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    New Multipolar World Order

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    nemrod
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    Henry Kissinger : Western new world order in decline ?

    Post  nemrod on Mon Sep 01, 2014 11:07 pm

    Western world order worked in the past because Russia -and most russians- naively believed in the US -US does not mean american people, Iam not doing anti americanism as a worker, a baker, a butcher, waitress, an engineer, an analyst developper are not the bastards who starve the planet in wall Street as Paul Singer, CEO of Goldman Sachs, Loyid Blanksfein, Bank of America, Rothschild bank' CEO, Rubin etc.... In US there two world, the world of average people and the parasytes. - hoax. 20 years after the end of the Soviet Union, russians realized how US are their strongest and the more lethal ennemy. As russians leaders and elite realized it, since the early 2000's they took actions against Nato and the west. Now with the help of China, India, Russia is more stronger than never, and western new world order is on the verge of collapse. Russia will have to continue to rearm, and to take care about where is, and who is its mortal ennemy.
    For that reason Kissinger who are among those who decide in US is in disarray, if not angry. Brezynski reached the same conclusion.
    The main event in the 2000's is the election of Putin. This why US establishment is enraged against russian's adminstration.


    http://online.wsj.com/articles/henry-kissinger-on-the-assembly-of-a-new-world-order-1409328075


    Henry Kissinger on the Assembly of a New World Order
    The concept that has underpinned the modern geopolitical era is in crisis

    The concept of order that has underpinned the modern era is in crisis, writes Henry Kissinger. Above, a pro-Russian fighter stands guard at a checkpoint close to Donetsk, Ukraine in July. European Pressphoto Agency

    Libya is in civil war, fundamentalist armies are building a self-declared caliphate across Syria and Iraq and Afghanistan's young democracy is on the verge of paralysis. To these troubles are added a resurgence of tensions with Russia and a relationship with China divided between pledges of cooperation and public recrimination. The concept of order that has underpinned the modern era is in crisis.

    The search for world order has long been defined almost exclusively by the concepts of Western societies. In the decades following World War II, the U.S.—strengthened in its economy and national confidence—began to take up the torch of international leadership and added a new dimension. A nation founded explicitly on an idea of free and representative governance, the U.S. identified its own rise with the spread of liberty and democracy and credited these forces with an ability to achieve just and lasting peace. The traditional European approach to order had viewed peoples and states as inherently competitive; to constrain the effects of their clashing ambitions, it relied on a balance of power and a concert of enlightened statesmen. The prevalent American view considered people inherently reasonable and inclined toward peaceful compromise and common sense; the spread of democracy was therefore the overarching goal for international order. Free markets would uplift individuals, enrich societies and substitute economic interdependence for traditional international rivalries.

    This effort to establish world order has in many ways come to fruition. A plethora of independent sovereign states govern most of the world's territory. The spread of democracy and participatory governance has become a shared aspiration if not a universal reality; global communications and financial networks operate in real time.

    The years from perhaps 1948 to the turn of the century marked a brief moment in human history when one could speak of an incipient global world order composed of an amalgam of American idealism and traditional European concepts of statehood and balance of power. But vast regions of the world have never shared and only acquiesced in the Western concept of order. These reservations are now becoming explicit, for example, in the Ukraine crisis and the South China Sea. The order established and proclaimed by the West stands at a turning point.

    First, the nature of the state itself—the basic formal unit of international life—has been subjected to a multitude of pressures. Europe has set out to transcend the state and craft a foreign policy based primarily on the principles of soft power. But it is doubtful that claims to legitimacy separated from a concept of strategy can sustain a world order. And Europe has not yet given itself attributes of statehood, tempting a vacuum of authority internally and an imbalance of power along its borders. At the same time, parts of the Middle East have dissolved into sectarian and ethnic components in conflict with each other; religious militias and the powers backing them violate borders and sovereignty at will, producing the phenomenon of failed states not controlling their own territory.

