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    Russia's presence in South-Εast Asia

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    Russian Patriot

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    Russia's presence in South-Εast Asia

    Post  Russian Patriot on Sat Oct 17, 2009 1:43 am

    Russia, Brunei agree to develop military, energy cooperation
    RIA Novosti

    00:08 17/10/2009 MOSCOW, October 16 (RIA Novosti) - Russia and Brunei intend to develop military and energy cooperation, the countries said in a joint statement on Friday after Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah's visit.

    During the week, Bolkiah met with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, as well as officials from Russian state arms exporter Rosoboronexport for discussions on the possibility of future arms purchases.

    "It was noted that military sphere is a promising direction. The sides spoke in favor of signing a military cooperation agreement after concluding ongoing negotiations," the statement said.

    The countries also intend to "step up cooperation" in the energy sector.


    The two countries also agreed to step up trade, economic and investment cooperation. Analysts say Russia's trade with the southeast Asian nation could increase to $50-75 million over the coming three to five years. Last year it was worth $802,700 with Russian exports at $801,900 and imports at a mere $800.

    The joint statement also said Russia and Brunei "decisively condemn and reject terrorism in all its forms and manifestations," and support the adoption of the Comprehensive Convention on International Terrorism.

    Bolkiah invited Medvedev to visit Brunei. "The invitation was accepted with gratitude. The date of the visit will be coordinated through diplomatic channels," the statement said.


    http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/news/2009/10/mil-091016-rianovosti11.htm
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    Tshering22

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    Re: Russia's presence in South-Εast Asia

    Post  Tshering22 on Mon Oct 25, 2010 5:33 pm

    This is a very good move that Russia is approaching and deepening its reach in the Southeast. Southeast is a critical location where Russian arms and energy agreements can economically bring back its world power status again since the days of USSR. In my opinion, there should be bi-annual Russia-Vietnam-India trade summits held, Vietnam being one of the leading countries of the region.
    Intense Russian involvement in Southeast would also come as a relief to the lesser prominent Southeast countries like Cambodia, Laos, Burma (and even Thailand), that are over-dependent on China's grace and totally tied down.
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    GarryB

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    Re: Russia's presence in South-Εast Asia

    Post  GarryB on Tue Oct 26, 2010 3:47 am

    I agree, it will be good for Russia but it will also be good for the countries of the South East to increase trade and diversify.
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    George1

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    Russian-Indonesian relationship

    Post  George1 on Fri Jul 27, 2012 1:19 am

    The period 2007–2008 may be viewed as a turning point in the development of strategic relations between the Russian Federation and the Republic of Indonesia. To date, however, the evolution of Indonesia-Russia strategic cooperation, particularly in the security sphere, has not received much scholarly attention. Yet relations between Indonesia and the Soviet Union, between the former’s proclamation of independence in August 1945 and the latter’s collapse in December 1991, went though a number of phases, at times reaching unprecedented levels of what can be described as near-allied partnership.
    The 6 September 2007 visit of then Russian President Vladimir Putin to Jakarta marked the culmination of a long and complex process of reanimating bilateral strategic ties begun in the 1990s. Indonesia intends to seek long-term military-technical cooperation with Russia.
    Moscow’s willingness to sell Indonesia advanced military hardware on flexible terms, noninterference in Indonesia’s internal affairs (particularly in relation to human rights violations), common views on international developments, and the previous history of bilateral contacts in this sphere, positions Indonesia strongly as a long-term strategic partner.


    Last edited by George1 on Thu May 19, 2016 3:56 pm; edited 2 times in total
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    George1

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    Re: Russia's presence in South-Εast Asia

    Post  George1 on Fri Jul 27, 2012 11:38 pm

    http://english.ruvr.ru/2012_07_11/Indonesian-air-carriers-eye-Superjets/

    Indonesian air carriers eye Superjets

    Indonesia’s Sky Aviation air carrier expects to receive three Russian-produced Sukhoi Superjets 100 under a bilateral 380 –mln dollar deal to deliver 12 jets to Indonesia by 2015.
    The information comes from a local business portal citing the company’s spokesman.
    According to the source, Sky Aviation plans to aircraft for its flights between Jakarta and major regional centers.
    Another Indonesian carrier, Kartika Airlines, is going to purchase 30 Russian Superjets for a total value of 951 mln.
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    GarryB

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    Re: Russia's presence in South-Εast Asia

    Post  GarryB on Sat Jul 28, 2012 3:34 am

    I hope the cooperation expands beyond defence, and that it expands in both directions so that Indonesia is not just buying Russian products with cash. Just a quick look on wiki and it says Indonesia exports electrical appliances, so opening up the Russian market to such products will be good for both countries.

    Perhaps Indonesian companies might open factories in Russia and make products there for the European market?


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    flamming_python

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    Re: Russia's presence in South-Εast Asia

    Post  flamming_python on Sat Jul 28, 2012 2:06 pm

    Surprised that Indonesia still wants Supejets; considering the incredible fuck up by Sukhoi and pals when they tried to impress their customers and instead ended up killing them.
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    TR1

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    Russia-Indonesia Defence Cooperation

    Post  TR1 on Sat Jul 28, 2012 10:05 pm

    flamming_python wrote:Surprised that Indonesia still wants Supejets; considering the incredible fuck up by Sukhoi and pals when they tried to impress their customers and instead ended up killing them.

