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    Μilitary Questions & Answers

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    nightcrawler

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    Μilitary Questions & Answers

    Post  nightcrawler on Sun Aug 22, 2010 4:32 pm

    @GarryB
    Thnx.
    The inclusion of ADVANCED MEDIUM-RANGE AIR-TO-AIR MISSILE along with Helmet Mounted Cueing systems & AIRBORNE WARNING AND CONTROL SYSTEM; West is of the view that dogfights will be nonexistent in the coming future so the agility much proclaimed by Sukhois will be of no use!!

    What your point of view is!!
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    Viktor

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    Re: Μilitary Questions & Answers

    Post  Viktor on Sun Aug 22, 2010 6:10 pm

    Of course it will matter. US overcalculated itself with F-22 price and now when is stuck with F-35 is saying sensors matters and thats it.

    Well I thing in such technology war everything matters and slightest thing you can exploit in your advantage can easily change the outcome.

    In 90ies MIG-29 proved to be outstanding in comparison with US fighters because of HMS/R-73 combo. Now its race on multiple fiels.

    Radar range and capability and sensors in general, speed, maneuverability, missiles, stealth etc etc ....
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    GarryB

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    The inclusion of ADVANCED MEDIUM-RANGE AIR-TO-AIR MISSILE

    Post  GarryB on Mon Aug 23, 2010 3:09 am

    My opinion is that before it was known about Soviet helmet mounted sights and the R-73 I think the west had little faith in the BVR missile and wanted close in knife fights because of their belief in better training and higher pilot skill leading to an advantage in close in fights that would give them a victory in the air.
    Testing Mig-29s with R-73s was a real kick in the balls for them, though they would never admit that in combat even with a lower standard of training eastern AF pilots would have been able to do to NATO pilots what British Harrier pilots did to the Argentine pilots in the Falklands war. Basically shoot first and kill first before the other guy could line you up for a shot that had a chance to kill you.

    Now that the west has weapons comparable to the R-73 they realise that WVR combat comes down to having to kill the other guy before he even sees you. The thing is that if you see the other guy and fire a missile he can still kill you as long as he sees you and fires before your missile hits him... WVR has become too dangerous in big expensive western fighters.

    Now the focus is long range missiles, but while previously the problem has been reliability, it is currently more a case of kill zones and correctly identifying the target. There is an enormous amount of incoming and outgoing traffic in a war zone and things like cruise missiles and helos and all sorts of military aircraft flying around mistakes can be made... BVR air combat makes that even more likely.
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    nightcrawler

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    Μilitary Questions & Answers

    Post  nightcrawler on Sat Oct 23, 2010 3:39 pm

    First entry...
    Why the conventional flat bullets are succeeded by Rebated Boattail Base??
    Doesnt in the former case a uniform pressure be exerted across a flat base to effectively push the bullet out of muzzle with precise orientation??
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    GarryB

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    Re: Μilitary Questions & Answers

    Post  GarryB on Sun Oct 24, 2010 5:48 am

    At the start of last century most rifle bullets had flat bases.
    Bullets often also had rounded tips too.

    As we learned more about aerodynamics however it was realised that a pointed tip bullet would reduce drag and improve flight range for supersonic bullets.
    For low velocity bullets like the 9mm a pointed nose was of no use because the bullets only spent very short periods at supersonic speeds and at subsonic speeds it didn't effect drag at all.

    During testing it was found that even a high velocity rifle bullet does not retain supersonic flight speed for all of its flight and for most calibres they are subsonic before they get to 800m.
    Once they transition from supersonic to subsonic the tip of the projectile is no longer the main source of drag... the tail end is.

    With a flat tailed bullet the entire width of the projectile is generating drag.
    With what is called a boat tail or narrowed rear the airflow narrows behind the bullet and reduces the drag area and therefore extends range during the subsonic flight portion of the bullet.

