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    Russian made Scopes and Optics

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    magnumcromagnon

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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  magnumcromagnon on Sun Dec 07, 2014 12:36 am

    Morpheus Eberhardt wrote:
    magnumcromagnon wrote:
    Morpheus Eberhardt wrote:
    magnumcromagnon wrote:
    Asf wrote:
    And here

    Wow, it has a ridiculous amount of capabilities...but unfortunately it'll probably cost at least $10,000 a piece even with the devalued Rouble. However if mass produced then the cost could go down by 2/3rds...but the real question remains, would the Ru ground forces want something like this?

    What does the Rouble rate have to do with its price?

    The cost of labor of manufacturing.

    To what extent the Russian labor rates follow the Rouble rate?

    Usually a highly valued currency makes the cost of paying for a manual laborer a lot more expensive, while a lowered valued currency makes manufacturing significantly cheaper. Hence the reason why Su-27, it's variants and derivatives are highly competitive on the export market. If the Su-35 was built in Europe or America, it would cost well over a $100 million like most overly priced NATO equipment, thankfully it's not. In fact if Russian export fighter jets are so highly competitive that if arms deals weren't so politically motivated, and everything was on a level playing field, the Su-27 variants would beat out any fighter from the West in arms competitions, easily by sheer cost-effectiveness alone.
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    AlfaT8

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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  AlfaT8 on Sun Dec 07, 2014 1:06 am

    magnumcromagnon wrote:
    Usually a highly valued currency makes the cost of paying for a manual laborer a lot more expensive, while a lowered valued currency makes manufacturing significantly cheaper. Hence the reason why Su-27, it's variants and derivatives are highly competitive on the export market. If the Su-35 was built in Europe or America, it would cost well over a $100 million like most overly priced NATO equipment, thankfully it's not. In fact if Russian export fighter jets are so highly competitive that if arms deals weren't so politically motivated, and everything was on a level playing field, the Su-27 variants would beat out any fighter from the West in arms competitions, easily by sheer cost-effectiveness alone.
    Couldn't agree more, in terms of bang for your buck the Ruskies got the West beat hands down, would be a different story if Lockheed had gotten permission to export (downgraded) F-22s, but that didn't happen. Twisted Evil

    On that note, when is the Pak-Fa expected to enter the export market??
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    Zivo

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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  Zivo on Sun Dec 07, 2014 2:11 am

    It's an OP newb attachment.

    They might as well add an air-burst grenade capability and put it the next Call of Duty.
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    sepheronx

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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  sepheronx on Sun Dec 07, 2014 4:21 am

    Good product but would cost a fortune. 1 way they can save money is skip out on the OLED display and go just for basic LCD display. OLED's cost a fortune. OLD is good for the fact they can handle more extreme temperatures, but there are other (much cheaper) methods to do similar for LCD. That will save a lot already.

    The Thermal optic can technically be the same used on the other Russian made Thermal Scopes being developed in Russia. UOMZ is really the only company in Russia who produces them so they can produce them quite cheaply since they will have a massive production already going for thermals. Sensors can be cheap beyond imagine, unless all sensors are made in Russia then prices may be high due to Russia's possible lower production rate. Most sensors used are Chinese these days. So that can be cheap. The rest are nothing special or nothing amazing.

    One method they can make this cheaper is coming with both the sniper variant, spotters variant (So spotter has their own) and units made for leutenants and the like. Get it in the hands of the soldiers en mass through it not only being a scope, but as a tool for various other units.
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    Viktor

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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  Viktor on Sun Dec 07, 2014 11:08 am

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    GarryB

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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  GarryB on Sun Dec 07, 2014 11:08 am

    This would be an excellent piece of kit for scouts and recon units as well as snipers.

    I don't think its cost is really that important... initially it will be for specific users that would benefit from its capabilities the most... scouts, snipers, recon as well as special forces.

    The IFF system alone is awesome, let alone the GPS component that allows information and maps to be sent to other uses. Even recording the shot...

    This technology wont replace sniper training but will certainly make effective shooting easier with an electronic trigger it can be totally automatic.

    I suspect that this sight will likely be incorporated into Ratnik 2.

    Amazing.

    I'll take about 3 for evaluation purposes.

    In terms of civilian use perhaps they could be adapted so that users could carry something like a beacon that will allow a shooter to determine if the target they are aiming at is human or game.

    save a lot of accidents.

    640 x 480 pixels is very high resolution for a thermal sight this sight will have excellent optical performance.



