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    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM

    George1
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    Post  George1 on Tue Jun 23, 2015 11:17 pm

    Cruise missiles and INF - What about 9M729?

    I have a piece in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists where I try to untangle the controversy around alleged Russia's non-compliance with the INF Treaty. The short version of it is that I believe that the culprit missile is an SLCM that was tested from a "wrong" kind of launcher. It's still a violation, of course, which would require some creative thinking to reverse. Read the column for details.

    Hard evidence is difficult to come by these days (unfortunately, a ban on posting selfies taken on the test site seems to be enforced quite well), so all we have is bits and pieces that may or may not fit together. When the Bulletin column was published, some of my colleagues were skeptical about the SLCM claim. The question I got was, What about that 9M729 missile that looks like the Iskander's 9M728/R-500 follow-on?

    Well, what about it? Very much all we know about 9M729 comes from a brief mention in a report of GosNIIP, a design bureau that builds guidance for cruise missiles (the site has been taken down for redesign). According to the report, Russia completed state acceptance trials of the "ground-based system 9M728, 9M729 and its modernized version." We know that 9M728 is a cruise missile developed as part of the Iskander project (see "Kamnev" on this page; as always, thanks to Alexander for the links). It appears that it is the missile usually referred to as R-500, which has been now deployed with Iskander-M systems.

    It's very reasonable to suggest that 9M729 is a follow-on to 9M728, also to be deployed as part of the ground-based Iskander-M. If so, it appear to be a very good candidate for the role of the INF non-compliance culprit. The only thing I would note here that since it was tested together with 9M728, it's unlikely to be a follow-on. A long-range version with a light (presumably nuclear) payload would be one possibility. But not the only one.

    The 9M729 theory looks fairly compelling, but it doesn't seem to fit the various bits and pieces of information about the non-compliance allegation. First, U.S. officials have repeatedly said that the missile in question is not Iskander. There are many ways to interpret these statements, but I would think that if we were talking about a nuclear-capable Iskander missile the language would have been somewhat different.

    Then, as I understand, Russia has been working on long-range cruise missiles, but these seem to be larger (8 meters) missiles. This does not necessarily mean that there is no project that produced a short 6-meter missile to be launched from Iskander, but it's just another piece that doesn't quite fit.

    Also, I have it on good authority that the missile in question has its own launcher (apparently treaty-compliant) that is different from the (presumably non-fixed) launcher that triggered the non-compliance allegation. Again, this does not prove anything, but it's one more detail to consider.

    Finally, I would just note that the difference between SLCMs and GLCMs is very much artificial. There is no reason a SLCM cannot be easily deployed on land. There are few doubts that Russia is working on long-range SLCMs, which could then be deployed on ground-based launchers, if necessary. In fact, they don't have to be - as far as Europe is concerned, Russia could cover it with SLCMs. So, while I cannot completely rule out a scenario in which Russia decided to openly disregard the INF Treaty, I still strongly believe that the alternative - SLCM tests that turned out to be non-compliant - is much more plausible.

    Does anyone have details about this new missile??


    Last edited by George1 on Thu Nov 29, 2018 11:36 am; edited 6 times in total
    max steel
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    Post  max steel on Tue Jun 23, 2015 11:37 pm

    I like russianforces blog(contributors)  , i wish if they could also join this forum . Looks like a new modified cruise missile to me .
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    Post  GarryB on Wed Jun 24, 2015 6:40 am

    I suspect they were testing a naval missile from a land launcher, which should not be a violation of the INF treaty as long as it was intended to be a naval missile... ie Ship or Sub Launched Cruise Missile... SLCM.

    One aspect no one seems to have considered is that current air launched cruise missiles have a flight range of 5,000km, which means if the naval and land based cruise missiles can attain this range or even slightly more they would be excluded from the INF agreement as they exceed the range boundaries.

    the INF agreement applies to missiles with a flight range of between 500 and 5,000km, so a new land attack cruise missile with a flight range of 5,000km or more would not be covered by the INF treaty.