    The challenge in Asia is the opposite of Europe's: Balance-of-power principles prevail unrelated to an agreed concept of legitimacy, driving some disagreements to the edge of confrontation.

    The clash between the international economy and the political institutions that ostensibly govern it also weakens the sense of common purpose necessary for world order. The economic system has become global, while the political structure of the world remains based on the nation-state. Economic globalization, in its essence, ignores national frontiers. Foreign policy affirms them, even as it seeks to reconcile conflicting national aims or ideals of world order.

    This dynamic has produced decades of sustained economic growth punctuated by periodic financial crises of seemingly escalating intensity: in Latin America in the 1980s; in Asia in 1997; in Russia in 1998; in the U.S. in 2001 and again starting in 2007; in Europe after 2010. The winners have few reservations about the system. But the losers—such as those stuck in structural misdesigns, as has been the case with the European Union's southern tier—seek their remedies by solutions that negate, or at least obstruct, the functioning of the global economic system.

    The international order thus faces a paradox: Its prosperity is dependent on the success of globalization, but the process produces a political reaction that often works counter to its aspirations. A third failing of the current world order, such as it exists, is the absence of an effective mechanism for the great powers to consult and possibly cooperate on the most consequential issues. This may seem an odd criticism in light of the many multilateral forums that exist—more by far than at any other time in history. Yet the nature and frequency of these meetings work against the elaboration of long-range strategy. This process permits little beyond, at best, a discussion of pending tactical issues and, at worst, a new form of summitry as "social media" event. A contemporary structure of international rules and norms, if it is to prove relevant, cannot merely be affirmed by joint declarations; it must be fostered as a matter of common conviction.

    The penalty for failing will be not so much a major war between states (though in some regions this remains possible) as an evolution into spheres of influence identified with particular domestic structures and forms of governance. At its edges, each sphere would be tempted to test its strength against other entities deemed illegitimate. A struggle between regions could be even more debilitating than the struggle between nations has been.

    The contemporary quest for world order will require a coherent strategy to establish a concept of order within the various regions and to relate these regional orders to one another. These goals are not necessarily self-reconciling: The triumph of a radical movement might bring order to one region while setting the stage for turmoil in and with all others. The domination of a region by one country militarily, even if it brings the appearance of order, could produce a crisis for the rest of the world.
    A world order of states affirming individual dignity and participatory governance, and cooperating internationally in accordance with agreed-upon rules, can be our hope and should be our inspiration. But progress toward it will need to be sustained through a series of intermediary stages.

    To play a responsible role in the evolution of a 21st-century world order, the U.S. must be prepared to answer a number of questions for itself: What do we seek to prevent, no matter how it happens, and if necessary alone? What do we seek to achieve, even if not supported by any multilateral effort? What do we seek to achieve, or prevent, only if supported by an alliance? What should we not engage in, even if urged on by a multilateral group or an alliance? What is the nature of the values that we seek to advance? And how much does the application of these values depend on circumstance?

    For the U.S., this will require thinking on two seemingly contradictory levels. The celebration of universal principles needs to be paired with recognition of the reality of other regions' histories, cultures and views of their security. Even as the lessons of challenging decades are examined, the affirmation of America's exceptional nature must be sustained. History offers no respite to countries that set aside their sense of identity in favor of a seemingly less arduous course. But nor does it assure success for the most elevated convictions in the absence of a comprehensive geopolitical strategy.

    — Dr. Kissinger served as national security adviser and secretary of state under Presidents Nixon and Ford. Adapted from his book "World Order," to be published Sept. 9 by the Penguin Press.

    higurashihougi
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    Re: New Multipolar World Order

    Post  higurashihougi on Tue Sep 02, 2014 9:54 am

    US cannot claimed the spread of so-called "democracy" to be its own deeds. To be fair, the US and the West play a certain role in the spread of modern democracy. But the main power for democracy lays in the local people themselves. Not to mention that the US strongly support many kinds of dicactor and tyrant regime such as Saudi Arabia, Franco's Spain, Mobutu's Zaire, and Somoza's Nicaragua.

