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    Zumwalt-class destroyer

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    Hachimoto

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    USS Zumwalt

    Post  Hachimoto on Mon Aug 05, 2013 1:49 pm



    The Electric Warship

    After years of research, development, and debate, the USS Zumwalt, the first of a new class of high-tech destroyers, nears completion




    Two decades ago, the U.S. Navy began designing what it then called its “21st-century destroyers.” These were to be a fleet of 32 guided-missile destroyers that would be able to cruise near coastlines and attack forces on land with mind-boggling might. In 2001, though, the Navy canceled that program and replaced it with a less costly alternative.

    It took another dozen years, but the first destroyer of that new generation is now nearing completion. Although less ambitious than the original concept, the first ship of this new class, the USS Zumwalt, is pioneering so many advanced technologies that some decision makers have criticized the program for trying to do too much, too soon.

    Some of the pushback came simply from the enormous costs involved in developing so many cutting-edge technologies. Indeed, faced with mushrooming costs, the U.S. government reacted by repeatedly reducing the number of these destroyers to be built—eventually settling on just three ships. The total cost of the program, including R&D, that will result in those three ships is estimated to be US $22 billion, according to the Congressional Research Service [PDF]. Another point of intense debate was whether the main task envisioned for this ship—cruising in coastal waters while supporting military operations on nearby lands—was really so important to U.S. geopolitical interests.

    And there has been no shortage of purely technical questions. Chief among them: Are the many advanced technologies slated for the Zumwalt really battle ready? It will probably be years before we’ll know for sure. But it’s not too soon to consider how these technologies will affect future naval warfare.

    The U.S. Navy has not released details about the ship’s interior. But after gathering what information we could, including construction photos, we assembled the accompanying illustration. Together these visual elements offer what may be a preview of how warships will look for decades to come.

    One of the most obvious differences between the Zumwalt and almost all other ships is its basic shape. The Zumwalt has what’s known as a tumblehome hull, which narrows rather than widens with height above the waterline. The rake of the bow is also inverted, making the ship look like an oddly angular submarine.

    Tumblehome hulls haven’t been seen on naval ships in over a century. The U.S. Navy used it here because the inward-angled hull won’t reflect radar energy straight back to an adversary’s antennas. Its main disadvantage is instability: A tumblehome hull provides no additional righting force when the ship heels over, causing some naval architects to speculate that it could make the Zumwalt prone to capsizing in rough seas.

    Another distinguishing feature of the Zumwalt is its deckhouse, which rises above the main deck and houses the bridge, the exhaust stacks, and various radar antennas. Like the hull, it was designed to reduce the ship’s radar profile and has sides that cant inward. Unlike the steel hull, the upper part of the deckhouse is made of balsawood-cored carbon-composite panels.

    This material, highly unusual for a warship, was used to reduce weight up top (which aids stability), enhance corrosion resistance, and make the ship more stealthy. But it’s very expensive, and in January of this year the Navy began investigating using only steel for the deckhouse of the third and final ship of the Zumwalt class, the USS Lyndon B. Johnson.



    electricship diagram
    Illustration: John MacNeillDownload PDF of the illustration.

    Yet another departure from tradition is how the Zumwalt arranges its many missiles. Guided-missile destroyers of earlier design position their vertical missile-launcher tubes amidships, where they are best protected from enemy fire. The Zumwalt’s designers arrayed its missiles along the ship’s flanks, positioning them between inner and outer hulls. Putting them on the periphery does make the missiles more vulnerable to enemy fire, but it lessens the consequences should they be struck. Were that to happen, the resulting blast would explode outward, leaving intact the inner, watertight hull.

    In another break from the U.S. Navy’s usual designs, the Zumwalt’s propellers and drive shafts are turned by electric motors, rather than being directly attached to combustion engines. Such electric-drive systems, while a rarity for the U.S. Navy, have long been standard on big ships. What’s new and different about the one on the Zumwalt is that it’s flexible enough to propel the ship, fire railguns or directed-energy weapons (should these eventually be deployed), or both at the same time. That’s because the 78 megawatts from its four gas-turbine generators can be directed through the ship’s power-distribution network wherever it’s needed. The presence of such a tightly integrated power-generation and distribution system has led some to call the Zumwalt the U.S. Navy’s first “all-electric ship.”

