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    Israeli Navy: News

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    Cyberspec

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    Re: Israeli Navy: News

    Post  Cyberspec on Thu Dec 17, 2015 4:22 am

    Israeli Military to Install Missile Interceptors on Warships Protecting Gas Drilling Rigs

    The interim solution will remain in place until Israel receives new warships from Germany in 2019.
    read more: http://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/1.691535

    one more report: http://alert5.com/2015/12/14/israel-plans-to-install-iron-dome-interceptors-on-saar-5-class-corvettes/

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    Re: Israeli Navy: News

    Post  max steel on Wed Feb 10, 2016 7:42 pm

    Israel’s Elbit Unveils USV for Anti-Sub, Anti-Mine Missions



    Israel’s Elbit Systems unveiled on Monday a prototype of what it claims is the world’s first unmanned system for anti-submarine warfare (ASW) missions.

    Developed in less than three years with technical and performance input from the Israeli Navy and Israel’s Ministry of Defense, the self-funded Seagull can complement or even replace expensive, manpower-intensive frigates or aircraft currently used to hunt submarines at sea, according to executives in Israel.

    Outfitted with built-in networked C4I and a remote-controlled crane that operates a variety of sonars and sensors, Elbit said its unmanned Seagulls can perform deep-water missions for four days at a time at line-of-sight ranges of up to 100 kilometers.

    “Today, everything in the market used to perform ASW involves very serious and heavy investment, whether we’re talking about other submarines, large frigates costing hundreds of millions of dollars, or expensive aircraft like the P-8,” said Elad Aharonson, director of Elbit’s ISTAR Division.

    "Seagull changes the dynamics of anti-submarine operations by creating an inexpensive, unmanned threat to submarines. By transforming small, remotely operated surface platforms into advanced, highly autonomous networked systems, we’re bringing asymmetry to the advantage of our customers,” Aharonson said.

    Ofer Ben Dov, vice president of the Elbit ISTAR Division’s naval system and unmanned systems business line, said company research of the proliferating threat tallied some 135 nuclear submarines, 315 diesel or air-independent propulsion submarines, and an “unnumbered” amount of mini and macro subs, more than 50 percent of which are operated by non-NATO nations.

    “We’re seeking to reverse the ASW equation and gain advantage over submarines, with significantly reduced costs and no risk to crews,” Ben Dov said.

    Briefing reporters on Monday, Ben Dov said two Seagulls could perform an ASW mission comparable to that of a single frigate and its crew of dozens, at a fraction of the estimated $220 million cost of the large, manned surface ship.

    Aside from the ASW role, executives here said Seagull is also optimized to scour the seas for mines. In its countermine configuration, Seagulls are equipped with a modular mine countermeasures (MCM) suite, which includes dipping sonars and robotics to identify and neutralize undersea threats.

    “We want to take the man out of the minefield,” Ben Dov said. “Seagull provides unmanned end-to-end mine-hunting operations, from mission planning to on-line operations in known and unknown areas, including area survey, search, detection, classification, identification, neutralization and verification. It’s equipped to search the entire water volume and operate underwater robotic vehicles to identify and neutralize mines.”

    Elbit executives said Seagull, with its modular mission suites, can be used for a variety of other missions, including electronic warfare, harbor protection, and defense of pipelines and offshore energy platforms from frogmen and other threats. Two Seagull USVs can be operated by a single mission control system, which can be located on shore or aboard a mothership, executives said.

    The 12-meter-long vessel is powered by twin engines, travels at a top speed of 32 knots and is designed to carry a payload of 2.5 tons. Elbit currently has one operational prototype, which recently completed a series of tests with the Israeli Navy.

    For purposes of testing in conditions close to shore, Elbit’s USV has accommodated a manned crew that transitions to fully autonomous operations at a press of a button. A second, fully unmanned prototype is expected to be ready soon for sea trials, executives said.

