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    Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

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    BTRfan

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    Re: Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

    Post  BTRfan on Thu Jul 16, 2015 6:47 am

    Russia to me is a mysterious engima or an engimatic mystery... I have a very difficult time assessing if they are preparing to start a war, preparing to defend against a war NATO might start, building up for war or defense, unable to adequately build up...

    It is often difficult to tell if they are a paper tiger lacking the economy and logistics to support a mass build-up and mass mobilization, or if they are easily capable of sustaining major conventional operations.

    Culturally Russia is certainly unique, it is not some bad clone of the USA or the UK.

    Russia is at least as geographically diverse as the USA, it has many languages within its borders, numerous ethnic groups, a rich and unique history, but Russia remains a mystery.


    I have no idea if the Russians aim to spread their values by showcasing their culture and exporting their literature, music, etc, or if they want to spread their values at gunpoint, or if they even want to spread their values at all for that matter.

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    Re: Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

    Post  BTRfan on Thu Jul 16, 2015 6:49 am

    It might be odd to say this but it is possible that the West has a better understanding of North Korea [DPRK] than of the Russian Federation.
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    max steel

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    Re: Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

    Post  max steel on Thu Jul 16, 2015 7:55 am

    BTRfan wrote:It might be odd to say this but it is possible that the West has a better understanding of North Korea [DPRK] than of the Russian Federation.

    Because west wants to invade N.K not Russia .
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    Re: Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

    Post  GarryB on Thu Jul 16, 2015 10:02 am

    I have no idea if the Russians aim to spread their values by showcasing their culture and exporting their literature, music, etc, or if they want to spread their values at gunpoint, or if they even want to spread their values at all for that matter.

    Why would they care about spreading values?

    Very simply they are preparing for war so they don't have to fight... that is what deterrence is all about... and MAD.

    It might be odd to say this but it is possible that the West has a better understanding of North Korea [DPRK] than of the Russian Federation.

    The west never tries to understand anyone... it just assimilates or destroys.


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    George1

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    Re: Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

    Post  George1 on Wed Sep 30, 2015 8:23 am

    Federation Council will consider the use of the Russian Armed Forces abroad


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    Re: Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

    Post  flamming_python on Thu Oct 01, 2015 8:52 pm

    George1 wrote:Federation Council will consider the use of the Russian Armed Forces abroad

    Rubber-stamp committee
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    Russian Military: Strategic issues, Doctrines and Threats

    Post  Godric on Fri Oct 09, 2015 7:30 pm

    Military Operation in Syria may return Russia as a World Power

    http://sputniknews.com/russia/20151009/1028284477/military-operation-syria-russia-world-power.html


    would love to see China also join Russia in wiping out these wahabists vermin .... it would bring more stability into the world and end the notion that western interference and aggression can go unchecked ... this is the first step

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    Russia tests command and control system in an exercise with multiple missile launches

    Post  max steel on Mon Nov 02, 2015 7:48 pm

    Russia tests command and control system in an exercise with multiple missile launches





    On 30 October 2015, Russia conducted a test of the command and control system that involved a number of strategic and non-strategic systems . As part of the exercise, K-117 Bryansk submarine of the Project 667BDRM/Delta IV-class launched a R-29RM missile from the Barents Sea. K-223 Podolsk submarine of the Project 667BDR/Delta III class launched a R-29R missile from the Sea of Okhotsk. The Strategic Rocket Forces conducted a launch of a Topol/SS-25 missile from Plesetsk, while the Tu-160 strategic bombers launched cruise missiles toward targets at the Pemboy and Kura test ranges. In addition, Velikiy Ustyug small missile ship launched a Kalibr cruise missile from the Kaspian Sea. The exercise also involved a launch of an Iskander cruise missile from Kapustin Yar.

    A similar exercise was conducted in May 2014. The only difference is that in 2014 it included a launch of a missile defense interceptor and there were no cruise missile launches. Iskander did take part, but it launched its ballistic missile. In 2013, the exercise was conducted also on October 30.