    Ironically several US UCAVs however would be bound by the INF treaty...
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    Post  Rmf on Wed Jun 24, 2015 7:23 pm

    this is pure b.s. from americans to prop up BMD shields in romania. they have to come up with concrete EVIDENCE  that Russia has violated but they have not so far. ZERO.
    this missiles are probably for ships actually and submarines.
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    Post  max steel on Wed Jun 24, 2015 9:24 pm

    They have propped up BMD shields in Romanian waters already .

    http://www.russiadefence.net/t672p15-romania-to-host-us-missile-interceptors (n.30)
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    Post  Guest on Mon Nov 02, 2015 8:25 pm

    "There have been two Russian cruise missiles in the news lately.  One is a ground-launched cruise missile that apparently violates the 1987 Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, the other is a sea-launched cruise missile that Russia recently fired against targets in Syria. Both of these cruise missiles are made by the same firm, Novator.  I have a sneaking suspicion that they are closely related.  In fact, I bet they look exactly alike.  Here is my best effort at a hypothesis.  It is speculation, since the United States is not releasing any information about the missile that violates the INF treaty.  But I think we can make an educated guess or two.

    Bill Gertz (I know!) claimed that Russia had, on September 2, conducted another test of the ground-launched cruise missile that the United States claims violatesthe 1987 INF Treaty.  Gertz indicated that the US designation is the “SSC-X-8.” I believe this missile is designated 9M729.  There was a Russian announcement by GosNIIP, the design bureau that builds guidance for cruise missiles, that Russia completed state acceptance trials of the “ground-based system 9M728, 9M729 and its modernized version.” We know the 9M728 is the Iskander cruise missile.  (It is also called the R500 — the name of the missile is different from its GRAU number.) The way Russian GRAU numbers work is formulaic — the 9M means it is an Army missile.  That means the 9M729 is also for Iskander or a new launcher that we have yet to see.  Let’s presume that the 9M728 is a reduced-range version of the 9M729 — an INF-compliant version of its bigger brother.  That’s not hard to believe — Russian officials have long said they could extend the range of the cruise missile for Iskander  beyond 500 km with little difficulty; their confidence was probably rooted in some evidence.

    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM Screen-Shot-2015-10-27-at-12.31.55-PM-580x476

    Now, this is where it gets tricky.  We know the Russians make an export version of the Kalibr family missiles, which they call  Klub.  So, Klub missiles are reduced range versions of the Kalibr systems that can be exported without violating the MTCR. (You may recall they are marketed with the awesome video about how great it is to hide cruise missiles in shipping containers.)  So, for example, the 3M14E (e is for export) Klub is a reduced range (~300 km) version of the 3M14 Kalibr that Russia used to strike Syria (2,000 km). It is hard to know how Russia reduced the range, but one option is just to reduce the size of the fuel tank. It is possible that the Kalibr and Klub versions are externally identical, although we don’t know that for certain.

    If the 9M728/R500 deployed with Iskander (~500 km range) is a reduced range version of the 9M729 (~2000 km), and if the 3M14E is a reduced range version of the 3M14, what does it say that the reduced range versions appear to be identical?  That would strongly imply, to me anyway, that the 9M729 and the 3M14 are probably externally identical. We are looking at a single family of missiles. One benefit of concluding the the 3m14 and the 9M279 are likely similar is that  we can infer something about the range of one based on the other.  The United States has not offered a public assessment of the GLCM range, but the Russians have described the range of the 3m14 (SS-N-30A) as 2000-2500 km.  That would imply a similar range for the 9M729 (SSC-X-Cool, depending on the type of warhead."


