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    US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

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    Littoral Combat Ship:

    Post  F-15E on Wed Dec 17, 2014 5:38 pm

    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/12/11/hagel-approves-navys-proposal-to-build-more-lethal-lcs-variant/
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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  George1 on Sat Jan 17, 2015 1:18 am

    Modified US Navy littoral combat ships to be renamed

    The US Navy has confirmed plans to rename 20 modified littoral combat ships (LCS) as frigates.

    US Navy Secretary Ray Mabus said: "It is going to be the same ship, same programme of record, just with an appropriate and traditional name.

    "One of the requirements of the small surface combatant task force was to have a ship with frigate-like capabilities.
    "It is going to be the same ship, same programme of record, just with an appropriate and traditional name."

    "Well, if it is like a frigate, why don't we call it a frigate?"

    The new designation of the FF label will apply to all LCS that are upgraded with additional weapons, sensors and combat systems such as retrofitted vessels.

    However, hull numbers could stay as they are.

    Future ships will also be eligible for the new designation, with 32 vessels set to be reclassified if and when they are equipped with additional weapons.

    The decision comes as the US Navy retires the last of its legacy frigate vessels, including USS Kauffman, which is on its last deployment.

    The navy is also reportedly considering changing the designation of the several other vessels such as joint high-speed vessels, mobile landing platforms and the afloat forward-staging base.
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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  George1 on Sun Jan 25, 2015 3:26 am

    LCS Now Officially Called A Frigate
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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  GarryB on Thu Mar 12, 2015 1:02 am

    One Brahmos could sink an AEGIS cruiser... if it hits it.

    How many would be needed to hit it reliably is unknown and would depend on the situation and tactics of both sides.

    British ships on paper able to defend themselves from Exocet were hit because they had their Sea Wolf systems turned off because they were communicating by satellite with London.

    The US AEGIS cruiser that shot down an Iranian Airbus in the late 1980s had a missile launcher malfunction which delayed the launch of the SAM by 90 seconds (one and a half minutes), which didn't make any difference at the time because they were not under attack, but if they had been fired upon it would have been lethal.

    Performance of Bastion should be similar to Brahmos, but with likely extended range of the domestic model over the export model.



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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  George1 on Fri Mar 13, 2015 11:27 am

    US Navy Details New Strike Fighter Need

    WASHINGTON – It's been only two years since the US Navy quit buying F/A-18 Super Hornet strike fighters – part of a long-planned transition to the F-35C Joint Strike Fighter -- but a confluence of events has led to the new possibility that more attack aircraft could be ordered from Boeing.

    When the US Navy submitted its fiscal 2015 request a year ago, it was the first budget since the 1970s that did not include some version of the F/A-18 Hornet strike fighter. Procurement of F/A-18 E and F Super Hornets ended in 2013, and the last of 138 EA-18G Growler electronic warfare versions was included in the 2014 budget.

    Congress, however, added an unplanned-for 15 Growlers in the 2015 budget, responding to a Navy unfunded priority list request to meet a joint tactical need. The move keeps open Boeing's St. Louis production line an extra year, through 2017.

    Now, a strike fighter shortfall the Navy thought it could manage by a variety of methods is being further exacerbated, and it seems highly likely that when the new unfunded requirements list is submitted to Congress by mid-March, it will include a request for new Super Hornets.

    "We have a shortfall in Super Hornets, we do," Adm. Jon Greenert, chief of naval operations, told Congress on March 4. "And we're going to have to work our way through here in order to manage it."

    The shortfall is not a new situation – it's been developing for years, and was something the Navy's leadership thought it could manage its way through. But in recent weeks, sources said, the emphasis has shifted from using current resources to deal with the problem to including the purchase of new aircraft as part of an overall solution.

    Simply put, the situation breaks down like this:

    The fleet has about 600 F/A-18C Hornet "legacy" aircraft – pre-Super Hornet strike fighters – in its current inventory, with something over half scheduled to be replaced by 340 new F-35C Joint Strike Fighters. About 300 of the 18Cs are out of service, according to the Navy.
    Budget constraints and software development issues have pushed out F-35C procurement to the right – delayed by several years – and the first "35 Charlies" aren't scheduled to reach initial operating capability until 2018. Full rate production of 20 aircraft per year isn't planned until 2020, and it will be another two years before those aircraft enter service.
    Increased operating tempos due to combat operations against the Islamic State in northern Iraq and western Syria meant that the Navy did not realize reduced flying hours from the drawdown in Afghanistan.
    Thus the legacy Hornets need to keep flying longer. While they were rated up to a lifespan of 6,000 flying hours, the Navy figures it needs a service life extension program (SLEP) to get 150 of those planes out to 8,000 hours.
    With fewer F/A-18Cs flying, newer E and F Super Hornets are being used up at higher rates than planned.
    Budget reductions in recent years reduced money for depot maintenance, creating something of a backlog that, a year ago, reached 65 F/A-18Cs. Technicians, however, discovered much higher levels of corrosion when those aircraft were opened up, leading to growth in the number of aircraft that needed work, and a longer work period to deal with them. While the Navy has restored the depot funding, the backlog has expanded from 65 to 100 aircraft, and the service is struggling to hire more skilled labor to work on the planes.
    The growth in the backlog of 35 aircraft over the past year led Greenert to estimate the need was for "two or three squadrons" of new strike fighters to plug the gap. F/A-18 E and F Super Hornets are organized into 12-plane squadrons, while 18Cs fly in squadrons of 10 aircraft. Two squadrons of new planes works out to 24 aircraft, 36 for three squadrons.