    For R-29R missile it was the first launch since May 2014. R-29RM missile was launched in November 2014, from Tula submarine. The previous Topol launch took place in August 2015, but it was a test of a new payload from Kapustin Yar. The last "regular" Topol launch from Plesetsk was last conducted in May 2014.
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    Russian Military: Strategic issues, Doctrines and Threats

    Post  max steel on Wed Jan 27, 2016 10:20 pm

    How Powerful Is Russia’s Military?


    The Russian military suffered years of neglect after the Soviet collapse and no longer casts the shadow of a global superpower. However, the Russian armed forces are in the midst of a historic overhaul with significant consequences for Eurasian politics and security. Russian officials say the reforms are necessary to bring a Cold War-era military into the twenty-first century, but many Western analysts fear they will enable Moscow to pursue a more aggressive foreign policy, often relying on force to coerce its weaker neighbors. Some say Russian interventions in Georgia in 2008 and Ukraine in 2014—both former Soviet republics seeking closer ties to the West—demonstrate that President Vladimir Putin is prepared to use military force to reestablish Russian hegemony in its near abroad.

    What are Russian conventional military capabilities?


    Both in terms of troops and weapons, Russian conventional forces dwarf those of its Eastern European and Central Asian neighbors (see Table 1), many of which are relatively weak ex-Soviet republics closely allied with Moscow. Russia has a military pact with Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and Tajikistan through the Collective Security Treaty Organization, formed in 1992. Moscow also stations significant troops in the region: Armenia (3,200), Georgia’s breakaway regions of Abkhazia and South Ossetia (7,000), Moldova’s separatist Transnistria region (1,500), Kyrgyzstan (500), and Tajikistan (5,000).



    As part of defense reforms, most Russian ground forces are to be professionalized and reorganized into formations of a few thousand troops for low- and medium-intensity conflicts. But for the foreseeable future many will remain one-year conscripts with limited training (military service is compulsory for Russian men aged eighteen to twenty-seven). The Airborne Assault Forces, which comprises about thirty-five thousand troops and whose commander answers directly to Putin, is Russia’s elite crisis-reaction force. A Special Operations Command, also a reserve of Putin, was created in 2013 to manage special operators outside Russian borders.

    Moscow is intent on remilitarizing its Arctic territory and is restoring Soviet-era airfields and ports to help protect important hydrocarbon resources and shipping lanes. (Russia has the world’s largest fleet of icebreakers, which are regularly required to navigate these waters.) In late 2013, Putin ordered the creation of a new strategic military command in the Russian Arctic.




    Meanwhile, rearmament has been slow, and much of the military’s equipment remains decades old. The once formidable Soviet navy is now little more than a coastal protection force, experts say. All of the navy’s large vessels, including its flagship and sole aircraft carrier, the non-nuclear Kuznetsov, are holdovers from the Cold War. (By comparison, the United States has ten nuclear carriers and builds several new warships each year.) Russian air power will also be limited, at least in the short term. Aircraft manufacturer Sukhoi is developing several new advanced warplanes, including a fifth-generation “stealth” fighter (the T-50), but production has been sluggish in some cases, and most of the current air force dates from the 1980s.

    Russia has made the modernization of its air and space defenses a top priority of the rearmament program, establishing a consolidated Aerospace Defense Command in 2011. The mainstay of this defense network is the S-400, a long- to medium-range surface-to-air missile system, to be deployed near Moscow and strategic positions along Russia’s perimeter. A more advanced S-500 is in development.

    What are Russian nuclear capabilities?

    Russia’s vast nuclear arsenal remains on par with the United States and is the country’s only residual great power feature, military experts say. Moscow has about 1,500 strategic warheads on deployed intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs), submarines, and heavy bombers. These numbers comply with the so-called New START treaty with the United States, which came into force February 2011. Russia is also believed to have some 2,000 nonstrategic (also referred to as tactical, theater, or battlefield) nuclear warheads.