    Is that actually proven, or just speculation?
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    George1

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    Bangladesh–Russia relations

    Post  George1 on Fri Apr 04, 2014 1:50 pm

    Agreements between Russia and Bangladesh promote bilateral relations

    The signing of agreements between Russia and Bangladesh is a solid step forward in promoting bilateral relations, President Vladimir Putin said at the talks with Bangladeshi Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina in Moscow on Tuesday.

    According to Putin, the two countries have established warm relations.

    The fulfillment of economic contracts is gaining momentum. In 2012, the growth was more than 20 percent, Putin said.

    After the talks, Russia and Bangladesh are expected to sign 11 agreements, including an agreement on grating a 500 million-dollar-loan to build a nuclear power station in Bangladesh.

    Putin meets with Bangladesh PM to sign a package of deals

    Russian President Vladimir Putin has said he pinned a lot of hope on the package of agreements that would be signed today during his meeting with Bangladeshi Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina.

    “Ahead of your visit, our colleagues put together a package of accords and contracts that will advance cooperation between the two countries,” Mr. Putin said as he greeted the Bangladeshi premier.

    The talks are expected to culminate in the adoption of eleven bilateral agreements, including the one on the settling of Bangladesh’s debt to Russia and a $500-million loan to build a nuclear power station in Bangladesh.

    President Putin praised positive dynamics in economic relations between the two nations. He pointed out that mutual trade turnover scaled up by over 60% in 2011 and by further 20% in 2012.
    Read more: http://voiceofrussia.com/2013_01_15/Agreements-between-Russia-and-Bangladesh-promote-bilateral-relations/
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    George1

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    Re: Russia's presence in South-Εast Asia

    Post  George1 on Sun Apr 13, 2014 3:33 am

    'Russia coming back to Bangladesh'

    “We never stopped, but we want to engage more actively,” Deputy Head of Russian Federal Agency for Cooperation with Foreign Countries Alexander Chesnokov says.

    Russian ambassador in Dhaka Alexander Nikolaev said on Friday the relations between the two countries were experiencing “a renaissance now”.

    He added that “Russia is coming back to Bangladesh, ‘seriously’ and ‘for long time’.

    The ambassador's effusive remark was made in the presence of the Deputy Head of Russian Federal Agency for Cooperation with Foreign Countries (Rossotrudnichestvo), Alexander Chesnokov, currently in Dhaka.

    Chesnokov is here on a visit to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Russian Centre of Science & Culture in the city.

    The ambassador told journalists that Russian culture and its people's friendliness were his country's “power”. “And it (culture) has enormous importance.”

    Russia-Bangladesh relations began in 1971 when the then Soviet Union stood by the side of Bangladesh’s freedom fighters in their struggle against Pakistan.

    Bangladesh was born after a nine-month war and the erstwhile Soviet Union had extended its support to the newborn country at the UN in 1971.

    It also helped Bangladesh to restore and develop its war-ravaged economy.

    The Cultural Centre was set up in 1974, encouraging many Bangladeshis, students in particular, to visit the Soviet Union.

    Russian books and cinema became popular among Bangladeshi readers and cine goers.

    The Soviet Union broke up in 1991, leaving Russia without its union of socialist republics.

    In a period of Russia's own transition, the Culture Centre had stymied owing to a lack of diversity and modernisation.

    “We never stopped, but we want to engage more actively,” Deputy Head Chesnokov said. “This centre acts a bridge between Russia and a foreign country.”

    There are more than 80 such centres across the world and at least another 20 will be added soon.

    Chesnokov said they would modernise the Dhaka centre, connecting its library with Moscow’s national library and national museum, enabling Bangladesh’s new generation learn a great deal about Russia from Dhaka.

    “It’ll also foster their interest in visiting Russia,” he said.

    “We have a strong alumni group. Now we are focusing on the young generation,” he said.

    Last year, a group of Dhaka University students had gone to Russia, and more students will be on a visit this year, he said.

    Last year, 47 Bangladeshi students had enrolled in different Russian universities. This year the number was expected to cross 60, he said.

    Young professionals from various fields, aged between 20 and 35 years, would also be invited.

    “It will be the ‘first step’ in further strengthening our relationship,” he said.

    The ties between the two countries have not always been close because of Bangladesh’s own political transition.

    Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina’s visit to Moscow in January last year was the first by a Bangladeshi head of government since Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman’s visit of the erstwhile Soviet Union in April 1972.

    The ambassador attributed the "cool" relationship to a “series of events” in between without elaborating.

    The transition in Russia was difficult, too, he said, referring to the period following the collapse of the Soviet Union.

    “And that’s why our presence has not been felt in South Asia,” he added.

    He said when he came to Dhaka two years ago he had faced a barrage of questions like: “Where are Russian books? Where are Russian films? Where’re Russian documentaries, where are your actors? Moscow circus?”

    “It gave me new hope,” he said.

    Deals were signed during Hasina's visit to Moscow on the Rooppur nuclear power plant, to be built in northern Pabna. The plant will add a generation capacity of 1000MW to a country that is badly power-starved.

    Russia has a history of contributing to Bangladesh’s power sector. The thermal power plants at Siddhirganj and Ghorasal, commissioned in the mid 1970s, still produce a major share of the country's total power output.

    Two oldest blocks of Ghorasal have been recently modernized by a Russian engineering company.

    The bilateral trade also grew after Hasina’s visit.

    The two-way trade, which touched $700 million last year, would cross $1 billion next year, the ambassador hoped.

    He said they would extend their support in all areas of bilateral cooperation, with politics topping the list.