    I guess this goes under Ground force thread Smile

    Full article: http://lewis.armscontrolwonk.com/archive/7816/russian-cruise-missiles-revisited

    "Well, what about it? Very much all we know about 9M729 comes from a brief mention in a report of GosNIIP, a design bureau that builds guidance for cruise missiles (the site has been taken down for redesign). According to the report, Russia completed state acceptance trials of the "ground-based system 9M728, 9M729 and its modernized version." We know that 9M728 is a cruise missile developed as part of the Iskander project (see "Kamnev" on this page; as always, thanks to Alexander for the links). It appears that it is the missile usually referred to as R-500, which has been now deployed with Iskander-M systems.

    It's very reasonable to suggest that 9M729 is a follow-on to 9M728, also to be deployed as part of the ground-based Iskander-M. If so, it appear to be a very good candidate for the role of the INF non-compliance culprit. The only thing I would note here that since it was tested together with 9M728, it's unlikely to be a follow-on. A long-range version with a light (presumably nuclear) payload would be one possibility. But not the only one."


    Source: http://russianforces.org/blog/2015/06/cruise_missiles_and_inf_-_what.shtml

    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM Mo20150918-24%281%29

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    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM KEL_3532Centr2015-900
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    Post  max steel on Mon Nov 02, 2015 8:58 pm

    Militarov wrote:"There have been two Russian cruise missiles in the news lately.  One is a ground-launched cruise missile that apparently violates the 1987 Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, the other is a sea-launched cruise missile that Russia recently fired against targets in Syria. Both of these cruise missiles are made by the same firm, Novator.  I have a sneaking suspicion that they are closely related.  In fact, I bet they look exactly alike.  Here is my best effort at a hypothesis.  It is speculation, since the United States is not releasing any information about the missile that violates the INF treaty.  But I think we can make an educated guess or two.

    Bill Gertz (I know!) claimed that Russia had, on September 2, conducted another test of the ground-launched cruise missile that the United States claims violatesthe 1987 INF Treaty.  Gertz indicated that the US designation is the “SSC-X-8.” I believe this missile is designated 9M729.  There was a Russian announcement by GosNIIP, the design bureau that builds guidance for cruise missiles, that Russia completed state acceptance trials of the “ground-based system 9M728, 9M729 and its modernized version.” We know the 9M728 is the Iskander cruise missile.  (It is also called the R500 — the name of the missile is different from its GRAU number.) The way Russian GRAU numbers work is formulaic — the 9M means it is an Army missile.  That means the 9M729 is also for Iskander or a new launcher that we have yet to see.  Let’s presume that the 9M728 is a reduced-range version of the 9M729 — an INF-compliant version of its bigger brother.  That’s not hard to believe — Russian officials have long said they could extend the range of the cruise missile for Iskander  beyond 500 km with little difficulty; their confidence was probably rooted in some evidence.

    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM Screen-Shot-2015-10-27-at-12.31.55-PM-580x476

    Now, this is where it gets tricky.  We know the Russians make an export version of the Kalibr family missiles, which they call  Klub.  So, Klub missiles are reduced range versions of the Kalibr systems that can be exported without violating the MTCR. (You may recall they are marketed with the awesome video about how great it is to hide cruise missiles in shipping containers.)  So, for example, the 3M14E (e is for export) Klub is a reduced range (~300 km) version of the 3M14 Kalibr that Russia used to strike Syria (2,000 km). It is hard to know how Russia reduced the range, but one option is just to reduce the size of the fuel tank. It is possible that the Kalibr and Klub versions are externally identical, although we don’t know that for certain.

    If the 9M728/R500 deployed with Iskander (~500 km range) is a reduced range version of the 9M729 (~2000 km), and if the 3M14E is a reduced range version of the 3M14, what does it say that the reduced range versions appear to be identical?  That would strongly imply, to me anyway, that the 9M729 and the 3M14 are probably externally identical. We are looking at a single family of missiles. One benefit of concluding the the 3m14 and the 9M279 are likely similar is that  we can infer something about the range of one based on the other.  The United States has not offered a public assessment of the GLCM range, but the Russians have described the range of the 3m14 (SS-N-30A) as 2000-2500 km.  That would imply a similar range for the 9M729 (SSC-X-Cool, depending on the type of warhead."


