUB

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    Post  ATLASCUB on Sat Mar 02, 2019 10:25 pm

    George1 wrote:
    ATLASCUB wrote:https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-47420485
    https://www.rt.com/newsline/452764-algerians-protest-extend-rule/
    https://edition.cnn.com/2019/03/01/africa/algeria-protests-intl/

    Algiers, Algeria (CNN)Security forces fired tear gas Friday as demonstrators staged one of Algeria's biggest protests in decades, days before ailing President Abdelaziz Bouteflika is set to run formally for a fifth term.
    Protesters are demanding that the 81-year-old leader withdraw from the April 18 election. A sea of protesters filled multiple streets in the capital, Algiers, and other cities across the North African country in what's considered one of the largest displays of public discontent since the 1954-1962 war of independence from France.

    Succession always a problem...

    Easy to exploit.

    Yes but Bouteflika's succesion is an ogoing subject last years for them. My opinion is that Bouteflika should have paved the way for the man that will replace him, after all he incapable of exercising power

    It just shows that there are internal divisions and jockeying for power with no central figure strong enough to rise to the top as it stands. This opens up room for foreign interference to fish in the troubled waters.
    Varyag
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    Post  Varyag on Wed Mar 27, 2019 1:34 pm

    Nobody, Western governments or traditional allies of Algeria understand anything for a simple reason. As most of the former french colony, African states are simply inherent and permanent failed states.

    They make a confusion between independance and sovereignty...

    These states do not administrate any nations or any free will from the peoples to leave with each others.

    The borders, the languages, the institutions, the culture, the place of the religion and even their own history was made by the french. But yes, african control mineral ressources to do what ? Nothing about building a Nation.

    There is only one and simple for a Nation : the free and sincere adhesion of peoples.

    Algeria is not a Nation, as all the Sahel states. It is a French colony with a sovereignty transfered to a total babarbaric power : The N.L.F (National Liberation Front) of Egyptian Nasserian ideologic pattern ( arabo-social-islamism) at the term of an absolute nasty insurrection.

    They kill thousands of peoples (North african) to start a degenerative no limit war to cross the moral point where the french would be obligated to use the force.

    In the 90s again, (100 to 150 thousand dead, yugoslavian level of barbary), there is no such of "forein hand" or foreign islamic threat". There is as in "egyptian style of arab states" , a disgusting power who do nothing but taking all the money, and terrorising the population with the army or with religious mercenaries of the army, to make people believe there is a threat.

    The 90s civil war is nothing more than the democratic traduction of the opportunism of the religious to orientate the unbelievable degree of misery of the people to a "Califate solution", which people choose by hopeless feeling. The responsable of this misery and his consequences (religious rising) complete their missions : terrorise the population ==> this is "Us" or the "Bad, evil and very violent Islamists" ... that we created to terrorise you.


    Last edited by Varyag on Wed Mar 27, 2019 2:41 pm; edited 2 times in total
    Varyag
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    Post  Varyag on Wed Mar 27, 2019 2:22 pm

    The problem is not the succession, the problem is the system (that we call Algeria, and that is really named National Liberation Front) in which the sucession has to be made.

    The turkish, as always, justify their imperialism (which is only and very only ethno-linguistic and nothing else) by the religion : Islamic expansion. Which of course is only a justification of their ethnic imperialism.

    When they take North-Africa (except morocco) with the pretext of protecting the islamic society from the spanish reconquista in the 16th century, they simply put some naval bases on the littoral cities, to have the gibraltar straits control (what they really and only want in their ethnic, non-muslim imperialism). These cities only satisfy their naval views, no economic or social development, not even religious management (that they pretend to be the casus belli).

    What the turkish do then ? Two things. One for the locals, the other for the neighbors, who were Christians and who will suffer a hell during at least 3 centuries.


    • They first pay some tribes which leave at the periphery of the littoral cities they need to control, they pay some tribes to take a tax from other tribes...for nothing in return (tribes of the same north-african roots and language) and those tribes threaten the others of killing and destruction. When the turkish masters don't find tribes to collect that tax on the others , they do it with mercenaries coming from all their shity empire. (you can find everything, european renegades, slavic christian slaves... even nigers)



    • The other political project if we can call it as a project, is simply the one of piracy, stealing the other, as simple, with total barbary, total undiscrimination of target or geographic spaces. Boats or land, they attack permanently christian kingdoms, whether it is their fleets or their lands. They take gold, goods and... crew to turn into slaves. We know that episode, for those who live in non muslim countries, as "White Slavery"

    ==> between 2 and 3 millions of slaves.

