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    Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

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    magnumcromagnon
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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  magnumcromagnon on Thu Feb 11, 2016 7:31 pm

    George1 wrote:Sth that might have relation with the war in syria. NATO fleet with the approval of EE and Greek government is being deployed to the Aegean Sea immediately in a bid to end the flow of refugees crossing the sea into Europe from Turkey. (bullshits, all this i think happen to support Turkey in a possible invasion in Syria)

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/nato-orders-fleet-to-deploy-in-aegean-sea-to-help-end-europes-refugee-crisis-a6867076.html

    If they were serious they would put pressure on Turdkey and the GCC vermin.

    par far
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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  par far on Thu Feb 11, 2016 7:39 pm

    magnumcromagnon wrote:
    George1 wrote:Sth that might have relation with the war in syria. NATO fleet with the approval of EE and Greek government is being deployed to the Aegean Sea immediately in a bid to end the flow of refugees crossing the sea into Europe from Turkey. (bullshits, all this i think happen to support Turkey in a possible invasion in Syria)

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/nato-orders-fleet-to-deploy-in-aegean-sea-to-help-end-europes-refugee-crisis-a6867076.html

    If they were serious they would put pressure on Turdkey and the GCC vermin.


    They will get into the EU, it does not matter what NATO does, where there's the will, there's a way.

    GunshipDemocracy
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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  GunshipDemocracy on Thu Feb 11, 2016 7:47 pm

    ultron wrote:Putin may genuinely want a ceasefire. He's a soft guy. He did that in Donbas. This time it won't work in Syria because Qaeda are die hard lunatics. They are no Ukrainian army. They'll never agree to ceasefire.

    Wow, so you are kinda badass, huh? so what is biggest organization you´ve ever managed in terms budget/manpower?

    as for ceasefire? so what would you do then in his shoes? go for war (what was expected by US) ?
    conquest U-crying in 5 days and then what? face

    a) western trained and sponsored saboteurs and bandits (nazi UPA)
    b) 40mlns hungry and pissed people convinced they are poor and hungry because of Russia?
    c) U-404 economy is shatters and crumbling Russian due to complete closure of trade (Russia aggressor)
    ?
    d) propaganda war 10x harder? and unrest in Russia?

    Tell me your story what would you do tough guy?

    PapaDragon
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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  PapaDragon on Thu Feb 11, 2016 10:58 pm

    par far wrote:
    magnumcromagnon wrote:
    George1 wrote:Sth that might have relation with the war in syria. NATO fleet with the approval of EE and Greek government is being deployed to the Aegean Sea immediately in a bid to end the flow of refugees crossing the sea into Europe from Turkey. (bullshits, all this i think happen to support Turkey in a possible invasion in Syria)

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/nato-orders-fleet-to-deploy-in-aegean-sea-to-help-end-europes-refugee-crisis-a6867076.html

    If they were serious they would put pressure on Turdkey and the GCC vermin.


    They will get into the EU, it does not matter what NATO does, where there's the will, there's a way.

    This is precisely why nobody here in Serbia is too bothered with migrants. We know they want to leave and that no fence, guards, minefields, etc... will stop them. You just wait it out and enjoy the show.

    Funs fact: remember that big bad fence on Hungarian border? Well as of recently migrants have been cutting their way trough with "generous" help from local guides who get them over the border for standard fee. And sell them pair of wire cutters for cool 100 euros a pop. Cool

    I would call them coyotes but we have no coyotes here outside the zoos so we should find some other animal name to call them by. Any suggestions?

    Viva Mexic.... sorry, I meant to say: Viva Serbia!!! lol1





    max steel
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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  max steel on Fri Feb 12, 2016 1:14 am

    par far wrote:


    I think this "proposed ceasefire is just politics, when you are winning, you don't make ceasefires.


    Kremlin demanded not to speculate on rumors of a ceasefire in Syria

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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  PapaDragon on Fri Feb 12, 2016 2:35 am


    There will be ''cessation of hostilities'' but VKS will continue to hit all the top shelf ''moderates'' and ISIS as usual.

    Lavrov be da boss... thumbsup russia

    Militarov
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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  Militarov on Fri Feb 12, 2016 3:11 am


    magnumcromagnon
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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  magnumcromagnon on Fri Feb 12, 2016 4:39 am


    par far
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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  par far on Fri Feb 12, 2016 5:19 am

    Militarov wrote:


    Hey Militarov, is this the Russian Army or Private Military?