    Russia leaned on its nuclear deterrent as its conventional force languished in the years after the Soviet collapse. NATO’s bombing of Yugoslavia in 1999 added to fears in the Kremlin that the U.S.-led alliance might impede Russia’s ability to act in the region. Moscow appeared to lower its nuclear threshold in 2000, permitting the use of such weapons in response to major conventional attacks. By comparison, Soviet doctrine reserved nuclear weapons for use only in retaliation for a nuclear attack.

    Much of the Russian nuclear deterrent is being modernized: a new class of ballistic missile submarine is coming into service; some strategic bombers are being upgraded; and there are plans to replace all Soviet-era ICBMs over the next decade or so.

    What is the Russian military budget?

    At close to $90 billion for 2013, the Russian military budget has more than doubled over the last decade (see Figure 2), trailing behind only China ($188 billion) and the United States ($640 billion), according to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute(SIPRI). (Data includes funding for armed services, paramilitary forces, military space activities, foreign military aid, and military R&D.)

    Defense spending has benefited from a surge in global energy prices over the last decade, as oil and gas account for more than half of Russia’s federal budget revenues, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. In 2014, Russia is about half way through a ten-year $700 billion weapons modernization program, with priorities given to strategic nuclear weapons, fighter aircraft, ships and submarines, air defenses, communications and intelligence.

    But analysts say recent spending should be taken in context. First, defense outlays plunged dramatically during the 1990s and remain well below Soviet levels. Second, Russia still spends a fraction of what the United States and many of its allies spend per soldier. Third, high inflation rates in the defense industry as well as endemic corruption consume a large portion of newly allocated resources. And, lastly, Russian defense spending is closely tied to global energy prices, which can fluctuate dramatically. Many analysts link the two-thirds drop in oil prices in the mid-1980s to the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991.




    What prompted the reforms?

    The five-day conflict with Georgia in August 2008 exposed major deficiencies—in command-and-control systems, hardware, weaponry, and intelligence—and confirmed that Russia’s mass-mobilization military, where millions of conscripts could marshal to protect the motherland, remained outdated.

    “The Georgian war was arguably the last war of the twentieth century for Russia’s armed forces; in the sense that it was largely fought using organizations, tactics, and equipment designed in the last century,” wrote Roger N. McDermott, a Eurasian military expert at the Jamestown Foundation, in 2009.

    In the weeks after the conflict, Defense Minister Anatoliy Serdyukov, a powerful reformer appointed by Putin, recommitted the military to a lengthy overhaul involving massive personnel cuts (from 1.2 million to 1 million), rearmament, and reorganization into a professional force capable of responding quickly to acute crises.

    Experts assessing the status of reform in late 2013 say it has lacked strategic direction and suffered from major planning failures, and they forecast a number of challenges related to personnel, funding, and procurement in years ahead. However, they conclude the overhaul has made tremendous strides. “It is undoubtedly the case that post-[military] transformation Russia will have a very different force available from the one that went into action in Georgia in 2008, and one that is more effective, flexible, adaptable, and scalable for achieving Russia’s foreign policy aims,” wrote coauthors of a Strategic Studies Institute report.

    What does Russia consider threats?

    Russian leaders acknowledge that there is now little threat of a large-scale NATO land invasion— a top concern of the Cold War—but they repeatedly criticize the bloc’s eastward expansion, including its plans to roll out a ballistic missile defense shield across Europe. The United States, which developed the technology, says the system is only designed to guard against limited missile attacks from “rogue” states like Iran, but Moscow believes the technology could be updated and may tip the strategic nuclear balance. Putin and his military leaders have also frequently expressed concern with conventional precision strike weapons being developed by rivals.





    Moscow believes the so-called color revolutions—a series of popular uprisings in former Soviet satellites—were concerted attempts by the United States and its allies to erode Russian influence in the region. “Russian foreign policy appears to be based on a combination of fears of popular protest and opposition to U.S. world hegemony, both of which are seen as threatening the Putin regime,” writes Dmitry Gorenburg, an expert on the Russian military at CNA, a Virginia-based research institution.