    Elbit’s Seagull program is based on knowledge gained from Silver Marlin, the firm’s first USV initiative launched in 2007; more than 30 years of experience with unmanned aerial vehicles and the company’s heavily-honed C4ISR portfolio.

    “Silver Marlin was a great learning experience for us. We realized that it’s not enough to offer high-performance capabilities for less risky, less costly coast guard and patrol-type missions. We needed to demonstrate to our customers not only the operational and force protectional value, but the enormous savings that can be achieved by opting for the unmanned alternative,” Aaronson said.

    “That’s what we’re now fully prepared to demonstrate with Seagull,” he added.

    Neither Aaronson nor Ben Dov were willing to discuss how much money the company has invested in its Seagull program. However, both executives said they were confident that the investment would pay off, given interest already shown by potential customers in Israel and around the world.
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    Israeli Navy: News

    Post  max steel on Sat Feb 13, 2016 12:18 pm

    Israeli Navy to begin installing Barak 8 on Sa'ar 4.5 corvettes





    The Israeli Navy will soon begin a conversion programme for its Sa'ar 4.5 missile corvettes to enable them to be fitted with the Israel Aerospace Industries' (IAI's) Barak 8 missile-based air defence system, a senior naval source in Israel said on 7 February.

    The conversion programme, due to be completed within two to three years, will see all the Sa'ar 4.5 ships fitted with Barak 8 launchers and a variant of IAI's Elta EL/M 2248 MF-STAR radar.

    The conversions of the Sa'ar 4.5 ships come as the navy expects to complete upgrades to the heavier Sa'ar 5 corvettes within a year, enabling all of them to use the Barak 8. Currently, the system is installed on one Sa'ar 5 vessel, INS Lahav , which carried out a live-fire trial in November.

    The source described a lengthy conversion process, beginning with computer-simulated models and stability tests to ensure that the heavy radars do not negatively affect the vessels' stability.

    The work is being overseen by the Israeli Navy's Department for Vessel Engineering, which has access to its own shipyard in Haifa, where the navy also maintains a major ship and submarine port.

    "There is no other navy in the world that is installing phased-array radars in ships that weigh this little," the source said. The Sa'ar 4.5 weighs about 500 tonnes and the Sa'ar 5 weighs around 1,300 tonnes, while other navies have installed phased-array radars in vessels weighing around 6,000 tonnes, according to the source.

    The phased-array radars, which can detect and track threats from 360° when used in full-power mode, will have three arrays on the front of the vessels, with the fourth array placed near the stern.

    "We explained to IAI that we cannot put the four radar walls [arrays] together in one place, as the Barak 8 launcher will interfere with the electromagnetic waves of one of the walls," the source said.


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    Re: Israeli Navy: News

    Post  max steel on Fri Apr 01, 2016 1:20 pm

    Israel develops new anti-ship missile

    The MBT division of Israel Aircraft Industries is developing a long-range, surface-to-surface, anti-ship missile to replace the Gabriel system aboard Israeli navy warships. The Gabriel, in service since the late 1960s, has been upgraded continuously but is near the end of its operational life.

    MBT has been developing the new anti-ship missile for some time and, according to sources, it has already been tested.

    Performance details of the long range over-the-horizon range system also remain classified, but sources say it will surpass most existing sea-launched missiles and has an advanced seeker. The missile has large aerodynamic surfaces that deploy after launch.

    Yitzhak Nissan, general manager of the MBT division, says the missile will be able to defeat existing naval anti-missile defences.

    Israel’s Navy conducted a successful test firing of surface-surface missiles from a Saar 5 corvette. The test included the launch of missile RGM-84 Harpoon and a new weapon, assumed to be an indigenous surface-to-surface missile developed for the Israel Navy by Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI).

    The blurred images shown on this video depict a missile longer and faster than the Harpoon, possibly driven by ram-air propulsion to achieve supersonic cruise and extended range. IAI has been known to continue the development of surface-to-surface missiles beyond Gabriel 3, the latest variant of the Gabriel family that entered service in the early 1970s.

