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    NATO operations in Afghanistan:

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    Drone Attack Kills 4 Militants in Pakistan

    Post  Russian Patriot on Mon Sep 14, 2009 7:51 pm

    Drone Attack Kills 4 Militants in Pakistan

    By Ayaz Gul
    Islamabad
    14 September 2009

    A suspected U.S drone attack in a remote border region of Pakistan is said to have killed at least four militants believed to have links to the Taliban and al-Qaida networks. The Pakistani military says it has killed 16 Taliban militants in the ongoing Swat offensive and has tightened the noose around the key rebel commander in the valley. Analysts say that killings and arrests of some of the top Taliban commanders in recent days appears to have dealt a crippling blow to the insurgents in Pakistan.

    The early morning missile strike in the tribal region known as North Waziristan is said to have struck a vehicle carrying local and foreign militants. Residents and local intelligence officials in the area that borders Afghanistan say that a suspected U.S. unmanned aircraft fired the missiles near the town of Mir Ali.

    Independent confirmation of the death toll is not possible because the region is a militant stronghold.

    It was the third such strike in North Waziristan within the past week. At least 18 suspected militants were killed in the previous two attacks.

    A similar missile attack in the neighboring South Waziristan border region in early August killed Pakistani Taliban leader Baituallah Mehsud.

    Meanwhile, the Pakistani military has reported more gains against Taliban militants in the ongoing offensive in and round the northwestern Swat Valley. It says 16 militants were killed in the clashes, including two key Taliban commanders, while more than 150 suspected fighters surrendered to local military authorities.

    Senior Pakistani officials also say security forces in Swat have surrounded Taliban leader Maulana Fazlullah and efforts are being made to capture him. Last week the extremist leader's top spokesman, Muslim Khan was captured with four other militant commanders and military officials say information obtained from the detainees has helped the subsequent raids in Swat.

    Analysts say that recent arrests and killings of top militant commanders, including Baituallah Mehsud, appear to have broken the back of militants and led to infighting among various Taliban groups.

    Former security chief of Pakistan's tribal regions, Mahmood Shah, says the military is better placed today to extend the Swat anti-insurgency offensive into other Taliban strongholds, like the Waziristan region on the Afghan border.

    "The Taliban are basically on retreat," Shah said. "They have not got their acts together. So I think the Swat operation has sent a very strong signal and if the government now starts an operation in even Waziristan, which is considered as a hard nut, I think it has good chances to succeed."

    Pakistan's military says since launching the Swat offensive in late April, it has killed nearly 2,000 militants and captured many more. It has also carried out major air strikes in the South Waziristan tribal region, the Taliban stronghold. But the military has yet to launch a ground offensive there because it says it is consolidating gains in the Swat Valley before expanding the anti-insurgency activity.

    http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/library/news/pakistan/2009/pakistan-090914-voa01.htm
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    NATO operations in Afghanistan:

    Post  milky_candy_sugar on Sat Feb 13, 2010 9:03 am

    MARJAH, Afghanistan (Reuters) - U.S.-led NATO troops launched a crucial offensive on Saturday against the Taliban's last big stronghold in Afghanistan's most violent province and were quickly thrown into a firefight with the militants.

    WORLD

    The assault is a test of President Barack Obama's ordered "surge" of extra troops to Afghanistan in December and the start of a campaign to impose government control on rebel-held areas this year, before U.S. forces start to withdraw in 2011.

    Within hours of the operation getting underway, U.S. Marines at the tip of the assault battled with Taliban militants in Marjah, in Helmand Province, all the time facing the possibility of being blown up by booby traps rigged across the town.

    Marines engaged in a firefight with Taliban militants after the U.S. troops landed in helicopters near the town. They fired at least four rockets at militants who attacked from compounds.

    At least one Marine was wounded by shrapnel.

    More than two hours later, the area was still gripped by the firefight, with the Marines firing another large rocket. One family of civilians nearby was huddled in a room of their house, with the washing flapping on the line outside.

    The first objective of U.S. Marines was to take over the town center, a large cluster of dwellings.

    A Reuters reporter said exchanges of fire -- with assault rifles crackling -- erupted initially about 300 meters away. Moments earlier, two large explosions resounded and a large black plume of smoke rose into the sky.