    I guess this goes under Ground force thread Smile

    Full article: http://lewis.armscontrolwonk.com/archive/7816/russian-cruise-missiles-revisited

    "Well, what about it? Very much all we know about 9M729 comes from a brief mention in a report of GosNIIP, a design bureau that builds guidance for cruise missiles (the site has been taken down for redesign). According to the report, Russia completed state acceptance trials of the "ground-based system 9M728, 9M729 and its modernized version." We know that 9M728 is a cruise missile developed as part of the Iskander project (see "Kamnev" on this page; as always, thanks to Alexander for the links). It appears that it is the missile usually referred to as R-500, which has been now deployed with Iskander-M systems.

    It's very reasonable to suggest that 9M729 is a follow-on to 9M728, also to be deployed as part of the ground-based Iskander-M. If so, it appear to be a very good candidate for the role of the INF non-compliance culprit. The only thing I would note here that since it was tested together with 9M728, it's unlikely to be a follow-on. A long-range version with a light (presumably nuclear) payload would be one possibility. But not the only one."


    Source: http://russianforces.org/blog/2015/06/cruise_missiles_and_inf_-_what.shtml

    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM Mo20150918-24%281%29

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    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM KEL_3532Centr2015-900



    They didn't violate any treaty moreover US is violating with placement of SM missile series in both Poland and Romania.
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    Post  GarryB on Tue Nov 03, 2015 6:55 am

    There is no practical difference between a cruise missile with a flight range of more than 500km and a UAV with a flight range of more than 500km like Predator... especially an armed UAV like a UCAV.

    Of course the sizes involved the R-500 could easily have a reduce conventional payload and terminal guidance and a range of more than 5,500km and therefore still comply with the INF treaty...
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    Post  flamming_python on Wed Nov 04, 2015 8:22 pm

    Militarov wrote:"There have been two Russian cruise missiles in the news lately.  One is a ground-launched cruise missile that apparently violates the 1987 Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, the other is a sea-launched cruise missile that Russia recently fired against targets in Syria. Both of these cruise missiles are made by the same firm, Novator.  I have a sneaking suspicion that they are closely related.  In fact, I bet they look exactly alike.  Here is my best effort at a hypothesis.  It is speculation, since the United States is not releasing any information about the missile that violates the INF treaty.  But I think we can make an educated guess or two.

    Bill Gertz (I know!) claimed that Russia had, on September 2, conducted another test of the ground-launched cruise missile that the United States claims violatesthe 1987 INF Treaty.  Gertz indicated that the US designation is the “SSC-X-8.” I believe this missile is designated 9M729.  There was a Russian announcement by GosNIIP, the design bureau that builds guidance for cruise missiles, that Russia completed state acceptance trials of the “ground-based system 9M728, 9M729 and its modernized version.” We know the 9M728 is the Iskander cruise missile.  (It is also called the R500 — the name of the missile is different from its GRAU number.) The way Russian GRAU numbers work is formulaic — the 9M means it is an Army missile.  That means the 9M729 is also for Iskander or a new launcher that we have yet to see.  Let’s presume that the 9M728 is a reduced-range version of the 9M729 — an INF-compliant version of its bigger brother.  That’s not hard to believe — Russian officials have long said they could extend the range of the cruise missile for Iskander  beyond 500 km with little difficulty; their confidence was probably rooted in some evidence.

    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM Screen-Shot-2015-10-27-at-12.31.55-PM-580x476

    Now, this is where it gets tricky.  We know the Russians make an export version of the Kalibr family missiles, which they call  Klub.  So, Klub missiles are reduced range versions of the Kalibr systems that can be exported without violating the MTCR. (You may recall they are marketed with the awesome video about how great it is to hide cruise missiles in shipping containers.)  So, for example, the 3M14E (e is for export) Klub is a reduced range (~300 km) version of the 3M14 Kalibr that Russia used to strike Syria (2,000 km). It is hard to know how Russia reduced the range, but one option is just to reduce the size of the fuel tank. It is possible that the Kalibr and Klub versions are externally identical, although we don’t know that for certain.

