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    Russian Navy: Status & News #1

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    GarryB
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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #1

    Post  GarryB on Thu Apr 01, 2010 6:57 am

    Ships of 10,000 ton displacement can generally be detected by radar of most fighter aircraft at 400km or beyond.

    I have read comments from British Navy guys that with the Kirov class, which were designed for reduced radar cross section too, it was easier to detect them by the wake that they created than to try to detect the ship itself.

    That is not to suggest the Kirov was radar invisible, but that the wake can give you away and also a hint that the radar reduction measures were effective of course.

    At the end of the day unless you turn all your radars off you will not be invisible and if you do turn your radars off then you are vulnerable to surprise attack.

    There is safety in numbers, but in the end it doesn't matter what the defence is it can be overwhelmed with numbers.

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    Russian North Fleet destroyer to rejoin fleet after 18 years

    Post  Russian Patriot on Tue Apr 06, 2010 1:19 am

    Russian North Fleet destroyer to rejoin fleet after 18 years

    RIA Novosti

    05/04/201016:53

    MOSCOW, April 5 (RIA Novosti) - The Vice-Admiral Kulakov destroyer will rejoin Russia's Northern Fleet after an 18-year overhaul, a spokesman for the Severnaya Verf shipyard said on Monday.

    The Vice-Admiral Kulakov, a Project-1155 Udaloy-class destroyer, was commissioned in 1982 and was in service until March 1991 when it was retired for repairs.

    The retrofit program ran into serious difficulties over a lack of funding and there were even plans to scrap the warship. However, in the early 2000s, the Russian Defense Ministry raised enough funds to complete the modernization.

    The Vice-Admiral Kulakov has a displacement of 6,200 tons, a length of 162.99 m, a speed of 35 knots, a range of 19,400 km, and a crew of 300.

    It is armed with AK-100 artillery systems, Rastrub-B and RBU-6000 antisubmarine complexes, Kinzhal antiaircraft missile systems, and anti-submarine torpedoes. It also carries two Ka-27 Helix-series helicopters.

    http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/library/news/russia/2010/russia-100405-rianovosti03.htm


    Personal opinion : This is what we should be doing!

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    Russian Navy: Status & News #1

    Post  Russian Patriot on Mon May 10, 2010 7:51 pm

    Russia mulls construction of 'anti-piracy' ship

    RIA Novosti

    08/05/201016:38

    MOSCOW, May 8 (RIA Novosti) - Russia could build at least one special-purpose ship to fight sea piracy in the next several years, the Pacific Fleet commander has said.

    Vice Admiral Konstantin Sidenko said "special ships and vessels" were needed to ensure safety at sea and deal with sea piracy, which posed the greatest security threat.

    He offered no details about its design or equipment but said that such a ship would be part of the Pacific Fleet, because its area of responsibility includes the Indian Ocean, in particular the Gulf of Aden.

    The chief of General Staff of the Armed Forces said on Friday Russia had no plans to beef up its task force in the Gulf of Aden following a pirate attack on a Russian tanker.

    "We have no plans to reinforce our deployment," said Gen. Nikolai Makarov, who is also first deputy defense minister.

    A SWAT team from the anti-submarine destroyer Marshal Shaposhnikov freed the Moscow University tanker and its 23 crewmembers on Thursday. The ship was hijacked by Somali pirates on Wednesday en route from the Red Sea to China.

    One pirate was killed and several injured in a 22-minute operation. The pirates were captured, but later released. Makarov said Russia had "no legal grounds for detaining them" as they could not be prosecuted under international or national law.
    A Russian special investigations committee spokesman initially said that all the detained pirates involved in hijacking the tanker would be sent to Moscow to face legal proceedings and prosecution.

    The Russian task force comprising the RFS Marshal Shaposhnikov, the MB-37 salvage tug and the Pechenga tanker arrived in the Gulf of Aden on March 29 to join the anti-piracy mission in the region.

    Somali pirates carried out a record number of attacks and hijackings in 2009. According to the International Maritime Bureau Piracy Reporting Center, a total of 217 vessels were attacked last year, resulting in 47 hijackings.

    http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/library/news/russia/2010/russia-100508-rianovosti01.htm


    Last edited by Russian Patriot on Wed Jul 14, 2010 11:05 pm; edited 1 time in total

    GarryB
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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #1

    Post  GarryB on Tue May 11, 2010 2:09 am

    It would be interesting to speculate on the design for such a role.

    Would you go for a wolf in sheeps clothing where it pretends to be a cargo vessel, or would you make it a hunter with high speed and lots of guns?