    “Russia will support Bangladesh at the UN on every point,” he stressed.
    “Our foreign policy has shifted from a bi-polar mindset to a multi-polar concept. We are following UN standards. We do not impose our own views to other countries. We show respect for a country’s internal affairs”.
    “And our relationship with Bangladesh will be based on cooperation and respect,” he said.

    He, however, urged the media to gather their information about Russia from the “main source”.

    “Don’t publish one-sided news. Try to look at multi-sided sources,” he said in an oblique reference to recent coverage of Russia’s 'annexation' of Crimea that President Vladimir Putin has described as “reunification”.

    The ambassador said he noted that Bangladesh media without keeping its journalists in overseas countries were covering stories following foreign media, mostly British and American.

    Russian embassy can be a source of news in Dhaka, he said.
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    George1

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    Insight - Russia's leading role in the Indonesian mining revolution

    Post  George1 on Mon Apr 14, 2014 10:27 am

    Insight - Russia's leading role in the Indonesian mining revolution

    A worker poses with a handful of nickel ore at the nickel mining factory of PT Vale Tbk, near Sorowako, Indonesia's Sulawesi island, in this January 8, 2014 file photograph. REUTERS/Yusuf Ahmad
    A worker poses with a handful of nickel ore at the nickel mining factory of PT Vale Tbk, near Sorowako, Indonesia's Sulawesi island, in this January 8, 2014 file photograph.

    (Reuters) - Russia's two metal giants have emerged as big winners from Indonesia's new mining law, after leading a drive to get Jakarta to stick to its controversial mineral ore export ban in the face of opposition from miners and Asian buyers.

    In its six-month lobbying campaign last year, United Company Rusal and Norilsk Nickel delivered a blunt message to Indonesian officials: We will only invest billions of dollars in smelters if you ban bauxite and nickel ore exports.

    The effort seemed to have paid off, despite a denial by Indonesia that it was influenced. When the law came into effect this year, Indonesia enforced a water-tight export ban for only two major minerals - nickel ore and bauxite.

    The halting of $3 billion (£1.8 billion) of annual nickel ore and bauxite exports has already lifted the price of nickel and helped support aluminium, boosting the fortunes of Rusal and Norilsk, the world's top aluminium and nickel producers, respectively.

    At the same time, it has strengthened the case for the pair to invest billions of dollars in Indonesia to build smelters to replace costly capacity in Russia, a key part of a recovery plan for struggling Rusal and in line with Indonesia's own aims to earn more from its minerals resources.

    The mineral ore export ban is aimed at forcing miners to move up the value chain by processing the minerals they dig up.
    Rusal CEO Oleg Deripaska travelled repeatedly to Jakarta last year as signs emerged that the government might water down the ban under pressure from miners, and concerns over its impact on Southeast Asia's largest economy.
    "They made the export ban policy the main requirement for them to invest here," Industry Minister Mohamad Hidayat told Reuters.
    Just before the ban took effect on January 12, Indonesia conceded to pressure from miners and made last-minute changes to the policy to allow shipments of most metals to go on, but it did not relax the policy for nickel ore and bauxite.
    The supply cuts have already been a game changer for nickel, with benchmark nickel prices soaring 17 percent to an 11-month high after the ban, while starving global markets of bauxite that should help curb China's huge aluminium expansion and support global prices.
    This has benefited Rusal and Norilsk, whose shares have risen more than 11 percent since the ban, though it has been at the expense of big buyers such as China and Japan. It has also come at a price for Indonesia which, despite gaining a pledge for a smelter, has suffered mine closures and layoffs.
    "Behind all of this is Rusal," said Tjandra Irawan, director of Indonesia's Mineral Entrepreneurs Association. "What Rusal always wanted was a total ban ... only then would they invest."
    Indonesia's industry minister denied overseas firms played a role in how the ban was implemented. Foreign influence on such a big economic policy is sensitive in Indonesia, particularly with elections looming in a few months.
    Russian firms were, however, involved like no other foreign companies in pushing their case - repeatedly sending executives to Jakarta, organising a conference to lobby officials, and teaming up with influential industry players to push their case.
    When asked about its lobbying strategy, Rusal said it was "closely following the developments" in the months leading up to the ban because of the uncertainty over how the government would implement the law. Norilsk declined to comment.

    SECOND THOUGHTS

    Before the ban, Indonesia was the world's top nickel ore exporter and the largest bauxite supplier to China, accounting for around 12 percent of the global market in both cases.
    In February, Maxim Sokov, first deputy CEO of En+, the parent of Rusal, said the ban was helping market prices of aluminium and nickel turn upwards. Sokov is also a board member of Norilsk.
    Around the middle of last year, Indonesia began wavering on the proposal due to fears a complete ore export ban would hurt the economy and lead to widespread unemployment.
    Government officials sought to reassure the mining sector that the law would be diluted.
    This worried Rusal, which has been struggling with weak aluminium prices and mounting debt and saw the export ban as key to its turnaround strategy, which included making Indonesia a regional hub for its alumina production.
    "Rusal and Norilsk were the only foreigners that seemed to be really concerned about how the ban would be implemented," said a government official close to the matter, who declined to be identified because of the sensitivity of the subject.
    China and Japan, both big buyers of Indonesian nickel ore, have been concerned by the ban. Beijing is organising a delegation of Chinese firms to visit Jakarta to discuss the new rules, while Japan is considering taking Indonesia to the World Trade Organisation over the ban.