    But many western and Russian analysts say Moscow’s concerns with NATO are often overstated and divert attention from more practical threats like those looming on Russia’s southern periphery, including ethnic insurgencies in the North Caucasus region, weapons proliferation, and a potential resurgence of the Taliban in Afghanistan.

    What are Russia’s strategic objectives in the region?

    Military modernization will enable the world’s largest country by far (and one of the most sparsely populated) to better defend its vast territory and national interests. But the conflicts in Ukraine and Georgia have aroused concerns about Russian aggression, namely Putin’s willingness to use military force unilaterally to preserve Russia’s traditional sphere of influence.

    Shortly before annexing Crimea in March 2014, Putin said he would defend the rights of Russians abroad, and in April he referred to a large swath of Ukrainian territory as Novorossiya (New Russia), a term used during imperial Russia. According to NATO and Ukrainian officials, Moscow has provided ethnic Russian insurgencies in Eastern Ukraine with training, personnel, and heavy weapons, including battle tanks and antiaircraft missiles. In November, Russia acknowledged rebel elections in the breakaway regions of Donetsk and Luhansk, a move that echoed Russia’s unilateral recognition of separatist governments in Abkhazia and South Ossetia after its conflict with Georgia in 2008.

    But Russia’s assertiveness has come with a cost. The Group of Eight (now G7) cut Moscow out of its elite club in March, and top Russian officials, banks, and businesses face an array of Western sanctions that may push the economy into recession. The Russian military will also suffer: France has delayed delivery of the first of two Mistral-class amphibious warships, and Russia’s extensive defense-industrial cooperation with Ukraine is in jeopardy.

    Experts say that there may also be domestic political consequences down the road. “[Putin]’s brand of ethnic geopolitics, redolent of the nineteenth century and the first half of the twentieth, is a double-edged sword,” wrote Strobe Talbott, president of the Brookings Institution, in August 2014. “It could shrink Russian territory, since vast parts of that country are populated by non-Russian ethnic groups who are unlikely to welcome or, over the long run, tolerate a Russian chauvinist in the Kremlin.”

    What is U.S. and NATO strategy toward Russia?

    Alliance leaders are reassessing defenses in Europe, particularly in the East. Since the annexation of Crimea, NATO has quadrupled (to sixteen) the number of warplanes policing the Baltics, which have witnessed a major surge in provocations involving Russian planes. NATO also announced plans for a new rapid reaction force—the Very High Readiness Joint Task Force (VJTF)—of about five thousand troops. Officials say the VJTF should be fully operational in early 2016 and will serve as an elite subset of the NATO Response Force composed of thirteen thousand troops.

    Some analysts recommend the alliance adopt a strategy of containment not unlike that of the Cold War. “Give up any hope of a return to business as usual; Boost the defense of Baltic states and Poland; Expose Russian corruption in the West; Impose sweeping visa sanctions on the Russian elite; Help Ukraine; and Reboot the Atlantic Alliance,” writes British journalist and Russia expert Edward Lucas.

    CFR’s Janine Davidson, an expert on military and defense strategy, says that NATO members need to prepare for the type of guerilla tactics Russia has used in eastern Ukraine. “NATO must consider what happens if and when these well-armed, unmarked, [Special Operations Forces]-like, suspiciously disciplined masked men turn up in a NATO nation, such as Estonia or Latvia (respectively 24 and 27 percent ethnic Russian) and commence another creeping invasion,” she writes.

    At the same time, CNA’s Gorenburg says Baltic governments should be wary of Russian subversion. “There is a danger that in focusing too much on strengthening military defenses, the Baltic states and NATO will neglect the non-military tools in Russia’s toolkit, including promoting and funding Euroskeptic political movements, encouraging radical groups to commit violent acts to create an environment of disorder, and using information warfare techniques to strengthen anti-government and anti-EU attitudes among minority populations,” he told CFR.
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    Re: Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

    Post  George1 on Fri Jan 29, 2016 12:50 am

    Νice article. From the map i understand how much has strengthened Russia's position in Black Seas after the 2008 S.Ossetia war and the unification of Crimea to Russia