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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  Militarov on Fri Feb 12, 2016 5:26 am

    par far wrote:
    Militarov wrote:


    Hey Militarov, is this the Russian Army or Private Military?

    This photo is taken somewhere in Aleppo. Tigr obviously was suppled by Russians, however who are the persons in photo i really do not know, they wear unusual mix of equipment but i guess they could be Russian advisors (not the guy in mid ofc he is obv Syrian).

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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  magnumcromagnon on Fri Feb 12, 2016 6:33 am

    From Murad Gazdiev

    https://twitter.com/MuradoRT/status/697697438992359425

    U.S. accuses #Russia of "bombing 2 hospitals in #Aleppo" on day that no #RuAF jets struck #Aleppo. U.S. jets did.

    https://www.rt.com/news/332109-russian-jets-isis-warlords/

    JohninMK
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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  JohninMK on Fri Feb 12, 2016 7:22 pm

    Couldn't resist this. I expect its Lavrov getting critical instructions from Moscow so he can't listen to Kerry. You know, something like his wife telling him what to get in duty free on his way home.


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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  Hannibal Barca on Fri Feb 12, 2016 8:09 pm

    He is using an iphone which is a shame.

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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  PapaDragon on Fri Feb 12, 2016 9:41 pm


    Take the ground on the cheap, herd them all in one place and euthanize them all...  Twisted Evil  


    Russia helps mediate local deals with rebels in Syria: minister

    Russian mediators are helping the Syrian government to broker deals with rebels seeking to lay down their weapons or to relocate to insurgent strongholds, as Moscow plays a role underwriting local truces with besieged opposition fighters.


    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-mideast-crisis-syria-ceasefires-idUSKCN0VK1CT

    National reconciliation minister Ali Haidar also said escalating military pressure was forcing more rebels to seek out deals that have resulted in some moving from areas of Damascus and Homs to insurgent strongholds in Idlib and Raqqa.

    Haidar's comments in an interview with Reuters reflect the dramatic shift in momentum in the Syrian war since Russia began air strikes in support of President Bashar al-Assad on Sept. 30.      

    As the United States struggles to advance diplomacy toward securing a wider ceasefire, so-called local reconciliation agreements represent the government's preferred tool for making peace on its terms from a position of strength, area by area.

    Such agreements - a feature of the conflict for some time - are often described as a means for the government to force surrender on insurgents, and have typically followed lengthy blockades of rebel-held areas and the civilians living there.

    "The truth is that since the presence of the Russians on Syrian land, they can play the role of mediator in some areas," Haidar said at his offices in Damascus.

    "Sometimes it is the militants who request mediation by the Russians," he said. Those wishing to relocate wanted guarantees of safe passage to rebel strongholds, and those wishing to stay wanted to be sure they wouldn't be killed later on, he said.

    Haidar described the process as purely Syrian even if there had at times been help from Russia since the start of its intervention in the war.    

    "It isn't the mediation that plays the important role. The important role is the achievements of the army in military operations, closing the path in front of these groups. The horizons are closed and this is what makes them head toward the other solution," he said.

    CONTACTS IN ALEPPO

    With the government gaining ground backed by Russian air power, international diplomacy is struggling to make headway toward an overall negotiated settlement to the war that has killed 250,000 people and forced 11 million from their homes.

    Major powers with influence over the conflict are meeting in Munich on Thursday. A Western official said on Wednesday Moscow had presented a proposal envisaging a truce in three weeks' time, though Washington has concerns about parts of it.

    Peace talks between the government and opposition factions were aborted in Geneva last week before they really began, with the opposition withdrawing as government forces backed by allied militia made a dramatic advance north of Aleppo.

    Haidar said contacts had begun with groups in Aleppo, a city divided into zones controlled separately by the government and opposition, with a view to concluding local agreements there. The government has vowed to recapture Aleppo.

    "We have started contacts with some of the militant commanders via mediators, we are seeking to arrive at solutions that keep civilians out of any coming military action," Haidar said.

    "This is happening in the Aleppo countryside, the districts of Aleppo, and rural Homs, and rural Damascus now," he said. The secret contacts in Aleppo had got underway less than two weeks ago, he said.

    In one local agreement, some 270 gunmen from the al Qaeda-linked Nusra Front left the last opposition-held district of Homs for the insurgent stronghold of Idlib in December. The buses were provided by the government.