    This has nothing to do with accuracy, and everything to do with bullet drop and bullet velocity.
    All bullets drop at the same rate due to gravity. A bullet that retains velocity will cover more ground as it drops than a high drag bullet.
    Comparing a pointed boat tailed projectile with a lead ball of the same weight fired from a gun at the same velocity at the same (ideal for max range) trajectory angle the ball will hit the ground potentially thousands of metres short of the modern bullet.
    A boat tail bullet in a 303 might travel 5km, whereas a flat based bullet in a 303 will travel half that distance.

    The minne (spelling?) bullet was an elongated ball with a hollow base that was designed so that the gas pressure would spread the hollow base outward to better engage the rifling and improve accuracy. The better aerodynamic shape of the projectile over the standard round ball (that was easier to muzzle load) probably had more to do with its improved performance.
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    nightcrawler

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    Re: Μilitary Questions & Answers

    Post  nightcrawler on Thu Nov 11, 2010 3:09 pm

    J-10 has been deployed in Xizang (Tibet)

    The cover, according to Chinese BBS, was supposed to protect the planes from high levels of ultraviolet rays in Tibet. Excessive radiation could weaken the titanium and cause the rubber wheels to weaken.
    Why dont they just build hangers??
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    nightcrawler

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    Re: Μilitary Questions & Answers

    Post  nightcrawler on Sat Nov 13, 2010 4:47 pm

    [QUOTE=sorter;2982084]

    Notice the folding rear fins and fact that they are at 45 degrees X relative to the intake.


    But clearly the rear fins r "+"

    Now provided that former missile is oldy with respect to the latter one; I am confused at this
    A design progression where the "x" fins didn't work out so they changed to non-folding "+" fins which probably give more range (less drag?, less weight?) but take up more space?[/QUOTE]

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    GarryB

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    J-10 has been deployed in Xizang (Tibet)

    Post  GarryB on Mon Nov 15, 2010 1:26 am

    They might simply have made the change to simplify manouvering with horizontal and vertical control surfaces climb an dive controls can be applied with just moving two surfaces instead of all four, while turning in the horizontal plane will likely require the two vertical surfaces plus a little bit adjustment as a horizontal turn often leads to the outer wing surface moving faster than the inner wing surface which causes some roll, but that can easily be corrected.

    In very long range flights I would think that horizontal control surfaces would make trimming the tail slightly down much easier and simpler. The other alternative would be nose mounted canards lifting the nose so the main wings can generate lift and keep the missile airborne.
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    IronsightSniper

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    Re: Μilitary Questions & Answers

    Post  IronsightSniper on Thu Dec 30, 2010 2:00 am

    Here's a question, what's the difference between a semi-rigid gun and a swiveling one?
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    GarryB

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    Here's a question, what's the difference between a semi-rigid gun and a swiveling one?

    Post  GarryB on Fri Dec 31, 2010 5:27 am

    The Ka-50/52 have a semi rigid mounted 30mm cannon. So does the Ka-29 model fitted with a 30mm cannon too.
    The Mi-28 and the last model Mi-24 have chin turret mounted cannon.
    The model of Hind with a twin barrel 30mm GSh-30 as fitted to the Su-25 but with longer barrels is a case of a rigid mounted fixed gun.

    Let me start by saying the 30mm cannon that is standard in use in the Russian Army, Navy, and Air Force is a very powerful round and it has rather significant recoil effect on the platform firing it.

    The very first Hind had a manual 12.7 x 108mm calibre HMG that had a dedicated gunner to operate it.
    This was rapidly replaced with a chin mounted 4 barrel gatling 12.7mm HMG with a rate of fire of about 4,500rpm. This new gun put a lot more rounds on target and was more accurate and effective and had an excellent field of fire. It was operated by the gunner/weapons operator. Its main problem was that the targets often were firing back with 50 cal weapons over which it had little or no range advantage over.
    The next step was an attempt to fit a twin barrel 23mm cannon in a chin turret but that failed so they resorted to the twin barrel 30mm GSh-30 fixed to the side of the aircraft.
    This solved the range issue and was accurate to 2km or more and was very powerful but because it was fixed it was aimed and fired by the pilot so the weapons officer only had ATGMs to operate in combat as the unguided rocket pods were aimed by the pilot too.