    RUSSIAN INVESTMENT

    From June last year, Rusal's CEO went to Indonesia at least three times in six months to push the government over the issue.
    The Russian firms also teamed up with UBS and the Indonesian Chamber of Commerce and Industry to hold a seminar in Jakarta in October attended by top government officials.
    The firms were especially worried about a proposal from the mines ministry that could allow exports of unprocessed mineral ore to continue for companies planning to build smelters.
    The ministry dropped the proposal a month later after it was rejected by parliament, though sought industry input on how to implement the mining law without damaging the entire sector.
    The export ban has also hurt U.S. miners in Indonesia.
    Despite being allowed to continue exporting copper, Freeport-McMoRan Copper and Gold Inc and Newmont Mining Corp have halted shipments and cut output due to a dispute over an escalating export tax under the new rules.
    While U.S., Japanese, and Chinese firms have long been big investors in resource-rich Indonesia, Russian firms are now pledging to significantly lift their investment.
    Rusal's Deripaska came with a big Russian business delegation to Jakarta in February to sign a memorandum of understanding to build an alumina smelter in West Kalimantan for an estimated $3 billion. Russian Railways is also planning to invest $2 billion in a line to East Kalimantan coal rail line.
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    George1

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    Re: Russia's presence in South-Εast Asia

    Post  George1 on Fri Apr 18, 2014 6:47 pm

    Russia, Bangladesh initial construction contract for Ruppur NPP

    Russia and Bangladesh have initialed the construction contract for the Ruppur Nuclear Power Plant in the South Asian country.

    Rosatom, Russia's state nuclear corporation, said the contract was initialed during an official visit to Dhaka by a Russian delegation.

    In the course of the visit, Rosatom deputy CEO Nikolai Spassky held negotiations with Bangladesh's Science and Technology Minister Yeafesh Osman. They agreed that Bangladesh would expedite documents for contracts on the preparatory phase.

    Contracts have now been signed to conduct surveys and planning for the plant. The construction contract is the third and it calls for setting up an engineering base at the NPP site and arranging for construction and installation work to the 'first concrete.'

    Spassky was quoted as saying that "work of the preparatory period is now being done, which is scheduled for completion in 2016. After this, work will begin on the main phase of construction, which according to practice takes five to six years. This is the standard work schedule. The Russian side plans to launch the Ruppur NPP in the early 2020s in line with the previously planned schedule."

    He also said that a representative of Rosatom subsidiary Atomstroyexport (ASE) has been in Bangladesh since last October to handle business issues, and a representative of Rosatom began working at the Russian embassy in Dhaka in April. ASE plans to open an office at Ruppur NPP, which is located on the eastern bank of the Ganges River, 160 km from the capital of Dhaka, in 2014.

    Valery Limarenko, the head of NIAEP-ASE, another Rosatom division, told reporters at the beginning of April that the third contract on the Ruppur NPP was expected to be signed in May. "Negotiations are now being held on the third contract - for building the construction engineering base," he said.

    "We expect that in the next few months the contract will be signed and processed accordingly in our Finance Ministry in order to open a credit line," Limarenko said.

    It was reported earlier that Russia has decided to extend a soft loan of $500 million to Bangladesh. Russia might also decide in 2015 to extend a new soft loan to the country. Such a plant with capacity of more than 2,000 MW could cost about $10 billion.

    Rosatom began work on the Ruppur plant in Bangladesh in the fall of 2013. Russia will design, built and launch two 1,000-MW generating units with VVER reactors at Ruppur, as well as build infrastructure.
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    George1

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    Russian-Indonesian relations:

    Post  George1 on Sun Jun 08, 2014 1:13 am

    Russia-Indonesia trade turnover to make $3B by yearend - ambassador to Jakarta

    The trade turnover between Russia and Indonesia, a major economy in the Asia-Pacific region, will make three billion dollars by the yearend, Russia's Ambassador to Jakarta Mikhail Galuzin said in an interview with Itar-Tass.

    "Over the first six months, the mutual trade turnover grew by over twelve percent year-on-year to 1.7 billion dollars. Thus, the forecast by the yearend may be three billion dollars," he said. Russian and Indonesian counterparts have been negotiating major joint projects, the ambassador said. "Government of the East Kalimantan province and the Kalimantan Rail Company, which represents the Russian Railway Company, signed a memorandum on mutual understanding in February 2012 on building of a railroad and its infrastructures in the province. RUSAL has been negotiating construction in West Kalimantan of a bauxite and alumina plant with capacity of 1.8 million tonnes per year. Other joint projects include satellite navigation, civil aviation, and peaceful use of nuclear energy."

    Civil aviation is a priority sector in the cooperation between Russia and Indonesia, Galuzin said. In 2011, Indonesia's Sky Aviation signed an agreement with the Sukhoi Corporation on leasing of twelve SuperJet-100 planes. "Under the contract, first two planes arrived in Indonesia in February and August of the current year. The third plane is due to come to Indonesia by the yearend."

    The diplomat also stressed the dynamic development of the military-technical cooperation between Moscow and Jakarta. "We are proud that the Russian armoury, well known around the world, is used for improvement of Indonesia's defence potential. In September, the Russian side completed ahead of the term supplies of six Sukhoi-30MK2 battle planes. Russia is also working on supplies of BMP-3F armoured vehicles," the ambassador said.


    Last edited by George1 on Sun Jun 08, 2014 2:02 am; edited 1 time in total
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    George1

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    Re: Russia's presence in South-Εast Asia

    Post  George1 on Sun Jun 08, 2014 1:14 am

    Indonesia plans to open maintenance center to service Russia-made helicopters

    Indonesia, a country in Southeast Asia, plans to open a maintenance center to service Russia-made helicopters. Four civil helicopters Mil Mi-171 were delivered to Indonesia in early May, the Russian embassy in that country told ITAR-TASS on Wednesday.