    Which lead us to 1830, when after 3 centuries of successive bombing expeditions by almost all the europeans kingdoms, and even the young American navy, France rebuild her very known project of permanent and definitive solution : military invasion. The first iteration of it was the confidential and very sadly episode of the Jijel Expedition... in 1664.

    That french expedition was a massive and in fact almost didactic fail : lack of logistics, confusion on the tactical objectives, internal rivalty in the high military hierarchy, climatic parameters, and even hygienic with the pest, and unpredictable resistance of local tribes. It was a total disaster, at a point that the contemporary historiograph just try to erase it of the official history...

    In 1830 that time, the level of preparation, political determination and let's say it, the delta of quantitative (soldiers) and qualitative (technology) investments allow them to take the city (Algiers) quite easily. Then, a colonial adventure of 50 years of territorial conquests and integration from the West to the East will start. But at the difference of the turkish, they will integer the locals, it is true, in a total racialist and ideologic paradigm (which was the norm in Europe at that time, including in Russia) that, whether you want it or not, will lead to a massive and substantial improvement of the life quality, regarding the objectives indicators of social confort for the locals Wink

    The genocide is a very interesting ambition : but it as to be predicted and established in his political volunty by his author which is absolutely not the case of the French, unlike Herr Dog -Han say it. Moreover, the population of the locals was about 3 or 3 million and a half at 1830. In 1962, it was about 9 millions. A x3 demographic increase genocide... those french are even bad at doing the bad...

    Then in 1954, happen what I describe earlier, barbaric Nasserian insurrection (with the terror at an artistic level, as only weapon.) 200 000 north African fight for France, thousands of countrymen were cut in peaces by N.L.F and by international pressure, France leave a Country she developed, design the border of, put institutions in, with French language, pipelines, petrol discovering, railway, highways, urbanism, everything a modern state has.

    But that state has no nation. And France choose to give the power to people who were nothing more than a team of terrorist and criminals, with no other National project to just take sovereignty (and not independance) on French Algeria, and leave on the French foundations, including petrol and gas to today.

    Algeria is french, always was, always will be. It was thinked, created, developed and maked by and for the french, which loose it by international pressure and give it to a Terrorist team. Nothing in Algeria is not french, out of the total islamization of the society of course ( the only thing the criminal N.L.F do by himself).

    The people in North-Africa, their language, (which can not be Arabic since Arabic is... from Arabia, 3000 km away), their social structure, their agriculture and so their culture (no culture without agriculture), are literally and absolutelty forbidden to death.

    North Africa is the only part of the world where people can die for speaking North-African. If they let people do what they want, they will refuse all the N.L.F and in fact the whole  french colonial concept of "Algeria", to start to create a society by themselves, with THEIR free will.

    You can not force people to leave in something they do not choose, or with barbaric terror.
    George1
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    Post  George1 on Wed Mar 27, 2019 5:34 pm

    Algerian army chief calls for President Abdelaziz Bouteflika to step down

    General Ahmed Gaid Salah says it is "imperative" to find a solution after President Bouteflika's 20-year reign sparks protests.

    The Algerian army's chief of staff has called for President Abdelaziz Bouteflika to be declared unfit to govern after two decades in power.

    In a televised speech, General Ahmed Gaid Salah said: "It is necessary, even imperative, to adopt a solution to get out of the crisis which responds to the legitimate demands of the Algerian people, and which guarantees the respect of the provisions of the constitution and safeguards the sovereignty of the state."

    The army chief is the most senior official to turn against the 82-year-old president, whose long rule has prompted weeks of mass protests in the north African nation.

    A possible solution to the crisis could be found in Article 102 of Algeria's constitution, under which parliament has the power to declare the president unfit to rule due to "serious and lasting illness".

    Thousands have taken to the streets as the country's longtime leader Abdelaziz Bouteflika tries to cling on to power.

    President Bouteflika suffered a stroke in April 2013, which left him in a wheelchair. The leader has often flown to Switzerland for treatment and now appears very rarely in public.

    Article 102 also allows for the extension of parliamentary terms of office in exceptional circumstances.

    Hasni Abidi, a Swiss-based Algerian who heads a think tank, said: "This is a default solution following the failure of the negotiations of the departure of the president. It moves away from the democratic transition and approaches a framed succession."

    Last month, Mr Bouteflika said he would run for a fifth term in office, triggering protests that brought hundreds of thousands of people to the streets.

    After returning home from medical treatment in Switzerland, on 11 March he announced that he was no longer running for another term.

    Instead, he postponed the elections that were scheduled for 18 April.