    Finally in the last model Hind they managed to solve the problems with the twin 23mm gun mount in a chin turret and control of the guns was returned to the weapons officer.

    In the Mi-28 they wanted more power than the twin 23mm gun offered and so they adopted the successful and reliable 2A42 cannon used on the Armys BMP-2. This is mounted in a chin turret that allows wide angles of fire, though firing sideways will effect the pilots control of the aircraft more than firing ahead.

    With the Kamov Ka-50 and later Ka-52 one of the advantages of the coaxial rotor design is that the pedals to turn the nose of the aircraft are effective and fairly high speed. This is because the mass of the main rotors is rather high and the torque generated by differential power settings on the main rotors exerts much more force on the airframe than the tiny tail rotor of a conventional helo.
    The end effect is that the Kamovs can all point their noses directly at targets while flying in all sorts of different directions so a chin mounted turret is not needed.
    This means the gun can be mounted on a limited elevation mount near the centre of gravity which means the aircraft is rather less effected by the recoil of the weapon and is rather more accurate than most other helo mounted cannon while still being one of the most powerful helo mounted cannon in service.

    The gun is able to elevate through about 90 degrees or something and can move sideways about 15 degrees or so to allow the gun to remain on target despite minor manouvers by the pilot during firing.

    It should be noted that the Soviets and now Russians have a wide range of guns in gunpods that have limited mobility and can be fitted firing forward or backwards.
    The Su-17 for example could carry pods carrying 23mm cannon that can depress down about 30 degrees so that the aircraft can start in a shallow dive towards the target and open fire and then pull up 20 degrees or so while still firing at the target... the guns depressed by computer to keep them aimed at the same angle as when firing began.
    There are several other pods including one with a 6 barrel 30mm cannon that can be depressed 30 degrees and can be aimed 90 degrees, 45 degrees either side of straight ahead.
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    ahmedfire

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    Can Russian aircraft carry US/Western guided bombs and missiles?

    Post  ahmedfire on Thu Jan 06, 2011 6:56 pm

    some sources said syria would get some iranian qassed bomb(copy from american GBU-15),,syria has russian aircrafts (mig 29 and su 24,,mig 21 ,,etc)

    qassed is alaser guided bomb..
    can syria use them on their russian aircrafts ?!!

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    GarryB

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    Re: Μilitary Questions & Answers

    Post  GarryB on Thu Jan 06, 2011 11:16 pm

    I don't see why not.

    The Indians use French and Russian LGBs on their French and Russian aircraft as far as I know. (perhaps check with Austin on that...)

    I would think it would make more sense to buy Russian LGBs however as that weapon looks rather large.
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    Hoof

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    Re: Μilitary Questions & Answers

    Post  Hoof on Fri Jan 07, 2011 12:30 am

    Looks a bit on the old side... they could have probably used different type stabilizers on it...

    but I think Russian planes can use it... as long as mounting system on a hardpoint is compatible... but then equipment on board of aircraft also has to be compatible with guidance system on a bomb itself...
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    ahmedfire

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    can Russian aircraft use GBU bomb??

    Post  ahmedfire on Fri Jan 07, 2011 11:55 am

    Hoof wrote:Looks a bit on the old side... they could have probably used different type stabilizers on it...

    but I think Russian planes can use it... as long as mounting system on a hardpoint is compatible... but then equipment on board of aircraft also has to be compatible with guidance system on a bomb itself...
    you mean software ??
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    nightcrawler

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    Re: Μilitary Questions & Answers

    Post  nightcrawler on Fri Feb 11, 2011 10:26 pm

    Which launching method you relatively prefer either Hot launch or a cold launch??Mine understanding is it is cold launch systems that are heavier, and in the case of mobile launching, more cumbersome. They have a gas-generator at the bottom of the pit, which is usually a solid rocket motor on its own, whose exhaust pops the missile out of the canister. The only advantage they have is shorter reload time since the same canister can be reused without having to be repaired. Western systems have classically preferred hot launches, changing the whole cell is easier if more expensive.Also which system is relatively preferable in naval versions; though many western missile pics suggest a major use of hot launch even onboard ships









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    GarryB

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    Re: Μilitary Questions & Answers

    Post  GarryB on Fri Feb 11, 2011 11:09 pm

    Which launching method you relatively prefer either Hot launch or a cold
    launch??Mine understanding is it is cold launch systems that are
    heavier, and in the case of mobile launching, more cumbersome.