    The rise of the US cannot be idetified with democracy or liberty, but with constant wars of invasion and a crazy attitude of intervene in others' internal affairs.

    Not to mention in the realm of religion and theology, the US is in the level of the Middle Age. With 46% of the population do not believe in scientific evolution, the US need to re-examine about the brainwashing and propaganda of right-wing god-mongers.


    George1
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    Re: New Multipolar World Order

    Post  George1 on Mon May 04, 2015 1:46 pm

    Russia-China interaction positively influences global power balance — Foreign Ministry

    "Russia-China interaction has positive influence on the balance of power in the world, maintaining stability of the world order after World War II," Chen Gopin said

    BEIJING, May 4. /TASS/. Cooperation between Russia and China on the international scene helps keep the world order established after World War Two, Chinese Deputy Foreign Minister Chen Gopin said on Monday.

    "Russia-China interaction has positive influence on the balance of power in the world, maintaining stability of the world order after World War II," the Chinese diplomat said ahead of an upcoming visit by China’s leader Xi Jinping to Moscow.

    As agreed between the leaders of both countries, China and Russia will hold events devoted to the celebration of the 70th anniversary of the Soviet Union’s victory over Nazi Germany in World War II and will also work in various international formats, such as the United Nations and the Shanghai Cooperation Organization, as well as with the international community for memorizing history, the Chinese diplomat said.

    During World War II, "Russia and China were the main theaters of military operations in Asia and Europe and they are the main victors in this war," the Chinese deputy foreign minister said.

    George1
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    Re: New Multipolar World Order

    Post  George1 on Fri May 08, 2015 2:24 pm

    Russia-Argentina Accords Are Another Step Toward Multipolar World - Expert

    Ariel Noyola Rodriguez, a Mexican economist and columnist for Contralinea Magazine, believes that the deepening of ties between Russia and Argentina portend the creation of a new, multipolar world order.

    The economist, who earlier postulated that the Eurasian Union project and Latin America's Common Market of the South complement each other in fundamental ways, now argues in an article for Voltaire Network that the present global situation presents huge challenges for countries, "inviting…the consolidation of multi-vectored alliances," of which the deepening of Russian-Argentinian relations is an example.

    Rodriguez states that such alliances are founded by economic cooperation (including commerce and investment), and strengthened by energy, geopolitics, and military technical cooperation.

    The expert explains that when it comes to Russia-Argentina relations, "the more than 20 documents [signed] by the president of Argentina, Christina Fernandez de Kirchner, during the meeting with her counterpart, President Vladimir Putin, indicate the opportunities which emerge" as bilateral links pass "from 'strategic partnership' (which started in December 2008 during Dmitri Medvedev's presidency) to an 'integral strategic partnership ([from] April of the current year)."

    Furthermore, Rodriguez believes that the growing links between the two countries are a sign of "Washington's incapacity to sabotage the construction of a multipolar world." In the expert's view, this is part of a larger, global trend. He notes that in the 21st century, US attempts at preserving a unipolar world order have "failed to stop the rise of new economic and political actors in Latin America and the Eurasian region."

    According to Rodriguez, Argentina's strengthening ties with Russia is part of a long-term strategy to reorient trade toward Eurasia and the Orient, noting that between 2005 and 2013, economic exchanges with Russia, India and China rose from 9.36 to 14 percent of total trade, while trade with the United States dropped from 13 to 8.21 percent in the same period. And a great deal of room for the further strengthen ties, in food, mining, petrol, and other areas, still exists, according to the economist.