    One of the members of IAI’s advanced anti-ship missiles was described in open sources as part of IAI’s Skimmer maritime combat helicopter mission suit.

    The existence of such missile was never confirmed but the fact that Israel hasn’t updated its Harpoon (RGM-84D) missiles into Block II configurations (RGM-84L), unlike most other Harpoon users which implemented this option.

    Hints about a possible existence of a new Israeli surface attack weapon surfaced in the early 2000s, as IAI participated in an international tender to equip the new ‘Formidable’ frigates of the Singaporean Navy frigates. Eventually Singapore selected the Harpoon missile.

    The Gabriel 5 was designed to be superior compared to most contemporary missiles, particularly when employed in littoral waters. It used an advanced active radar seeker backed by a sophisticated weapon control to optimize operational effectiveness in a target congested battlespace. The missile significantly improved target selectivity capability, especially in littoral waters, typically congested with marine traffic, and interference generating extensive and complex false target signals.

    As an advanced attack missile Gabriel 5 could penetrate the target’s protection, both soft- and hard-kill defenses. It was designed with sophisticated electronic counter-countermeasures (ECCM) dealing with chaff, advanced decoys and active ECM.


    Gabriel 5 and Barak 8 were described as part of a new offensive and defensive system suite under development at IAI’s Missiles and Space division.


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    Israeli Navy: News

    Post  max steel on Tue Jun 28, 2016 11:39 pm

    An Unmanned Seagull That Fires Torpedoes




    Elbit Systems completed recently a trial test torpedo launch from its Seagull multi-mission, autonomous Unmanned Surface Vessel (USV) system. Performed out of Israel’s Haifa port, the trial demonstrated the capability of Seagull to install and launch lightweight torpedoes, adding to the platform’s sensory capabilities. The Seagull is designed to carry out unmanned maritime missions, such as anti-submarine warfare (ASW) counter-mine operation, protecting high-value assets inshore and offshore. Lightweight torpedoes are often used by anti-submarine vessels, helicopters, and aircraft against submarines located in shallow waters. This is the first instance where such weapons are used from unmanned platforms.

    “The success of this test demonstrates Seagull’s modular mission system capability, enabling a highly effective ASW configuration of high-performance dipping sonar using two single tube torpedoes,” said Ofer Ben-Dov, Vice President Naval Systems Business Line at Elbit Systems’ ISTAR Division. The test highlighted Seagull’s capacity to detect and engage submarines, in addition to its ability to detect and destroy sea mines – all using the same multi-mission USV system in modular configurations. “This new and important capability has, to date, only been available to navies through manned vehicles.” Ben-Dov added.

    Introduced earlier this year, Seagull is a 12-meter long multi-mission USV system equipped with one or two vessels that can be operated and controlled in concert from manned ships or from shore. Seagull provides multi-mission capabilities and can be employed for ASW, MCM, EW, maritime security and other related missions, leveraging modular mission system installation and offering a high level of autonomy. In its basic configuration, the Seagull was armed with remotely operated weapon station mounting a 0.5” machine gun.

    In its full configuration, the advanced USV system delivers unmanned end-to-end mine hunting operation capability, taking the man out of the minefield. It features inherent C4I capabilities for enhanced Situation Awareness (SA) and has a large fuel capacity that allows it to remain at sea for several days. Seagulls are designed to operate in pairs, with one carrying the sonars that detect and locate the targets and the other operating devices such as counter-mine robots, depth charges and ASW torpedoes to neutralize the threats.

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    Israel Navy Targets Retired Ship in Live-Fire Med Drill

    Post  max steel on Fri Jul 08, 2016 8:48 pm

    Israel Navy Targets Retired Ship in Live-Fire Med Drill



    The Israel Navy capped a two-week drill in international waters off the Mediterranean coast by sinking one of its own ships, a retired Sa’ar-4 class vessel, with two US-built Harpoon sea-skimming missiles, a Navy officer told Defense News on Thursday.