    A cold launch system adds weight and cost to a system... but it also means the missile starts its motor well clear of the launch vehicle which means potential damage is minimised and with an added feature that the missile can use nose mounted rockets to point it in the direction of the target so time is not wasted turning an arm launcher in the direction of the target before launch.

    Many Russian SAMs currently use vertical launch and those that do use vertical launch use cold launch systems to protect the launcher and sensors from rocket blast damage.

    I would suggest those that do not do that simply haven't bothered to develop the technology to do so.

    The Soviets/Russians have developed effective reliable catapult systems for missiles so a cold launch for them makes a lot of sense as reloading is simpler and cheaper without the blast damage.

    Some of their larger older missiles still used hot launches like Moskit and Vulkan and Granit, but the current missiles like Brahmos/Oniks and Club seem to be cold launched too... and of course cold launch is a standard practise with SLBMs.

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    Where can i find the music of this anthem

    Post  Austin on Tue Nov 13, 2012 5:36 am

    Hello , I found this anthem "Anita Tsoy - Anthem of Russia (2000) .mp3"

    http://beemp3.com/download.php?file=251938&song=Anthem+of+Russia+%282000%29

    I liked it a lot , I want to know where can i just download the music minus the lyrics in mp3 format , my search gives me full song but i am more keen on the music part.

    Thanks
    Austin


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    TR1

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    Re: Μilitary Questions & Answers

    Post  TR1 on Tue Nov 13, 2012 6:16 am

    Do you mean the instrumental only version of this pop-cover, or an instrumental of the anthem itself?

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    Re: Μilitary Questions & Answers

    Post  Austin on Tue Nov 13, 2012 7:19 am

    TR1 wrote:Do you mean the instrumental only version of this pop-cover, or an instrumental of the anthem itself?

    Instrumental of this pop-cover

    BTRfan

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    BRDM-2 Questions

    Post  BTRfan on Mon Apr 22, 2013 10:36 am

    Well I have not yet come up with the funds for a BTR series vehicle or a Kamaz but I have found two BRDM-2 armored recon vehicles for sale... One is about $12,500 dollars and is stated to be in excellent condition, fine working order, fully functional, stored indoors, with low mileage.

    The next is about $6,500 dollars and it is stated as "needs a lot of love, much work to be done to get it up and running decently, stored outside, also needs a new paint job."


    I wonder, knowing nothing about the maintenance/repair of vehicles, especially Soviet armored vehicles, how much time and money/parts could it wind up costing to get a BRDM-2 up and running?

    I consider myself a fairly intelligent individual, I am almost finished with my degree in electronic engineering technology [and I have another degree in addition to that, which I earned a while ago], and my father is an electrical engineer who can pretty much fix anything ever made if it is electrical, electronic, especially if is radio/communication equipment related. But electronics is not the same as mechanics.


    Also, about the capabilities of the BRDM, I understand it will not withstand .50 BMG fire, but how will it stand against 7.62mm NATO or 30'06 [or .30 caliber rifle/machine gun fire in general?] Also how well does it withstand molotov cocktails?
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    GarryB

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    Re: Μilitary Questions & Answers

    Post  GarryB on Mon Apr 22, 2013 11:41 am

    The BRDM-2 was a popular vehicle... its armour wasn't amazing, but it was full amphibious and seemed to have pretty good mobility.

    I do remember reading that the extra wheels under the belly that were chain driven were not often used, as a post apocalyptic vehicle it would be a reasonable basis to start from. Not super roomy inside, but then rather more mechanically simpler than the BTR-60 as it only has the one engine.


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    milky_candy_sugar

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    Caliber dimension differences

    Post  milky_candy_sugar on Sun Sep 29, 2013 9:36 pm

    This question has been bugging me since i started cataloging my ammo collection.