    The offensive began with waves of helicopters ferrying U.S. Marines into the city in the early morning hours. British troops then flew into the northern part of the surrounding Nad Ali district, followed by tanks and combat engineering units.

    "The first phase of the operation is proceeding very successfully. The Taliban have heavily booby-trapped the area, but there has not been any fierce fighting yet," Helmand Governor Gulab Mangal told a news conference.

    "We have seized 11 key locations in the district and the resistance from the insurgents has been subdued."

    15,000 TROOPS IN OPERATION

    The 15,000-troop operation may have been named Mushtarak, or together, to highlight that NATO and Afghan forces were determined to work closely to bring stability to Afghanistan.

    Much of whether the apparent early success can translate into a more permanent solution to militancy may depend on whether the government can ensure long-term political and economic stability.

    It is also essential that Afghan troops become effective enough to prevent the return of militants to areas they previously held, without the help of Western firepower.

    Marjah has long been a breeding ground for insurgents and lucrative opium poppy cultivation. Residents may not be keen for any upheaval, even if they were subjected to the Taliban's austere brand of Islam.

    Afghanistan produces more than 90 percent of the world's illegal opium, the raw ingredient used to make heroin, an industry Western countries say funds the insurgency against NATO troops and the Afghan government.

    There are other complicating factors. Many of the militants on the top of the U.S. hit list operate from sanctuaries in forbidding border areas in Pakistan.

    U.S. ally Pakistan is reluctant to pursue them as they see the militants as assets to counter the influence of rival India in Afghanistan. If that does not change, offensives may produce limited results.

    SURROUNDED BY BOMBS

    Decades ago, the Marjah area was home to an Afghan-American development project. Its canals, which criss-cross lush farmland, were built by the Americans. Now NATO is trying to recapture it from militants unlikely to contemplate cooperation with the West.

    A local Taliban commander, Qari Fazluddin, told Reuters earlier some 2,000 fighters were ready to fight.

    Unlike previous operations, this offensive has been flagged for months, a move commanders hoped will persuade many fighters to lay down their arms or flee.

    The safety of civilians may be the vital issue for NATO against the Taliban, which have re-emerged as a deadly fighting force since they were toppled by a U.S.-led invasion in 2001.

    NATO forces have advised civilians not to leave their homes, though it is uncertain whether heavy fighting will occur.

    Most of the estimated 100,000 residents of the area have stayed put. But others have headed 30 km (18 miles) east to the provincial capital of Lashkar Gah. "All the walls between the streets and houses are surrounded by bombs. Most people have gone to Lashkar Gah. That's where we want to go today," resident Abdel Aziz, 16, told the Marines through a translator.

    Soon after, an elderly woman emerged from her house and asked Marines not to fire at it. "This is just my house," she said.


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    Re: NATO operations in Afghanistan:

    Post  Russian Patriot on Fri Feb 26, 2010 11:02 pm

    Marja Operations Move Toward ‘Holding’ Phase

    By Donna Miles
    American Forces Press Service

    WASHINGTON, Feb. 25, 2010 – Operations in Marja, Afghanistan, are transitioning from the clearing to the holding phase, as today’s turnover of the government center there marks a symbol of progress, Pentagon Press Secretary Geoff Morrell said today.

    Twelve days into Operation Moshtarak, the offensive in the former Taliban stronghold is “trending in a very positive direction,” Morrell said, on both the military and governance fronts.

    The new Afghan government raised its flag over Marja today, with Abdul Zahir Aryan installed as its administrator. Morrell called the transfer of the government center “symbolic of where we are in this operation.”

    Much of the city is now under Afghan and coalition control, and many of its citizens are returning to their homes, Morrell reported. Bazaars have reopened, and they’re full of goods that demonstrate the freedom of movement needed to promote commerce.

    Meanwhile, the Afghan government is extending its reach to ensure the clearing and subsequent holding phases of the counterinsurgency strategy successfully lead to building good governance and quality-of-life improvements.

    “Yesterday, there were more shuras taking place in Marja than there were troops in contact,” Morrell said, referring to government-sponsored citizens’ meetings. “That’s the kind of progress … that we’ve been looking for and that we are heartened to see.”

