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    Russian Economy General News: #5

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    kvs

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    Re: Russian Economy General News: #5

    Post  kvs on Mon Dec 21, 2015 6:35 pm

    http://think-head.livejournal.com/239345.html

    1.5 years of NATO sanctions, life without ham.



    Good old days of the Yeltsin era (not USSR).

    and life under sanctions and evil Putler:





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    sepheronx

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    Re: Russian Economy General News: #5

    Post  sepheronx on Mon Dec 21, 2015 9:15 pm

    Yeah, couple of days ago I saw a picture of someone shopping in Yakaterinberg and complaining about prices. I noticed how stacked the store was in food.
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    kvs

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    Re: Russian Economy General News: #5

    Post  kvs on Mon Dec 21, 2015 10:33 pm

    sepheronx wrote:Yeah, couple of days ago I saw a picture of someone shopping in Yakaterinberg and complaining about prices. I noticed how stacked the store was in food.

    There has been a surge of food substitution since the sanctions. This domestic cheese, etc., is actually not too cheap
    and of high quality. But there are parasites who fake food products and this is a problem. Of course, the 5th column
    is barking that 80% of the replacement for precious NATO products is fake. Predictable behaviour from the usual scum.

    Russian consumers should lump it for several years and they will come out ahead. If they can't live without their imported
    cheeses, then they should pack their bags to their promised land and live it up. There are too many malcontents and
    drama queens in Russia. This is partly a result of the USSR period and you can see this particularly in Ukraine or as it
    is now, Banderastan. Some sort of idiotic welfare bum entitlement syndrome.
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    sepheronx

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    Re: Russian Economy General News: #5

    Post  sepheronx on Mon Dec 21, 2015 11:02 pm

    kvs wrote:
    sepheronx wrote:Yeah, couple of days ago I saw a picture of someone shopping in Yakaterinberg and complaining about prices. I noticed how stacked the store was in food.

    There has been a surge of food substitution since the sanctions.  This domestic cheese, etc., is actually not too cheap
    and of high quality.   But there are parasites who fake food products and this is a problem.  Of course, the 5th column
    is barking that 80% of the replacement for precious NATO products is fake.   Predictable behaviour from the usual scum.

    Russian consumers should lump it for several years and they will come out ahead.  If they can't live without their imported
    cheeses, then they should pack their bags to their promised land and live it up.   There are too many malcontents and
    drama queens in Russia.   This is partly a result of the USSR period and you can see this particularly in Ukraine or as it
    is now, Banderastan.   Some sort of idiotic welfare bum entitlement syndrome.

    Fake food products? Like re-branded or simply from elsewhere and branded as the name brand stuff?
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    kvs

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    Re: Russian Economy General News: #5

    Post  kvs on Tue Dec 22, 2015 1:41 am

    sepheronx wrote:
    kvs wrote:
    sepheronx wrote:Yeah, couple of days ago I saw a picture of someone shopping in Yakaterinberg and complaining about prices. I noticed how stacked the store was in food.

    There has been a surge of food substitution since the sanctions.  This domestic cheese, etc., is actually not too cheap
    and of high quality.   But there are parasites who fake food products and this is a problem.  Of course, the 5th column
    is barking that 80% of the replacement for precious NATO products is fake.   Predictable behaviour from the usual scum.

    Russian consumers should lump it for several years and they will come out ahead.  If they can't live without their imported
    cheeses, then they should pack their bags to their promised land and live it up.   There are too many malcontents and
    drama queens in Russia.   This is partly a result of the USSR period and you can see this particularly in Ukraine or as it
    is now, Banderastan.   Some sort of idiotic welfare bum entitlement syndrome.

    Fake food products?  Like re-branded or simply from elsewhere and branded as the name brand stuff?

    The claim was made by the late Berezovsky's newspaper:

    http://kommersant.ru/doc/2822494

    and of course the Moscow Times rag:

    http://www.themoscowtimes.com/article/536730.html

    supposedly 80% of the cheese is fake, i.e. made with palm oil filler instead of genuine milk fats. This claim has been
    dismissed as BS by the people who actually do the testing:

    http://tass.ru/ekonomika/2313460

    According to the minister of agriculture the total falsification rate is between 10% and 15%. He considers this to
    be too much but the 80% figure is pure scare tactics.