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    AlfaT8

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    Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  AlfaT8 on Sun Dec 07, 2014 2:35 pm

    Asf wrote:

    And here
    Shocked Shocked Shocked
    Avoided the video at first thinking, ooh just another sight, but damn was i wrong.

    Putting IFF in the scopes is a marvelous idea, in page 2 of the Ratnik discussion(http://www.russiadefence.net/t2770p15-ratnik-equipment) an article was posted about how Russia was going to have every soldier have an IFF and of course this IFF was not going to be a stupid blinking low IR light, so i believed it had to be similar to IFF used on aircrafts, and if that was the case how would the soldiers be able to identify whether there target was friendly or not without some sort of HUD/HMD, so a good way to resolve this was by placing IFF in the scopes, this not only resolves the IFF issue, but also gives Russia a good reason the upgrade the scopes of all military branches.

    The only thing that still worries me is how Russia intends to prevent the personnel IFF from being compromised??

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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  par far on Sun Dec 07, 2014 4:11 pm




    That is amazing, we can test it out against isis terrorists in Syria.

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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  par far on Sun Dec 07, 2014 8:59 pm



    What does it mean at 3:00, will it pull the trigger by itself?

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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  acatomic on Sun Dec 07, 2014 11:15 pm

    Nice.

    I wish they made a video using real-world footage instead of just going with full CGI.
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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  flamming_python on Sun Dec 07, 2014 11:36 pm

    Asf wrote:

    And here

    Hot damn.
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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  flamming_python on Mon Dec 08, 2014 12:21 am

    AlfaT8 wrote:The only thing that still worries me is how Russia intends to prevent the personnel IFF from being compromised??

    If someone captures and studies this sight system - then they would know how to decrypt Russian IFF signals - but they wouldn't know how to encrypt/create them.

    This is called asymmetric cryptography.
    In such a system; one key is kept private, while the other is public.

    Now imagine - that you have a block of data - say 10 megabytes big. Both parties (that's to say both the weapon sight, and whatever device emits the friendly IFF signal) have this same identical block of data in their respective storage space.

    The friendly IFF device creates a digital signature on the basis of that block of data, using the private key - and then transmits that signature..

    ..which the sight promptly picks up, and then uses its public key to process that signature and compare the result with the copy of that block of data it has. If the result is as expected - then the system knows that's its a friendly that the signal came from.

    Now.. let's say that the enemy kills a soldier and captures his gun & sight, sending it to their research labs. What will the enemy have now? They will have the public key - and they will have that 10Mb block of data.
    Which means that they will be able to interpret Russian IFF signals; so that 'friendly' Russians will show up as blue to them instead of red.
    But what good will that do them? They already know who the enemy is and how he looks like - and if they bothered researching the Russian IFF receivers/sights then they probably have an IFF system of their own that would already perform the function of telling them who the bad guys are; so Russian IFF receivers would be useless for them.

    Now, I say this - but there is a flaw to this system. Which is of course - that in the same way as you have IFF receivers such as those sights; you must also have IFF transmitters that would be able to broadcast whether the soldier/vehicle in question is a friendly or not in the first place.
    And if the enemy captures THAT, then the system will be compromised altogether.

    Which is why I suspect that in practice, if they do use assymetric cryptography - they would change either the keys in both the receivers & transmitters, or the common block of data stored in both on them - on a fairly regular basis. All it would take is a quick firmware update of both sets of devices, after verification with some command vehicles, officers or what not. Perhaps they might be issued keys for manual input, or physically via memory cards; as having this stuff update automatically would mean that any gear the enemy captured will update automatically too.
    But of course there could be problems associated with this - what if some soldiers are stranded, surrounded, their satellite uplinks or comms are destroyed, etc...?

    There could also be measures taken to protect the transmitters of IFF signals; so instead of every soldier having a transmitter lets say - they might have a relay device, that reroutes/retransmits an IFF signal coming from some command vehicle in such a way so that it appears that the signal is coming from them - and such a device would only function at all within a certain radius of the command vehicle.
    But there are problems with this approach too, as you might imagine.

    I haven't had much time to think about this - but it's an exciting topic you must agree. There are many possibilities and it'd be interesting to see what the Russian military might go for - if they decide to go for an IFF system at all (IMO, it might just be more trouble than it's worth).
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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  flamming_python on Mon Dec 08, 2014 12:33 am

    par far wrote:


    What does it mean at 3:00, will it pull the trigger by itself?