    I would expect for armament you would want the ability to fire out to 8-10km or so accurately, so a 76.2mm AK-176M-MR-123-02 gun would probably be a good start. Perhaps a 57mm automatic gun as well for the faster small boats as well as the standard 30mm CIWS systems too.
    You would want helicopters and I would think that 2-4 Ka-29 assault helos for carrying troops, and maybe some armed attack helos like the Ka-52s might also be useful for their flight range and firepower, and also their armour protection to protect them from return fire.

    For the ship itself, high speed would just burn up fuel quickly and for long duration voyages from the Pacific Fleet base it will need large stores, for its own fuel and the fuel used by the aircraft, as well as ordinance and of course accommodation for the boarding teams.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #1

    Post  Farhad Gulemov on Tue May 11, 2010 2:38 pm

    GarryB wrote:It would be interesting to speculate on the design for such a role.

    Yep, but for that I would need to know more about the methods and means of the pirates. For example, I think I remember reading somewhere that once they seize a ship, they are in communications with specialized firms who conduct negotations. If so, the first thing I would go for is an electronic-warfare suite to cut-off all the means of communication of the pirates.

    Then there is the issue of the size of the area to be monitored. I suppose that to be effective such a ship would have to have a pretty good intelligence capability, including the ability to constantly monitor all movements in the area of responsability in real time.
    Ideally, this ship should be able to receive and share data with non-Russian forces in the area. Such a data fusion capability would have to be included in the design of the intelligence suite of the ship.

    Once a ship has been seized, a UAV/RPV above it 24/7 is probably a good idea.

    I might be mistaken, but my understanding is that firepower is not really an issue with pirates. They are, as far as I know, armed only with small-arms and RPGs. For safely, we can assume that they will also have machine guns and possible some 30/50 cal guns. None of that is much of a threat to a well-trained assault team, weather by speedboat or helo.

    It would probably be deisrable to be able to put the sized ship's rudder and/or engines out of commission. I am not sure as to what the easiest method for that would be. Any ideas?

    One thing the pirates most definitely do not have (so far) is night-vision gear. Hence, the assault component of the force should have top-of-the-line night vision equipment. That, and special weapons (flashbangs, gas, etc.).

    So my vote goes for a EW and intelligence ship with a squadron of helicotpers (Ka-29TB, Ka-32A2, Ka-32A7, Ka-32S, Ka-31, etc.), a complement of fast attack craft and a company of specially naval assault operators.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #1

    Post  GarryB on Wed May 12, 2010 3:54 am

    You make some very good points, though respectfully disagree that a 50 cal HMG is not threat to guys in an inflatable boat... no matter how well trained they are, or for that matter no threat to helos.

    It is my understanding that the smaller boats are controlled by larger boats that act as motherships or base ships for attacks.

    I would expect the main weapons used to foil an attack would be in helos, guns and rockets and the odd ATGM when precision is required. All three should be able to be used outside the range of RPG and small arms fire and potentially out to outside HMG range if necessary.

    Regarding the 57mm and 76.2mm guns, with almost 3kg and 16kg shells respectively able to engage targets out to 8-10km they can be used to fire warning shots and also to damage vessels. I would expect their rate of fire (240 rpm and 120 rpm) would make the engagement of high speed targets practical, because some of those little boats are fast.

    For a larger boat the 76.2mm gun might be a little light, but a heavy anti ship missile will be over kill.

    Something like a Kh-25ML with a 90kg HE warhead and laser guidance to allow targeting of the rear of the vessel would be useful.

    Having thought about it some more I actually think that modelling the pirates operation might be worth while... having a larger slower mothership as a base of supply with a load of a dozen or so helicopters with long range fuel tanks added to act like the high speed boats.

    The main problem is the speed of the little boats which is reportedly up to 50 knts so no modern conventional warship can catch them. Helos have a speed advantage, though obviously a few very high flying UCAVs would also be useful.

    I suspect the real solution is to build a land base there and hire a lot of fishermen to help support the base operations. Pay some of the fishermen to patrol looking for Pirates might sound strange, but all the options are not cheap and this is really the only one that might make the problem go away.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #1

    Post  Farhad Gulemov on Wed May 12, 2010 5:07 am

    GarryB wrote:You make some very good points, though respectfully disagree that a 50 cal HMG is not threat to guys in an inflatable boat... no matter how well trained they are, or for that matter no threat to helos.

    Sorry, I should have been more explicit on what I meant. 30 or 50 cal machine guns are, of course, a potential risk to an inflatable (or even a regular) small boat or helo. What I meant is that a modern force can use sound tactics (such as a night attack with NVGs) to destroy/disable these (or get rid of the folks manning them). I just don't think that your average Somali pirate crew is going to be very proficient at using a machine gun and a modern craft or helo will deliver its ammo with far more accuracy and effect. Targeting and precision will mean more than caliber or range in such a confrontation.