    Others have left suburbs of Damascus for both Idlib and Raqqa province, Islamic State's stronghold in Syria.

    Haidar said talks were under way for the evacuation of a total of 1,800 militants from suburbs of southern Damascus to both Idlib and Raqqa. He declined to give details because of the sensitivity of the talks.

    Haidar described it as a military tactic by insurgents who, feeling that are under pressure, are being forced to move fighters to areas such as Idlib "for the coming battle".

    "As their horizons close, and they feel ... they can no longer wage battles across all Syria, they have started to head toward gathering their forces in certain areas," Haidar said.  

    Haidar said more than 50 local deals had been concluded, though not all of them had been implemented in full. "We have a plan that can achieve reconciliations covering another million people within six months," he said.

    While welcoming deals that save lives, the United Nations says many have failed to improve conditions for civilians.

    "It is always a good thing when the guns go silent because it means lives can be saved. However, many local agreements, after they were concluded, have fallen short because free movement for civilians, free access for humanitarian aid, or restoration of basic services did not become reality," Yacoub El Hillo, UN Humanitarian and Resident Coordinator in Syria, said.

    "(Mouadamiya) is an example of how the agreement did not materialize as originally envisioned. It is imperative that these agreements have an immediate dividend that is felt by the people in these locations," he said.

    Haidar said rebels had breached the ceasefire in Mouadamiya, southwest of Damascus, which was concluded in 2013. The army is currently mounting an attack to separate Mouadamiya from nearby Daraya.

    Haidar said: "We are seeking the departure of the remaining gunmen from Mouadamiya and its return to (normal) life."

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    THE TURKISH 2ND ARMY. INVASION FORCE FOR SYRIA?

    Post  Kriva on Fri Feb 12, 2016 10:05 pm

    Recent public comments by the Turkish government have hinted at a possible invasion into Syrian territory to “stabilize” the situation and secure Turkey’s national security. Significant clashes between Turkish army and security forces with elements of the YPG and PKK, which have exacted a costly toll on the Kurdish civilian population have been raging in southern Turkey and northern Syria in recent months. Russian satellite surveillance and human intelligence employed by both Russian and Syria in the region have confirmed the build-up of troops and material on the border.

    http://southfront.org/military-analysis-the-turkish-2nd-army-invasion-force-for-syria/

    Syria has a military agreement with Iran. Would they intervene ?
    (I don't think so)

    Russia is currently helping Syria. Would they intervene ?
    (I don't think so)

    What are the possibilities to stop TurkISIStan?


    par far
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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  par far on Fri Feb 12, 2016 10:16 pm

    Kriva wrote:Recent public comments by the Turkish government have hinted at a possible invasion into Syrian territory to “stabilize” the situation and secure Turkey’s national security. Significant clashes between Turkish army and security forces with elements of the YPG and PKK, which have exacted a costly toll on the Kurdish civilian population have been raging in southern Turkey and northern Syria in recent months. Russian satellite surveillance and human intelligence employed by both Russian and Syria in the region have confirmed the build-up of troops and material on the border.

    http://southfront.org/military-analysis-the-turkish-2nd-army-invasion-force-for-syria/

    Syria has a military agreement with Iran. Would they intervene ?
    (I don't think so)

    Russia is currently helping Syria. Would they intervene ?
    (I don't think so)

    What are the possibilities to stop TurkISIStan?


    Arm the PKK and the Kurds to the teeth.

    ultron
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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  ultron on Fri Feb 12, 2016 10:17 pm

    If Turks go into Syria then the Mahdi Army from Iraq will rip Turk a new one cheers Never mess with Arabs.

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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  PapaDragon on Fri Feb 12, 2016 10:32 pm

    par far wrote:
    Kriva wrote:...................................

    Syria has a military agreement with Iran. Would they intervene ?
    (I don't think so)

    Russia is currently helping Syria. Would they intervene
    ?
    (I don't think so)

    What are the possibilities to stop TurkISIStan?


    Arm the PKK and the Kurds to the teeth.

    Russia WANTS turks to go for it.

    When they made noise to the press about turk preparations for invasion they did not do it so turks would back off. They did it so everyone knows who is blame when turkey gets cooked.

