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    sharkh
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    Malaysian Armed Forces

    Post  sharkh on Thu Mar 18, 2010 8:39 am

    Interview with Malaysia's Air Force Commander

    The May issue of the journal Kanwa Asian Defence publishes an interview with Air Force Chief of Malaysia Rodzali Daud, who praises fighters "MiG" and "Su", vaguely referring to some problems with the first service and full commissioning of the second. Commander argues that "MiGs" were too expensive to maintain and prepare pilots for the "dry" take under his wing Hindus. In addition, more or less cleared up prospects of purchasing AWACS systems - this will be the Swedish, American or Brazilian products.

    Kanwa: Can we now, after the official announcement of the decommissioning of the MiG-29, called the reason for this decision? The company "Sukhoi" says expects to sell Malyzii Su-30MKM. Do you think this is possible?

    First of all I would say that we were completely satisfied with the MiG-29 since its purchase. We have not encountered any serious problems with maintenance or operation of the aircraft. Nevertheless, we are faced with high maintenance costs and difficulties in obtaining spare parts, in particular, with very long delivery time of spare parts. Thus, the problem is in service. This was one of the main reasons that we have analyzed the efficiency of aircraft and concluded that the cost of service is becoming more and more. It is rather high, and taking into account the age of aircraft, we decided to withdraw them from service.

    Kanwa: You are going to accept the offer "Dry"?

    I would say that there are several options for withdrawal of the aircraft from service. First, you can make a redemption. Secondly, it is possible to hold an international tender. Finally, the third - to sell it "in the form in which it is, and right from where it is." In different ways you can do, but - it's not for me to decide. It will all depend on the Ministry of Defense and the Ministry of Finance. I would welcome any suggestions, but the final decision will come from someone else. Our only interest - to replace the plane or getting a multifunctional combat aircraft (MRCA). That's what we are interested

    Kanwa: Are you satisfied with after-sales service Su-30MKM?

    Well, first of all, this type of aircraft is in the state, which we call initial operational readiness - at least those airplanes that we received. And we have not done the aircraft fully operational.  We to cancelled the ECM as not meeting goals. Need something else to solve. But except for these things no problem. I still have a little talk on the issue of maintaining the life cycle, they developed a system for aircraft maintenance.

    Kanwa: Fortunately there was integration of the French system?

    Needless to say, that the integration of French and Russian systems is a difficult task? Of course, it is not easy. The aircraft is one of the most advanced fighter, so it should not be easy. There are a number of issues, some problems. But otherwise no serious problems. Some minor difficulties with the integration of systems are present, it is true.

    Kanwa: Regarding testing of weapons such as rockets, "air-air" or PKR - you performed these tests?

    Yes, some do, but not all. Weapons, we are very happy.

    Kanwa: Could you tell what kind of weapons do you have?

    No, I can not tell you.

    Kanwa: Two years ago, Air Force Commander expressed interest in buying some weapons from China. This interest once implemented?

    Yes, it is implemented. I was recently in China, held talks with some companies, they also come here. But it is completely clear yet, because it takes time to know each other - all the same for us this new market, and we have a new market for them. So you need some more time, but we do not stop and continue to look closely to China. We see its potential. The same thing I said this morning, members of the Chinese delegation. In regard to Malaysia, we are aware of the potential Chinese market, although they are not in our interests. In some areas we want to work together with China.

    Kanwa: What kind of weapons you want to buy in China?

    For specific systems, we have not decided yet. But we are trying to work with the Chinese - just to maintain our fleet, "Dry."

    Kanwa: With regard to personnel training, did you have to either India or China for help in preparing the pilots?

    Yes. As you know, our version of "Dry" is more close to the Indian than Chinese, so for us in the first place it makes sense to get help in learning from India, this is the first place. Second, there is a commonality in terms of English language, and for us it is more convenient to work with India. And we are satisfied with them, no problem.

    Kanwa: China to help you do not plan to apply?