    Basically, the liberast 5th column who openly calls the Russian people "bydlo" (i.e. animal chattel) pretends that
    Russians can't tell the difference between palm oil concoctions and the real thing. Palm oil in cheeses has to be
    for cheap, unaged varieties. You can't fake aged cheeses this way.

    Well, looky here:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/france/11674280/French-fury-over-fake-cheese-in-TV-expose.html

    Laughing

    attack all liberasts
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    sepheronx

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    Re: Russian Economy General News: #5

    Post  sepheronx on Tue Dec 22, 2015 6:14 am

    Interesting. And of course it would be bullshit. Anyone can tell. I can tell the difference just by tasting. Clearly whomever believed the 80% claim was clearly duped and in the end it is tabloids who believe it. There is a reason why beef production dropped yet dairy production increased.
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    sepheronx

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    Re: Russian Economy General News: #5

    Post  sepheronx on Tue Dec 22, 2015 6:43 am

    Russian shipyard plans to build drilling rigs for Iran

    Iran and Russia sign memorandum on cooperation in manufacturing industry

    Vann7

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    Re: Russian Economy General News: #5

    Post  Vann7 on Tue Dec 22, 2015 11:07 am



    can anyone explain how Ruble trade ratio vs dollars compares with Japan currency vs dollar?

    if im not mistaken? Japan currency trades at more than 100 vs 1 dollar? but Russia is 70 vs 1?

    Can Russia afford to have the ruble at 80 vs 1 dollar? like back in decenmber 2014 will the central bank have a need to defend the ruble with money as they did in end 2014 that burned like 80 billions dollars?
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    sepheronx

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    Re: Russian Economy General News: #5

    Post  sepheronx on Tue Dec 22, 2015 1:30 pm

    Russia can afford the USD to be worth 200 rubs.  Irans currency dropped hard many years ago to the countries record lows and they adjustedbecause of that.
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    kvs

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    Re: Russian Economy General News: #5

    Post  kvs on Tue Dec 22, 2015 2:54 pm

    Vann7 wrote:

    can anyone explain how Ruble trade ratio vs dollars compares with Japan currency vs dollar?

    if im not mistaken? Japan currency trades at more than 100 vs 1 dollar?  but Russia is 70 vs 1?

    Can Russia afford to have the ruble at 80 vs 1 dollar? like back in decenmber 2014  will the central bank have a need to defend the ruble with money as they did in end 2014 that burned like 80 billions dollars?

    People have this stupid notion that exchange rates are intrinsically objective and valid. They are not.
    They are driven by the choices of a small number of players on the forex market. Most of these
    players are based in NATO and have propaganda-driven agendas. So they pretend that Russia
    is a one-commodity banana republic and that the ruble is only dependent on the price of oil and
    not on the 90% of the rest of Russia's economy. Utter rubbish "market" dynamics.

    The good thing is that these forex players are so full of themselves they overdo it. They
    try to drive the ruble down as much as possible and in the process the cancel out the effect
    of the oil price drop. Russia's economy is in rubles and not dollars. We have already posted
    numerous times in these threads who the exchange rate compensates for the oil price change.

    The damage to Russia's economy is from more expensive imports. But this damage is temporary
    and good in the long term since it drives local production growth and reduces dependence on imports.
    Every dollar of import replacement with local production increases the GDP by two dollars.
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    PapaDragon

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    Re: Russian Economy General News: #5

    Post  PapaDragon on Tue Dec 22, 2015 9:28 pm


    Berhidsky going schizo...Very Happy

    Germany Is Right to Flout Russia Sanctions

    Germany has rallied Europe in support of Ukraine-related sanctions against Russia, but has been less diligent in their implementation. German leaders back these ineffectual measures primarily to humor the U.S. and are rightly unwilling to suffer too much for them.


    http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2015-12-22/germany-is-right-to-flout-russia-sanctions

    In a recent speech to her CDU party, which ended with a nine-minute standing ovation, Chancellor Angela Merkel said of the sanctions:

    It was the right reaction, no matter how much we'd like to keep a good relationship with Russia. We must adhere to our principles.