    “Major live fire drills of this type don’t happen often, because they’re expensive. But it gave the operators and warfighters validation of what they’ve accomplished,” said Lt. Col. Shai Elgam, head of the Navy’s weapons branch.

    The Sa’ar-4 vessel, the INS Atmaut (Independence), was retired in March 2014.


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    Re: Israeli Navy: News

    Post  George1 on Wed Sep 28, 2016 8:48 pm

    Interview With Vice Adm. Ram Rothberg, Israeli Navy Commander

    In his five years as chief naval officer (CNO), Ram Rothberg has worked with other military branches of the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) to transform the Israeli Navy from a defender of coastal waters and bit actor in joint battle to an essential provider of what he calls strategic sea superiority.

    Now the Navy is a full partner in IDF-networked operations at its borders and beyond, providing strategic depth from the sea domain. A former paratrooper, undercover infrantryman and Navy commando, Rothberg credits IDF-wide interoperability for the surging budgets and missions earmarked for Israel’s once marginalized sea service.

    In addition to having enhanced, persistent presence off the coast of Syria, he estimates 60 percent of all IDF special missions in recent years have been led by the Navy. Rothberg retires later this month after 34 years in uniform.


    Q. What do you mean when you talk about strategic sea superiority? How far does Israel’s strategic depth extend?

    A. I’m speaking about persistent command of the sea domain on behalf of the state of Israel’s security, economy and infrastructure. This extends well beyond our 12 nautical mile territorial waters or our [exclusive economic zone (EEZ)]. To ensure our ability to bring in fuel and food and everything that a state needs, we must remain relevant even beyond our economic waters. It’s the entire Mediterranean basin, the Red Sea and all kinds of places where we have interests in being there. The domain in which we operate and strive to exploit is much broader than the territory from which the IDF operates on behalf of the state.

    Q. During your tenure, you took command of two new German-built Dolphin-class submarines, but otherwise, your fleet is essentially the same. How are you doing so much more with such limited assets?

    A. The Navy is modernizing and my successor will eventually have command of significant new assets: Another Dolphin AIP submarine and four new, advanced corvettes will come by the end of the decade; all are Israeli designed and are being built in Germany. But yes, what you see now are the same ships that you know from my predecessors. What has changed is the new operational concept and the transformation brought about by interoperability.

    Q. Please explain.


    A. In the past, our ships operated vis-a-vis the Syrian enemy. It fought the OSA vessels (torpedo boats) with Russian Styx missiles. But this is no longer our primary challenge. Our real enemy has transitioned from the sea to the land. This is what happened in 2006, when our ship was attacked by a [Chinese C-802 missile]. We didn’t know how to distinguish this shift, that our enemy had changed. Now, weaponry we used to face at sea has been transferred from Syria to Lebanon.

    But what do we do with the state of Lebanon? How do you deal with a warship that is a landmass? How can you sink this huge metaphorical warship from which is housed some 200 missiles?

    Q. You’re referring to the Russian supersonic, sea-skimming Yakhont cruise missile?

    A. If we look at the Yakhont or other advanced missiles that came from Syria to Lebanon, our challenge is to prevent as much as possible their use before launch. Detection is critical. We need to remain in a persistent hunt for threats that can strike us. I’m talking about any relevant threats to our sea force. We need to make sure they can’t touch us before we get to them.

    I won’t delve deeper into details, but here’s where interoperability-driven sea superiority is critical. We need to create the means to act from these waters, which will be full of missiles.

    Q. Can you offer some examples of interoperability?


    A. Our systems are connected to the Air Force and serve as a floating part of the Air Force’s integrated air defense system. All our Sa’ar-5s [corvettes] contribute to the air defense picture built and maintained by the IAF. Our patrol boats are connected to the ground forces by way of the Torch [Digital Army Program].

    In Pillar of Defense [the 2012 Gaza operation], we didn’t operate in standoff, but in stand-in mode, striking the land as part of the overall campaign. We did five over-the-beach, small commando raids. It’s not just shooting with guided weapons but joint attacking on land.