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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  PapaDragon on Fri Feb 12, 2016 10:37 pm


    Checkmate in Syria: How Russia Mastered the Board

    http://www.newsweek.com/russia-syria-intervention-cease-fire-425991

    The balance has shifted in Syria’s civil war—Russian airpower has tipped the scales decisively in favor of the Damascus regime. In the days before a partial cease-fire was brokered in Munich, troops loyal to President Bashar al-Assad backed by Iranian Revolutionary Guards moved to encircle Aleppo, the biggest city still in rebel hands, as Moscow’s warplanes pulverized rebel positions. “The Syrian airplanes are attacking with bullets. The rockets are from Russian airplanes,” Dr. Rami Kalazi, a neurosurgeon still working in an Aleppo hospital, tells Newsweek by telephone. “The past four days were stressful. Two or three massacres every day, at least, 40 or 50 people [being brought to the hospital] a day.”

    The government onslaught on the nearby towns of Nubl and Zahra threatens to cut off Aleppo from the last remaining road link to Turkey—and thousands of residents have chosen to escape before the fighting engulfs Aleppo. According to the United Nations, more than 45,000 refugees reached the Turkish border in the first nine days of February, with tens of thousands more internally displaced in the rebel-held city of Idlib. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey said if Syrians “reach our door and have no other choice, if necessary, we have to and will let our brothers in.” But in practice, Turkish authorities have been allowing only a trickle of the most recent wave of Syrians into their country, corralling most of the newcomers in giant camps on the Syrian side of the border. Ankara has also balked at EU plans to have Turkey accept more refugees in exchange for aid.

    “We have taken 3 million Syrians and Iraqis into our home. How many did you take?” a visibly emotional Erdogan said to an audience of Turkish officials, denouncing a recent call by the U.N. for his country to accept more refugees. “Syria has turned into a...genocide. The Assad regime is the reason for this problem. What does the United Nations say? ‘Open your door to those massed at your door.’”

    The assault on Aleppo triggered a renewed flurry of diplomacy led by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, who has been trying for months to broker a cease-fire and develop a road map for a transitional government and, ultimately, new elections. In Munich, Kerry managed to reach a “cessation of hostilities” deal on Friday that would allow humanitarian aid into besieged rebel-held towns, but which did not exclude continued Russian bombing and would not go into effect for a week. In theory, Moscow backs the plan. In practice, though, many observers fear that Russia’s true tactic is to play along with talks while doing all it can to help Assad’s forces win on the ground.

    The Munich deal allows the Russians to continue bombing “terrorist” targets—chosen in Moscow.  “They are playing a game of rope-a-dope,” says the University of Oklahoma’s Joshua Landis, author of the influential Syria Comment blog. “Telling their opponents to talk themselves out while they go in for the kill.” Russia’s Defense Ministry said its planes were flying around 510 combat sorties a week from an airbase near Latakia, and the Russian Foreign Ministry’s spokeswoman, Maria Zakharova, insisted that Moscow “has still not received convincing evidence of civilian deaths as a result of Russian airstrikes in Syria.”

    In addition to its decisive air support, Russia has been supplying state-of-the-art T-90 tanks to the Syrian army. “Capitalizing on the superiority offered by T-90 tanks, Syrian government troops and their allies encircled the important towns of Khan Tuman and al-Qarasi near the Aleppo-Damascus road,” Iran’s semiofficial Fars news agency reported. Russia has also been active on the ground, building cooperation between Assad and some of his former enemies. The official Syrian government news agency announced earlier this month that Russian officers met with Kurdish officials in northeast Syria to discuss military cooperation with Assad’s government. According to the report—which the U.K.-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights confirmed—Russia has deployed 200 troops to the Kurdish-controlled town of Qamishli on the Turkish border to secure a military airport for Russian use. At the same time, the self-proclaimed government of Kurdish-held northern Syria, known as the Rojava Self-Ruled Democratic Administration, opened its first overseas representative office in Moscow.

    Much of northern Syria is controlled by the PYD, or Kurdish Democratic Union Party, and its militia. The PYD has close ties to the Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or PKK, that has been fighting a 30-year-old insurgency against the government of Turkey. The Kurds are officially part of the U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces, a coalition that includes Arab and Assyrian groups. But the U.S. is leery of giving the PYD too much support for fear of antagonizing its NATO ally Turkey—even though the Kurds have shown themselves to be the most effective, as well as the most moderate, rebel fighters on the ground in both Syria and Iraq.