    How, then, to explain the Deutsche Bank internal review that found $10 billion worth of suspicious transactions in its Russian operation? These appear to have been meant to help Russian business people move their money overseas. President Vladimir Putin's friends, Arkady and Boris Rotenberg, who are under sanctions and should therefore be off limits to banks that operate in the U.S. and Europe, are said to be among the clients. Up to $1 billion of the deals -- including "mirror trades," where securities are bought in one market and sold in another to move money to a different jurisdiction -- took place in 2014 and 2015, when sanctions were in effect.

    Yet Germany's regulators appear even less interested in this apparent transgression than Russia's. The Russian central bank has fined Deutsche about $5,000 for the trades, while the German authorities have so far ignored them. It's the U.S. Department of Justice that has been investigating the issue and is pressuring the German bank to do more digging around internally.

    Similarly, there has been no German government response to reports that a Russian company 65 percent owned by the German engineering giant Siemens has been contracted to produce gas turbines for power plants in Crimea. These plants would overcome the annexed peninsula's energy dependence on Ukraine, but EU companies aren't supposed to supply energy equipment to Crimea. Technically, the contract is in compliance with sanctions, because the turbines would be supplied to Taman, a Russian town on the Sea of Azov. Russia would then move them to Crimea. Plus, Siemens Tekhnologii Gazovykh Turbin is a Russian-registered company, not a German one -- despite the Siemens-heavy ownership split.

    These are transparent ruses. For a German company to supply Crimea with equipment is not in line with the spirit of the sanctions.

    Then there's the contract between state-controlled Russian natural gas supplier, Gazprom, and European companies, such as the German-based E.ON and BASF, to expand the Nord Stream pipeline into Germany. The deal was signed in September and, if implemented, will allow Russia to bypass Ukraine for most of its gas supplies to Europe.

    Late last year, Russia was forced to cancel another pipeline project, South Stream, which would have carried Russian gas directly to Southern Europe across the Black Sea. Countries such as Bulgaria, Italy and Austria strongly advocated the project, hoping it would bring them cheaper energy and transit fees. Yet the European Commission, whose energy department was at the time headed by a German national, found the project in violation of EU rules that don't allow a gas supplier to own pipelines or have the monopoly right to fill them -- both conditions of the Gazprom project. The Commission began an infringement procedure against Bulgaria to force a halt to construction.

    Nord Stream 2 is similarly suspect. Gazprom originally was supposed to hold a 51 percent stake in the project's Swiss-registered operating company and was meant to be the sole supplier of the gas that would run through it. Now, mindful of possible problems with the EU, Gazprom intends to sell 1 percent of the project to one of its fellow shareholders, the French company Engie. In theory, it could let other Russian natural gas producers into the pipeline if required. Even so, the project runs counter to the spirit of the EU energy rules that seek to diversify the bloc's fuel sources. Gazprom already delivers 38 percent of the natural gas used in Germany. "There is a strong indication that Nord Stream 2 contradicts the aims of the agreed European policy," European Council President Donald Tusk recently said.

    Southern European nations, denied their own Russian pipeline, are up in arms. Because of Nord Stream 2, Italy demanded a discussion before it could support an extension of Russian sanctions into next year. Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi repeated to the Financial Times what he told Merkel during that discussion:

    So we say no to South Stream and then all of a sudden, quietly, we discover that there’s Nord Stream. Who decided? Is that an EU energy policy choice? At the table, when I raised it, only Germany and Holland defended it. I understand this is important business, fine, I’m not scandalized — but I want to say either the rules apply to everyone, or no one.

    Merkel's response was that private companies were involved in the pipeline and she didn't want to interfere. Her coalition partner and Economy Minister Sigmar Gabriel is a proponent of Nord Stream 2, and the chancellor, understandably, wants to avoid a conflict with him. Besides, Germany needs more natural gas if it is to phase out coal-burning power plants and meet its clean energy goals.

    Some might call the German leniency toward borderline sanction-busting hypocritical, as Renzi does. Yet the sanctions are a political statement more than anything else. In purely economic terms, they have contributed no more than 10 percent of Russia's economic decline this year, or about 0.3 percent of gross domestic product. They have curtailed the ability of Russian banks and companies to borrow in Western markets, and that has hindered their expansion, but they ended up paying down their dollar- and euro-denominated debts, which, given the ruble's shakiness, has only improved their financial health. There has been no other noticeable effect.