    In Protective Edge [the 2014 Gaza war], we demonstrated this by order of magnitude. The operations officer of Southern Command was operating capabilities from our Ashdod base directly, not by way of requests to me or my staff. In that same operation the IAF was deploying my ship-based missiles as if it was another aircraft. I provided the fire, but he was the commander responsible.

    Q. What about the integration of sea power and ground maneuvering forces?

    A. Today, a tank commander talks to the commander of one of my patrol boats and gets the direct support he needs to advance, maneuver, coordinate targeting or implement fire. With air, land and intelligence arms, we are now full participants.

    The IDF General Staff has defined sea superiority as a top priority. It’s part of the new mission of defending our economic waters and empowering the Israel Navy to participate in the land battle. My colleagues on the General Staff understand sea is accessible. It can be exploited from multiple angles, and provides another means for the ground forces to shorten or release lots of bottlenecks.

    Q. Why didn’t this happen sooner. Lack of vision? Lack of budget? The technology wasn’t yet there? Failure to cooperate?

    A. Let’s start with vision. David Ben-Gurion founded our national security concept, but the word “sea” is not mentioned. That is sad. And to think that during Ben-Gurion’s time, the European diaspora, from the ashes of the Holocaust, was brought here and strengthened by way of the sea.

    The nation of Israel is tough. There is ego and resistance to change. I knew it would be an obstacle.

    Q. So what happened?

    A. I came in on Day One with a paper I submitted to the [former IDF Chief of General Staff] Benny Gantz, which detailed our grand strategy for exploiting the sea domain for the collective benefit of the IDF and the nation. It went well with his plan for interoperability. From then on, we started to build connections. We needed to convince and build trust and earn support for a plan that was holistic and win-win. Under the current Chief of Staff [Lt. Gen. Gadi Eizenkot], the IDF General Staff has defined sea superiority as a top priority.

    Q. And technology? Weren’t you fortunate to come into command at a time when IDF C4ISR systems were mature enough for cross-service integration?

    A. Certainly. For sea superiority, first of all, I need the Air Force. I need intel. I needed to build on top of our platforms systems that didn’t exist before I started this job. We needed the network that we have today, in which everyone plays a role, from Northern Command, Depth Command, Southern Command, the C4I Branch … everyone had to claim ownership of this.

    Q. What about cooperation? Did it take a former green suiter like yourself to break down parochial barriers?

    A. It’s true that in the past, the Israel Navy saw threats from the Air Force and Ground Forces for the budgets it needed. Personal and organizational ego was involved. Many thought that maybe the Navy should remain in this bathtub we call the Mediterranean Sea. Others wanted the Navy to remain as a type of coast guard.

    I came from the green suit world. I started in paratroopers. I was in Golani [infantry], I was a commando. I lived the world of Central Command [responsible for the West Bank]. Since I fought with them on the battlefield, I knew how to work with them to create a common IDF-wide language and an operational concept that benefits the IDF writ large. Today, just as battalion commanders and division commanders won’t start a new mission until they’ve understood their theater from the air, they insist on patrolling their sectors from the sea.

    Q. Is this translating into extra resources to the Navy?

    A. In Plan Gideon, our multi-year modernization plan, the sea arm is receiving greater percentages than ever before for its buildup. When you look at the submarines, the new surface ships, bigger helicopters and all the strike systems, it’s because this vision is already an integral part of the IDF operational concept.

    There’s a deep understanding by nearly everyone who is entrusted with national authority that the Navy must be an equal partner. There is no command, organization or service branch that can be decisive on its own.

    Q. But I thought funding for the Navy’s big ticket items — Dolphin submarines, the four new Sa’ar-6 surface ships, maritime patrol UAVs — comes from another national account, not the defense budget.