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    Re: Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

    Post  George1 on Thu Feb 18, 2016 3:57 am

    Russia has the world’s second most powerful military, according to the annual ranking made by Global Firepower, an analytical website exploring the military power of different countries.

    http://rbth.com/defence/2016/02/17/russia-ranked-worlds-2nd-military-power-after-us_568639


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    Re: Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

    Post  George1 on Fri May 13, 2016 2:01 pm

    Over 400 Russian servicemen take part in Transdniestria drills

    More:
    http://tass.ru/en/defense/875258


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    Re: Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

    Post  George1 on Thu Jun 09, 2016 10:37 am

    Russia Cannot Ignore Threats From Syria, Libya, Iraq - MoD

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/military/20160609/1041042673/threats-terrorism-shoigu-mod.html#ixzz4B4cACuMz


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    Re: Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

    Post  George1 on Sat Sep 03, 2016 1:01 pm

    Programs of Russian military academies adjusted to reflect combat experience in Syria

    The programs will also take into account t the snap checks of the troops

    MOSCOW, September 2. /TASS/. The Russian Defense Ministry’s military academies’ training programs in 2016 have been adjusted with taking into account the snap checks of the troops and combat experience of Russia’s forces in Syria, Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu said on Friday.

    "It is important to emphasize that this year's training programs for higher military educational establishments have been adjusted to reflect the results of surprise combat readiness inspections of troops and the experience of the Russian Aerospace Force and Navy operation in the Syrian Arab Republic", the minister said at a conference call at the Russian Defense Ministry.

    According to him, 14,500 students of military academies, cadets of military schools and students of pre-higher education institutions of the Defense Ministry have started training in the new academic year, together with schoolchildren and students.

    Russia launched an operation against militants the Islamic State terrorist group (banned in Russia) in Syria on September 30, 2015, at the request of Syrian President Bashar Assad. In addition to the Aerospace Forces, the Russian Navy has also been involved in the operation. In addition, Russian troops have taken part in a mine clearing operation in Syria’s ancient city of Palmyra. In March 2016, Putin ordered to withdraw the main part of the Russian aviation group from Syria.


    More:
    http://tass.com/defense/897302


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    Re: Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

    Post  GarryB on Mon Sep 05, 2016 6:58 am

    Aircraft manufacturer Sukhoi is developing several new advanced warplanes, including a fifth-generation “stealth” fighter (the T-50), but production has been sluggish in some cases, and most of the current air force dates from the 1980s.

    The vast majority of US and NATO air fleets are older than the 1980s... US B-52s are from the 1950s and 1960s.

    The backbone of the US AF fighter fleet are F-15s and F-16s from the 70s and 80s.

    The Current Russian AF aircraft with updates are comparable if not superior to western equivalents... MiG-29SMT being inferior, but Su-35S being superior to most western equivalents.


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    Re: Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

    Post  George1 on Mon Sep 05, 2016 12:19 pm

    Strategic exercise Kavkaz-2016 begins in Russia's Southern Military District

    New types of weapons, military equipment and control systems will be tested within the exercise involving some 12,500 troops

    MOSCOW, September 8. /TASS/. A strategic command staff exercise codenamed Kavkaz-2016 with 12,500 troops taking part has begun in the Southern Military District, the Russian Defense Ministry has said.

    "The Kavkaz-2016 exercise is the final phase of a package of command staff and special practices and drills for military command bodies and snap checks of troops’ combat readiness due in 2016. It will be held at test sites of the Southern Military District, the Black and Caspian sees on September 5-10," the Defense Ministry said in a news release obtained by TASS.

    "Taking part in the exercise there are about 12,500 troops, aviation, combat vehicles and naval vessels," Defense Ministry’s press-service said.

    One of the special tasks of the Kavkaz-2016 exercise will be to test new types of weapons and other military equipment and command systems.

    There are plans for organizing the operation of command posts of all levels with the use of the newest automation means, practice mobilization readiness and territorial defense measures and widely employ aviation and the forces of the Black Sea Fleet and the Caspian flotilla.