    Syria’s Kurds, says Landis, “are in the business of winning. They are very interested in taking more territory around Afrin and Kobani. They need all the help they can get”—including from the Russians. “America is a fickle ally.”

    Assad may not favor Kurdish independence—his ambassador to the U.N. said in February the Kurds should “put ideas of autonomy out of their minds.” But for Russia, the Kurds are a potentially valuable ally. And Moscow’s airpower could transform the Kurds’ fight against the Islamic State militant group in the same way it has boosted Assad’s war machine, with dramatic results for the PYD’s main battlefront against ISIS and the Nusra Front, Al-Qaeda’s franchise in Syria, in the country’s northeast.

    The Turks, meanwhile, are horrified by what Mustafa Akyol, a columnist for the daily Hurriyet newspaper, called “a perfect disaster for Turkey”—the triple whammy of a massive influx of refugees, a revived Assad regime and an independent Kurdish area on their border. Could Turkey, with the second largest military in NATO, put boots on the ground to contain all three threats? Russia’s Defense Ministry spokesman, Major General Igor Konashenkov, warned in early February that he had “significant evidence to suspect Turkey is in the midst of intense preparations for a military invasion into Syria.” He cited surveillance pictures of military buildup near the Reyhanli checkpoint. Konashenkov also said that “militants [in] Aleppo and Idlib are being supplied with arms and fighters from Turkish territory.”

    A Turkish invasion remains unlikely, though Ankara has considered a limited intervention in Syria before: In 2014, it shut off access to YouTube after leaked audiotapes revealed Turkish ministers allegedly discussing how to stage a provocation that could justify military action in Syria. And in February, President Erdogan praised a 2003 plan that would have established a joint U.S.-Turkish buffer zone in northern Iraq (which was voted down by Ankara’s parliament). “If...Turkey had been present in Iraq, the country would have never have fallen into its current situation,” Erdogan told reporters. Currently, there was “no need for a similar motion for Syria,” he continued, because “such authority has already been given” to the Turkish army, if necessary.

    Ultimately, though, the game-changer in Syria, Russian airpower, may keep Turkey out of the quagmire. “In the past five years, there have been several times people thought that Turkey will be drawn into a military intervention in Syria,” says Akyol, author of Islam Without Extremes: A Muslim Case for Liberty. “Ankara has always opted for caution. Now, with Russia involved, there is even more reason for caution.” Turkey has recently signed military alliance agreements with Saudi Arabia and Qatar “against common enemies,” but it’s unlikely those countries will intervene militarily to help the beleaguered Sunni rebels in Syria without Washington’s say-so. And despite escalating calls in Washington to create a “safe zone” in northern Syria with U.S. and Turkish troops on the ground, the risks of direct conflict with Moscow are too high for that to happen.

    “On September 30, when Russia went into Syria, [President Barack] Obama said, ‘We will not fight a proxy war with Russia over Syria,” says Landis. “This is our policy, and it will remain so.”

    Meanwhile, signs are increasing that Syria’s rebels are crumbling under the onslaught.
    The lifting of sanctions on Iran will likely allow Tehran to boost its support for its proxies in Syria and Iraq, and fuel is in desperately short supply in rebel-held areas of Aleppo, according to local reports.

    When Aleppo fell to rebels in 2012, many predicted the end of the Assad regime. Now, after a war that has claimed more than 250,000 lives, sent more than 4.5 million refugees abroad and displaced another 6.5 million within Syria, the roles are reversed. The latest cease-fire, if it holds up, will likely serve as a prelude for the capitulation of Aleppo to Assad’s forces—and with it the beginning of the end of the Middle East’s bloodiest war in a generation.

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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  Morpheus Eberhardt on Fri Feb 12, 2016 10:44 pm

    A few Iranian friends translate Iranian media for me.

    About 24-48 hours ago, it was announced in Iran (by Mashregh News) that Russia gave a very stiff ultimatum to Turkey. The ultimatum was very explicit and detailed. Turkey immediately acquiesced and said that it would not be part of any "Saudi" blah blah in Syria.

    Of course, as I have explained on multiple occasions before, all of these tidbits are pretty unimportant minor acts of the current world war; however, I was wondering if any Turkish governmental pawns have gone the way of Ozal as a result of this ultimatum. Has anybody heard of any?