    While the general idea of using electric motors to propel the ship wasn’t particularly controversial, the choice of what kind of motors to use did not come easily. The leading idea at first was to use permanent-magnet motors, but these proved challenging to develop, and the Navy ultimately opted for two 34-MW induction motors instead.

    It’s perhaps a bit ironic that, despite the many cutting-edge technologies it contains, the Zumwalt class was passed over for one of the Navy’s most technologically challenging missions of all: sea-based ballistic-missile defense [PDF], which has grown more important to the United States and its allies lately as more nations of concern attain nuclear and ballistic-missile capabilities. Instead, the Navy will build more destroyers of a more conventional type and outfit them with the radars and antiballistic missiles needed.

    In a 2009 speech, Adm. Gary Roughhead, then Chief of Naval Operations, made his reasoning for this change clear. While he applauded the Zumwalt’s advanced technology and how the program was being run, he also repeated a truism that only the most naive engineers in attendance didn’t already know: “Technology does not always equate to relevant capability.”


    http://spectrum.ieee.org/aerospace/military/the-electric-warship
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    NationalRus

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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  NationalRus on Mon Aug 05, 2013 6:16 pm

    very interisting ship, would love to see it later on in the sea
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    George1

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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  George1 on Wed Mar 11, 2015 4:56 pm

    Delivery of Troubled Zumwalt Stealth Destroyers Delayed for US Navy

    Problems resulting from the complex technology being installed in the United States Navy’s new Zumwalt class of destroyers will delay the delivery of the first two ships.

    The Navy and its shipbuilder, General Dynamics Bath Iron Works, pushed back the delivery of the first warship, the Zumwalt, from this summer to November. The second ship, the Michael Monsoor, will be delivered in November 2016, a few months delayed.

    At 610 feet, it is larger than any Navy destroyer or cruiser since the nuclear-powered USS Long Beach bought in 1957, according to the Congressional Research Service.She added that while work on the Zumwalt is 94% complete, the complexity of the project requires more time for tests and activation aboard the warship.

    Costing more than $3 billion, the ship will sport advanced automation to reduce crew size and a stealthy shape designed to minimize its visibility on enemy radar. It also features a new gun with rocket-propelled projectiles, new radar and sonar systems, and a new hull shape.

    The electric-powered Zumwalt has two main generators which, along with two auxiliary units, can produce enough electricity to light up about 10,000 homes.

    Named after the late Admiral Elmo Zumwalt, the ship will not be declared ready for initial combat until September 2018, about two years later than previously projected, according to Navy documents obtained by Bloomberg Business.

    Both the Zumwalt and the Monsoor – named after the late Navy SEAL and Medal of Honor recipient Michael Monsoor – are expected to begin engineering sea trials later this year.

    The third and final ship in the class, the Lyndon B. Johnson, remains on schedule for delivery in December 2018, the Navy said.

    The $22 billion estimated cost of the program includes development of what originally was intended to be a 10-ship program. The total procurement cost of the three ships total is an estimated $12.9 billion, or about $4.3 billion per ship.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/news/20150311/1019322119.html#ixzz3U5pEGSwH
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    max steel

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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  max steel on Fri Sep 04, 2015 3:49 pm

    Is This the Warship of the Future?



    Laser-armed battleships that print their own drones will have to survive anti-ship missiles plummeting from space



    If you thought the battleship era faded after World War II, just wait a few decades. A group of British designers with the Startpoint group have revealed concept art for a future warship called Dreadnought 2050, the product of an open-thought experiment at the informal request of the U.K. Ministry of Defense.