    The Defense Ministry’s press-service recalled that within the framework of preparations for the Kavkaz-2016 exercise twelve special logistics drills were held in August. On August 25-31 there was a series of combat readiness span checks involving the forces of the southern, western and central military districts, the Aerospace force and the Airborne Troops.

    In 2015 the Russian Armed Forces held a strategic exercise called Center-2015, with about 95,00 troops, 170 aircraft and 20 ships taking part.


    More:
    http://tass.com/defense/897869


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    Re: Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

    Post  AlfaT8 on Mon Sep 05, 2016 2:01 pm

    GarryB wrote:
    Aircraft manufacturer Sukhoi is developing several new advanced warplanes, including a fifth-generation “stealth” fighter (the T-50), but production has been sluggish in some cases, and most of the current air force dates from the 1980s.

    The vast majority of US and NATO air fleets are older than the 1980s... US B-52s are from the 1950s and 1960s.

    The backbone of the US AF fighter fleet are F-15s and F-16s from the 70s and 80s.

    The Current Russian AF aircraft with updates are comparable if not superior to western equivalents... MiG-29SMT being inferior, but Su-35S being superior to most western equivalents.

    "Inferior" in what way?
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    Re: Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

    Post  GarryB on Tue Sep 06, 2016 9:28 am

    I would consider the MiG-29SMT as inferior in some terms compared with the Eurocanards and F-22.

    I would vastly prefer the efficient and relatively cheap MiG-29SMT to any of those aircraft but in pure performance it would come up short in some areas.


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    Re: Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

    Post  George1 on Tue Sep 13, 2016 12:38 pm

    Russian military units arrive in Kyrgyzstan to take part in SCO drills

    More:
    http://tass.com/defense/899190


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    Re: Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

    Post  George1 on Wed Sep 14, 2016 10:46 am

    Next strategic military exercise due in 2017 in western Russia — General Staff

    Russia's previous strategic exercise in the western regions was held in 2013 and involved 10,000 troops

    MOSCOW, September 13. /TASS/. The next strategic command staff exercise will be held in western Russia next year, the chief of the Russian armed forces’ General Staff, Valery Gerasimov, has told the media.

    "Strategic command staff exercises are held annually. The next, codenamed Zapad-2017 (West-2017) will take place in the west of the country," Gerasimov told a news briefing devoted to the preliminary results of the Kavkaz-2016 war games.

    Gerasimov recalled that military exercises of that scale normally practiced operations to maintain security in a strategic direction.

    The Kavkaz-2016 exercise was conducted in the Southern Military District on September 5-10. A total of 120,000 troops and civilians were involved in different southern areas of Russia, but no more than 12,500 simultaneously at any one time.

    Russia held the previous strategic exercise in the west in 2013. The Russian-Belarussian exercise Zapad-2013 involved more than 10,000 troops.


    More:
    http://tass.com/defense/899714


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    kavkaz excersize

    Post  AlfaT8 on Wed Sep 14, 2016 8:34 pm

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    Re: Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

    Post  George1 on Tue Sep 20, 2016 12:52 pm

    Next SCO exercise Peace Mission due in Russia in 2018

    More:
    http://tass.com/defense/900937?_ga=1.67165137.1337049799.1447427261


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    Re: Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

    Post  George1 on Mon Nov 07, 2016 8:31 pm

    Russian troops to take part in three joint military exercises in 2017

    Servicemen of Russia’s Eastern Military District will hold drills with Vietnam for the first time

    VLADIVOSTOK, November 7. /TASS/. Servicemen of Russia’s Eastern Military District will take part in three joint military exercises in 2017, including the tenth Russian-Mongolian maneuvers Selenga and drills with Vietnam for the first time, district spokesman Colonel Alexander Gordeyev said on Monday.

    "In 2017, servicemen of the combined arms formations of the Eastern Military District will take part in three joint international military exercises. The Russian-Mongolian maneuvers Selenga-2017 will become the tenth jubilee drills. Next year, they are planned to be held from August to September on the territory of Mongolia. The place of holding the other traditional international drills Indra-2017 will be determined during the first planning conference by representatives of the defense ministries of Russia and India. Also, the first joint Russian-Vietnamese exercises are planned in October 2017," the spokesman said.