    Edit: Let me clarify something. All of these kind of announcement won't change the fact that everybody will eventually get involved in the current world war; it's just a matter of timing. Even the Saudis, of all drones, have been ordered to become cannon fodders, I am sure to their utmost surprise.


    Last edited by Morpheus Eberhardt on Fri Feb 12, 2016 11:00 pm; edited 4 times in total

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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  Erk on Fri Feb 12, 2016 10:56 pm

    PapaDragon wrote:


    Russia WANTS turks to go for it.

    When they made noise to the press about turk preparations for invasion they did not do it so turks would back off. They did it so everyone knows who is blame when turkey gets cooked.

    Wishful thinking I would say, the Turks deserve to be rolled, but in reality I think Erdogan is a fraud, not a great leader.

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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  Isos on Fri Feb 12, 2016 11:19 pm

    When a RAF Tornado meet a Su in Syria lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol!



    Wiki wrote:Genuflection (or genuflexion), bending at least one knee to the ground, was from early times a gesture of deep respect for a superior.


    PS: Nothing to do with the topic but funny.

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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  PapaDragon on Fri Feb 12, 2016 11:41 pm


    ^^^ Landed on the nose, rolled on and stayed in one piece. Back in the Cold War things were built to last. thumbsup



    Also:

    I have been reading articles on Syria in Guardian, Financial Times and couple of other outlets and I noticed that comment sections are 90% very critical (to put it politely) of the article's content.

    Could be that public opinion in UK (and maybe USA) do not buy into "democratic jihad" anymore. I wonder what the situation is in German, French and other media?

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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  Isos on Fri Feb 12, 2016 11:56 pm

    PapaDragon wrote:
    ^^^ Landed on the nose, rolled on and stayed in one piece. Back in the Cold War things were built to last. thumbsup



    Also:

    I have been reading articles on Syria in Guardian, Financial Times and couple of other outlets and I noticed that comment sections are 90% very critical (to put it politely) of the article's content.

    Could be that public opinion in UK (and maybe USA) do not buy into "democratic jihad" anymore. I wonder what the situation is in German, French and other media?

    In France it is. French like to vote for a president and then put all the bad things that happen on him. They like to critc evrything, they like anti-system speaches and political parties ... But when it's time to vote, they vote for the system. At they end of Sarkozy, they hated him but still vote for Holland which is praticly the same idiot as Sarkozy even if during the élections many of them said they wanted something new like a comunist.

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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  Vann7 on Sat Feb 13, 2016 12:15 am

    quote " ISIS used chemical weapons, may have more - CIA chief "

    https://www.rt.com/usa/332300-brennan-isis-chemical-weapons/

    Basically US Government is blackmailing Russia that are ready to take the fight to the use of lethal weapons  against them in Syria using Weapon of Mass destruction/advanced Chemical weapons if Russia continues supporting Assad or Liberating more terrorist cities.  The believe that Jihadist who "protest for freedom" with ak-47 ,now can produce in their garage in Syria chemical weapons ,in the middle of a warzone is laughable. US is threatening Russia with a chemical war as simple as that ,and later will blame it is "rebels " unsuspected "new abilities" to create them.

    What all this means ladies and gentleman is that US will not backdown in Syria and only increase
    the hostilities against Syrian Government and Russia. Russia will face a chemical warfare in Syria if they don't negotiate to partition it ,and force Assad out, this is what US is telling them. Through
    its CIA director. So we are heading to high level proxy war in Syria of US against Russia. That instead of Stinger missiles ,they now will rely in chemical warfare.. something that will make it very expensive for them to counter it and with a potential Turkey invasion too. So be ready for a False flag like event.. of what happened in Damascus ,but this time will not be blamed in Assad
    but in "ISIS". And Turkey can use as "Excuse" the chemical attack of them ,to invade syria.


    So things are heating up ,and Russia will have to either negotiate for the split of Syria in parts
    or continue with the game of pretending US and TUrkey are not fighting them though ISIS,or world war 3. Or maybe Russia have another option that will allow them to earn time and outmaneuver them. Whatever it is.. i don't think Russia is well prepared to fight a chemical war
    in Syria , their troops could have chemical gear ,but not the Syrian army or Syrian population.


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    Re: Russian Military involvement and aid to Syria #8

    Post  Sponsored content Today at 12:11 am


      Current date/time is Sat Dec 10, 2016 12:11 am