    Named for the 1905 British man-of-war that rendered its predecessors obsolete, Dreadnought 2050 has all the futuristic accessories that a mid-21st-century warship shouldn’t be without. The ship is powered by hydrogen fusion — or if that proves unworkable, then at least by “highly efficient turbines driving silent electric motors to waterjets.” The hull is composed of “ultra-strong” composites of the finest acrylic. Out back, there’s a floodable dock for launching Royal Marines and swimming drones, a deck for launching armed aerial drones, and 3D printers to make more as needed. The designers don’t specify the size of their new dreadnought, but they imagine it would replace a ship with a crew of about 200 — perhaps making it comparable to the U.S. Navy’s 15,000-ton Zumwalt-class destroyer.





    The captain and crew steer and fight the ship by interacting with elaborate holograms, which, of course, looks cool. But Startpoint says the futuristic interface will allow the ship to operate with a total complement of about 100 sailors or less, including just five in the ops room.




    The ship is armed with an electromagnetic railgun, not so different from the one that the Office of Naval Research is building, but with 200-kilometer range, plus microwave guns to keep small enemy boats at bay. Its supercavitating torpedoes can reach speeds of 300 knots. The cherry on top is a drone that launches from where the mast should be, connected to the hull via a cryogenically cooled, carbon-nanotube tether. It’s an extension cord to power the drone’s advanced sensors and, of course, its menacing laser.





    “While some of these technologies push today’s boundaries in science and engineering, there is no reason why elements could not be incorporated into future designs. The Royal Navy needs visionary, innovative thinking and these concepts point the way to cutting edge technology which can be acquired at less cost and operated with less manpower than anything at sea today in the world’s leading navies,” said Muir Macdonald, a Startpoint senior executive, said in a press release.

    Of course, what’s really on display here is the cutting-edge technology of the present, not the future, and all on a platform borrowed from the past. And how realistic is this vision, anyhow?

    In a recent piece for The National Interest, historian Robert Farley looked back at the age of the battleship, when ships faced predictable threats—namely, other ships. In a gentlemanly one-on-one match, the question of how much armor vs. armaments to put on a hull was a straightforward cost-benefit analysis.

    “The process of ensuring survivability was simplified, in these early battleships, by the predictability of the threat,” Farley wrote. “The most likely vector of attack in the late 1890s came from large naval artillery carried by other ships, and consequently protective schemes could concentrate on that threat.”

    Then came submarines, aircraft, aircraft carriers, the goal of projecting power from blue water onto land, and now the prospect of anti-ship ballistic missiles that might hold at risk any surface vessel of sufficient size. Does a return to large warships make any sense?

    China, which is reportedly working on an anti-ship ballistic missile, nevertheless seems to think so. Once completed, the Chinese Type 055 cruiser would stretch 160 to 180 meters and displace 12,000 to 14,000 tons of water. It will be slightly smaller than a U.S. Zumwalt-class destroyer, but will be the largest “Asian surface warship since World War II’s Japanese Tone-class heavy cruisers,” Peter Singer and Jeffrey Lin write in Popular Science.

    And that’s hardly the biggest warship in the sea. Russia recently announced plans to overhaul its Pyotr Veliky nuclear-powered Kirov-class battlecruiser, which displaces some 24,000 tons. That’s about as close to a World War I battleship as you get these days.

    In an era of hypersonic missiles and aircraft, what possible advantage could this type of platform still have? Farley said the simple answer is power — as in electricity: “The most interesting innovations in naval technology involve sensors, unmanned technology, lasers, and railguns, most of which are power intensive. Larger ships can generate more power, increasing not only their lethality (rail guns, sensors) but also their survivability (anti-missile lasers, defensive sensor technologies, close-defense systems).”

    In other words, warships have a future because we will keep inventing things to put on them.

    If laser weapons can evolve fast enough to fight off hypersonic ballistic and cruise missiles, large ships may still be relevant in 2050. Then there’s just diesel-electric stealth submarines and thousand-dollar naval mines to worry about .



    http://www.defenseone.com/technology/2015/08/warship-future-royal-navy/119930/?oref=d-topstory
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    Militarov

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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  Militarov on Tue Sep 15, 2015 7:01 pm

    Pentagon is considering the cancellation of the third next-generation stealth destroyer USS Lyndon B. Johnson.