    Morrell took care not to sugarcoat the operation. “Although signs point to progress, it is still clearly a very dangerous situation,” he said. “We’re still losing troops,” with improvised explosive devices remaining the biggest threat.

    “So we have to be very careful about how we progress into those areas that are not under Afghan and coalition control,” he said. “We’re doing so in a very thorough, methodical way so as to alleviate any potential for civilian or coalition force casualties.”

    The United States has suffered more casualties than Afghan security forces in the operation only because they tend to conduct high-risk missions such as route-clearing operations, and because enemy forces see them as more prized targets, Morrell said.

    Morrell conceded that the Afghan security forces will need help “for some time,” particularly in the intelligence and logistics arenas. But he dispelled reports that Afghan security forces aren’t carrying their load in the fight.

    “No one has ever questioned their willingness or their ability to fight,” he said. “These guys are every bit in the midst of this operation. … They match us one for one on the ground.”

    Meanwhile, across the border, the Pakistani government continues to show leadership in its own offensive on Taliban and al-Qaida leaders. Morrell said it’s too soon to tell if these activities will prove to be game-changers. But he said there’s hope among the Pakistanis that the dynamics are beginning to change in their country, as in Afghanistan, to favor the people rather than the Taliban.

    “We are hopeful that our combined efforts on both sides of the border will undermine the confidence and the capability of the Afghan Taliban and of the Pakistan Taliban,” Morrell said, with more of their members laying down their weapons and reintegrating into society.

    The key, he said, is to reverse the downward slide that had become apparent in both countries to put the momentum with their governments and pressure the enemy to want to rejoin society.

    While not addressing specific reports of high-value targets the Pakistanis have captured or killed, Morrell praised the ongoing effort and reiterated U.S. support to help as needed.

    “We are here to help them in any way they are comfortable as they continue to pursue this enemy that’s a threat not just to us and/or efforts in Afghanistan, but obviously to the Pakistani people as well,” he said.

    http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/news/2010/02/mil-100225-afps03.htm
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    Re: NATO operations in Afghanistan:

    Post  Viktor on Sat Feb 27, 2010 11:17 am

    Like every other major offensive it will end up with bunch of dead taliban witch changes nothing.

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    Re: NATO operations in Afghanistan:

    Post  lulldapull on Sat Sep 25, 2010 5:50 pm

    Viktor wrote:Like every other major offensive it will end up with bunch of dead taliban witch changes nothing.

    You forgot to mention that it also ends up with a bunch of dead NATO troops and assorted mercenaries.
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    US deploys 'game-changer' weapon to Afghanistan

    Post  nightcrawler on Thu Dec 30, 2010 11:33 pm

    ref:US deploys 'game-changer' weapon to Afghanistan - Telegraph
    US deploys 'game-changer' weapon to Afghanistan



    It looks and acts like something best left in the hands of Sylvester Stallone's "Rambo," but this latest dream weapon is real – and the US Army sees it becoming the Taliban's worst nightmare.

    The XM25 Counter Defilade Target Engagement System has now been deployed to US units on the battlefields of Afghanistan Photo: AFP/GETTY
    12:02AM GMT 03 Dec 2010


    The Pentagon has rolled out prototypes of its first-ever programmable "smart" grenade launcher, a shoulder-fired weapon that uses microchipped ammunition to target and kill the enemy, even when the enemy is hidden behind walls or other cover.

    After years of development, the XM25 Counter Defilade Target Engagement System, about the size of a regular rifle, has now been deployed to US units on the battlefields of Afghanistan, where the Army expects it to be a "game-changer" [in its counter-insurgency operations.

    "For well over a week, it's been actively on patrols, and in various combat outposts in areas that are hot," said Lieutenant Colonel Chris Lehner, program manager for the XM25.

    The gun fires 25mm air-bursting shells up to 2,300 feet, well past the range of most rifles used by today's soldiers, and programs them to explode at a precise distance, allowing troops to neutralise insurgents hiding behind walls, rocks or trenches or inside buildings.
    "This is the first time we're putting smart technology into the hands of the individual soldier," Lt Col Lehner told AFP in a telephone interview.

    "It's giving them the edge," he said, in the harsh Afghan landscape where Islamist extremists have vexed US troops using centuries-old techniques of popping up from behind cover to engage.
    "You get behind something when someone is shooting at you, and that sort of cover has protected people for thousands of years," Lt Col Lehner said.