    Helicopters will be used by several Indonesian agencies and companies, including the National Agency of Emergency Situations. "Creation of a maintenance centre to service this type of Russian aircrafts is on agenda. Its delivery is planned to enlarge to Indonesia," the Russian diplomatic mission noted.

    Meanwhile, supplies of one more type of Russian machinery began to Indonesia in early May. Four trucks KAMAZ were delivered to the country on the order from Indonesian company Tehnika Ina to pass certification. Certification of Russian vehicles is expected to be finalized in September.

    "Russia hopes for further successful implementation of joint projects with Indonesian partners on a broad range of trends, including construction of a road infrastructure, reprocessing of mineral resources, civil aviation and others," the Russian embassy noted.
    Read more: http://voiceofrussia.com/news/2014_05_28/Indonesia-plans-to-open-maintenance-center-to-service-Russia-made-helicopters-8167/
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    sepheronx

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    Bangledesh and Russian ties/trade

    Post  sepheronx on Mon Oct 27, 2014 2:22 pm

    http://en.itar-tass.com/world/756656

    Bangledesh will not suppory any sanction against Russia. It seems that in recent days/years, Bangledesh is becoming warmer towards Russia, possibly because of ties they have with India.

    http://en.itar-tass.com/russia/756693

    Bangledesh is a growing economy and has a relitively high population. This can be prrime opportunity for companies like Avtovaz to sell cheaper automobiles in Bangledesh. Agriculture and construction are big parts of bangledesh economy so also setting up a spare parts plant and a service center for agriculture machinery and construction equipment, may give Russian companoes an edge in these markets.

    Unfortunately, Russian enterprises are not very good at being agressive salesmen.
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    George1

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    Re: Russia's presence in South-Εast Asia

    Post  George1 on Fri Nov 14, 2014 8:06 am

    Russia ready to boost Sukhoi Superjet 100 supplies to Indonesia — upper house speaker

    JAKARTA, November 12. /TASS/. Russia is prepared to increase supplies of Sukhoi Superjet 100 medium-haul passenger airliners to Indonesia, the speaker of Russia’s upper house of parliament, the Federation Council, said on Wednesday.

    Addressing Indonesia’s parliament, the People's Consultative Assembly (MPR), Valentina Matviyenko marked the high level of trade and economic relations between Russia and Indonesia.

    “In 2013, trade turnover reached almost $3 billion. The leaders of our countries have set the goal of bringing this figure to $5 billion in the coming two years. This is a rather real level,” she said.

    Matviyenko mentioned a range of major projects involving Russia in Indonesia, namely the construction of a railway road on Kalimantan Island to transport coal, which is due to be completed by 2016.

    “A joint project on building an alumina refinery in Indonesia, being implemented by Rusal, is getting real shapes. An idea is studied to set up a facility for assembly of KAMAZ vehicles in Indonesia,” she added.

    Matviyenko said a possibility of Russia’s participation in the construction of the Asian country’s first nuclear power plant involving Russia's state nuclear corporation Rosatom is being considered.

    Russia’s upper house speaker also marked Russia’s interest in expanding imports of Indonesia’s fish and agricultural products and invited Indonesian investors to the country.

    “We wait for the Indonesian business, capital and investments in Siberia and the Far East, where major projects are being implemented on developing this important Russian region,” she added.
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    George1

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    Re: Russia's presence in South-Εast Asia

    Post  George1 on Fri Nov 14, 2014 8:06 am

    Russia discusses investment in Indonesian railways
    Rabu, 12 November 2014 18:45 WIB | 1.074 Views

    Jakarta (ANTARA News) - Russia has voiced its interest in investing in several major projects in Indonesia such as the development of railway tracks and aluminum factories in the country.

    "We also discussed cooperation in the latest technologies such as the development of Russian satellite technology in Indonesia and the participation of Russia in the development of nuclear power plants," Matvienko, the Federation Council chairman of the Russian Federations Federal Assembly, stated after a meeting with Vice President Jusuf Kalla here on Wednesday.

    He affirmed that during the meeting with the vice president, they discussed efforts to enhance economic cooperation between both countries and to boost two-way trade to US$2 billion.

    Matvienko said Russia was also interested in President Joko Widodos idea to develop a maritime axis in the Asia-Pacific region as Russia and Indonesia are part of the region.

    "In order to realize this idea, Russia is ready to assist Indonesia in trade and investment and the maritime sector," he stated.

    Besides efforts to boost trade and investment cooperation, he remarked that Russia also called on Indonesia to cooperate in fighting international terrorism.

    "Russia sees Indonesia as an important and key partner in the Pacific region," he noted.

    Kalla emphasized that Indonesia and Russia enjoyed sound relations in the fields of politics, trade and investment.

    "We discussed steps to carry out all forms of cooperation, and they will be followed up by visits of other delegations," stated the vice president.

    During the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum in Beijing on Monday, Indonesian President Joko Widodo offered investment opportunities to Russia at a meeting with President Vladimir Putin.

    "We have invited investors from Russia to invest in the energy, power plants, railways, irrigation, food, and manufacturing sectors," the Indonesian head of state said.

    He noted that the good relations developed between the two countries, so far, need to be further nurtured in the future.