    Yes. You just have to line it up and it will decide for itself when to take the shot.

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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  par far on Mon Dec 08, 2014 2:37 am

    Quick question Viktor, do you know if this scope is ready for use or this still in development stages?
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    AlfaT8

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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  AlfaT8 on Mon Dec 08, 2014 5:04 am

    flamming_python wrote:
    AlfaT8 wrote:The only thing that still worries me is how Russia intends to prevent the personnel IFF from being compromised??

    If someone captures and studies this sight system - then they would know how to decrypt Russian IFF signals - but they wouldn't know how to encrypt/create them.

    This is called asymmetric cryptography.
    In such a system; one key is kept private, while the other is public.

    Now imagine - that you have a block of data - say 10 megabytes big. Both parties (that's to say both the weapon sight, and whatever device emits the friendly IFF signal) have this same identical block of data in their respective storage space.

    The friendly IFF device creates a digital signature on the basis of that block of data, using the private key - and then transmits that signature..

    ..which the sight promptly picks up, and then uses its public key to process that signature and compare the result with the copy of that block of data it has. If the result is as expected - then the system knows that's its a friendly that the signal came from.

    Now.. let's say that the enemy kills a soldier and captures his gun & sight, sending it to their research labs. What will the enemy have now? They will have the public key - and they will have that 10Mb block of data.
    Which means that they will be able to interpret Russian IFF signals; so that 'friendly' Russians will show up as blue to them instead of red.
    But what good will that do them? They already know who the enemy is and how he looks like - and if they bothered researching the Russian IFF receivers/sights then they probably have an IFF system of their own that would already perform the function of telling them who the bad guys are; so Russian IFF receivers would be useless for them.

    Now, I say this - but there is a flaw to this system. Which is of course - that in the same way as you have IFF receivers such as those sights; you must also have IFF transmitters that would be able to broadcast whether the soldier/vehicle in question is a friendly or not in the first place.
    And if the enemy captures THAT, then the system will be compromised altogether.

    Which is why I suspect that in practice, if they do use assymetric cryptography - they would change either the keys in both the receivers & transmitters, or the common block of data stored in both on them - on a fairly regular basis. All it would take is a quick firmware update of both sets of devices, after verification with some command vehicles, officers or what not. Perhaps they might be issued keys for manual input, or physically via memory cards; as having this stuff update automatically would mean that any gear the enemy captured will update automatically too.
    But of course there could be problems associated with this - what if some soldiers are stranded, surrounded, their satellite uplinks or comms are destroyed, etc...?

    There could also be measures taken to protect the transmitters of IFF signals; so instead of every soldier having a transmitter lets say - they might have a relay device, that reroutes/retransmits an IFF signal coming from some command vehicle in such a way so that it appears that the signal is coming from them - and such a device would only function at all within a certain radius of the command vehicle.
    But there are problems with this approach too, as you might imagine.

    I haven't had much time to think about this - but it's an exciting topic you must agree. There are many possibilities and it'd be interesting to see what the Russian military might go for - if they decide to go for an IFF system at all (IMO, it might just be more trouble than it's worth).
    Interesting post FP, the method to protect the receivers in the scope seems possible, but my main worry isn't the receiver, but the transmission module.
    How is Russia going to prevent this from being compromised, i don't believe using them as relays is gonna work, because i don't believe Russia is just intending to make this IFF solely for the men on the ground, but also for the aircrafts in the air and Tanks and armored vehicles in the area (BMP/Ds - BTRs - T-xx and/or Armata-Kurganets-Boomerang) and even satellites (if relayed from there command vehicles/comms officer to satellite).

    If Russia is going for sought a grand scale IFF then the relay option is out of the question, unless there was one soldier carrying transmitter with him and the others are relays, but then we'll end up right back where we started.

    IMHO, the IFF being part of The Ratnik package will most likely be hard wired to number of sensors monitoring the soldier health, so if the soldier get killed it'll automatically Self-destruct the same thing will happen if the soldier(traitor) himself were to try tamper with it, also if the transmitter itself doesn't receive a certain signal after a certain amount of time, and also a Self-destruct order either from the soldier himself/his nearby officer or even a Self-destruct signal from there local command( the nuclear option),

    Now these are some things that can be done on the battlefield, but what i am worried about is sum bastard sneaking into the facility and straight up stealing one, i guess the timed self destruct would take care of it unless they can replicate the "don't self-destruct" signal, maybe a glonass signal could also be used, lets say the module has left Russia's borders it detonates, it'll also detonate if it doesn't get the Glonass signal/positioning.