    According to a Defense Department briefing document reported by Bloomberg Business the fate of the Zumwalt-class destroyer will be known in the “next few weeks”. Two officials have confirmed that talks about cancellation are in progress yet no decision has been made. Pentagon has set up an independent cost-assessment office which will decide on whether the build of the last of three Zumwalt destroyers, Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) will be canceled.

    Initially, 32 Zumwalt destroyers were supposed to be built. Over the years the number declined to three vessels which are being built at the General Dynamics’ Bath Iron Works shipyard. Even if the build were to be cancelled the question of how much, if at all, would the government save still looms large.

    According to Portland Press Herald, U.S. Rep. Chellie Pingree said that cancelling the third Zumwalt would not make much sense, adding that since the ship is already under construction, cancelling it now would be a total waste of taxpayers’ money.


    Source: http://navaltoday.com/2015/09/15/us-navy-to-cancel-third-zumwalt/
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    Militarov

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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  Militarov on Wed Dec 09, 2015 7:26 pm



    Zumwal on trials.
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    Militarov

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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  Militarov on Tue Dec 15, 2015 2:41 am

    "The Rolls-Royce powered future USS Zumwalt DDG-1000 put to sea for the first time on Monday 7 December 2015. At 8.27 a.m local time she left the dock side at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works Shipyard in Maine, USA, and headed out into the Kinnebeck river. This advanced destroyer is lead ship in a class of three powered by Rolls-Royce technology. Zumwalt class destroyers provide multi-mission offensive and defensive capabilities and can operate independently or as part of carrier strike groups, surface action groups, amphibious ready groups, and underway replenishment groups. The future USS Zumwalt, and each subsequent ship in the series, will be powered by a pair of Rolls-Royce MT30 main gas turbine generator sets (MTGs) providing 35.4MW each and two MT5S auxiliary turbine generator sets (ATGs) 3.9MW each, combining to deliver 78MW of total ship power. Zumwalt’s electrical system is configured as an Integrated Power System (IPS), which allows for power generated by the turbine generator sets to be used for propulsion as well as the ship’s weapons, sensors and on-board systems.



    In addition, Rolls-Royce Naval is also providing two fixed pitch propellers to this ship, cast and machined at Pascagoula in Mississippi US. Rolls-Royce Naval facilities in Canada have supplied the Multi-function Towed Array Handling System (MTAH) that deploys the anti-submarine warfare towed array sonar and torpedo defence system. Neil Pickard, Naval Program Director - Americas stated, “Today marks the culmination of the tremendous efforts undertaken by the Naval team. Due to the innovative technology involved with this being the first all-electric ship, we have had many significant challenges to overcome throughout this programme. I would like to thank everyone in Rolls-Royce who has been involved in DDG-1000.” Alex Greve, Project Engineer Naval said, “DDG-1000’s alpha trials will mobilise nearly 80MW of power on a single vessel. I am proud to be part of the team that will meet this challenge. Our gas turbine generator sets will provide the power density our customer needs to bring tomorrow’s military technology alive.”

    Rob Rice, Service Engineer Naval said, “Having served in the US Navy on-board ships powered by Rolls-Royce equipment, I always had a great sense of pride standing on my ship’s deck, porting anywhere in the world! Now, as a Rolls-Royce team member providing an excellent product for our United States Navy and my Country, words will never describe the sense of achievement as I witness USS Zumwalt, light-off, set restricted manoeuvring, cast off lines, and set a course out to sea!”


    Source: http://www.rolls-royce.com/customers/marine/customer-focus.aspx
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    OminousSpudd

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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  OminousSpudd on Tue Dec 15, 2015 4:39 am

    Not to bash for the sake of bashing but man... That thing is fugly.
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    max steel

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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  max steel on Sat Apr 16, 2016 12:01 am

    The Navy's $22 Billion Stealth Destroyer Program Is Delayed Again Wink



    General Dynamics Corp.’s stealthy, electric-powered destroyer for the U.S. Navy will be delivered almost three years late, according to the Pentagon’s latest schedule.

    The Navy now estimates delivery of the DDG-1000, the first of three Zumwalt-class vessels in a $22.4 billion program, by midyear, according to the Defense Department’s annual “Selected Acquisition Report” on the program. In 2010, the delivery was projected for September 2013 and last year for November 2015.