    Indonesia and Russia have been strategic partners since April 21, 2003, after they signed an agreement in Moscow.

    Since then, the two nations have developed cooperation in the fields of economy, trade and investment, including the manufacture of heavy equipment and satellite-based communication equipment. They have also cooperated in the development of security systems, information technology, and transportation.

    "I am convinced that relations between the two countries as strategic partners will further improve in the future," he affirmed.

    He added that the strategic Indonesia-Russia partnership has covered wider areas and "it is hoped that if can be further developed and increased in the future."
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    Re: Russia's presence in South-Εast Asia

    Post  George1 on Mon Feb 09, 2015 3:23 pm

    Russia Develops Strong Relationship With New Indonesian Leadership

    Russian Ambassador to Indonesia stated that Moscow has established a strong and constructive relationship with the new leadership of Indonesia.

    MOSCOW, (Sputnik) – Russia has established a strong and constructive relationship with the new leadership of Indonesia, Russian Ambassador to Indonesia Mikhail Galuzin told RIA Novosti.

    "Most importantly, we have managed to establish robust and extensive contacts with the administration of the new Indonesian President Joko Widodo, who took office last October," Galuzin said.

    The ambassador underscored the importance of the first bilateral meeting of Russian President Vladimir Putin with Widodo on the sidelines of the APEC summit in Beijing in November 2014, which was held in a "constructive atmosphere and allowed to establish the contact between the two leaders."

    According to the diplomat, Putin and Widodo agreed to enhance trade and economic ties and broaden scientific and technical cooperation, as well as expand political dialogue.

    Russian-Indonesian economic cooperation includes a number of promising and significant projects, Galuzin said.

    Russian aluminum giant RUSAL is considering building a bauxite and alumina industrial complex in Indonesia's West Kalimantan. Russian truck manufacturer KamAZ is looking into the possibility of supplying trucks to the country and Russian Railways is building a special-purpose railroad in East Kalimantan.

    Moscow is also considering the possibility of supplying Indonesia with passenger aircraft, including the Sukhoi SuperJet-100 and Irkut MC-21.

    The diplomat noted that cooperation in marine and shipbuilding infrastructure also has good prospects. Indonesia wants to become a strong maritime power and Russia is offering many cooperation possibilities in this field.

    Russia and Indonesia may carry out another intergovernmental meeting, the ambassador said. He stressed that the work of the previous commission in February 2014 was very fruitful, with the two nations signing documents on promoting cooperation in energy and creating working groups on industry, trade, transport and investment.

    Galuzin stated that recent display of friendship and cooperation, mutual understanding and assistance between the countries was in December 2014, when more than 70 Russian rescuers using two planes, an Il-76 cargo plane and a Be-200 helped Indonesia in the search for AirAsia's Airbus A320-200, which crashed into the Java Sea on December 28.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/asia/20150209/1017995642.html#ixzz3RG2NEpGo
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    Re: Russia's presence in South-Εast Asia

    Post  George1 on Fri Apr 10, 2015 3:11 pm

    Russia Offers Indonesia Mutual Transactions in National Currencies

    Russia and Indonesia could switch to mutual trade payments in their national currencies, Denis Manturov, Russia's minister of industry and trade suggested Thursday during a Russia-Indonesia session on economic issues.

    MOSCOW (Sputnik) — Earlier on Thursday, the 10th Session of the Indonesia-Russia Joint Commission on Trade-Economic and Technical Cooperation started in the city of Kazan in the southeastern part of European Russia.

    “We [Russia] expect active support in the transition to the use of national currencies in our trade relations with [a number of countries] and Indonesia, too" Denis Manturov, Russia's minister of industry and trade, told his Indonesian interlocutor, Coordinating Economic Minister Sofyan Djalil during the session.

    Russia has already discussed this initiative with India, China, Vietnam and Thailand, Manturov added.

    Such a “transition” will strengthen the national currencies and allow the trading partners to work independently of the dollar or the euro, he stressed.

    In turn, Sofyan Djalil said that Indonesia is ready to consider Russia’s proposal, because exposure to dollar fluctuations is a “pain in the neck” for both countries.

    The announcement of the Indonesia-Russia Joint Commission on Trade-Economic and Technical Cooperation was proposed in 1999. Since then, the economic ties between the two countries have strengthened.

    Moscow and Jakarta also have engaged in military cooperation. Apart from numerous arms sold from Russia to Indonesia, in 2011 the Russian and Indonesian navies practiced anti-piracy counteraction in their first ever joint drills.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/business/20150409/1020682996.html#ixzz3WuZOE1yT
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    Re: Russia's presence in South-Εast Asia

    Post  George1 on Fri Apr 17, 2015 2:48 pm

    Rosatom Subsidiary Wins Tender for Research Reactor Blueprint in Indonesia

    A consortium comprising a subsidiary of Russia’s Rosatom nuclear state corporation and Indonesian companies won a tender to prepare blueprints for a research reactor in Indonesia, Rosatom said Friday.

    MOSCOW (Sputnik) – Construction of the research reactor will be a first step in nuclear energy development in Indonesia, a Rosatom spokesperson told RIA Novosti earlier in the month.

    “Indonesia’s national nuclear energy agency BATAN has declared a Russian-Indonesian consortium winner in a tender for a blueprint in a project to build a multi-functional energy reactor in Indonesia,” Rosatom said in a statement.

    It is expected that signing the contract for blueprint preparation will take place by April 30, while the announcement of the contract for the construction of the research reactor is scheduled for the beginning of 2016.