    In general, I think that kinetics should be kept to a minimal level, both for safety and to minimize costs. This is why I respectfully disagree with the use of heavy guns or missiles - depending on the ship, they might do too much damage.

    What still eludes me is a good solution to temporarily disable the engines or rudder without trashing the hijacked ship. Some kind of small specialized slow-speed torpedo might be the answer I would imagine. Getting it right on the screws should be a piece of cake, and a small warhead might be just enough to get the job done without catastrophic damage.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #1

    Post  GarryB on Wed May 12, 2010 7:43 am

    I have seen one video on Youtube I think it was, where a Russian vessel "stopped" another vessel with its 30mm gatling. It just fired burst after burst at the rear end of the target vessel till it stopped. Well actually it caught fire I think from memory.

    The heavy guns on the boats would not increase costs by very much, in fact I think I remember some training ships that had medium calibre guns on them for the purposes of training.

    A couple of 76.2mm or even 100mm or 130mm shells into the hull near the waterline to the rear of most vessels will stop them without too much risk of sinking them. Unless the vessels are small or overloaded then it would only take a couple of shells at the hull below the smoke stack to take out the engine room and stop the ship.

    Equally aiming at the rudder might be possible, but hitting the screws with any gun would be unlikely.

    Landing special forces on board to take over the bridge would be the most sure option, but for little boats a single 57mm shell to the rear of the boat should stop it. The Ka-29 has a 4 barrel 30 cal gatling gun behind a moving panel in the nose that fires at 6,000 rounds per minute. Directing that at the rear of a speed boat should physically stop it if spraying the water around the boat doesn't make the crew stop.

    If you don't care about the lives of the pirates then a single ATGM like ATAKA with a HE Frag warhead aimed at the centre of a small speed boat should neutralise the target.

    I think the real question is tactics.

    Do you want to simply escort vessels to protect them, do you want to simply use safe room tactics and respond to vessels in the process of being hijacked, or do you want to scan the ocean and hunt for pirates.

    For each role slightly different vessels and equipment will work better.

    Certainly helos offer good response times without the need for an expensive aircraft carrier.
    An AWACS helicopter like Ka-31 would be most useful in detecting attacks as they are launched.
    Electronics to enable mother craft to be identified means you can attack the source of the problem rather than having to chase around the little fish.

    Personally I think the best weapons would be light cannon on aircraft and ships (30mm would be fine, but I would like some heavier options just in case though only to about 76.2mm rather than really heavy guns). I would want 57mm guns for their high rate of fire, their range and their hitting power and their ability to hit very fast moving targets like small boats. 30mm guns for the same reason, but use the 30mm because they would be cheaper per round.
    I would also want ATGMs from ship and helo platforms simply because they are relatively cheap compared with proper Anti Ship Missiles, yet offer precision targeting at ranges beyond HMG and RPG fire range so point targets can be accurately engaged.
    Lastly I would want unguided rockets from Helos, preferably with Ugroza laser guidance kits so they could be used as cheap ATGMs with range and accuracy, but also reduced costs.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #1

    Post  Farhad Gulemov on Wed May 12, 2010 2:33 pm

    GarryB wrote:I have seen one video on Youtube I think it was, where a Russian vessel "stopped" another vessel with its 30mm gatling. It just fired burst after burst at the rear end of the target vessel till it stopped. Well actually it caught fire I think from memory.

    Interesting. If you find the link, please post it here, ok?

    GarryB wrote:I think the real question is tactics. Do you want to simply escort vessels to protect them, do you want to simply use safe room tactics and respond to vessels in the process of being hijacked, or do you want to scan the ocean and hunt for pirates.

    I would imagine that escorting is just too expensive so as long as the anti-piracy force can a) sever communications between the pirates and their representatives b) immobilize the seized ship and c) send in an assault team the deterrence factor should already bring down the number of incidents substantially.

    A specialized ships does make sense. There is something a little silly in seeing a major anti-submarine ship like the Shaposhnikov going after pirates (even the Peter the Great on its reecent multi-ocean cruise to a shoot at some anti-piracy ops if I remember correctly!). The kind of ship that would be needed for this kind of stuff could be far cheaper to built (or, most likely, convert).

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #1

    Post  Vladimir79 on Wed May 12, 2010 10:40 pm

    The easy answer is to arm merchants with 14.5mm rail mountable MGs. No pirate skiff is going to stick around for that.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #1

    Post  GarryB on Thu May 13, 2010 4:36 am

    Indeed I think the cheapest option would be a couple of 14.5mm guns and perhaps a few man portable ATGMs like Kornet or even older models like AT-4/-5 Konkurs/fagot with HE Frag warheads.
    A unit of ten Marines with one commander and three teams of three men to operate 24/7 in 8 hour shifts for each of the three teams.