    The sanctions were a U.S. idea, and the administration loved having Merkel's support. Together, U.S. allies have presented a united Western front against Russia's aggression. These benefits have been reaped, but it's impractical to force German companies to pay for them. Sanctions activism on the government's part would have been excessive and counterproductive.

    Merkel may be forced to move against Nord Stream next year to prevent a new conflict with southern European countries, where anti-German sentiment is already high. She is more likely, however, to make sure the gas project fully complies with European rules. Italy and its neighbors should have tried harder with South Stream instead of taking the EU's outwardly anti-Russian policy at face value.

    ^^^ I do agree with him 100% on bolded part
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    Kimppis

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    Re: Russian Economy General News: #5

    Post  Kimppis on Wed Dec 23, 2015 3:27 am

    Vann7 wrote:

    can anyone explain how Ruble trade ratio vs dollars compares with Japan currency vs dollar?

    if im not mistaken? Japan currency trades at more than 100 vs 1 dollar?  but Russia is 70 vs 1?

    Can Russia afford to have the ruble at 80 vs 1 dollar? like back in decenmber 2014  will the central bank have a need to defend the ruble with money as they did in end 2014 that burned like 80 billions dollars?

    Just wanted to add that you can't compare currencies directly like that, if I'm not totally mistaken. Those are just "random" numbers, period. It's not like the dollar is 130 more valuable than the Japanese currency, 70 times more valuable than the ruble or 6 times more valuable than the Chinese Yuan. None of that makes any sense. (And despite that I've actually seen trolls commenting on RT how the ruble is now "70 times weaker than the dollar." Jesus...) Their values (%!) change against each other all the time and you can compare the those changes in nominal GDP, but that's about it.


    Last edited by Kimppis on Wed Dec 23, 2015 5:22 am; edited 1 time in total

    Austin

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    Re: Russian Economy General News: #5

    Post  Austin on Wed Dec 23, 2015 5:10 am

    check this interview

    Sergei Alexashenko, former Deputy Finance Minister and deputy governor of the Russian Central Bank, speaks in an exclusive interview about economic challenges currently facing Russia. He talks about sanctions, crisis management, the need for reform, and the country’s dependence on oil.

    Right cure for economy needs right diagnosis

    http://in.rbth.com/economics/finance/2015/12/18/right-cure-for-economy-needs-right-diagnosis_551961
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    kvs

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    Re: Russian Economy General News: #5

    Post  kvs on Wed Dec 23, 2015 5:52 am

    Austin wrote:check this interview

    Sergei Alexashenko, former Deputy Finance Minister and deputy governor of the Russian Central Bank, speaks in an exclusive interview about economic challenges currently facing Russia. He talks about sanctions, crisis management, the need for reform, and the country’s dependence on oil.

    Right cure for economy needs right diagnosis

    http://in.rbth.com/economics/finance/2015/12/18/right-cure-for-economy-needs-right-diagnosis_551961

    The questions have the standard 5th column hysterical "the sky is falling" tone. Russian real disposable income growth
    exceeded the GDP increase by a very large factor in the last 6 years. So the GDP grew by 1.5% but real (inflation adjusted)
    incomes of the population grew by 10% in the same year. As far as Russians are concerned that is the only parameter
    that matters. In addition the jobless rate has been under 5.5% systematically over the last 6 years and this includes the
    rapid rebound after the recession in early 2015 induced by the forex shock. As I have posted before the CBR and the
    Ministry of Finance use the wrong inflation metric so they underestimate Russia's GDP growth and its actual size. The
    personal income growth and unemployment rate (ILO standard) confirm this gross error. You can't have such a sharp
    disagreement between macroeconomic performance and microeconomic performance.

    The huge 30% of total foreign debt pay down over the last year also contradicts the BS about Russia's economy being
    weak. Companies wouldn't be raising the sort of revenue to be able to pay off debts if they were in a serious economic
    crisis situation.