    Energy

    Rodriguez focuses on the express importance of Russian energy and construction firms' slew of deals with their Argentinian counterparts aimed at the creation and upgrading of nuclear, hydroelectric and thermal power in Argentina, noting that the deals will allow Buenos Aires to save foreign exchange in the purchase of energy and fuel. He comments as well on the importance of Gazprom's signing of a memorandum of understanding with Argentina's Treasury Petroleum Fields (YPF), Argentina's majority state-owned energy company, stating that "for the first time in history, both companies are going to make parallel investments in exploration activities, production and transportation of hydrocarbons in Argentina and third countries."

    Defense


    Considering the propensity for the "geo-politicization of international relations," Rodriguez's most intriguing argument by far is that in order to resist aggressive powers' tools of "war and occupation as mechanisms of dispossession," Russia and China should deepen their economic and energy 'integral strategic partnerships' via security and defense pacts as well. The expert argues that at present, Moscow and Beijing are the only nations "capable of offsetting North American forces in Latin American territory."

    Ariel Noyola Rodriguez, economist and columnist for Contralinea Magazine, notes that US attempts to contain emerging economies including Russia and the countries of Latin America work only to hasten these nations' efforts to create a new, truly multipolar world order independent of Washington's influence

    In this respect, Rodriguez believes that "technical-military cooperation with the Russian Federation constitutes a key element in guarding Latin America's sovereignty." For Argentina specifically, he argues that enhanced security cooperation with Moscow, which can include arms sales and the exchange of military instructors, will assist Buenos Aires in defending against US interventionism while simultaneously countering Britain's military power projection capabilities in the Falkland/Malvinas Islands.

    The Mexican economist argues that "in the final analysis…the construction of a multipolar world demands" that Russia and Argentina "unify their efforts to articulate a security and defense strategy against the excesses of the United States and its allies."

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/analysis/20150508/1021868566.html#ixzz3ZY6YQStF

    George1
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    Re: New Multipolar World Order

    Post  George1 on Sat Jun 06, 2015 2:35 pm

    US to Lose Its Ground Under BRICS Pressure

    Blind adherence to US policies and the introduction of anti-Russian sanctions have turned fatal for Europe; the axis of Russia-China-BRICS is set to overturn the global economic system and to prevail over the hegemony of the US, according to the chief economist of the German Bremer Landesbank.

    The real damage to the EU countries caused by the launch of anti-Russian sanctions is much more comprehensive than that estimated by the statistics, Folker Hellmeyer, chief economist of the German Bremer Landesbank told in an interview with Deutsche Wirtschafts Nachrichten.

    “The slump in German export volume by 18 percent in 2014 and by 34 percent for the first two months of 2015 is just the tip of the iceberg,” he said. “There are much more of the side-effects.”

    “European countries, like Finland and Austria, who have strong developing businesses in Russia, place fewer orders within Germany. Moreover, the European corporations evade sanctions and create high-efficient production facilities in Russia. We, therefore, lose this potential capital stock, which is the basis of our prosperity, and Russia wins.”

    The relationship of trust between Russia and Germany and the EU is somewhat broken. And it will take years to rebuild it. As the result, such companies as Siemens and Alstom have lost major projects in Russia, he said. The potential damage not only for Germany but for the whole of the EU, therefore, is much more comprehensive than what is being shown by current figures.

    Meanwhile, Moscow, Beijing and other BRICS countries are looking forward to building the largest projects of the modern history: the construction of new Eurasian infrastructure from Moscow to Vladivostok, in South China and India.

    Participation of the Western countries in these mega-projects looks quite uncertain, Hellmeyer said.

    “For me, the conflict has already been set,” he said. “The axis Moscow-Beijing-BRIC has won. The West had enough. In 1990 th, these countries accounted for about 25% of world economic output. Now, they represent 56% of world economic output, and account for 85% of world population. They control about 70% of the world's foreign exchange reserves. They grow annually by an average of 4% — 5%. Since the United States has not been prepared to share the power worldwide, nor to build the emerging market sector on its own financial system, it lost.”