    Directly on the preparation, probably not. But somehow indirectly - perhaps, yes. Indirectly - in the sense that we can appeal to the Chinese side to provide assistance for some minor issues of training or service. But immediately on learning in the sense that they will teach us to fly? No, probably not.

    Kanwa: We have a great significance of the data. In your "dry" set the Western system. Do you have a system of data exchange with the western / eastern equipment?

    Right now, no. We are armed with data exchange system "airplane flight" and "ship-to-ship." However, we are working with a Malaysian company on this issue. "We" does not mean the Air Force and the armed forces of Malaysia. But as long as the Air Force will have this need, we will continue to work on getting the technology of data exchange at the tactical level. If we follow procurement, including the fact that the samples had to be procured data interchange system at the tactical level.

    Kanwa: You are a couple of times considered the possibility of purchase of AWACS systems?

    Yes, that's a long story, it goes much since 1997!

    Kanwa: Do you expect in the near future any specific?

    Yes, it is being developed by the 10th Malaysia Plan, which will come into force from 2011 AWACS aircraft is one of our priorities. We learned a lot and watched the proposals and have some have chosen. It all depends on budget allocations.

    Kanwa: You already have a candidate?

    Yes, it already is. But as I said, it all depends on funding. Its never enough, as indeed throughout the world. Yes, we consider the Swedish, American and, perhaps, the Brazilian variants.

    Andrei Frolov

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    Economic Downturn Forces Malaysian MiG-29s to Continue Flying

    Post  GarryB on Wed Feb 09, 2011 2:02 am

    It seems the so called Plague of problems with the Mig-29 you claim the Malaysians are suffering is not that bad:

    Economic Downturn Forces Malaysian MiG-29s to Continue Flying

    The Malaysian Government last week announced that it would continue to
    operate ten of its 16 MiG-29N interceptors, reversing plans announced
    late last year to decommission the entire fleet of by the end of 2010.
    The original plan by the Ministry of Defence to replace the MiG-29N
    fighter jets with the 'Multi Role Combat Aircraft' (MRCA) has been
    delayed by the economic downturn, a ministry official told reporters. As
    defpro.com previously reported in November last year, the Royal
    Malaysian Air Forces’ (RMAF) plan to purchase a new fleet of fighter
    aircraft faced serious financial obstacles (see: http://www.defpro.com/daily/details/438/).
    On Wednesday last week, the defence ministry confirmed that due to the
    postponement of the purchase of new fighter jets, the retirement of its
    Russian-made MiG-29N would be delayed for at least five years.

    “We have decided to continue using ten of the 16 MiG-29N jet fighters
    after sending them for repairs and upgrades,” the New Straits Times
    quoted Defence Minister Datuk Seri Dr Ahmad Zahid Hamidi as saying. “We
    initially wanted to ground the [MiG] jets and sell them to a third
    country, but after much thought and deliberation, we have decided to
    hold on.”


    The global economic downturn appears to have put a damper on Malaysian
    defence procurements. Since 2008, Kuala Lumpur has been careful not to
    announce any major orders but, rather, proceed with ongoing commitments.
    The defence procurement budget remains under strain as the government
    focuses on economic recovery.

    The 10th Five-Year Malaysian Plan (2011-1015), which is to be submitted
    to Parliament in June 2010, is expected to propose procurement and
    development funding of RM7 billion ($2.07 billion / €1.51 billion) for
    the entire defence and security sector, with approximately RM5 billion
    being allocated for defence proper. It is further understood that nearly
    half the total amount would be invested to replenish war stocks
    (missiles, bombs and ammunition), with relatively little money being
    left for new procurement efforts. Also, at least 30 per cent of the
    available money would be reserved for purchases from the national
    defence industry. Clearly enough there is no way the purchase of 18 new
    generation aircraft could be financed under these conditions.

    The MiG-29N aircraft played the role of interceptor jets and 18 of the
    fighter jets were purchased for the RMAF in 1993 for $380 million.
    However, two of the aircraft crashed in 1998 and 2005 while six others
    have been decommissioned. Malaysia was the first non-Soviet block
    country to acquire Russian combat aircraft and was expected to float a
    request for proposal (RfP) for 18 new-generation fighter aircraft to
    replace the MiG-29Ns.