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    Re: NATO operations in Afghanistan:

    Post  IronsightSniper on Fri Dec 31, 2010 12:00 am

    Guess that's why the SCAR and XM8 got canceled. But oh well, I was reading about this little weapon when I was younger and went to the library to read books about this kinda stuff, good to know it's finally being deployed.
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    Re: NATO operations in Afghanistan:

    Post  GarryB on Fri Dec 31, 2010 6:13 am

    Game changer?

    Really?

    It is just a shoulder fired grenade launcher with a grenade with a timed fuse to make it air burst.

    The soviets had 40mm under barrel rifle grenades that also air burst and while they were popular they were hardly a game changer.

    BTW 2,300ft is about 750m which is not outside 50 cal or PKM range.

    I assume the Muj still have all those .50 cal rifles the US gave to them to deal with helos in the 1980s.

    Of course I will be interested to see how they justify this weapon, the automatic grenade launchers like the AGS-30 and Mk.19 are claimed to be crew served weapons that are used against area targets but this weapon is clearly an individuals weapon and likely to be used directly against other individuals using HE ammo.
    This is banned by the Hague convention.
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    Re: NATO operations in Afghanistan:

    Post  nightcrawler on Fri Dec 31, 2010 6:34 am

    @Garry
    Its innovative in the essence that the airbursting mechanism is somewht new & unique.
    If I recall in discovery channel it was told that airbursting mechanism is totally new. The revolving of the projectile is calibrated against its cutting of the earths magnetic field lines, along the path; which is( intersections b/w projectile rev. & magnetic line) then calibrated against the distance the projectile has to travel till airbursting.


    & by the way you can see through wall as well with this scifi tool
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    Re: NATO operations in Afghanistan:

    Post  Viktor on Fri Dec 31, 2010 4:43 pm

    I guess every new US weapon in Iraq or Afganistan or where ever is a game changer althrow it basicly changes nothing.
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    Re: NATO operations in Afghanistan:

    Post  Russian Patriot on Fri Dec 31, 2010 11:52 pm

    They also deployed Abrams and called that a gamechanger also. Contridacting themselves? Suspect

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    Afghanistan—One American Killed Every 18 Hours

    Post  lulldapull on Mon Jan 03, 2011 3:19 am

    Boy! I remember that the Americans used to make fun of the Russian Gunships going down one every 36 hours over Afghanistan in the late 80's........now seems like its their turn to get it in the ass!

    If it wasn't for Iran reigning in the Iraqi Shia's and supporting the elected Iraqi government with serious logistical, weaponry and political support not to mention battling out the Taliban via the Afghan army with millions of dollars in aid and weaponry, the U.S./ NATO casualties would have got these fools evicted from both Iraq and Afghanistan a long time ago!lol!

    The coalition is faring worse than the Soviets did in Afghanistan 25 years ago!

    2010 Was By Far the Deadliest Year for U.S. Troops in Afghanistan—One American Killed Every 18 Hours

    Friday, December 31, 2010
    By Edwin Mora

    Afghanistan casualties

    The remains of Pfc. Jacob A. Gassen return to the country he died defending on Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2010 at Dover Air Force Base, Del. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)

    (CNSNews.com) - With 496 casualties, 2010 was by far the deadliest year for U.S. troops fighting a war in Afghanistan that has now entered its tenth year, according to casualty reports issued by the Department of Defense and tracked in a comprehensive database of war casualties maintained by CNSNews.com.

    There were 303 U.S. casualties in the Afghanistan war in 2009, making 2009 the second deadliest year of the war.

    Almost 17 times as many U.S. troops were killed in the Afghanistan war in 2010 as were killed in 2002, the first full calendar year of the war. In the past year, U.S. military personnel in Afghanistan were killed at a rate of about one every 18 hours.

    Thus far, 1,357 U.S. armed services personnel have lost their lives in the war in Afghanistan. The year-by-year casualty count is as follows:

    Year Casualties

    2001 5

    2002 30

    2003 31

    2004 49

    2005 94

    2006 87

    2007 111

    2008 151

    2009 303

    2010 496

    Of these 1,357 casualties, 1,344 were U.S. service personnel who died from fatal wounds received in Afghanistan or from accidents that occurred there during the war. The other 13 Afghanistan war casualties include one person who was killed in the Arabian Gulf in 2010 while supporting military operations in Afghanistan and 12 who were killed in Pakistan (2 in 2001, 7 in 2002 and 3 in 2010) while supporting military action in Afghanistan.