    A more expensive option might be to tow a small patrol craft with a power line leading back to it so it could operate engines off and during an attack, or an attack on a nearby vessel it could be released and zip at up to 50 knots to intervene. Such a vessel could be towed through the danger areas and then refuel and rearm and restock and then be towed by the next vessel through.
    The added fuel bill for the tow should not be large for the towing vessel and the marines will be in their own boat with a wider range of weapons and communications and sensors.

    I think a good option might be to go with the first option but add some UAVs for early detection of pirate vessels.

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    Russia set to use naval pilot training facilities in Ukraine

    Post  Russian Patriot on Sat Jun 26, 2010 12:33 am

    Russia set to use naval pilot training facilities in Ukraine

    RIA Novosti

    11:05 25/06/2010 MOSCOW, June 25 (RIA Novosti) - Russia will use facilities on Ukraine's Crimean Peninsula for naval pilot training in the next few years, the Russian defense minister said on Friday.

    In line with a 1997 bilateral agreement, Russia used the Nitka Naval Pilot Training Center in Ukraine as the only training facility for its naval pilots, but Kiev has been less willing to allow Russian pilots to train at the facility in the past few years and, according to some sources, was even planning to rent it to China.

    "Russia is interested in the continuation of its naval pilot training at this [the Nitka] facility," Anatoly Serdyukov said after a session of a Russian-Ukrainian sub-committee on security.

    The Russian minister said Moscow and Kiev were preparing an agreement on the conditions of a new rental deal.

    The Nitka Center was built in the Soviet era for pilots to practice their skills in taking off from and landing on an aircraft carrier's deck.

    After the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, the facility remained under Ukrainian jurisdiction. The Ukrainian Navy does not have an aircraft carrier.

    The center provides naval aviation training facilities such as a launch pad, an aerofinisher, a trampoline, a catapult launching device, a glide-path localizer, a marker beacon, and an optical landing system.

    Meanwhile, Moscow has announced plans to start construction of a naval pilot training facility on the Sea of Azov in southern Russia in 2010.

    The new center will be built at an old airfield near the town of Eisk on the Sea of Azov, which is separated from the Black Sea by the Kerch Strait between the Crimean and Taman peninsulas.

    According to the head of Russia's naval pilot training, Col. Alexander Mudrenov, the new center will cost some 24 billion rubles ($730 million) and will take two years to complete.

    Russia, which has only one aircraft carrier - the Admiral Kuznetsov - is aiming to finish drafting plans for a new nuclear-powered aircraft carrier for its Navy by 2012 and build at least three of the ships for its Northern and Pacific fleets.

    http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/news/2010/06/mil-100625-rianovosti07.htm

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    Caspian Flotilla to retain independent status - Russian Navy

    Post  Russian Patriot on Sat Jul 24, 2010 1:35 am


    Caspian Flotilla to retain independent status - Russian Navy

    RIA Novosti

    16:34 23/07/2010

    MOSCOW, July 23 (RIA Novosti) - The Caspian Flotilla will retain its independent status in the process of Russian military reform, a high-ranking Navy official said on Friday.

    Earlier Russian media that the Caspian Flotilla could lose its independent status and would be placed under the operational command of the Russian Black Fleet.

    "There will not be any structural changes," the official said.

    On July 14, President Dmitry Medvedev issued a decree establishing four strategic commands in the Armed Forces and an integrated logistic support system.

    Russia's six military districts will be reorganized into four with four respective strategic commands.

    The Moscow and Leningrad military districts will be merged into the Western Military District (West Strategic Command) and will also include the Northern and Baltic Fleets.

    The North Caucasus Military District will be changed to the South Military District (South Strategic Command) and will include the Black Sea Fleet.

    The Volga-Urals Military District and the western part of the Siberian Military District will be merged to form the Central Military District (Center Strategic Command).

    The remaining part of the Siberian Military District will be merged with the Far East Military District into the East Military District (East Strategic Command) and will include the Pacific Fleet.

    http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/library/news/russia/2010/russia-100723-rianovosti02.htm

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    The French saved the Russian officer

    Post  Vladimir79 on Fri Oct 22, 2010 8:45 am

    The French saved the Russian officer

    Russian Foreign Ministry expressed its gratitude to the Government of France, the French military and civilian organizations for helping officer
    2010-10-15 / Viktor Litovkin

    Russian Foreign Ministry expressed its gratitude to the Government of France, the French military and civilian organizations for helping an officer of a large anti-submarine ship Admiral Levchenko, who needed urgent surgery. Reported by the website of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

    "September 20 - it said - it was reported that one of the officers of a large anti-submarine ship Admiral Levchenko Northern Fleet of Russia, conducting patrols in the Gulf of Aden, a senior lieutenant Radhika Buharmetovu for health needs emergency hospitalization. The patient's condition was extremely grave. " (According to our records, he had an acute inflammation of the pancreas. - VL) At the request of commanders of the Navy Russian Foreign Ministry immediately requested the assistance of French authorities, who immediately gave the necessary orders to its military and diplomatic representatives in Djibouti - the nearest point to the location of our battleships.