    In December last year, former premier Mahathir Mohamad criticised the
    phasing out of the jets as a waste of money. In his blog, he said the
    aircraft have a life span of at least 20 years and could remain in
    service till 2013/2014. He also compared the purchase of the MiG fleet
    to the Boeing F/A-18D Hornets, which are also in service with the RMAF.
    He said that the US fighters have longer life spans but are too costly
    compared to Russian aircraft and have too many restrictions, as the
    entire technology of the aircraft is kept secret.


    However, by keeping ten MiG-29s in service the Defence Ministry will
    have major expenditures for repairs and upgrades of the aircraft, as
    well as costly maintenance. The aircrafts’ engines need to be overhauled
    every year and the maintenance costs may rise to over €60 million (~$82
    million) annually. Beyond that, the weaponry for the fighter jets has
    reached the end of its life span and extending the life span would not
    be viable.

    Further, the plan to acquire new aircraft could be back on the table in
    2015, the Defence Minister said. “After the global economy shows signs
    of recovery, we may be able to proceed with the plan,” he noted.


    ----
    By Luca Bonsignore, Publisher

    Source: http://www.defpro.com/daily/details/518/

    So clearly the problem with the Mig-29s in this case is that their aging equipment is getting more costly to maintain and that because they have so few aircraft it is not economically viable to set up overhaul facilities in Malaysia.

    Given an SMT upgrade the aging equipment would be replaced and maintainence greatly improved.

    I would suggest that in 2015 when there is more money the Malaysians will most likely contact the Russians and trade the Migs for Sukhois... probably Su-30MKMs so they have 28 of them instead of 18.
    Personally I would get rid of the F-18s as the USN is probably keen to get some D models and replace them with Su-30MKMs too which would make a force of 36 Flankers. The Malaysian Hornets weren't allowed the latest weapons so in many ways the Su-30s could easily replace Sparrow armed Hornets effectively enough. A purchase of satellite guided bombs and a wide range of guided air to ground weapons available to the Flanker would make it a potent multirole aircraft.

    Or of course they could maintain the different aircraft types and replace the Mig-29N aircraft with Mig-29M2 aircraft... but I think having larger numbers of fewer types will reduce operational costs... they could replace the original 16 Mig-29N aircraft and the 8 F-18s with 24 Mig-29M2s to make a significant enough force to warrant local upgrade and overhaul facilities.

    A Mig-29M2 with R-77s should have a significant advantage over a F-18 with Sparrows in the air to air combat role and for light strike the Mig is no slouch though the Flankers might be better suited with 1,500kg guided bombs.

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    Re: Malaysian Armed Forces

    Post  George1 on Wed Jun 03, 2015 6:29 am

    Malaysian MiG-29s will be retained in service and modernized

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    Re: Malaysian Armed Forces

    Post  Book. on Tue Jul 07, 2015 6:11 am

    Malaysia, Singapore order VL MICA naval variant
    Richard Scott, London - IHS Jane's Missiles & Rockets
    02 July 2015


    Key Points
    • Malaysia to fit VL MICA in the Second-Generation Patrol Vessel - Littoral Combat Ship


    • Singapore MINDEF reveals VL MICA selection for Littoral Mission Vessel programme



    European missile house MBDA Missile Systems has chalked up two additional sales for its VL MICA shipborne point defence missile system, bringing its total number of confirmed customers to six.