    Mr Bouteflika's plan was seen as a way prolonging his current term and protests have continued since then.

    Algeria's ruling coalition party has called for his resignation too, with the RND party's secretary general Ahmed Ouyahia saying it "recommends" Mr Bouteflika's resignation to facilitate the transition of power.


    https://news.sky.com/story/algerian-army-chief-calls-for-president-abdelaziz-bouteflika-to-step-down-11676459
    George1
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    Post  George1 on Mon Apr 01, 2019 2:42 am

    Bouteflica named a new government and prepares to announce resignation in Tuesday

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/sputniknews.com/amp/middleeast/201904011073717189-algerian-president-bouteflika-prepares-resignation/
    George1
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    Post  George1 on Tue Apr 02, 2019 1:54 pm

    Algeria's Bouteflika to resign before mandate ends April 28: state media


    Algerian President Abdelaziz Bouteflika will resign before his mandate ends on April 28, state news agency APS said on Monday, bowing to weeks of mass protests and army pressure seeking an end to his 20-year rule.

    There was no immediate reaction from leaders of the protest movement that has buffeted Algeria, a major oil producer, since Feb. 22. Many protesters want a new generation of leaders to replace an elderly, secretive ruling elite seen by many as out of touch and unable to jump-start a faltering economy hampered by cronyism.

    In a sign that protesters might demand more changes, most opposition parties rejected a new caretaker cabinet appointed by Bouteflika late on Sunday, saying the prime minister was too close to ruling circles.

    APS said Bouteflika, who is 82 and in poor health, would take important decisions to ensure “continuity of the state’s institutions” before stepping down. It did not spell out a date for his departure or give more details immediately.

    Under Algeria’s constitution, Abdelkader Bensalah, chairman of the upper house of parliament, would take over as caretaker president for 90 days until elections are held.

    Bouteflika, rarely seen in public since he suffered a stroke in 2013, at first sought to defuse the unrest by saying on March 11 he was dropping plans to run for a fifth term.

    But he gave no timetable for his exit, advocating a national conference on reforms to address the outpouring of discontent over corruption, nepotism, economic mismanagement and the protracted grip on power of veterans of the 1954-62 war of independence against France.

    Bouteflika’s hesitation further enraged protesters, spurring the powerful army chief of staff to step in by proposing last week to implement a provision of Algeria’s constitution under which a constitutional council would determine whether Bouteflika was still fit to govern or allow him to resign.

    But Bouteflika signaled late on Sunday that he was on his way out when he appointed a caretaker cabinet headed by interim Prime Minister Noureddine Bedoui. An interim leader cannot appoint ministers under the constitution.

    Central Bank Governor Mohamed Loukal was named finance minister, while the former head of the state power and gas utility, Mohamed Arkab, will take up the energy portfolio. OPEC member Algeria is a major oil and natural gas exporter.

    Most opposition parties rejected the cabinet because they see Bedoui as too close to the ruling elite. They also say past elections he supervised as interior minister were not fair.

    Several opposition leaders on Sunday supported the army chief’s proposal that Bouteflika’s capacity to govern be assessed under article 102 of the constitution.

    12 businessmen probed for alleged graft

    The announcement of Bouteflika’s pending resignation came hours after private Ennahar TV said Algeria had seized the passports of 12 businessmen in an apparent swoop on associates of the president.

    It said an investigation into alleged corruption had been ordered by the army without informing the presidency — part of a struggle between the military and Bouteflika’s circle, analysts said.

    On Sunday, authorities had arrested Ali Haddad, a leading Algerian businessman close to Bouteflika.

    On Monday, the state prosecutor opened cases against “some people” over alleged corruption and banned them from transferring assets abroad, APS said.

    It gave no details, but Ennahar TV, a well-informed media outlet throughout the wave of unrest, said 12 businessmen had been targeted and their passports seized, citing a statement from the general prosecutor.

    Apart from Haddad, two tycoons close to Bouteflika, Mahieddine Tahkout and Reda Kouninef, were also on the list, according to Ennahar.

    Some demonstrators have rejected Algeria’s tradition of military intervention in civilian matters and want to dismantle the entire power elite, known locally as “le pouvoir”, which includes army officers, the long-ruling National Liberation Front (FLN) party and business tycoons.

    Several close allies, including FLN figures and union leaders, had in the past weeks abandoned Bouteflika.

    He established himself in the early 2000s by ending a civil war with Islamist militants that claimed 200,000 lives.