    The Indra-2017 drills will presumably be held in November next year. Earlier, troops of the Eastern Military District took part in three joint Russian-Indian drills Indra in 2012, 2013 and 2016 at the Burduny practice range in the Republic of Buryatia in East Siberia, the Mahajan training range in the Indian state of Rajasthan and at the Sergeyevsky range in the Primorye Territory in the Russian Far East, respectively.

    The joint Russian-Mongolian military exercises Selenga-2016 were held at the Burduny training range of the Eastern Military District in the Republic of Buryatia.

    All the joint military drills will be held under the plan of the Eastern Military District’s international cooperation.


    More:
    http://tass.com/defense/910726


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    Strategic Importance of Kaliningrad

    Post  Odin of Ossetia on Thu Nov 24, 2016 3:55 am



    These maps show it:


    http://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/world/these-maps-show-how-russia-has-europe-spooked/ar-AAkEVEb?li=AAggv0m&ocid=SKY2DHP
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    George1

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    Location : Greece

    Re: Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

    Post  George1 on Wed Nov 30, 2016 1:05 pm

    Today, the session of the Russian Defence Ministry Board has been held in Moscow under the leadership of the head of the military department General of the Army Sergei Shoigu.

    The Minister of Defence suggested starting the discussion with the implementation of the decisions of the President of the Russian Federation aimed at improvement of combat staff in the Western strategic direction.

    According to General of the Army Sergei Shoigu, approximately 100 organizational activities, including the formation of two motorized rifle divisions, units of which are located in Belgorod, Voronezh and Smolensk Regions, have been carried out in the Western Military District this year.

    It is planned to complete their installation in the first half of 2017.
    To organize combat training, areas for firing small arms and grenade launchers, as well as facilities for driving military vehicles and automobiles have been equipped.

    The head of the military department paid special attention to removing shortcomings of the Baltic Fleet, which had identified by commission of the Ministry of Defence in June.

    According to the Defence Minister, most problems have been solved. Results of operational and combat training as well as summer training period inspection showed capabilities of the Baltic Fleet to perform assigned tasks successfully.

    Participants of the session paid special attention to orders of the President of the Russian Federation dated May 2012 and his decisions according to results of session in Sochi.

    Implementation of the Activity Plan of the Central military district 2016-2020 was discussed within this subject.

    According to the head of the military department, the district forces are actively practicing joint peacekeeping and special operations with the Russian allies in the CSTO (Collective Security Treaty) and SCO (Shanghai Cooperation Organization).

    For the last four months, the military authorities and the troops of the district took part in three international exercises in Belarus and Kyrgyzstan.

    In order to improve the combat staff of the district, 5 formations, 12 military units and 20 small units were formed and reformed in 2016.
    "In total, more than 80 formations and military units of the district will get the modern samples of arms and military hardware. In general, the implementation of the plan in 2016 allowed to increase the combat potential of the Central military district troops and guarantee the fulfillment of its tasks," stated General of the Army Sergei Shoigu.

    The Board session participants also discussed the improvement of the organizational structure of military units, construction of new military towns, equipping of troops with modern weapons and military equipment.

    There was a detail discussion of the improvement of the structure of the 800th air base located at the Chkalovsky Airport.

    A large complex of works on creation of modern infrastructure has been held at the Chkalovsky Airport.

    "All of this is necessary for the Chkalovsky Airport to meet the requirements of the state aviation airports and be able to maintain modern aircraft. And most important thing is to reach the new, higher level of flight safety," said the Defence Minister General of the Army Sergei Shoigu.

    Leadership of the Russian Armed Forces, representatives of state authorities, public and other organizations attended the session Board.

    http://bmpd.livejournal.com/2292816.html


    _________________
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    Re: Russian National Security Strategy: Issues

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      Current date/time is Tue Sep 19, 2017 4:28 pm