    The Navy in 2012 surveyed its strike fighter inventory to assess the problem. "We looked at the inventory challenges," said Rear Adm. Mike Manazer, the Navy's director of air warfare. "SLEP 150 F/A-18Cs and buy 41 Es and Fs."

    "As we pushed JSF outside to the right -- this latest budget moved 16 outside the FYDP [six-year Future years Defense Plan] -- I'm not making up those aircraft." Over the past three years, Manazir said, a total of 159 F-35C carrier variant and F-35B Marine jump jets have been moved out of the FYDP.

    Assuming the air fleet keeps flying at about 330 hours a year per airplane, he said, "from 2020 to 2035, I need to be buying about 30 to 39 aircraft per year to replace" older, worn-out aircraft. "It's a product of supply and demand."

    Another key factor, Manazir noted, is the Super Hornet mid-life refit program expected a decade from now.

    "I have to get 563 Super Hornets out to 9,000 hours," he noted. "Ten years from now I'm going to be in the middle of SLEP'ping 563 airplanes. Do I have enough depot capacity? If I can do that successfully, I can manage that risk. Procurement [of new aircraft] reduces that risk."

    Some observers look at a Navy effort to keep buying Boeing F/A-18s as an indication the service is soft on support for the Lockheed Martin F-35. Manazir insists there is no truth to that.

    "There is no move here to not buy something," he declared. "In order for me to win in 2024 I have to have F-35Cs flying with F-18Es and Fs. I have to. And I have to be able to fill my air wings out.

    "I am trying to get rid of the myth that all the Navy wants to do is continue F-18 Es and Fs. If I only have F-18 Es and Fs in 2024 I can't win. [The JSF is] fourth generation – I have to have a number of F-35C squadrons."

    "What I try to do is avoid – because it's not true -- the F-18 Boeing versus the Lockheed Martin F-35" story line, he said. "Because for the United States Navy it's not all about getting the F-35, it's about getting the integrated capabilities of the high-end war fight -- which takes the F-18 E F and the F-35C. It takes them both."

    The number of aircraft Greenert is talking about, Manazir said, is the right number.

    "So two to three squadrons in 2016 -- 36 airplanes -- helps me reduce my risk of extension for that.

    "If I reduce my risk through that procurement that he testified to, and I can extend my 18Es and Fs to the plan that I'm going to now, and I'm going to procure F-35Cs to the tune of 20 per year starting in 2020. I've reduced my risk to a manageable level. And that's my entire cohesive plan going forward."
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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  George1 on Tue Mar 17, 2015 11:38 pm

    US Navy Seeks Drastic Increase in Tomahawk Missiles on Attack Subs

    As the US prepares to retire its Ohio-class submarines, the Navy is looking for ways to make up for that loss in firepower. One consideration is to outfit Virginia-class subs with even more missiles. 28 more, to be precise, a dramatic increase from the current 12.

    The United States currently operates 18 Ohio-class submarines. But in 2020, the Navy will begin decommissioning four of these vessels, each capable of firing up to 154 Tomahawk missiles. Which is a lot less firepower on the high seas.

    "When the [Ohio-class submarines] retire in the 2020s – if no action is taken the Navy will lose about 60% of its undersea strike launchers," Navy Captain David Goggins, Virginia-class submarine program manager, told Military.com.

    To mitigate this loss, the Navy is considering some pretty substantial upgrades to its Virginia-class subs. While this class can currently fire 12 Tomahawks, the military has plans to start adding new missile tube sections, which would allow an additional 28 Tomahawks.

    Construction on these new sections was originally slated to begin in 2019, but the Navy is evaluating whether that timeframe can be expedited.

    Most of the Virginia-class vessels have 12 individual 21-inch diameter vertical launch tubes. Models currently under construction are instead being built with two launch tubes that measure 87-inches in diameter, and will house 6 missiles each.

    The upgrades will add even more of these wider tubes.

    "With the Virginia Payload Modules, we’re adding a body section that will house four additional Virginia Payload Tubes," Goggins said. "That will allow you to go from 12 to 40 Tomahawks – that is the main driver or requirement for this new module."