    Russia has to be careful not to accept all the cheap, malicious "reform" advice being rammed down its throat by the
    media both inside and outside its borders. This is paralysis propaganda designed to sabotage Russia's economic ascent.
    Russia has been on the right track for the last 15 years and the real results are there to behold. It does not need any
    BS monetarist "reforms".
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    sepheronx

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    Re: Russian Economy General News: #5

    Post  sepheronx on Wed Dec 23, 2015 6:40 am

    He handled those questions very well imo.

    Some of those questions made no sense in reference to what he was stating.  Like this one:
    RIR: Are all the sectors in Russia’s economy in equally bad shape at the moment?
    He didn't state anything in bad shape, so how can it be "equally bad shape" when nothing of the sort was mentioned?

    Who the hell are these people?  The real question is, who owns them?

    kvs wrote:
    Austin wrote:check this interview

    Sergei Alexashenko, former Deputy Finance Minister and deputy governor of the Russian Central Bank, speaks in an exclusive interview about economic challenges currently facing Russia. He talks about sanctions, crisis management, the need for reform, and the country’s dependence on oil.

    Right cure for economy needs right diagnosis

    http://in.rbth.com/economics/finance/2015/12/18/right-cure-for-economy-needs-right-diagnosis_551961

    The questions have the standard 5th column hysterical "the sky is falling" tone. Russian real disposable income growth
    exceeded the GDP increase by a very large factor in the last 6 years. So the GDP grew by 1.5% but real (inflation adjusted)
    incomes of the population grew by 10% in the same year. As far as Russians are concerned that is the only parameter
    that matters. In addition the jobless rate has been under 5.5% systematically over the last 6 years and this includes the
    rapid rebound after the recession in early 2015 induced by the forex shock. As I have posted before the CBR and the
    Ministry of Finance use the wrong inflation metric so they underestimate Russia's GDP growth and its actual size. The
    personal income growth and unemployment rate (ILO standard) confirm this gross error. You can't have such a sharp
    disagreement between macroeconomic performance and microeconomic performance.

    The huge 30% of total foreign debt pay down over the last year also contradicts the BS about Russia's economy being
    weak. Companies wouldn't be raising the sort of revenue to be able to pay off debts if they were in a serious economic
    crisis situation.


    Russia has to be careful not to accept all the cheap, malicious "reform" advice being rammed down its throat by the
    media both inside and outside its borders. This is paralysis propaganda designed to sabotage Russia's economic ascent.
    Russia has been on the right track for the last 15 years and the real results are there to behold. It does not need any
    BS monetarist "reforms".

    Bolded part is very true and also raises the point to those who say otherwise of "If it was problematic, then where did the billions come from?". Many of these are heavily overlooked as you pointed out KVS. As you mentioned, one has to look at the GDP per capita of the average person in the last 10 - 15 years and you will see how huge it has become due to that. And yet, growth was barely noticed as per the so called GDP growth figures. Which also leads me to believe that it is all garbage about measuring in GDP. Which I pointed out before:

    https://www.boundless.com/economics/textbooks/boundless-economics-textbook/measuring-output-and-income-19/measuring-output-using-gdp-92/calculating-gdp-350-12447/



    As you will notice, the key feature is the last part: expenditure. This alone is the reason for US GDP growth through government purchases and consumption of goods. But, as one will notice, there is nothing to state a negative through debt alone. Hence why Greece whom is heavily in debt, more than its GDP, can still show a GDP growth. This isn't indication of a healthy economy, but one reliant on borrowed money. If debt is also added in the calculation, then Russia would be shining compared to a lot others.
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    higurashihougi

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    Re: Russian Economy General News: #5

    Post  higurashihougi on Wed Dec 23, 2015 1:22 pm

    GOOD Twisted Evil Twisted Evil Twisted Evil

    http://www.unian.info/economics/1219956-russian-mp-offers-sanctions-against-pepsi-visa-other-intl-giants.html

    "An extravagant response” to the U.S. sanctions against Russia could be the introduction of higher excise taxes on the sale of soda drinks, which would affect Pepsi and Coca-Cola, according to First Deputy Chairman of the State Duma Committee on Economic Policy, Mikhail Yemelyanov, RIA Novosti reported.

    -------

    http://www.russiadefence.net/viewtopic.forum?t=7463

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