    Of the 496 U.S. casualties in the Afghanistan war in 2010, 469 were combat-related deaths.

    Since President Barack Obama was inaugurated on Jan. 20, 2009, the U.S. has suffered 788 casualties in the Afghanistan war, which is 58 percent of the total casualties the U.S. has suffered in the war since it began in October 2001.

    After arguing in his presidential campaign that President Bush had wrongly shifted the focus in the war on terror from Afghanistan to Iraq, Obama announced in December 2009 that he was escalating the U.S. deployment in Afghanistan by sending an additional 30,000 troops there.

    Four of the five deadliest months for U.S. troops in Afghanistan have taken place since then. The five deadliest months since the start of the war in October 2001 have been:

    Month Casualties

    1. July 2010 65

    2. June 2010 60

    3. Oct. 2009 58

    4. Aug. 2010 55

    5. Nov. 2010 53

    Historically, most of the heavy fighting and thus most of the casualties, in Afghanistan has taken place during the summer months of June to September. In 2010, however, November ended up being one of the deadliest months of the war.

    CNSNews.com’s casualty database is derived primarily from official Defense Department casualty reports, but it also includes information gleaned from news media outlets.

    This year, President Obama and military officials have indicated that the process of withdrawing U.S. forces from Afghanistan and transitioning the security lead over to Afghan forces is expected to last more than three years, and will begin in July 2011.

    The commander of the U.S.-led NATO training mission in Afghanistan told CNSNews.com that coalition troops will remain in support of Afghan forces beyond 2014, but it remains uncertain how many U.S.-led NATO troops will remain in Afghanistan beyond then.

    Nevertheless, Vice-President Joe Biden said on Dec. 19 that U.S. troops would exit Afghanistan by 2014 "come hell or high water."

    http://www.cnsnews.com/news/article/2010-was-far-deadliest-year-us-troops-af

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    Re: NATO operations in Afghanistan:

    Post  Pervius on Mon Mar 28, 2011 10:55 pm

    lulldapull wrote:
    Viktor wrote:Like every other major offensive it will end up with bunch of dead taliban witch changes nothing.

    You forgot to mention that it also ends up with a bunch of dead NATO troops and assorted mercenaries.


    America can print dollars fast enough to keep a steady supply of mercenaries in there. This is a tactic Russia should have used.

    If they die you don't have to pay them. If they are dead you drain their account. No costs.

    Not many NATO troops have died. More US veterans commit suicide every day because there are no jobs than War Casualties.

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    Re: NATO operations in Afghanistan:

    Post  GarryB on Tue Mar 29, 2011 12:03 am

    Companies like Blackwater are not the solution in Afghanistan.

    Training an Afghan Army and Police force that can stand on its own, and developing an economy that creates jobs for young men and women so they have an alternative to joining a militant group, and can build a future for themselves and their families is the only lasting solution.

    Hunting down every last Taleban will not work. Their crime was not 11/9, their crime was not handing OBL over to the Americans when the Americans demanded it. Hardly a crime that warrants the genocide of the entire group.
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    Re: NATO operations in Afghanistan:

    Post  Russian Patriot on Tue Mar 29, 2011 12:21 am

    GarryB wrote:Companies like Blackwater are not the solution in Afghanistan.

    Training an Afghan Army and Police force that can stand on its own, and developing an economy that creates jobs for young men and women so they have an alternative to joining a militant group, and can build a future for themselves and their families is the only lasting solution.

    Hunting down every last Taleban will not work. Their crime was not 11/9, their crime was not handing OBL over to the Americans when the Americans demanded it. Hardly a crime that warrants the genocide of the entire group.

    Its actually the Haqquni network that we need to destory for the attack on FOB Champman... But yes I agree with you. The issue is though the Afganswait for U.S Marines to do everything.
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    Poland extends military presence in Afghanistan until Apr. 2012

    Post  Russian Patriot on Wed Oct 12, 2011 12:10 am


    Poland extends military presence in Afghanistan until Apr. 2012


    Polish President Bronislaw Komorowski extended on Wednesday the mandate for the country's peacekeeping contingent in Afghanistan until April 13, 2012, the Polish press agency said.