    With its inverted bow and profile meant to reduce the ship’s cross-section to radar, the DDG-1000 is intended for multiple missions, including land attacks. The vessels, named after the late Admiral Elmo Zumwalt, are made by General Dynamics’ Bath Iron Works unit in Bath, Maine. Raytheon Co., based in Waltham, Massachusetts, provides the vessel’s combat electronics.

    The cumulative delays “are due to overall effects of shipyard production and test challenges,” according to the report sent to Congress last month and obtained by Bloomberg News.

    Lucy Ryan, a spokeswoman for Falls Church, Virginia-based General Dynamics, said in an e-mail that the company had no comment on the delays.

    Combat Capability


    In addition to the late delivery, the DDG-1000 isn’t expected to be declared to have an initial combat capability until December 2019, more than four years later than the Navy projected in 2010 and more than a year later than estimated last year, based on a comparison of the latest annual Pentagon report with past editions.

    The Navy is updating its acquisition benchmarks for the program, including cost and schedule milestones, according to the report. “The DDG-1000 will begin acceptance trials later this month, and the ship is on track for commissioning on Oct. 15, 2016,” Captain Thurraya Kent, a Navy spokeswoman, said in an e-mail that didn’t address the delays.

    After the ship is commissioned, it will transit to San Diego to have its combat mission systems activated, she said.

    One of the biggest contributors to the delays is the complexity of activating the ship’s integrated power system, according to the Pentagon report. The ship will use electricity generated by gas turbines to power all of its systems, including weapons, according to a Navy fact sheet.

    The vessel is larger than any Navy destroyer or cruiser since the nuclear-powered USS Long Beach bought in 1957, according to the Congressional Research Service. It is also “much more” stealthy than earlier Navy surface combat ships, CRS analyst Ron O’Rourke, told Bloomberg.

    The $22.4 billion estimated cost includes development of what originally was intended to be a 10-ship program.

    Procurement Cost

    The procurement cost of the three ships is an estimated $13.2 billion, including $3.8 billion for the DDG-1000, $2.8 billion for the second vessel and $2.4 billion for the third, Kent said. The balance of the $13.2 billion includes one-time expenditures that apply to all three vessels, outfitting and post-delivery costs, she said.

    The program’s procurement cost increased by about $450 million last year due to the “effect of shipyard production and test challenges,” the report said.

    The new destroyer’s Advanced Gun System from London-based BAE Systems Plc has two 155mm guns capable of firing precision projectiles 63 nautical miles (73 miles) inland. The vessel will carry a crew of 142, down from about 300 on the Navy’s Aegis destroyers and cruisers, producing savings in personnel costs.

    “Skilled labor shortages at Bath Iron Works contributed to the cost increases, but they were only one factor among several resulting in the rise” for “the most advanced warship ever built,” Loren Thompson, a defense analyst with the Lexington Institute. Thompson follows the Zumwalt class for his consulting client General Dynamics, which also contributes to the Arlington, Virginia-based institute, he said in an e-mail.
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    max steel

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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  max steel on Fri Apr 22, 2016 12:42 pm

    Zumwalt Departs Bath Iron Works for U.S. Navy Acceptance Trials



    The guided missile destroyer Zumwalt (DDG-1000) left the General Dynamics Bath Iron Works shipyard for its acceptance trials ahead of delivery to the U.S. Navy, the service announced on Wednesday.

    This morning, the 16,000-ton warship transited down the Kennebec River to the Atlantic Ocean for the Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) evaluation before the ship’s anticipated delivery to the service in May.

    “While underway, many of the ship’s key systems and technologies including navigation, propulsion readiness, auxiliary systems, habitability, fire protection and damage control capabilities will be demonstrated to ensure they meet the Navy’s requirements,” read a statement from Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA).

    In March, Bath took the ship out on four days of builder’s trials to test the ship’s hull, mechanical and electrical (HM&E) systems.