    Neither problem in the world nowadays can be solved without Moscow or Beijing, said the economist.

    The lack of its own agenda makes the EU and Germany look like a loser.

    “The longer we pursue this policy in the EU, the higher is the price. The less one will take us seriously as an interlocutor,” he added.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/world/20150606/1023019604.html#ixzz3cHiK0bW9

    George1
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    Re: New Multipolar World Order

    Post  George1 on Fri Jul 31, 2015 3:01 am

    China, Latin American Ties to Weaken US Influence in New Multipolar World

    China and Latin America are developing a new bilateral approach based on trade and investment.

    China has become an essential source of growth for Latin America. The value of bilateral trade grew 22 times between 2000 and 2014. Last year, two-way trade hit 263.6 billion US dollars and China's investment in the region also went up to more than 80 billion dollars.

    Six months ago Beijing held a two-day forum with the leaders of the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC in Spanish), a 33-country bloc. During the forum the Chinese President Xi Jinping pledged that Chinese direct investment in Latin America would reach $250 billion over the next decade while predicting that annual bilateral trade could hit $500 billion, reports Strategic Culture.

    This business alliance has also contributed to the political change in China-Latin America ties. Countries like Brazil, Chile and Peru, represent most of South America and China makes up their first commercial partner.

    As for Latin America as a whole, China is its second commercial partner, slightly behind the US. Even Central America and the Caribbean which just decades ago were within the grip of US hegemonic influence are now recognizing Beijing as their closest ally in Asia.

    Likewise, as some SCO member partners do, several South American countries are replacing the US dollar in bilateral trade by using their local currencies and the Chinese yuan.

    The most recent agreement signed in May, between Chile and China established that Chile's central bank and the People's Bank of China are clearing a path for the use of the Chinese yuan in South America, including a swap agreement about to facilitate exchanges of a maximum of 2.2 trillion pesos ($3.6 billion) for three years.

    Furthermore, Chinese president Xi Jinping has proposed increased connectivity between BRICS and South America. Ufa’s BRICS declaration in July 2015 proclaimed that New Development Bank (NDB) “shall serve as a powerful instrument for financing infrastructure investment and sustainable development projects in the BRICS and other developing countries and emerging market economies.”

    Xi also proposed NDB’s close cooperation with financing mechanisms such as the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB).

    Whether Beijing has the intention to compete with Washington for a greater sphere of influence in the South American region remains unclear but unavoidably it will significantly weaken the US influence in the subcontinent.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/business/20150730/1025223210.html#ixzz3hQU4bBa1


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    George1
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    Re: New Multipolar World Order

    Post  George1 on Thu Dec 24, 2015 12:07 am

    Equal Rivals? China May Push Out US as the Sole Superpower

    In November, China signed an agreement to open its first military base in Africa. This move will enable Beijing to control the most important "container-road" in the world, German newspaper Deutsche Wirtschafts Nachrichten (DWN) wrote.

    China has successfully used a long-term, inconspicuous strategy to become a major power in the world economy, the newspaper reported.

    The importance of China has already become visible in US-dominated financial institutions. For instance, the IMF added the yuan, the Chinese currency, into its basket of reserve currencies. Moreover, China created its own financial institution — the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) — as an alternative to the institutions led by the US.

    At the same time, Beijing is also pursuing a clever strategy in military and geopolitical fields. In the Middle East, the Chinese have joined an alliance with Russia, while in Africa it is planning to build its first military base in Djibouti, one of the key trade hubs and strategically important territories in the world.

    China's activities and its — both political and economic — expansion have alarmed the United States, who are anxious that they may lose their positions as the only superpower in the current world order.

    The Chinese are coming into direct conflict with US global interests and are making Washington nervous, DWN wrote, adding that the Americans are now having the new experience of dealing with China as an equal opponent.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/politics/20151223/1032215380/equal-rivals-china-us.html#ixzz3vBjD0VLW


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