    In close coordination with the Russian Embassy in Djibouti was organized by the delivery of patient French Air Force helicopter to the hospital the French armed forces on the basis of the French Navy in Djibouti, where he was made a few steps. When there was a shortage of blood of rare groups, one member of the hospital staff invited the donor. "Willingness to become donors expressed working in Djibouti Russian citizens, as well as the crew of a hospital ship" Rainbow World "Chinese Navy, who was at that time in the waters of Djibouti", - said in a statement the Foreign Ministry. After providing necessary medical care has improved the status of lieutenant, allowing Oct. 6 to take him by plane to Moscow, the Russian Air Force and placed in the Main Military Clinical Hospital named after Burdenko for further treatment and rehabilitation of health. And as reported by "IEE" Head of the Burdenko hospital, medical service Colonel Igor Maksimov, and now the patient's condition stabilized, Radik Buharmetov on the mend.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #1

    Post  Austin on Tue Nov 02, 2010 6:30 pm

    Russian Navy to standardize its warships and submarines

    On October 29, 2010 saw the launch of the Admiral Sergei Gorshkov class frigate, the lead ship under the Navy's Project 22350. This is the first Russian capital warship designed and launched after the collapse of the Soviet Union.

    Russia's naval ship-building program is gradually gaining momentum. The keels of numerous warships and submarines have already been laid, and many other ships are in the design phase. Taken together, this gives us a peek into the future of the Russian Navy for the next 10, 15 and even 20 years.

    So, what will it look like?

    Before I get to specific warships and submarines, I should note the current trend of naval development is completely different than the trend 30-35 years ago.

    What we are seeing is maximum standardization in warship and submarine designs. They all begin with a few base platforms, and from there standard equipment is added depending on the function of the warship.

    This same goes for the submarine fleet. The pressure hulls of new strategic ballistic-missile submarines and attack submarines are assembled using standardized sections.

    The submarines have standard propulsion units, as well as similar sonars and radio-electronic equipment. Essentially, they differ only in terms of their main armament.

    Strategic ballistic-missile submarines are equipped with silos which will house RSM-56 SS-NX-32 submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBMs), while attack submarines will feature multi-purpose launchers for various types of cruise missiles.

    The warships currently being developed also use standardized propulsion units, launchers, radio-electronic equipment, etc.

    The Soviet Union had realized the need for standardization by the early 1980s. At the time, its vast navy was a motley assortment of warships and submarines with limited production runs and drastically different armament and equipment.

    This made it extremely difficult to service, repair and resupply warships and submarines and to train their crews. Standardized warships, which began to be developed in the 1980s, were expected to help overhaul the navy by the mid 1990s and early 2000s. However, these plans were not realized for obvious reasons.

    Russia had inherited a scaled-down version of the Soviet navy, which was hard to service and even harder to adapt to meet new challenges. The government worked to upgrade the navy throughout the 2000s.

    The submarine fleet is the backbone of the navy

    Analysts and high-ranking Defense Ministry officials believe that the submarine fleet is still the backbone of the Russian Navy, and that it will continue to play this role in the future.

    Most important are the strategic nuclear forces accounting for 700-750 out of the 1,500 strategic nuclear warheads, which Russia plans to keep until the late 2010s.

    Barring experimental submarines and special-purpose submarines, which are traditionally veiled in secrecy, the Russian Navy will continue to receive two types of nuclear-powered submarines and two types of diesel-electric submarines in the next few years. The latter are more frequently called non-nuclear submarines featuring next-generation propulsion units.

    Eight Project 955 Borei class ballistic-missile submarines will form the foundation of the navy's strategic nuclear forces. The first submarine is currently being tested, three more are under construction, and the keels of four other submarines are to be laid in the next five to six years.

    The success of this project depends on the prompt completion of Bulava missile tests and the missile's subsequent adoption. This is a priority of the government. Hopefully, the various design problems will be solved soon.

    In the next few decades, the navy will operate Project 885 Yasen (Graney class) attack submarines. The lead submarine, the Severodvinsk, was launched in the summer of 2010.

    These heavily armed and extremely costly submarines are expected to replace 15 Project 671 Victor class, Project 945 Sierra I class and Project 949-A Oscar II submarines dating back to the Soviet period in the course of the next 15 years.

    They are to replace the 12 aging Project 971 Akula class submarines after 2025.