    But dissatisfaction grew with an establishment widely seen as unaccountable, raising pressure for a new generation to take over, capable of modernizing the oil-dependent state and giving hope to a young population impatient for a better life.

    https://www.standardmedia.co.ke/article/2001319128/algeria-s-president-bouteflika-to-resign-before-mandate-ends-april-28
    George1
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    Post  George1 on Wed Apr 03, 2019 3:30 am

    Bouteflika resigned

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.bbc.com/news/amp/world-africa-47795108
    George1
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    Post  George1 on Wed Apr 03, 2019 11:26 pm

    Algerian Constitutional Council declares presidency vacant


    On Tuesday, Abdelaziz Bouteflika steped down after more than a month of popular unrest

    CAIRO, April 3. /TASS/. Algeria’s Constitutional Council has declared the presidency vacant, Sky News Arabia reported.

    The Constitutional Council’s meeting was held under Article 102 of the country’s constitutio, which says that "in case of the president’s resignation or death, the Constitutional Council holds a meeting and announces that the president’s post is vacant." After it is done, the parliament appoints the president of the Council of the Nation (the upper house of parliament) as the country’s interim president who will not be able to run for president. Under Algerian laws, he will be able to serve as interim president for no longer than 90 days. A presidential election needs to be held within that period.

    Abdelkader Bensalah, the current President of the Council of the Nation, has become Algeria’s interim president.

    Situation in Algeria

    Abdelaziz Bouteflika, 82, served as Algerian president between 1999 and 2019. In early February, the country’s ruling National Liberation Front nominated him to run the April 18 presidential election. The second member of the pro-presidential alliance, the Democratic National Rally party, supported the decision. The initiative triggered mass protests in the country. The poor health condition of Bouteflika is one of the reasons behind the protests.

    On March 3, Bouteflika’s official statement was released, in which he said that if elected, he would call an early presidential election, refraining from taking part in it. He also pledged to arrange a nation-wide referendum to adopt a new constitution.

    However, the leading opposition parties and movements rejected the president’s initiative.

    On March 11, Bouteflika withdrew his bid for a fifth term in office and postponed the election. On April 2, Bouteflika informed the Constitutional Council about his decision to step down as the head of state. "I made this decision consciously and of my own free will, seeking to calm the hearts and souls of my fellow countrymen and let them work together to help Algeria progress towards a better future, which is their legitimate desire," Bouteflika said in his message.


    More:
    http://tass.com/world/1051951
    George1
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    Post  George1 on Tue Apr 09, 2019 2:44 pm

    Algeria's parliament has appointed upper house speaker Abdelkader Bensalah new interim president after the long-time head of state, Abdelaziz Bouteflika, stepped down in a public address last week.

    https://sputniknews.com/middleeast/201904091073952825-algeria-interim-president-pressure/
    Odin of Ossetia
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    Post  Odin of Ossetia on Wed Apr 10, 2019 10:55 pm

    Varyag wrote:Nobody, Western governments or traditional allies of Algeria understand anything for a simple reason. As most of the former french colony, African states are simply inherent and permanent failed states.

    They make a confusion between independance and sovereignty...

    These states do not administrate any nations or any free will from the peoples to leave with each others.

    The borders, the languages, the institutions, the culture, the place of the religion and even their own history was made by the french. But yes, african control mineral ressources to do what ? Nothing about building a Nation.

    There is only one and simple for a Nation : the free and sincere adhesion of peoples.

    Algeria is not a Nation, as all the Sahel states. It is a French colony with a sovereignty transfered to a total babarbaric power : The N.L.F (National Liberation Front) of Egyptian Nasserian ideologic pattern ( arabo-social-islamism) at the term of an absolute nasty insurrection.

    They kill thousands of peoples (North african) to start a degenerative no limit war to cross the moral point where the french would be obligated to use the force.

    In the 90s again, (100 to 150 thousand dead, yugoslavian level of barbary), there is no such of "forein hand" or foreign islamic threat". There is as in "egyptian style of arab states" , a disgusting power who do nothing but taking all the money, and terrorising the population with the army or with religious mercenaries of the army, to make people believe there is a threat.

    The 90s civil war is nothing more than the democratic traduction of the opportunism of the religious to orientate the unbelievable degree of misery of the people to a "Califate solution", which people choose by hopeless feeling. The responsable of this misery and his consequences (religious rising) complete their missions : terrorise the population ==> this is "Us" or the "Bad, evil and very violent Islamists" ... that we created to terrorise you.





    "Yugoslav level barbarity"?

    How about Varangian level atrocities:

    http://michalw.narod.ru/index-Truth.html



    And that from someone who has a forum name of "Varyag".



    While most of the African states are indeed artificial, that is not really the case with Algeria, or any of the North African states.



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