    Hmmm.....if Russia really intends to go with such a project it'll require a lot of infrastructure work to say the least, so you're probly right FP this most likely be more trouble then it's worth, but damn would it be awesome if they could pull it off.russia
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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  flamming_python on Mon Dec 08, 2014 5:35 am

    AlfaT8 wrote:
    flamming_python wrote:
    AlfaT8 wrote:The only thing that still worries me is how Russia intends to prevent the personnel IFF from being compromised??

    If someone captures and studies this sight system - then they would know how to decrypt Russian IFF signals - but they wouldn't know how to encrypt/create them.

    This is called asymmetric cryptography.
    In such a system; one key is kept private, while the other is public.

    Now imagine - that you have a block of data - say 10 megabytes big. Both parties (that's to say both the weapon sight, and whatever device emits the friendly IFF signal) have this same identical block of data in their respective storage space.

    The friendly IFF device creates a digital signature on the basis of that block of data, using the private key - and then transmits that signature..

    ..which the sight promptly picks up, and then uses its public key to process that signature and compare the result with the copy of that block of data it has. If the result is as expected - then the system knows that's its a friendly that the signal came from.

    Now.. let's say that the enemy kills a soldier and captures his gun & sight, sending it to their research labs. What will the enemy have now? They will have the public key - and they will have that 10Mb block of data.
    Which means that they will be able to interpret Russian IFF signals; so that 'friendly' Russians will show up as blue to them instead of red.
    But what good will that do them? They already know who the enemy is and how he looks like - and if they bothered researching the Russian IFF receivers/sights then they probably have an IFF system of their own that would already perform the function of telling them who the bad guys are; so Russian IFF receivers would be useless for them.

    Now, I say this - but there is a flaw to this system. Which is of course - that in the same way as you have IFF receivers such as those sights; you must also have IFF transmitters that would be able to broadcast whether the soldier/vehicle in question is a friendly or not in the first place.
    And if the enemy captures THAT, then the system will be compromised altogether.

    Which is why I suspect that in practice, if they do use assymetric cryptography - they would change either the keys in both the receivers & transmitters, or the common block of data stored in both on them - on a fairly regular basis. All it would take is a quick firmware update of both sets of devices, after verification with some command vehicles, officers or what not. Perhaps they might be issued keys for manual input, or physically via memory cards; as having this stuff update automatically would mean that any gear the enemy captured will update automatically too.
    But of course there could be problems associated with this - what if some soldiers are stranded, surrounded, their satellite uplinks or comms are destroyed, etc...?

    There could also be measures taken to protect the transmitters of IFF signals; so instead of every soldier having a transmitter lets say - they might have a relay device, that reroutes/retransmits an IFF signal coming from some command vehicle in such a way so that it appears that the signal is coming from them - and such a device would only function at all within a certain radius of the command vehicle.
    But there are problems with this approach too, as you might imagine.

    I haven't had much time to think about this - but it's an exciting topic you must agree. There are many possibilities and it'd be interesting to see what the Russian military might go for - if they decide to go for an IFF system at all (IMO, it might just be more trouble than it's worth).
    Interesting post FP, the method to protect the receivers in the scope seems possible, but my main worry isn't the receiver, but the transmission module.
    How is Russia going to prevent this from being compromised, i don't believe using them as relays is gonna work, because i don't believe Russia is just intending to make this IFF solely for the men on the ground, but also for the aircrafts in the air and Tanks and armored vehicles in the area (BMP/Ds - BTRs - T-xx and/or Armata-Kurganets-Boomerang) and even satellites (if relayed from there command vehicles/comms officer to satellite).

    If Russia is going for sought a grand scale IFF then the relay option is out of the question, unless there was one soldier carrying transmitter with him and the others are relays, but then we'll end up right back where we started.

    IMHO, the IFF being part of The Ratnik package will most likely be hard wired to number of sensors monitoring the soldier health, so if the soldier get killed it'll automatically Self-destruct the same thing will happen if the soldier(traitor) himself were to try tamper with it, also if the transmitter itself doesn't receive a certain signal after a certain amount of time, and also a Self-destruct order either from the soldier himself/his nearby officer or even a Self-destruct signal from there local command( the nuclear option),

    Now these are some things that can be done on the battlefield, but what i am worried about is sum bastard sneaking into the facility and straight up stealing one, i guess the timed self destruct would take care of it unless they can replicate the "don't self-destruct" signal, maybe a glonass signal could also be used, lets say the module has left Russia's borders it detonates, it'll also detonate if it doesn't get the Glonass signal/positioning.