    The decision was made upon a proposal from the government, led by Prime Minister Donald Tusk.

    Poland currently maintains a 2,600-troop contingent in the war-torn Central Asian country as part of the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF).

    In line with Wednesday’s decision, Poland will have 2,500 troops deployed in Afghanistan.

    The Polish authorities plan to gradually decrease the number of troops and completely withdraw its military contingent from Afghanistan by the end of 2014.

    Twenty nine Polish soldiers have been killed and hundreds wounded since Poland sent its troops to fight Taliban and al-Qaeda militants in the country in 2002.

    http://www.en.ria.ru/mlitary_news/20111012/167594727.html
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    U.S. army to send new helicopter drone to Afghanistan

    Post  Russian Patriot on Fri Dec 30, 2011 9:55 pm

    U.S. army to send new helicopter drone to Afghanistan


    The U.S. Army is almost ready to deploy to Afghanistan a new rotary-wing surveillance drone, the Boeing A160T Hummingbird, equipped with a cutting-edge 1.8-gigapixel camera, the army says.

    Three drones, or unmanned air vehicles (UAV) in military jargon, will be deployed to Afghanistan in May or June, after they complete flight testing in Arizona at the beginning of the year, said the US Army's project manager for unmanned air systems modernization, Lt. Col. Matthew Munster.

    The drones are capable of “beaming back information and images of the surrounding terrain” in real time thanks to the highly sensitive 1.8-gigapixel camera, the largest video sensor used in tactical missions, the U.S. Army said on its website.

    Hummingbird's surveillance equipment can “track people and vehicles from altitudes above 20,000 feet (over six kilometers) across almost 65 square miles (168 square kilometers),” the army said.

    The 35-foot (11 meter) aircraft has the advantage of not needing a runway thanks to its rotary-wing configuration - ideal in Afghanistan's mountainous terrain.

    The drones’ hovering capability is one of the unique features that existing unmanned aircraft do not have, maker Boeing says. Hummingbird also has better hovering performance than other rotary-wing UAVs thanks to new technology allowing it to change its rotor speed according to altitude.

    The UAV's sophisticated "eye-in-the-sky" technology has, however, been blamed for a number of a "friendly fire" incidents in Pakistan and Afghanistan.

    Islamabad hit out furiously at NATO over drone strikes that killed 24 Pakistani soldiers on the Afghan border in November. NATO claimed the attack was a result of incorrect mapping information.

    In early December, Iran unveiled video footage showing a captured U.S. RQ-170 UAV. Tehran refused to return the drone and demanded an apology from the Pentagon for the invasion of its territory.

    http://www.en.ria.ru/mlitary_news/20111230/170559127.html
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    Re: NATO operations in Afghanistan:

    Post  GarryB on Fri Dec 30, 2011 11:27 pm

    Its hovering performance will be useful, but the vibration caused by just being a helicopter will require excellent physical and electronic stabilisation, otherwise that powerful camera is just a waste of time.

    BTW a 1.8 gigapixel camera would create an image with 1.8 billion or 1 800 000 000 pixels, so with a standard 4:3 image aspect ratio that would be something like a 48,000 pixel by 37,500 pixel image.

    That would take a while to load into photoshop...
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    Re: NATO operations in Afghanistan:

    Post  Russian Patriot on Sat Dec 31, 2011 11:41 pm

    GarryB wrote:Its hovering performance will be useful, but the vibration caused by just being a helicopter will require excellent physical and electronic stabilisation, otherwise that powerful camera is just a waste of time.

    BTW a 1.8 gigapixel camera would create an image with 1.8 billion or 1 800 000 000 pixels, so with a standard 4:3 image aspect ratio that would be something like a 48,000 pixel by 37,500 pixel image.

    That would take a while to load into photoshop...