    Malaysia and Singapore will now join Egypt, Morocco, Oman and the United Arab Emirates, all of which have previously specified the naval variant of the VL MICA system

    Earlier this year Malaysia's Boustead Naval Shipyard Sdn Bhd disclosed that VL MICA had been confirmed as the point defence missile system for the Royal Malaysian Navy's six-ship Second-Generation Patrol Vessel - Littoral Combat Ship (SGPV-LCS) programme.

    http://www.janes.com/article/52757/malaysia-singapore-order-vl-mica-naval-variant

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    Re: Malaysian Armed Forces

    Post  max steel on Thu Nov 19, 2015 11:27 am

    Letter of Acceptance for Refit of Two Prime Minister-Class Submarines for the Royal Malaysian Navy



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    Malaysian Military

    Post  max steel on Tue Feb 02, 2016 7:01 am

    Malaysia picks MD530G for armed scout helicopters

    Malaysia has become the launch customer for the upgraded G-model of the MD Helicopters MD530, with an order for six examples of the armed scout rotorcraft for its army.

    Mesa, Arizona-based MD will supply an initial helicopter during the fourth quarter of 2016, with the full fleet to be delivered by the following March.

    First flown in 2013, the MD530G features a higher maximum take-off weight of 3.75t and a top speed of over 130kt (240km/h).

    Malaysia’s fleet will include an unspecified weapons package and electro-optical/infrared sensor, says the company.

    Previous live-firing tests have trialled guided and unguided rockets, alongside .50cal machine guns.

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    Re: Malaysian Armed Forces

    Post  George1 on Thu Mar 03, 2016 6:32 am

    Malaysia Army will receive 24 units M109A6 «Paladin» SPH

    Malaysia Army had accepted the offer of 24 units M109A6 «Paladin»  self propelled howitzer (SPH) from USA under the Excess Defence Articles (EDA) programme.

    On the offer of M109 A5/A6 SPH by the United States under the Excess Defence Articles (EDA) programme, Raja Affandi said the Army had accepted the offer and was in the process of finalising the procurement. “If the procurement is completed, it will boost the firepower capability of the Army especially for units operating in Sabah”.

    Malaysian Defence had reported on the SPH offer from the US recently. The Army is expected to field 24 M109 SPH upgraded to the latest A6 standard with another six vehicles used for spares and training.

    Paladin M109A6 achieves a maximum firing rate of up to eight rounds a minute or three rounds in 15 seconds, and a sustained firing rate of one round every three minutes. The gun is operated with an automatic fire control system with ballistic computer, fitted with an optical backup.

    The vehicle’s inertial positioning and navigation system is integrated with the automatic fire control system.

    The 39-calibre 155mm M284 cannon, which is fitted with an M182 gun mount, has a range of 24km using unassisted rounds or 30km using assisted rounds. The projectile loading can be carried out using the full-stroke hydraulic system, or a semi-automatic loading system is optional.

    A 12.7mm M2 machine gun is mounted on the right hand side of the turret.

    http://defence-blog.com/army/malaysia-army-will-receive-24-units-m109a6-paladin-sph.html


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    Re: Malaysian Armed Forces

    Post  George1 on Sat Apr 02, 2016 2:09 am

    Malaysian armed forces conducts starstreak firing trial ahead of system’s service entry





    The Malaysian Armed Forces carried out a live firing exercise on March 28 with the Thales Starstreak missile as part of its preparation for the 2018 service entry of the Starstreak Lightweight Multiple Launcher – Next Generation (LML-NG).

    The firing took place at the Tanjung Logok Ground to Air Firing Range located in Peninsular Malaysia on the east coast of the southern state of Johor, with a total of three missiles fired by composite teams drawn from the Malaysian Army’s 32nd Royal Artillery Regiment, the Royal Malaysian Navy’s Base Air Defence Unit, and the Royal Malaysian Air Force’s 401 GBAD (Ground Base Air Defence) Squadron. The missiles were fired at a Meggitt BTT-3 Banshee target drone, with two firings declared as hits. A fourth launch was called off due to time constraints.

    The live missiles had only arrived in Malaysia on 25 March and no live firing practice had been carried out prior to the event. Defence Minister Hishammuddin Hussein, who was observing the exercise, told a media conference there that the live missiles formed part of the GBP100 million (USD142 million) Starstreak contract that Malaysia formally ratified on 15 September last year at the DSEI exhibition in London. Under the contract Malaysia’s stock of phased-out Starburst missiles were exchanged for Starstreak rounds for the Malaysian armed forces to use for practice firings. The minister did not disclose the number of missiles exchanged.