    During the four days of builders trials, “representatives from BIW, PCU Zumwalt, the Navy’s Program Office, SUPSHIP Bath and various technical subject matter experts, including Raytheon personnel, tested several ship systems including key propulsion and auxiliary systems as well as boat operations,” read a March statement provided to USNI News by the service.

    The acceptance trails will only focus on Zumwalt’s HM&E system that are based on a first-in-concept Integrated Power System. The IPS combines the output of two Rolls Royce MT-30 gas turbine engines, along with diesel generators, to power a ship wide electrical grid. Instead of a direct mechanical connection to the ships props, the IPS powers large electrical induction motors that propel the ship through the water.

    The complexity of constructing and testing the IPS is the primary cause for the schedule of the ship to slip several months from its original anticipated delivery date.

    Following delivery, Zumwalt will transit to San Diego, Calif. where it will be outfitted with the remainder of its combat system – in part – to free up space at Bath for the construction of the two follow-on ships Michael Moonsor (DDG-1001) and Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) and Arleigh Burke-class (DDG-51) guided missile destroyers.
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    Militarov

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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  Militarov on Fri Apr 22, 2016 9:42 pm











    Zum on trials and one pic from "wintering".
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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  Werewolf on Fri Apr 22, 2016 9:47 pm

    Didn't know they have Egyptian ship builders.
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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  George1 on Fri May 06, 2016 2:31 am

    US Stealth Destroyer USS Zumwalt Conducts Sea Trials (VIDEO)

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/us/20160506/1039158960/zumwalt-sea-trial.html#ixzz47pau0GdF


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    max steel

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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  max steel on Sat May 21, 2016 1:22 am

    US Navy Takes Ownership of Stealth Destroyer Zumwalt

    Shipbuilder General Dynamics Bath Iron Works formally delivered the stealth destroyer Zumwalt (DDG 1000) to the US Navy Friday, marking a turnover of ownership from the ship’s status as a private vessel to become a government-owned warship.

    “Today represents a significant achievement for not only the DDG 1000 program and shipbuilding team but for the entire US Navy,” Capt. Jim Downey, the Zumwalt-class program manager at Naval Sea Systems Command, said in a statement. “This impressive ship incorporates a new design alongside the integration of sophisticated new technologies that will lead the Navy into the next generation of capabilities.”

    Delivery represents a major milestone in the design and development of the ships, conceived in the late 1990s as the epitome of stealth in warship design. At various times the Navy envisioned 32 ships in the class, then 28, then seven, then two, and back up to three – the class size of today. Laughing

    Concept and design work has been taking place on the Zumwalt class since the late 1990s, when it was known as the Land Attack Destroyer variant of the Surface Combatant 21 (SC 21) program. It was known as the DD(X) program in 2002 when Northrop Grumman and Raytheon were chosen as the prime contractors, and recast as the DDG 1000 in April 2006.

    For a variety of reasons prime contractor responsibility shifted to the Navy, with General Dynamics Bath Iron Works overseeing the hull, mechanical and engineering (HM&E) portion of the shipbuilding contract. Raytheon retains overall responsibility for the combat system.

    A construction contract was awarded for the Zumwalt in Feb. 2008, when the ship was expected to be delivered in July 2014. A keel-laying ceremony was held in November 2011 at Bath’s Maine shipyard, and the destroyer was launched in October 2013.

    The Zumwalt first went to sea in December 2015 for Alpha trials, a series of tests run by the shipbuilder to test the ship’s HM&E components. A second Bravo trial was held in March, and the Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) completed out a two-day acceptance trial on April 21.

    With delivery, the Zumwalt’s Navy crew has officially moved aboard and taken up residence. She’s expected to sail away from Bath this fall and will likely operate for a few weeks from the fleet base at Norfolk, Va., travelling to Baltimore, Md., for an October 15 commissioning ceremony. After that, the Zumwalt will leave the US East Coast for her homeport of San Diego.

    Work on the Zumwalt is by no means finished. A new phase will begin in 2017 as Raytheon and the Navy work to complete the ship’s combat systems – an array of radars, sensors and weapons. By late 2017 or the first part of 2018, the Zumwalt should be ready for combat system operational testing (CSQT), when the weapons and sensors will be fully tested. Only after the successful completion of CSQT will the Zumwalt work up for a deployment.