    One Project 885 submarine is currently being built. The keels of another six submarines are to be laid in the next six to seven years. In all, 10 to 12 Yasen submarines are to be constructed by 2025.

    The expensive Project 885 submarines are frequently derided as a luxury in the media, and Moscow is encouraged to follow the example of the United States.

    In effect, Washington has scrapped the ambitious SSN-21 Sea Wolf attack submarine program, designed as a response to the Soviet Akula class submarines, because of its prohibitive costs. Instead, the U.S. Navy has started building the much smaller Virginia class submarines.

    Moscow clearly thinks that it would be too risky and expensive to design a new submarine now. Consequently, new Yasen submarines will be built, and operational ones upgraded.

    The Russian Navy had problems developing the new Project 677 Lada diesel-electric submarines, whereas Project 877 Paltus (Kilo class) submarines continued to age rapidly. As a result, the Navy had to order upgraded Project 636-M (Kilo class) submarines once again. In August 2010, the keel of a lead Project 636-M submarine was laid for the Black Sea Fleet.

    Over the next decade, the Navy will replace obsolete Paltus submarines with improved models, while continuing to upgrade the Lada submarine. The Navy is to operate four to five Ladas, as well as 9-12 upgraded and 5-6 obsolete Paltus submarines.

    Renovating the warship fleet

    The Russian Navy is in critical condition. Nowhere is this truer than in its warship fleet.

    The Russian warship fleet has become obsolete and needs to be completely replaced because it did not receive even the meager replacements and allocations given to the submarine fleet in the past 20 years.

    The Defense Ministry has shown a preference for the cautious but probably correct strategy of renovating the warship fleet from the bottom up. This involves the construction of small and relatively cheap warships, which will eventually be followed by larger, more sophisticated and expensive ships.

    A Project 20380 Steregushchy class corvette is the first production warship to enter service with an overhauled Navy. The lead ship has already been commissioned. One more has been launched, and three more are under construction.

    Moreover, construction has begun on ocean-going warships, namely, Project 22350 Admiral Sergei Gorshkov frigates.

    These are the first post-Soviet capital warships. Once this ship-building program got underway, it became obvious that these sophisticated and expensive ships would delay the fleet's renovation.

    Consequently, it was decided to expedite the process and to begin construction on the Project 11356 Talwar class frigates, which are on a par with the new warships. Russia has already built several such ships for the Indian Navy.

    These frigates should have the same interchangeable components - including equipment and main weapons systems - as next-generation warships. Eight next-generation frigates, as well as the same number of Project 11356 warships, are to be commissioned in the next ten years.

    The Russian Navy is to receive 30 frigates and 30 corvettes in the next 20 years.

    Frigates will be followed by even larger warships. It is no secret that Russia has almost finished designing a next-generation destroyer, with a displacement of 10,000 metric tons. The new warship is to be equipped with standard launchers, a standard information-and-control system and other interchangeable equipment.

    Corvettes, frigates and next-generation destroyers will form the backbone of the Navy's warship fleet in the next 20-30 years.

    Without these new ships, it would be pointless to buy French-made Mistral class amphibious assault ships, to build them in Russia, to overhaul and refit the Admiral Kuznetsov aircraft carrier and to build other aircraft carriers.

    The views expressed in this article are the author's and do not necessarily represent those of RIA Novosti.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #1

    Post  Viktor on Tue Nov 02, 2010 10:01 pm

    Any one of us could have wrote such article, nothing new there.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #1

    Post  IronsightSniper on Wed Nov 03, 2010 12:45 am

    Problem is why is Vlad bored enough to do all that?

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #1

    Post  GarryB on Wed Nov 03, 2010 1:27 am

    Actually I appreciated Vlad doing that, it makes things a lot clearer.

    The extra effort of putting in all those drawings is also helpful as I have a few books that describe various potential boats that don't have drawings or much detail.

    It is certainly clear that the Navy needs a lot of work, and I think a smaller, more efficient navy is probably more important to Russia as a global power than all those tanks she has.

    Superpowers in the last century or so get their global reach from their navies. It is not about being a bully, or rattling the sabre... it is about having substance behind the words... Russia found during the Kosovo crisis... as did the US find during the war in Georgia in 2008 that if you can't project power by air or sea or land then you are a spectator.
    Of course in the case of Kosovo land and air routes were clearly blocked by "new europe". A naval presence might have had an effect if there had been something that could be sent to stay for the two months it took.
    For the US, they had the navy, they just didn't have the access.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #1

    Post  Viktor on Wed Nov 03, 2010 7:38 am

    My thoughts was with Ilya Kramnik, the author of article Austin posted.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #1

    Post  GarryB on Wed Nov 03, 2010 8:01 am

    Some times it is useful to spell out all the problems and things needing to be done.