    Why are some calibers who's dimensions are listed in their name, different from their actual dimensions?

    Examples:
    -5.56mm bullets
    Actual Bullet Diameter is 5.7mm
    -anything 7.62mm
    actual diameter measures 7.8-92mm
    -anything 8mm
    diameter measures 8.2-3

    these wouldn't bother me so much, if there werent other calibers that actually listed their dimensions correctly.

    5.7x28mm for example is (5.72x28.8mm) so thats much closer.

    I dont know anything about reloading, so im going to claim ignorance if there is something important that im missing here.

    Also, i'm getting most of this information from Wikipedia and my own physical measurements


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    flamming_python

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    Re: Μilitary Questions & Answers

    Post  flamming_python on Sun Sep 29, 2013 10:27 pm

    milky_candy_sugar wrote:This question has been bugging me since i started cataloging my ammo collection.

    Why are some calibers who's dimensions are listed in their name, different from their actual dimensions?

    Examples:
    -5.56mm bullets
    Actual Bullet Diameter is 5.7mm
    -anything 7.62mm
    actual diameter measures 7.8-92mm
    -anything 8mm
    diameter measures 8.2-3

    these wouldn't bother me so much, if there werent other calibers that actually listed their dimensions correctly.

    5.7x28mm for example is (5.72x28.8mm) so thats much closer.

    I dont know anything about reloading, so im going to claim ignorance if there is something important that im missing here.

    Also, i'm getting most of this information from Wikipedia and my own physical measurements
    As I recall the calibre refers to the diameter between the groves in the rifled barrel; not to the diameter of the bullet. The diameter of the bullet, and the diameter of the barrel will be a bit larger
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    GarryB

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    Re: Μilitary Questions & Answers

    Post  GarryB on Tue Oct 01, 2013 2:39 am

    The other problems include manufacturing and also designation systems.

    For instance some countries measure calibre from the depths of the grooves in the barrel while other countries measure calibre from the tops of the grooves (called the lands).

    Another issue is tradition and habit... the Russian 7.62mm calibres... ie the 7.62 x 54mm, 7.62 x 39mm, and 7.62 x 25mm calibres are all actually .311 calibre... the same as the .303 Twisted Evil 

    This means you can take an old 303 rifle and rechamber it to 7.62 x 54mm, 7.62 x 39mm, or 7.62 x 25mm.

    Here in New Zealand there is still an abundance of old 303 rifles but 303 ammo is getting rather expensive, so a cheap solution is to get them re-barreled in the 7.62 x 39mm calibre of the AK as a short useful hunting round for use against light and medium game like Goats and Pigs.

    The advantage is that with a chamber bore adapter you can fire 7.62 x 25mm rounds without any modification of the original 303 rifling..

    Would be interesting to see how a rifle can handle such a range of projectiles with the Nagant 7.62mm having projectiles in the 150-203 grain range, the AK 7.62 having rounds in the 122-154 grain range and the Tokarev pistol 7.62mm calibre having 90 grain projectiles.

    I imagine a 90 grain projectile in a 7.62 x 54mm case would be a very zippy light recoiling round for use against small goats... would be fun experimenting...

    BTW what sort of variety do you have with your ammo collection?

    I have tried to focus on Soviet and Russian ammo types but I have a few others as well... I am missing the Soviet HMG calibres... ie 12.7 x 108mm and 14.5 x 114mm, but also would be interested in 5.45 x 18mm pistol ammo. I have a Nagant 7.62 revolver round, a 9 x 18mm Makarov, but none of the new suppressed ammo types or exotic rounds.

    I also have a western 105mm howitzer shell and three rounds of 25mm cannon shells with links from a LAV... both from my Nephew... Smile (all fired of course)


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    Deep Throat

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    How does Ramjet, Turbojet and Scramjet differ from one another ?

    Post  Deep Throat on Sun Dec 15, 2013 7:34 am

    Just need to find out how Ramjet, Turbojet and Scramjet are different from one another and what advantages do each of these provide .

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