    The last of Malaysia’s Starburst systems, operated by all three services, were phased out from the RMAF’s two GBAD squadrons in 2013.

    During a briefing held prior to the firing, it was stated that a total of 26 personnel had so far been trained on the Starstreak system at a Thales facility in the United Kingdom. Additional Starstreak firings are scheduled for October at Tanjung Logok.

    Malaysia’s Starstreak contract, which covers an undisclosed number of launchers, also includes the Starstreak/Rapid Ranger system and the LML-NG system’s integration onto a Global Komited Toyota-based 4×4 GKM1 light utility vehicle.


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    Re: Malaysian Armed Forces

    Post  George1 on Fri May 13, 2016 5:45 pm

    Eurofighter Typhoon and Dassault Rafale shortlisted for Malaysian Air Force

    Malaysia is all set to issue a request for information to two aircraft manufacturers, including Eurofighter Typhoon and Dassault Rafale.

    Under the RMAF’s Multi-Role Combat Aircraft (MRCA) program, the replacement of the MiG-29Ns with 18 new fighters had emerged as the core requirement. An initial Request for Proposals (RFP) was issued in March 2011 calling for 18 new fighters, plus an option for a further 18-unit batch. The Boeing F/A‑18E/F Super Hornet, Dassault Rafale, Eurofighter Typhoon, and Saab JAS 39 Gripen were all offered up as potential contenders to fill the RMAF requirement, with a further buy of Su-30MKMs ruled out by the service.

    But as time passed, the Malaysian government began to get cold feet about such an expensive procurement, and reports coming out of Kuala Lumpur in April 2014 indicated a gathering consensus that a lease – or even a lease-to-buy – would be preferential to an outright purchase.

    The decision on the Multi-Role Combat Aircraft (MRCA) could be made soon, though funding remained the biggest issue on the table. As both UK and France offers funding options under a government-to-government deal the tricky issue could be resolved.

    http://defence-blog.com/news/eurofighter-typhoon-and-dassault-rafale-shortlisted-for-malaysian-air-force.html


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    Re: Malaysian Armed Forces

    Post  max steel on Fri Jun 03, 2016 9:44 pm

    Use Of MIG-29N Fighter Aircraft Being Reduced

    The use of the MIG-29N fighter aircraft will be reduced following increasing operating expenses, said Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF) chief, Tan Sri Roslan Saad.

    He said apart from that, the capabilities of the fighter aircraft were also getting more limited as the aircraft have been in service for 21 years since they were first used in 1995.

    "We have been reducing the use of the aircraft since three years ago and so far there is no time frame as to when the aircraft will be completely phased out," he said.

    Roslan was speaking at a press conference after inspecting a parade which comprised 27 officers and 625 members of other ranks held in conjunction with the RMAF 58th anniversary at Kuantan Air Base here, Tuesday.

    Asked whether the RMAF would be purchasing new aircraft, he said the air force was now identifying several types of fighter aircraft among them the Gripen, Rafale and Typhoon.

    "We are now in the final stages of studying which of the companies are able to meet with our requirements and the decision to be made is not for a short term.

    "Our focus is on a multi-role combat aircraft (MRCA) capable of performing various roles, among others, the role of air-to-air combat and air-to-surface attack," he said.

    Over 500 guests including the public were feasted to an air show including a demonstration by RMAF Special Forces (Paskau) and parachute display during the ceremony.

    Among the aircraft involved during the demonstration were the Pilatus PC-7 Mk II, EC725 helicopters, Nuri helicopters, Sukhoi SU 30MKM, F/A 18D4 and MiG29N fighter aircraft.

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    Re: Malaysian Armed Forces

    Post  George1 on Wed Oct 19, 2016 11:56 pm

    Malaysian Scorpene submarines will take average repair



    http://bmpd.livejournal.com/2193873.html


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