    The consortium lists Indonesia’s Rekayasa Engineering and Kogas Driyap Consultant and Russia’s NUKEM Technologies GmbH, a subsidiary of Rosatom.

    On April 13, Rosatom Deputy Director Kirill Komarov said Moscow can offer cooperation in building nuclear reactors to such countries as Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/business/20150417/1021012229.html#ixzz3XZPL9Aex
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    Russian involvement in Myanmar

    Post  George1 on Sat Jun 13, 2015 3:59 am

    An old article but Myanmar remains a possible country for deals and influence for Russia

    Russia's Challenge to the US in Southeast Asia. Growing Russian involvement in Myanmar could pose a strategic risk for Washington

    The Republic of the Union of Myanmar, previously known as Burma, has been described as a potential geopolitical flashpoint between China and India, as well as fertile ground for US psychological warfare. Now another global power -Russia- is slowly edging its way into Myanmar’s geopolitical array. Specifically, defense and security ties between Myanmar and Russia are increasing at a steady pace.

    Recent Russian actions, combined with a relative lack of American engagement in Southeast Asia, point to yet another potential geopolitical sore spot for the US. Until the declared “pivot” or rebalancing toward Asia by the US produces real substance, Washington still risks losing its optimal geopolitical strength in the region.

    In addition to Russia’s continued foreign policy ambition of re-asserting its power in the post-Soviet space, Russia under Vladimir Putin has also enacted a strategy of courting key allies in regions well away from Russia’s immediate vicinity, where it could extend its geopolitical leverage, form solid business relationships (particularly in the energy and arms fields), and counter the influence of the United States.

    Two strong examples of this trend are Syria and Venezuela, countries which Russia has used to gain a strategic foothold in the Middle East and Latin America, respectively. Now Russia seems to be doing this in Myanmar, which gives Russia a three-pronged geopolitical thrust- into the Indian Subcontinent, the Indian Ocean, and Southeast Asia.

    Post-Soviet Russia has been heavily engaged in Southeast Asia, in contrast to the United States. Although US President Barack Obama has declared his “pivot” toward Asia, a vast amount of US resources are still vested in the War on Terror and its main battlegrounds in the Middle East and Central Asia. The US of late has missed several ASEAN summits, whereas Russia, on the other hand, has been actively engaged with the organization since 1991, and was made a full-scale dialogue partner with ASEAN in 1996. Bilateral ASEAN-Russia summits were held in 2005 and in 2010.

    It seems, however, that the United States has come to realize the risks as well as opportunities inherent in greater engagement with Southeast Asia, and Myanmar in particular. In November, 2012, President Obama announced his intention to hold an annual summit with ASEAN, so it seems the need for greater American engagement in Southeast Asia is not lost on the president. Around that same time, Mr. Obama visited Myanmar itself (a first for any sitting US president). While these actions have been taken in the context of geopolitical tensions between China and the US, the less-developed but ever-growing Russian presence cannot be ignored.

    Sometimes Russian actions are taken not to merely counter US influence, but to outright thwart and frustrate US national interests, exemplified most notably in Russian intransigence over Syria. In a similar vein to recent actions on Syria, China and Russia both refused to approve a UN resolution on human rights in Myanmar in 2007.

    Traditionally, Russia’s greatest ally in Southeast Asia has been Vietnam, based (in the past) on both a shared Communist government as well as mutual distrust of China in light of the Sino-Soviet Split and, in the case of Vietnam, deep-rooted historic suspicions of China. Vietnam’s ties to the US, however, have grown consistently warmer since US President Bill Clinton opened up relations starting in 1995.

    Myanmar, on the other hand, was largely isolationist after the establishment of the military government in 1962, although the country had a relatively strong friend in China since the 1970’s. What makes this web of relations different from the case of Vietnam, however, is that the state of affairs between China and Russia has been very different lately than it had been since the mid-1960’s, and while some problems between the two countries still abide, many foreign policy analysts now speak of a growing China-Russia axis.

    As Myanmar’s defense ties with Russia continue to grow, Myanmar could eventually represent a key strategic state in Southeast Asia where both Russia and China (insofar as their own respective national interests permit) can take complimentary or even collaborative foreign policy actions to counter US pursuits in the region, thus posing a risk to geopolitical stability in Southeast Asia as well as the Indian Ocean.

    The first major development in Russian assistance to Myanmar was the 2007 announcement that Russia would assist in the development of a light water nuclear reactor. Military and defense ties between Myanmar and Russia continue in earnest. In 2013, the Burmese army’s commander-in-chief, Min Augung Hlayn and Russian defense minister Sergei Shoigu met twice to discuss deepening defense relations between the two countries. In light of the second meeting, Shoigu was quoted by Russian news agency ITAR-TASS as saying “The meeting shows a great potential for Burmese-Russian cooperation” and that “I’m pleased to note the activation of bilateral relations in the military realm.”

    In November 2013, three Russian Navy ships made a six-day port call to Yangon, Myanmar’s largest city, the first ever by Russian warships in the modern era and an event that could set the tone for later joint military exercises. Even before these meetings, Myanmar-Russia military ties were strong as it has been common for Burmese military officers to spend a few years in Russia to study (a Russian-language school for Burmese military officers will soon open in the country, allowing students to achieve a professional working proficiency in Russian before moving to Russia for training).