    Two more Zumwalt-class ships, the Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) and Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG 1002), are under construction at Bath.
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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  max steel on Mon May 30, 2016 12:23 am

    Russian Naval Expert Calls US Navy’s New Stealth Destroyer ‘Giant Washtub’ Wink

    Russian military experts have been belittling the U.S. Navy’s next generation guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt, the largest and most technologically sophisticated destroyer in U.S. naval history, which will be handed over to the U.S. Navy tomorrow, in Russian state media. Speaking to Russian state-owned media outlet Radio Sputnik, a prominent Russian military analyst, critically examines the Zumwalt program and its high price tag:

    With an annual defense budget of over $600 billion, the Pentagon can take the liberty of conducting various kinds of experiments, including spending $4.4 billion on a single destroyer. By comparison, one US [Virginia-class] nuclear submarine, the newest in the fleet, costs about $2.2 billion. In other words, they used the budget for two nuclear subs to build one Zumwalt. What can be said? Americans love grandiose projects which sometimes go beyond the scope of reason.

    The future guided-missile destroyer is allegedly 50 times harder to detect than current U.S. Navy destroyers. However, the Russian analyst is also taking issue with the destroyers’ stealth capabilities:

    With regard to its stealth, this is just a fairy tale for fools. Imagine a colossus with a solid wall the height of a sixteen-story building. Given the capabilities of current weapons using space and aerial reconnaissance, in addition to those of UAVs, this giant washtub cannot remain an inconspicuous target on the sea surface.

    Once inducted into the U.S. Navy, the USS Zumwalt will be one of the most heavily armed surface ships in the world, capable of striking its targets far inland. Yet, another Russian military expert speaking to Sputnik Radio says that the United States has been exaggerating the ships combat capabilities:

    The Americans have presented the Zumwalt as the best warship in history; this of course is an exaggerated characterization. The ship really is interesting in terms of innovation, when looking at its power plant, the types of weapons installed, and its control system. All this really is a breakthrough. But taken altogether, this does not turn the destroyer into a super-menacing weapon. This is a floating supercomputer with missiles…It doesn’t alter the balance of forces.

    The USS Zumwalt, the lead ship of the U.S. Navy’s new destroyer class is slated to achieve initial operational capability in October, 2016. One can expect disparaging remarks from Kremlin-influenced Russian media outlets about the U.S. Navy’s newest stealth warship to continue in the months ahead.
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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  KiloGolf on Mon Jun 20, 2016 6:39 pm

    The two Kirov class cruisers have now competition, two Zumwalts out there, soon three.



    great looking ships I might add

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    max steel

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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  max steel on Mon Jun 20, 2016 10:09 pm

    And there will only be 3 .
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    JohninMK

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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  JohninMK on Wed Sep 28, 2016 12:25 am

    Long and very interesting article on the D-1000 Zumwalt pointing out what looks to be a wasted opportunity. But no doubt good for MIC profits overall.

    http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/5343/the-navys-new-stealth-destroyer-has-watered-down-capabilities-questionable-future
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    George1

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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  George1 on Mon Nov 07, 2016 9:15 pm

    The US Navy commissioned an elaborate warship, with massive guns designed to hit targets 80 miles away, but now must scrap its current weapons plans because the ammunition alone is estimated to cost at least $800,000 per shot.

    Read more: https://sputniknews.com/military/201611071047162702-us-navy-warships-expensive-ammo/


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    AlfaT8

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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  AlfaT8 on Tue Nov 22, 2016 10:49 pm

    Ooh, how the mighty have fallen. Rolling Eyes

    $4.4 Billion USS Zumwalt Destroyer Towed From Panama Canal After Breakdown

    While passing through the lower half of the Panama Canal on Monday evening, a new Zumwalt-class destroyer broke down and had to be taken under tow to a berth, according to the US Third Navy Fleet in San Diego

    https://sputniknews.com/military/201611221047730510-zumwalt-towed-after-engineering-issues/
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    Militarov