    If the 9M728/R500 deployed with Iskander (~500 km range) is a reduced range version of the 9M729 (~2000 km), and if the 3M14E is a reduced range version of the 3M14, what does it say that the reduced range versions appear to be identical?  That would strongly imply, to me anyway, that the 9M729 and the 3M14 are probably externally identical. We are looking at a single family of missiles. One benefit of concluding the the 3m14 and the 9M279 are likely similar is that  we can infer something about the range of one based on the other.  The United States has not offered a public assessment of the GLCM range, but the Russians have described the range of the 3m14 (SS-N-30A) as 2000-2500 km.  That would imply a similar range for the 9M729 (SSC-X-Cool, depending on the type of warhead."


    I guess this goes under Ground force thread Smile

    Full article: http://lewis.armscontrolwonk.com/archive/7816/russian-cruise-missiles-revisited

    "Well, what about it? Very much all we know about 9M729 comes from a brief mention in a report of GosNIIP, a design bureau that builds guidance for cruise missiles (the site has been taken down for redesign). According to the report, Russia completed state acceptance trials of the "ground-based system 9M728, 9M729 and its modernized version." We know that 9M728 is a cruise missile developed as part of the Iskander project (see "Kamnev" on this page; as always, thanks to Alexander for the links). It appears that it is the missile usually referred to as R-500, which has been now deployed with Iskander-M systems.

    It's very reasonable to suggest that 9M729 is a follow-on to 9M728, also to be deployed as part of the ground-based Iskander-M. If so, it appear to be a very good candidate for the role of the INF non-compliance culprit. The only thing I would note here that since it was tested together with 9M728, it's unlikely to be a follow-on. A long-range version with a light (presumably nuclear) payload would be one possibility. But not the only one."


    Source: http://russianforces.org/blog/2015/06/cruise_missiles_and_inf_-_what.shtml

    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM Mo20150918-24%281%29

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    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM KEL_3532Centr2015-900

    I really do hate it when people, especially those purporting to be military analysts, get their damn Iskander-Ms and Iskander-Ks mixed up.
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    Post  Guest on Thu Nov 05, 2015 12:23 am

    flamming_python wrote:
    Militarov wrote:"There have been two Russian cruise missiles in the news lately.  One is a ground-launched cruise missile that apparently violates the 1987 Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, the other is a sea-launched cruise missile that Russia recently fired against targets in Syria. Both of these cruise missiles are made by the same firm, Novator.  I have a sneaking suspicion that they are closely related.  In fact, I bet they look exactly alike.  Here is my best effort at a hypothesis.  It is speculation, since the United States is not releasing any information about the missile that violates the INF treaty.  But I think we can make an educated guess or two.

    Bill Gertz (I know!) claimed that Russia had, on September 2, conducted another test of the ground-launched cruise missile that the United States claims violatesthe 1987 INF Treaty.  Gertz indicated that the US designation is the “SSC-X-8.” I believe this missile is designated 9M729.  There was a Russian announcement by GosNIIP, the design bureau that builds guidance for cruise missiles, that Russia completed state acceptance trials of the “ground-based system 9M728, 9M729 and its modernized version.” We know the 9M728 is the Iskander cruise missile.  (It is also called the R500 — the name of the missile is different from its GRAU number.) The way Russian GRAU numbers work is formulaic — the 9M means it is an Army missile.  That means the 9M729 is also for Iskander or a new launcher that we have yet to see.  Let’s presume that the 9M728 is a reduced-range version of the 9M729 — an INF-compliant version of its bigger brother.  That’s not hard to believe — Russian officials have long said they could extend the range of the cruise missile for Iskander  beyond 500 km with little difficulty; their confidence was probably rooted in some evidence.