    Hmmm.....if Russia really intends to go with such a project it'll require a lot of infrastructure work to say the least, so you're probly right FP this most likely be more trouble then it's worth, but damn would it be awesome if they could pull it off.russia  

    No need for self-destruct or anything so silly.

    Like I said, all that's necessary to remove the risk from a compromised system is to change the codes, or change the data which the codes are being authenticated on. Doing either is a trivial matter with modern technology - you just establish an uplink to whatever satellite/command vehicle or whatever has this week's codes - and update; or alternatively take the memory card, put it into that sights' memory card slot and wait for it to update, then passing it along to the next soldier in your squad until the last man updates - at which point he destroys it.
    Everyone has to do it and at a scheduled time, so the big challenge is organization and also getting that update through to any of your soldiers that have been cut-off.

    Another challenge is to prevent compromised gear being updated as well - as then the enemy would have access to the new codes too. Hence the suggestion of manual updating by memory cards, or only being able to update within the vicinity of a command-vehicle, with the authorization an officer.
    Monitoring soldier vital signs could figure into such a system; in that as soon as a soldier's vitals drop to zero - or the sensors are disabled, taken off or damaged - the gear is automatically locked out of the grid so to speak, and won't auto-update anymore until manually reset at a command vehicle or some such.
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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  Regular on Tue Dec 09, 2014 2:03 am

    I don't think it will be very expensive if it's domestic product.
    It's nothing super futuristic in today's world. But it looks very practical. Hehe, it looks more like DSLR than a scope.
    I can see this sight to be used not only for snipers, but for KORD gunners or even modified one for AGS to get those precise drops on target. IMHO this sight doesn't bring anything new that wasn't done and tested before, but it wraps it one neat package. Leo's would appreciate it too.

    And yeah, shooting is not everything snipers do Very Happy
    Pretty much recon training on steroids.
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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  Regular on Tue Dec 09, 2014 2:08 am

    Well I doubt that this sight will be friendly fire proof. It's to the user to ID the target before engaging. IFF is darn problem in conventional war when enemy can see You too and IR transmitters would help enemy more than You.
    How would I solve IFF problem? For tactical level? I have no idea, and FP posted a good read.
    As a grunt I would use fricking wristbands like today, but I would hope that they are barelly(but still) vissible in thermal Very Happy
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    A new pic of the improved AEK-971:

    Post  GarryB on Tue Dec 09, 2014 2:41 am

    As I mentioned in post 80 above with a weapon with an electronic firing mechanism the scope can fire the weapon.

    Very simply unlike in video games when you are holding a real rifle looking down a scope that might have x12 zoom it is hard to hold still and the fact that you will be breathing and the target will be moving means making sure the trigger is pulled and the round is fired at exactly the right time when the crosshair is covering the target is a real skill.

    With the target being able to be selected and with electronic triggering system the sniper should be able to select a target and then pull the trigger. the bluetooth connection between the scope and the trigger will mean the rifle will not fire until the crosshair is on the selected targets head to assure a kill.

    Boy would I love that scope on a VS-121...

    Of course as cool as it would be you don't really want your enemies to get hold of that sort of thing either...


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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  GarryB on Tue Dec 09, 2014 3:23 am

    The only thing that still worries me is how Russia intends to prevent the personnel IFF from being compromised??

    Part of the system of Ratnik is supposed to monitor the health of the soldier... perhaps when they are killed their IFF system is reset until they can be reinstalled into the system...

    I am sure they will make sure it is difficult to compromise the system...

    I wish they made a video using real-world footage instead of just going with full CGI.

    It is a thermal sight... the cgi used would pretty much be very similar to what the user would see through that scope.

    I haven't had much time to think about this - but it's an exciting topic you must agree. There are many possibilities and it'd be interesting to see what the Russian military might go for - if they decide to go for an IFF system at all (IMO, it might just be more trouble than it's worth).

    I remember reading somewhere that the Israelis developed a system that interrogates the IFF of all aircraft... and tracks the location of the return signal. It didn't crack the code or give any information other than the presence of an enemy target.

    It meant that any enemy flight of planes could be interrogated and located by their reply signals.

    In other words they were using it to track the position of enemy aircraft based on their old model IFF systems.