    A. There is a black box where government funds outside of the defense budget are supporting the mission of defending the nation’s economic waters. In that fund, there’s money for ships, for intel, air assets and other things needed to establish this order of battle. But in addition to this significant, outside funding, our Plan Gideon is also allocating increasing resources for the sea superiority mission we’ve discussed.

    Q. You were on Israel’s National Security Council when it formulated the plan, eventually approved by the government, for defense of offshore energy assets. Aside from the new capabilities to come, what does the plan entail?

    A. It’s an operational concept much broader than platforms. It involves presence. Persistent presence. And it requires us to strengthen coalitions among core nations that are in this area.

    No other country has to deal with threats the way we do. In the Gulf of Mexico, there are some 400 drilling platforms, each with no more than two or three security guards. They don’t have rockets, missiles and terror threatening them. I’m gratified that the cabinet endorsed our concept of a layered defense.

    Q. Beyond the longtime partnership with the US and the cooperation built up with Greece and Cyprus — two friendly nations that share your EEZ — what other nations are part of these informal coalitions?

    A. We have strong ties with the Italians. We train with the Italian Navy. Just two months ago, we returned from Taranto port, where we had a submarine, a Sa’ar-5 and a Sa’ar-4.5. We’re cultivating cooperation with the French, which we didn’t have before. I recently returned from a visit to the French CNO, and we decided to raise the number of joint exercises we’re doing with them in the Mediterranean.

    And then there’s the British. We have good ties between the CNOs, but we aspire to more port visits and eventual joint exercises.

    Q. How has the Russian presence on behalf of Syrian President Bashar Assad changed the nature of the theater? Are you building up cooperation with the Russians as well?

    A.
    When we look at our sea theater, it’s surrealistic. At any given time, there are American, Russian, French, Turkish, Greek, sometimes German ships. All of them are sailing alongside the other. So the naval theater takes on even added significance. It’s an extension of our national presence. We need to be there all the time to drive home this message that this is our front yard.

    Therefore, we have ships across from Syria — between Syria and Cyprus and between Cyprus and Lebanon. Everyone needs to understand that this is our theater, so I sail there. I collect intel there. I am part of the design of a theater that is changing before our eyes.

    Q. Do you cooperate with the Russians? Do they have to give notice when they launch cruise missiles from the Black Sea in your direction?


    A. There are international codes of behavior at sea; laws and procedures in place to prevent clashes. These codes are well understood in a common language. So the Russians are here next to us and we are next to them. We launch helicopters off our ships and they do the same.

    There is no real coordination, but there are international codes that we all abide by. Everyone knows how to respect the other. There isn’t any friction. But the fact that we’re building coalitions is part of our strategy for sea superiority.

    Q. Finally, Israeli officials often speak about growing cooperation with moderate Sunni Gulf states driven by the common threat from Iran. How, if at all, is this manifest at sea?

    A. We have no friction. We sail wherever we need to according to our operational plans. But there’s no real cooperation either. From an operative, tactical level, there’s been no interaction, at least up until now.

    http://www.defensenews.com/articles/interview-with-vice-adm-ram-rothberg-israeli-navy-commander


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    Re: Israeli Navy: News

    Post  George1 on Sat Oct 15, 2016 4:11 pm

    Israel is negotiating with Germany to purchase additional submarines

    http://bmpd.livejournal.com/2183413.html


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    Re: Israeli Navy: News

    Post  George1 on Sun May 07, 2017 1:06 am

    New Israeli anti-ship missile on the corvette of the Israeli Navy

    About 10 years ago it was published that the "Israeli Aviation Industry" is developing a new RCC. In other sources, it is usually called "Gabriel-5", although IAI uses the name ANAM (Advanced Naval Attack Missile). It was reported about the export of a batch of these missiles to Azerbaijan for 1.8 billion. The contract of 2011 (together with other weapons), but there is no confirmation of the fact of the supply.