    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM Screen-Shot-2015-10-27-at-12.31.55-PM-580x476

    Now, this is where it gets tricky.  We know the Russians make an export version of the Kalibr family missiles, which they call  Klub.  So, Klub missiles are reduced range versions of the Kalibr systems that can be exported without violating the MTCR. (You may recall they are marketed with the awesome video about how great it is to hide cruise missiles in shipping containers.)  So, for example, the 3M14E (e is for export) Klub is a reduced range (~300 km) version of the 3M14 Kalibr that Russia used to strike Syria (2,000 km). It is hard to know how Russia reduced the range, but one option is just to reduce the size of the fuel tank. It is possible that the Kalibr and Klub versions are externally identical, although we don’t know that for certain.

    If the 9M728/R500 deployed with Iskander (~500 km range) is a reduced range version of the 9M729 (~2000 km), and if the 3M14E is a reduced range version of the 3M14, what does it say that the reduced range versions appear to be identical?  That would strongly imply, to me anyway, that the 9M729 and the 3M14 are probably externally identical. We are looking at a single family of missiles. One benefit of concluding the the 3m14 and the 9M279 are likely similar is that  we can infer something about the range of one based on the other.  The United States has not offered a public assessment of the GLCM range, but the Russians have described the range of the 3m14 (SS-N-30A) as 2000-2500 km.  That would imply a similar range for the 9M729 (SSC-X-Cool, depending on the type of warhead."


    I guess this goes under Ground force thread Smile

    Full article: http://lewis.armscontrolwonk.com/archive/7816/russian-cruise-missiles-revisited

    "Well, what about it? Very much all we know about 9M729 comes from a brief mention in a report of GosNIIP, a design bureau that builds guidance for cruise missiles (the site has been taken down for redesign). According to the report, Russia completed state acceptance trials of the "ground-based system 9M728, 9M729 and its modernized version." We know that 9M728 is a cruise missile developed as part of the Iskander project (see "Kamnev" on this page; as always, thanks to Alexander for the links). It appears that it is the missile usually referred to as R-500, which has been now deployed with Iskander-M systems.

    It's very reasonable to suggest that 9M729 is a follow-on to 9M728, also to be deployed as part of the ground-based Iskander-M. If so, it appear to be a very good candidate for the role of the INF non-compliance culprit. The only thing I would note here that since it was tested together with 9M728, it's unlikely to be a follow-on. A long-range version with a light (presumably nuclear) payload would be one possibility. But not the only one."


    Source: http://russianforces.org/blog/2015/06/cruise_missiles_and_inf_-_what.shtml

    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM Mo20150918-24%281%29

    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM KEL_3527Centr2015_1-900

    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM KEL_3532Centr2015-900

    I really do hate it when people, especially those purporting to be military analysts, get their damn Iskander-Ms and Iskander-Ks mixed up.

    Partially due to Russian designations i suppose. Also suddenly comes R-500/Iskander K, but there is already Iskander-M and E, people lose it Very Happy
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    Post  George1 on Mon Dec 31, 2018 6:03 pm

    So a little about 9P701 TEL for 9M729 missile

    https://militaryrussia.livejournal.com/433149.html
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    Post  dino00 on Wed Jan 23, 2019 10:24 am

    In the Ministry of Defense revealed the characteristics of the rocket 9M729

    KUBINKA, January 23 - RIA News . The maximum range of the 9M729 missile is 480 kilometers and complies with the conditions of the INF Treaty, said the head of the missile forces and artillery of the Armed Forces, Mikhail Matveyevsky.

    "The specified range was confirmed during the West-2017 SKSHU," he said
    at a briefing for military attaches and the media.