    Just knowing where the enemy is is valuable...

    I am sure they will have thought of this. I suspect the IFF system does not reply unless it gets a valid signal.

    and also a Self-destruct order either from the soldier himself/his nearby officer or even a Self-destruct signal from there local command( the nuclear option),

    Self destruct sounds a bit harsh... it could just log out and if someone tries to log in without the correct password it could simply delete its files and reset itself.


    Now these are some things that can be done on the battlefield, but what i am worried about is sum bastard sneaking into the facility and straight up stealing one, i guess the timed self destruct would take care of it unless they can replicate the "don't self-destruct" signal, maybe a glonass signal could also be used, lets say the module has left Russia's borders it detonates, it'll also detonate if it doesn't get the Glonass signal/positioning.

    So all the enemy has to do is hack into the system and set all the equipment and vehicles and people for self destruct.... Mad

    Like I said, all that's necessary to remove the risk from a compromised system is to change the codes, or change the data which the codes are being authenticated on. Doing either is a trivial matter with modern technology - you just establish an uplink to whatever satellite/command vehicle or whatever has this week's codes - and update; or alternatively take the memory card, put it into that sights' memory card slot and wait for it to update, then passing it along to the next soldier in your squad until the last man updates - at which point he destroys it.

    They all have bluetooth and wireless... no need to pass anything around...

    The same data connection they use to upload target locations (maps) and photos and videos can be used to update the software and change settings.

    Monitoring soldier vital signs could figure into such a system; in that as soon as a soldier's vitals drop to zero - or the sensors are disabled, taken off or damaged - the gear is automatically locked out of the grid so to speak, and won't auto-update anymore until manually reset at a command vehicle or some such.

    That would be a missed opportunity... lets be smart about this. A unit gets cornered and wiped out and its kit seems to be functioning and is accessing the network you can use the GLONASS sensors to locate the new users... mark them as suspect and put their electronics in a quarantine with restricted information so they think they are still part of the network... with an electronic trigger you can use their own scopes to prevent them firing on friendly forces and you can use simple questions... get them to photograph each other as proof of who they are with secret code words if they are under duress... then you can decide whether to send support or a clean up crew.

    As a grunt I would use fricking wristbands like today, but I would hope that they are barelly(but still) vissible in thermal

    With Ratnik every soldier will have some sort of comms system so it might as well have an IFF function. Obviously transmitting all the time will give away your position to a sophisticated enemy but a sophisticated enemy will likely detect you anyway.

    This is not anything amazing indeed, but with every soldier being equipped with something like this would be revolutionary outside of special forces.

    the number of laser guided weapons in Russian service that 3.5km range laser range finder would be very interesting and could be used by scouts to add a large range of targets to local maps... the data can be uploaded to friendly forces in the vicinity which means instead of having a blank map showing only targets you can see it will be populated with both friendly and enemy targets in the area... much more useful.


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    GarryB

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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  GarryB on Tue Dec 09, 2014 11:57 am

    They might as well add an air-burst grenade capability and put it the next Call of Duty.

    Actually Russian soldiers have had air burst capability with their under barrel grenade launchers for the last 3 decades...



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    “The West won the world not by the superiority of its ideas or values or religion […] but rather by its superiority in applying organized violence. Westerners often forget this fact; non-Westerners never do.”

    ― Samuel P. Huntington, The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order
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    TheArmenian

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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  TheArmenian on Tue Dec 09, 2014 6:07 pm

    This is the youtube channel of the manufacturer (IWT) where all the presentation videos can be found. Some are in English language.

    http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZFZfKGxvq3bHRXQzc02Kmw/videos

    The latest video with the MINI sight is interesting.


    par far

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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  par far on Mon Dec 15, 2014 10:03 pm

    Does this system work in urban areas. The video shows it is mostly used in jungle settings.
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    GarryB

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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  GarryB on Tue Dec 16, 2014 10:08 am

    I don't see why it would not work in an urban environment.

    the laser rangefinder and glonass mapping system and thermal sight should all work in an urban setting and the ballistics system should work fine too.

    I especially like the way you can zero the scope with just one shot...


    _________________
    “The West won the world not by the superiority of its ideas or values or religion […] but rather by its superiority in applying organized violence. Westerners often forget this fact; non-Westerners never do.”

    ― Samuel P. Huntington, The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order
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    George1

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    Re: Russian made Scopes and Optics

    Post  George1 on Mon Jan 05, 2015 12:08 pm




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