    Dwelling on them too much can be harmful too.

    Overnight solutions are for Hollywood... it is going to take time and money and will.

    Evaluating where they are at is a good way to measure progress or lack of it so attention goes where it is needed most.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #1

    Post  Austin on Wed Nov 03, 2010 8:08 am

    I am really happy they are serial producing the Yasen SSGN in big numbers to replace Victor,Sierra and Oscar 2.

    Yasen is one good submarine which brings technology parity with west and has better fire power , I think serial producing it will reduce the cost as well.

    For the Akula replacement they are building new gen of small submarines 6000 T which are SSN and will replace Akula post 2025 , they are researching on this since early 2000.

    http://paralay.com/advanced.html

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    Two Russian ASW planes interrupt U.S.-Japanese drills

    Post  Russian Patriot on Thu Dec 09, 2010 10:02 pm


    Two Russian ASW planes interrupt U.S.-Japanese drills
    RIA Novosti

    05:36 08/12/2010

    TOKYO, December 8 (RIA Novosti) - A joint U.S.-Japanese military exercise in the Sea of Japan was suspended when two Russian Il-38 May anti-submarine aircraft flew over the area, the NHK channel said on Wednesday citing the Japanese defense ministry.

    The biennial Keen Sword drills were suspended amid fears that the Russian aircraft may obtain top-secret data, the channel reported.

    Around 34,000 Japanese military personnel with 40 warships and 250 aircraft joined more than 10,000 U.S. troops with 20 warships and 150 aircraft in the drills in the Sea of Japan, off the southern island of Okinawa.

    The agenda of the exercises, which will continue until December 10, include integrated air and missile defense, base security, close-air support, live-fire drills, maritime defense and search and rescue missions.

    http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/news/2010/12/mil-101208-rianovosti04.htm

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    Russia's Naval ship-building program:

    Post  GarryB on Fri Feb 04, 2011 3:17 am

    October 29, 2010 saw the launch of the Admiral Sergei Gorshkov class frigate, the lead ship of the Navy's Project 22350 class. This is the first large Russian surface warship designed and launched since the collapse of the Soviet Union.

    Russia's naval ship-building program is gradually gaining momentum. The keels of numerous warships and submarines have already been laid, and many other ships are in the design phase. Taken together, this gives us a peek into the future of the Russian Navy for the next 10, 15 and even 20 years.

    So, what will it look like?

    Before I get to specific warships and submarines, I should note the current trend of naval development is completely different than the trend 30-35 years ago.

    What we are seeing is maximum standardization in warship and submarine designs. They all begin with a few base platforms, and from there standard equipment is added depending on the function of the warship.

    This same goes for the submarine fleet. The pressure hulls of new strategic ballistic-missile submarines and attack submarines are assembled using standardized sections.

    The submarines have standard propulsion units, as well as similar sonars and radio-electronic equipment. Essentially, they differ only in terms of their main armament.

    Strategic ballistic-missile submarines are equipped with silos which will house RSM-56 SS-NX-32 submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBMs), while attack submarines will feature multi-purpose launchers for various types of cruise missiles.

    The warships currently being developed also use standardized propulsion units, launchers, radio-electronic equipment, etc.

    The Soviet Union had realized the need for standardization by the early 1980s. At the time, its vast navy was a motley assortment of warships and submarines with limited production runs and drastically different armament and equipment.

    This made it extremely difficult to service, repair and resupply warships and submarines and to train their crews. Standardized warships, which began to be developed in the 1980s, were expected to help overhaul the navy by the mid 1990s and early 2000s. However, these plans were not realized for obvious reasons.

    Russia had inherited a scaled-down version of the Soviet navy, which was hard to service and even harder to adapt to meet new challenges. The government worked to upgrade the navy throughout the 2000s.

    The submarine fleet is the backbone of the navy

    Analysts and high-ranking Defense Ministry officials believe that the submarine fleet is still the backbone of the Russian Navy, and that it will continue to play this role in the future.

    Most important are the strategic nuclear forces accounting for 700-750 out of the 1,500 strategic nuclear warheads, which Russia plans to keep until the late 2010s.

    Barring experimental submarines and special-purpose submarines, which are traditionally veiled in secrecy, the Russian Navy will continue to receive two types of nuclear-powered submarines and two types of diesel-electric submarines in the next few years. The latter are more frequently called non-nuclear submarines featuring next-generation propulsion units.

    Eight Project 955 Borei class ballistic-missile submarines will form the foundation of the navy's strategic nuclear forces. The first submarine is currently being tested, three more are under construction, and the keels of four other submarines are to be laid in the next five to six years.

    The success of this project depends on the prompt completion of Bulava missile tests and the missile's subsequent adoption. This is a priority of the government. Hopefully, the various design problems will be solved soon.