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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  Militarov on Tue Nov 22, 2016 10:56 pm

    AlfaT8 wrote:Ooh, how the mighty have fallen.  Rolling Eyes

    $4.4 Billion USS Zumwalt Destroyer Towed From Panama Canal After Breakdown

    While passing through the lower half of the Panama Canal on Monday evening, a new Zumwalt-class destroyer broke down and had to be taken under tow to a berth, according to the US Third Navy Fleet in San Diego

    https://sputniknews.com/military/201611221047730510-zumwalt-towed-after-engineering-issues/

    Allegedly coolant radiators malfunctioned and made that all electric bullshit to halt working due to overheating.
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    KiloGolf

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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  KiloGolf on Tue Nov 22, 2016 11:25 pm

    AlfaT8 wrote:Ooh, how the mighty have fallen.  Rolling Eyes

    $4.4 Billion USS Zumwalt Destroyer Towed From Panama Canal After Breakdown

    While passing through the lower half of the Panama Canal on Monday evening, a new Zumwalt-class destroyer broke down and had to be taken under tow to a berth, according to the US Third Navy Fleet in San Diego

    https://sputniknews.com/military/201611221047730510-zumwalt-towed-after-engineering-issues/

    Hardly surprising. The ship is just entering service. They are ironing out all these issues.
    Unlike the Biscay incident of the Kuz in 2012.
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    AlfaT8

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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  AlfaT8 on Wed Nov 23, 2016 12:17 am

    KiloGolf wrote:
    AlfaT8 wrote:Ooh, how the mighty have fallen.  Rolling Eyes

    $4.4 Billion USS Zumwalt Destroyer Towed From Panama Canal After Breakdown

    While passing through the lower half of the Panama Canal on Monday evening, a new Zumwalt-class destroyer broke down and had to be taken under tow to a berth, according to the US Third Navy Fleet in San Diego

    https://sputniknews.com/military/201611221047730510-zumwalt-towed-after-engineering-issues/

    Hardly surprising. The ship is just entering service. They are ironing out all these issues.
    Unlike the Biscay incident of the Kuz in 2012.

    Yes, because a 20+ year old Soviet aircraft carrying-cruiser is clearly comparable to a $7Bil top of the line next generation stealth Uber destroyer.
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    AlfaT8

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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  AlfaT8 on Wed Nov 23, 2016 12:21 am

    Militarov wrote:
    AlfaT8 wrote:Ooh, how the mighty have fallen.  Rolling Eyes

    $4.4 Billion USS Zumwalt Destroyer Towed From Panama Canal After Breakdown

    While passing through the lower half of the Panama Canal on Monday evening, a new Zumwalt-class destroyer broke down and had to be taken under tow to a berth, according to the US Third Navy Fleet in San Diego

    https://sputniknews.com/military/201611221047730510-zumwalt-towed-after-engineering-issues/

    Allegedly coolant radiators malfunctioned and made that all electric bullshit to halt working due to overheating.

    I've heard it was a drive shaft failure, which led to it crashing into the Panama wall.
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    Militarov

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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

    Post  Militarov on Wed Nov 23, 2016 12:55 am

    AlfaT8 wrote:
    Militarov wrote:
    AlfaT8 wrote:Ooh, how the mighty have fallen.  Rolling Eyes

    $4.4 Billion USS Zumwalt Destroyer Towed From Panama Canal After Breakdown

    While passing through the lower half of the Panama Canal on Monday evening, a new Zumwalt-class destroyer broke down and had to be taken under tow to a berth, according to the US Third Navy Fleet in San Diego

    https://sputniknews.com/military/201611221047730510-zumwalt-towed-after-engineering-issues/

    Allegedly coolant radiators malfunctioned and made that all electric bullshit to halt working due to overheating.

    I've heard it was a drive shaft failure, which led to it crashing into the Panama wall.

    It lost power due to lack of cooling, so it ended up being on only auxilary power apparently, and then drifted into side of the Ch. No electricity, no propulsion, thats how it works on this ship.

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    Re: Zumwalt-class destroyer

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