    Yes it would, but The Pentagon has better things than that I assume!
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    Re: NATO operations in Afghanistan:

    Post  GarryB on Sun Jan 01, 2012 12:29 am

    Hey... don't knock photoshop... Smile

    I am sure that running on a super computer it will be smooth as silk... but I bet they wont be running a 32 bit version of XP because they will need more than just over 3 GB of RAM for those images...
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    Re: NATO operations in Afghanistan:

    Post  Russian Patriot on Sun Jan 01, 2012 12:31 am

    GarryB wrote:Hey... don't knock photoshop... Smile

    I am sure that running on a super computer it will be smooth as silk... but I bet they wont be running a 32 bit version of XP because they will need more than just over 3 GB of RAM for those images...

    correct, if theuy like I use CS3 Very Happy
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    French troops to serve in Afghanistan after 2014

    Post  Russian Patriot on Fri Jan 06, 2012 12:44 am



    French troops to serve in Afghanistan after 2014

    French armed forces will stay in Afghanistan after withdrawal of coalition troops in 2014, France's Defense Minister Gerard Longuet said on Sunday.

    Longuet told his Tajik counterpart Sherali Khairullaev that the two countries would widen its cooperation in security improvement at the Tajik-Afghan board.

    France's airpower forces unit is being based in the Tajik capital of Dushanbe since 2001 to provide services for coalition armed forces in Afghanistan.

    The unit included 250 troopers and six Dassault Rafale jet fighters till 2008 when the fighters were redeployed to Kunduz region in northern Afghanistan. Current number of French troopers in Dushanbe equals to 100.

    http://www.en.ria.ru/mlitary_news/20120101/170588258.html
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    GarryB
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    Re: NATO operations in Afghanistan:

    Post  GarryB on Fri Jan 06, 2012 5:37 am

    I rather suspect the French troops probably have a better relationship with the locals than the Americans or Brits.

    My nephew was sent to Afghanistan a couple of years back now, and he served in a region more to the north of the country. The New Zealand force that went with him had the role of rebuilding and support for the local Afghans, unlike the US and UK who were hunting the Taleban.

    Basically that meant our (NZ) forces were not bursting into peoples houses at 3am or doing much of the fighting... which meant our troops were not responsible for "collateral damage", so they got on a lot better with the locals than the American troops and British troops could.

    The irony is that Afghanistan has supposedly huge mineral wealth potential, so if they sorted out the security situation they could be as wealthy as Saudi Arabia... but they have a culture of fighting which will be hard to shed.

    It is good that the French are not abandoning the Afghans, but I am a little suspicious of their motives.
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    Mr.Kalishnikov47
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    Helmet cam footage from firefights in Afghanistan.

    Post  Mr.Kalishnikov47 on Fri Mar 23, 2012 10:44 am

    Very high quality footage of firefights between U.S (and Afghan) forces and the Taliban.

    For those of you who don't know these videos are posted by a user named FUNKER530. He's got a lot of videos so check out his channel if you like these.

    Also note the third video down is MARSOC, Marine special forces.







    Don't see a whole lot of that "single shot placement" that the Army and Marines are always bragging about, but what are you gonna do? Smile

    TheRealist
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    Foreign Military Bases in Afghanistan Raise Concern - Churkin

    Post  TheRealist on Fri Sep 21, 2012 3:46 am

    Foreign Military Bases in Afghanistan Raise Concern - Churkin
    UN, September 21

    Russia wants to know what is the purpose of foreign military bases that will remain in Afghanistan after the completion of the U.S.-led antiterrorism operation in 2014, Russia’s UN envoy Vitaly Churkin said.

    “Contradictory statements that foreign troops will be withdrawn from Afghanistan in 2014, but the foreign military bases will remain there raise a number of questions,” Churkin said.

    NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) plans to hand over responsibility for security in Afghanistan to the Afghan leadership by the end of 2014, as decided at the 2010 NATO summit in Lisbon.

    Churkin said that if the antiterrorism operation was completed in Afghanistan then the purpose to keep foreign military bases there would be different and Russia wanted to know the aim for maintaining the bases.

    “If the fight against terrorism continues [after 2014], the UN Security Council will have to extend the mandate for this operation,” the diplomat added.

    The international coalition in Afghanistan has lost more than 330 troops killed so far in 2012, according to ISAF information. The foreign troop contingents are scheduled to withdraw by the end of 2014.

    http://en.ria.ru/mlitary_news/20120921/176104680.html



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    Re: NATO operations in Afghanistan:

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