    In the next few decades, the navy will operate Project 885 Yasen (Graney class) attack submarines. The lead submarine, the Severodvinsk, was launched in the summer of 2010.

    These heavily armed and extremely costly submarines are expected to replace 15 Project 671 Victor class, Project 945 Sierra I class and Project 949-A Oscar II submarines dating back to the Soviet period in the course of the next 15 years.

    They are to replace the 12 aging Project 971 Akula class submarines after 2025.

    One Project 885 submarine is currently being built. The keels of another six submarines are to be laid in the next six to seven years. In all, 10 to 12 Yasen submarines are to be constructed by 2025.

    The expensive Project 885 submarines are frequently derided as a luxury in the media, and Moscow is encouraged to follow the example of the United States.

    In effect, Washington has scrapped the ambitious SSN-21 Sea Wolf attack submarine program, designed as a response to the Soviet Akula class submarines, because of its prohibitive costs. Instead, the U.S. Navy has started building the much smaller Virginia class submarines.

    Moscow clearly thinks that it would be too risky and expensive to design a new submarine now. Consequently, new Yasen submarines will be built, and operational ones upgraded.

    The Russian Navy had problems developing the new Project 677 Lada diesel-electric submarines, whereas Project 877 Paltus (Kilo class) submarines continued to age rapidly. As a result, the Navy had to order upgraded Project 636-M (Kilo class) submarines once again. In August 2010, the keel of a lead Project 636-M submarine was laid for the Black Sea Fleet.

    Over the next decade, the Navy will replace obsolete Paltus submarines with improved models, while continuing to upgrade the Lada submarine. The Navy is to operate four to five Ladas, as well as 9-12 upgraded and 5-6 obsolete Paltus submarines.

    Renovating the warship fleet

    The Russian Navy is in critical condition. Nowhere is this truer than in its warship fleet.

    The Russian warship fleet has become obsolete and needs to be completely replaced because it did not receive even the meager replacements and allocations given to the submarine fleet in the past 20 years.

    The Defense Ministry has shown a preference for the cautious but probably correct strategy of renovating the warship fleet from the bottom up. This involves the construction of small and relatively cheap warships, which will eventually be followed by larger, more sophisticated and expensive ships.

    A Project 20380 Steregushchy class corvette is the first production warship to enter service with an overhauled Navy. The lead ship has already been commissioned. One more has been launched, and three more are under construction.

    Moreover, construction has begun on ocean-going warships, namely, Project 22350 Admiral Sergei Gorshkov frigates.

    These are the first post-Soviet capital warships. Once this ship-building program got underway, it became obvious that these sophisticated and expensive ships would delay the fleet's renovation.

    Consequently, it was decided to expedite the process and to begin construction on the Project 11356 Talwar class frigates, which are on a par with the new warships. Russia has already built several such ships for the Indian Navy.

    These frigates should have the same interchangeable components - including equipment and main weapons systems - as next-generation warships. Eight next-generation frigates, as well as the same number of Project 11356 warships, are to be commissioned in the next ten years.

    The Russian Navy is to receive 30 frigates and 30 corvettes in the next 20 years.

    Frigates will be followed by even larger warships. It is no secret that Russia has almost finished designing a next-generation destroyer, with a displacement of 10,000 metric tons. The new warship is to be equipped with standard launchers, a standard information-and-control system and other interchangeable equipment.

    Corvettes, frigates and next-generation destroyers will form the backbone of the Navy's warship fleet in the next 20-30 years.

    Without these new ships, it would be pointless to buy French-made Mistral class amphibious assault ships, to build them in Russia, to overhaul and refit the Admiral Kuznetsov aircraft carrier and to build other aircraft carriers.

    The views expressed in this article are the author's and do not necessarily represent those of RIA Novosti.

    17:23 02/11/2010
    RIA Novosti military commentator Ilya Kramnik

    http://en.rian.ru/analysis/20101102/161183586.html

    So they are standardising hulls, propulsion, weapons, sensors, etc etc. That should be a huge improvement...

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #1

    Post  Viktor on Fri Feb 04, 2011 3:59 pm

    I have a feeling to slow is this progress in comparison with wishes.

    To few new keels for new ships and subs is being laid on to match construction schedule by 2020.


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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #1

    Post  GarryB on Sat Feb 05, 2011 3:31 am

    That is only to be expected isn't it?

    Once they start, especially with their focus on everything all brand new and up to date, I really don't think they had an idea of how expensive it would all turn out to be.

    They are used to cheap knock down prices for military stuff and you can do that if you neglect the factories and most stuff is hand made, but factory robots are not cheap, and new high tech stuff is not cheap either... especially when you are buying licences to produce as well.

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