    He noted that the 9M729 missile contains combat equipment of increased power(bigger warhead) and a new airborne control complex, providing higher accuracy of hitting the target.
    Matveyevsky stressed that the 9M728 and 9M729 missiles are equipped with a warhead and refuel only in factory conditions.
    "The mass of fuel at the same time provides the maximum constructive range of flight limited by the requirements of the contract (INF-Ed.). They are supplied to the troops in special containers. Changing the mass of fuel and refueling the missile in military conditions are impossible. launchers and transport-charging machines and carrying out routine maintenance, "- added the general.

    Also, according to him, 9M729 received a new launcher, allowing to place four missiles, and not two.

    https://ria.ru/20190123/1549762900.html
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    Post  dino00 on Wed Jan 23, 2019 11:24 am

    From the oficial presentation
    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM Img_2012
    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM Img_2013
    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM Img_2014
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    Post  dino00 on Wed Jan 23, 2019 11:26 am

    And here is the beast!
    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM Img_2015
    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM Img_2016
    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM Img_2017
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    Post  miketheterrible on Wed Jan 23, 2019 11:37 am

    Anyway, Russia said that they are willing to discuss about the missile only if US starts discussing about the Aegis systems.

    So in other words, no one is budging.
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    Post  crod on Wed Jan 23, 2019 1:01 pm

    dino00 wrote:And here is the beast!

    No other word for it, a proper beast. Looking forward to seeing it in action.
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    Post  George1 on Wed Jan 23, 2019 3:33 pm



    http://russianforces.org/blog/2019/01/moscow_shows_the_9m729_missile.shtml


    Last edited by George1 on Wed Jan 23, 2019 3:39 pm; edited 1 time in total
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    Post  George1 on Wed Jan 23, 2019 3:39 pm

    "A special configuration of the self-propelled launcher was developed for the 9M729 missile. It accommodates four 9M729 missiles, while the previous launcher carries two 9M728 missiles," the commander of Russia’s Missile and Artillery Force, Lieutenant-General Mikhail Matveyevsky told a news briefing earlier.
    More:
    http://tass.com/defense/1041360

    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM DxlpaJLW0AAGfov


    so the launcher of 9M279 is a derivation of Iskander launcher but with four launch tubes and a bit longer chasis
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    Post  George1 on Wed Jan 23, 2019 3:46 pm

    This is an interesting slide - all test launches from Kapustin Yar, including ICBMs, in 2008-2014. Here is the specific site - 48.774, 46.31
    https://www.google.com/maps/place/48%C2%B046'26.4%22N+46%C2%B018'36.0%22E/@48.774,46.3078113,925m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x0:0x0!8m2!3d48.774!4d46.31

    Probably this is the one that the US pointed at

    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM Dxlqyr5WsAE3N4o
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    Post  Hole on Wed Jan 23, 2019 4:27 pm

    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM Dxlboz10
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    Post  PapaDragon on Wed Jan 23, 2019 5:14 pm


    I want to see that 4 missile setup on the truck. thumbsup
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    Post  Hole on Wed Jan 23, 2019 8:52 pm

    Will look like this:

    9M729 (SSC-X-8) GLCM 000225
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    Post  George1 on Thu Jan 24, 2019 1:28 pm

    Αll photos and videos from presentation here

    https://bmpd.livejournal.com/3504255.html
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    Post  dino00 on Thu Jan 24, 2019 8:19 pm

    As several sources in the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation told Izvestia, the new operational-tactical missile system with the “9M729 product” was given the name “Iskander-M1”. While he is in service with only one experienced division. The prefix “experienced” in its name is not accidental: the increased firepower and new capabilities of the Iskander-M1 require changes in the tactics of using the operational-tactical missile system (OTRK).

    https://iz.ru/837234/tatiana-baikova-nataliia-portiakova-aleksei-ramm-aleksei-kazachenko-bogdan-stepovoi/derzhat-distantciiu-chem-interesna-raketa-iz-za-kotoroi
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    Post  George1 on Sat Feb 02, 2019 6:52 pm

    Notes after 9M729-missile breifing (23/01/2019)

    https://militaryrussia.livejournal.com/438749.html

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