    In addition to allowing Russia greater geopolitical thrust into Southeast Asia, a strategic Myanmar-Russia relationship also gives the latter country a stronger hand in the Strait of Malacca, one of the key shipping lanes in the region. If the proposed Trans-Afghanistan pipeline, which is supposed to bring Caspian Sea energy all the way down to India, is completed, India could potentially sell some of this energy to customers in Asia, but such an endeavor could face a political risk if Russia sought to thwart energy shipments through the Strait that did not meet its own national interests.

    A more assertive Russia has proven to be a source of instability in various regions and in particular a source of consternation for the United States. The US would do well to watch and react appropriately to Russia’s developing ties with Myanmar, lest a situation detrimental to US interests take root in this most critical part of the globe.



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    Re: Russia's presence in South-Εast Asia

    Post  George1 on Sat Jun 13, 2015 4:04 am

    magnumcromagnon wrote:Indonesia is definitely in Russia's sphere of influence, the current govt. of Indonesia is Pro-Russian. Meanwhile the Philippines is in the US sphere influence.

    i agree for Philippines but i think for Indonesia that they follow a neutral foreign policy avoiding involvement in conflicts among major powers.


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    Re: Russia's presence in South-Εast Asia

    Post  George1 on Wed Jun 17, 2015 6:22 pm



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    Re: Russia's presence in South-Εast Asia

    Post  George1 on Fri Sep 18, 2015 1:05 am

    Russia, Indonesia Sign Memorandum on Building High-Power, Floating NPPs

    Moscow and Jakarta have signed a memorandum of understanding on the construction of high-power and floating nuclear power plants in Indonesia, Rusatom Overseas, a subsidiary of the Russian state nuclear corporation Rosatom, said Thursday.

    MOSCOW (Sputnik) — The signing of the memorandum between Rusatom Overseas and Indonesia’s National Nuclear Energy Agency took place in Jakarta, according to the Russian company.

    "The main aim of the memorandum is to create an extra basis for further cooperation within the framework of the integrated suggestion of the Rosatom state company," Rusatom Overseas head Yevgeny Pakermanov said, as quoted in the statement.

    Last month, Indonesia’s National Nuclear Energy Agency announced that Jakarta planned to construct its first nuclear power plant by 2024.

    In April, Rosatom won a tender to prepare blueprints for a research reactor in Indonesia.

    Earlier this year, Rosatom Deputy Director Kirill Komarov said that Moscow was ready to cooperate in building nuclear reactors in countries that have nuclear energy development plans, such as Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/business/20150917/1027132036.html#ixzz3m2XPxzjc


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    Re: Russia's presence in South-Εast Asia

    Post  George1 on Wed Nov 18, 2015 11:22 am

    Indonesia Seeks $5Bln in Trade With Russia by End of 2016

    Russia and Indonesia plan to achieve $5 billion in trade between the countries by the end of this year and repeat that goal in 2016, Indonesia’s ambassador to Russia said Wednesday.

    MOSCOW (Sputnik) – A Russian and Indonesian Intergovernmental Commission set a goal in April to realize $5 billion in trade between the countries by the end of 2015. Russia's trade representative to Indonesia Sergei Rossomakhov last week indicated a figure of $10 billion by 2018.

    “We need to actively move in this direction, especially given the commitments our governments have made, namely the achievement of $5 billion in mutual trade turnover. There are plans to achieve this level by the end of 2015 and 2016,” Ambassador Djauhari Oratmangun told RIA Novosti in an interview.

    The envoy suggested that improved political relations will positively affect commerce, noting a lack of “aggressive attitude and a readiness to seize new opportunities” among companies in both nations.

    Oratmangun suggested that both Russian and Indonesian business communities could take advantage of the sanctions imposed on Russia by the United States, the European Union and their allies over the past two years.

    “They need to be more proactive to take advantage of those benefits that currently exist,” the diplomat stressed. “This task is feasible if there is the will and desire on both sides.”

    Oratmangun said “even new possibilities for interaction” are available despite challenging circumstances, citing $3.67 billion in commerce last year and $2 billion by mid-2015.

    A Russian business delegation is scheduled to visit Indonesia later this month or early December. Possible aerospace technology, shipbuilding, and mining projects are likely to be presented during the visit.

    Indonesia Not Currently Considering TPP Membership

    Indonesia is not yet considering membership in the hotly-debated Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade pact led by the United States, Indonesia’s ambassador to Russia said.

    "At least so far, Indonesia is not evaluating the possibility [of joining TPP], but is only studying the creation of the TPP," Djauhari Oratmangun told RIA Novosti.

    Oratmangun said Indonesian Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi has announced that she was waiting to view a finalized text of the deal to study the pros and cons of Jakarta’s membership in the controversial trade pact.

    The 12 Pacific Rim nations reached an agreement on the pact’s wording early last month. The TPP is expected to be heavily promoted but it remains unclear whether US President Barack Obama can see it ratified before the end of his term in early 2017.

    "If there is no paperwork and the terms are unclear, how can we seriously consider the possibility of joining," the envoy observed, adding that Indonesia’s priority is to launch the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Economic Community later this year.

    Indonesian President Joko Widodo announced last month his intention to join the TPP. Japan and Australia subsequently welcomed Indonesia's objective.

    Ambassador Oramangun confirmed that the TPP, whose ongoing negotiations have been shrouded in secrecy, has not been on the agenda of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit currently underway in the Philippines.

    Mohamad Iqbal Djamil, an Indonesian Ministry of Trade APEC Directorate official, told Sputnik on Monday it could take up to two years for Indonesia to join the TPP, if the deal is ratified.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/business/20151118/1030312626/indonesia-russia-trade.html#ixzz3rpyFy1r3


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