    In March 2016, the Israeli Navy demonstrated the testing of a new rocket from the corvette "Saar-5" (although its name was not mentioned). The site defense-update noted that the new missile is longer and faster than Harpoon, presumably equipped with a straight-through air-jet engine, has supersonic flight speed and a considerable range of fire. In any case, it is clear that this is not ANAM.





    http://bmpd.livejournal.com/2595650.html


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    Re: Israeli Navy: News

    Post  George1 on Wed May 17, 2017 2:34 pm

    Israel Navy Updates Fleet With Advanced Radar System

    The Israeli Navy is set to receive 11 new advanced radar systems as a part of ongoing upgrades to its entire combat surface fleet.

    Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) announced that it is moving forward with operational sea trials after successfully installing the radar system on the Sa’ar 4.5 missile ship.

    By the end of the year, the navy expects to receive two more Advanced Lightweight Phased Array (ALPHA) ELM-2258 radar systems, bringing the total to 11.

    IAI said in a statement that the system was based on “unique full-digital AESA technology by IAI unit ELTA Systems Ltd., and is an integral part” of the missile ships’ combat systems.

    The Jerusalem Post reported that the dextrous new system can produce a large number of beams for aerial and maritime targets simultaneously, while providing a high quality picture even in the most extreme environments. Its small size allows it to be installed on medium-sized and smaller vessel like the Sa’ar 4.5 missile ships, medium-sized patrol vessels and corvettes.

    The system can also carry out several tasks concurrently, such as integrating the defense system for attack and defense and tracking a large number of targets.

    Weighing in at 490 tons and measuring 62 meters long, Israel Shipyards’ Sa’ar 4.5 missile ships entered service in the 1990s and 2000s. In order to guard Israel’s offshore gas fields, the Sa’ar-4.5 and Sa’ar-6 will get a $440 million installation of naval guns and other spare parts.

    Technical manuals, test equipment, preventive maintenance and transportation fixtures are included in the deal as well, with logistics support, facility and vessel surveys and engineering provided by contractor DRS North America, a subsidiary of Leonardo and the US government.

    Israel is set to receive four new Sa’ar-6 class warships from Germany in 2020, and in November received the first of three Super Dvora Mark III class fast patrol craft.

    On Monday, the Israeli navy shot a Palestinian fisherman to death after he sailed out of a fishing zone near the northern Gaza strip.

    "A vessel deviated from the designated fishing zone in the northern Gaza Strip," an Israeli military spokeswoman said, claiming the 25-year-old fisherman was unresponsive when "Naval forces in the area called upon the vessel to halt and fired warning shots into the air."

    The killing came as Palestinians observed the 69th anniversary of the Nakba, or Great Catastrophe, when more than 750,000 Palestinians were forced from their homes and more than Palestinian 500 towns and villages were destroyed to make way for the establishment of Israel.

    https://sputniknews.com/middleeast/201705171053680984-israel-navy-updates-fleet-radar/


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    Re: Israeli Navy: News

    Post  George1 on Wed Aug 16, 2017 11:28 pm

    Israel allegedly builds corvettes of the Saar 72 project

    "Saar-72" (Saar-72, S-72) - mini-corvettes (displacement of 800 tons) developed by the company "Israeli shipyards". The first publications about Saar-72 refer to May 2013, but this is not entirely true: one year earlier, in March 2012, the website of the Israeli shipyard published virtualization (computer graphics) of this project. The name "Saar-72" was not mentioned, but the length was 72 m, in addition, the name OPV-72M (OPV-Offshore Patrol Vessel) was indicated for the same project in the version of the patrol ship.

    The development of new ships was associated with the need to strengthen the protection of the economic zone of Israel: just recently, a number of large gas fields were discovered on the sea shelf (eg Tamar 2009, Levanat - 2010), which transformed Israel from an energy importer into Their potential exporter. Approximately at the same time, the Navy accelerated work on the selection of new large ships, later called "Saar-6" (see the article "Chronology of deciding on the purchase of corvettes" Saar-6 ").

    http://bmpd.livejournal.com/2789221.html



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