    These larger launch tubes can also accommodate larger artillery, and will leave room for any future artillery which could be developed.

    "We will have flexibility to house a range of weapons that were too big to fit in our existing VLS tubes. We have inherent flexibility," Goggins said. "As new payloads become available and as the demand and threat environment change – we will have the flexibility to adapt future payloads."

    All in all, the Navy plans to expand its heavily armed, Virginia-class fleet to 51 ships by 2033, costing in excess of $14 billion.

    One explanation for this massive overhaul in naval capabilities, aside from the retiring of the Ohio-class, could be traced back to comments made by Rear Admiral Joseph Tofalo, director of undersea warfare, during the Sea, Air and Space Exposition last April.

    "There are two countries on the planet today with a new [fleet ballistic missile submarine] in the water and sea based missiles being flight tested," he said. "Neither of those countries are the United States – they are China and Russia."

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/us/20150317/1019622021.html#ixzz3UgAo5fMQ
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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  George1 on Wed Mar 25, 2015 8:21 pm

    New Nuclear Sub's Funding to Start on Time Despite Media Reports - US Navy

    Earlier in March, media reported that the US Navy and Congress had not managed to find the funds to pay for the procurement of the Ohio Replacement Program, in charge of replacing the aging Ohio-class submarines with 12 more advanced subs.

    MOSCOW (Sputnik), Alexander Mosesov — Procurement funding for the US next-generation strategic nuclear submarine will start in 2017 as expected, despite earlier media reports claiming the funds have not been found yet, a US Navy spokeswoman told Sputnik on Wednesday.

    Compared to its predecessor — the third-generation Ohio-class strategic nuclear submarine, which was built from 1976 till 1997 — the fourth-generation replacement submarine is expected to feature fewer launch tubes, state-of-the-art sonar, optical imaging and weapons control systems, a new electric drive and a nuclear fuel core able to power the ship for its entire service life.

    "[Advanced] procurement for the Navy's top programmatic priority, the Ohio replacement program, begins… in fiscal year 2017 and leading to the procurement of the first boat construction in fiscal year 2021," Nicole Schwegman told Sputnik.

    The first replacement submarine is expected to cost $12,4 billion, including $4,8 billion in design and engineering costs and $7,6 billion in construction costs. The first submarine is expected to enter service in 2031.

    As of 2015, Russia is the world's only country with fourth-generation strategic nuclear submarines in service — the Borey-class submarines, which are to become the mainstay of the naval component of Russia's strategic nuclear deterrent.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/military/20150325/1020001327.html#ixzz3VQWJkbF9
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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  max steel on Wed Mar 25, 2015 8:34 pm

    By 2031 hopefully Russia will deploy fifth-generation subs .
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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  George1 on Wed Mar 25, 2015 8:40 pm

    max steel wrote:By 2031 hopefully Russia will deploy fifth-generation subs .

    u mean attack submarines?
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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  max steel on Wed Mar 25, 2015 8:45 pm

    any type of subs man . Just want them to stay few steps ahead of yanks in naval warfare .
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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  max steel on Thu Apr 02, 2015 9:18 pm

    US Navy Unveils Firefighting Robot

    Researchers at Virginia Tech in cooperation with the US Navy’s Office of Naval Research presented a firefighting robot, capable of mobility aboard a ship, manipulating doors and fire hoses, and equipped with sensors to see and navigate through smoke.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/military/20150205/1017794688.html#ixzz3WBIP75qh
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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  George1 on Tue Apr 07, 2015 9:52 am

    US to Base 60% of Military Fleet in Pacific-Indian Ocean Area

    Pentagon says that the United States plans to locate in the future 60 percent of its military fleet in the Pacific-Indian Ocean area.

    WASHINGTON (Sputnik) — The United States plans to locate in the future 60 percent of its military fleet in the Pacific-Indian Ocean area, the US Defense Department said in a press release.

    “The newest and most capable weapons systems will go first to the [Asia-Pacific] region. When movements are completed… 60 percent of the US fleet will be in the Pacific-Indian Ocean area,” the release, published on Monday, said.

    The US Marines already have a rotational presence in Australia, and Washington is currently negotiating strengthening its military cooperation with the Philippines, according to the release.

    The United States is also cooperating with Japan and South Korea on information-sharing agreements, and is working with Australia, Japan and India to strengthen maritime security, the release added.

    “America is a Pacific power and will remain one,” US Defense Secretary Ashton Carter said in the release, noting that the United States will continue to engage with nations in the Asia-Pacific region.

    On Monday, Carter begins his trip to Japan and South Korea to promote and strengthen defense relations with the countries. In May 2015, Carter will also visit Singapore and India to enhance their military partnership, according to the Defense Department.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/military/20150407/1020551099.html#ixzz3Wbjb2Vmm
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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  max steel on Tue Apr 07, 2015 10:09 am

    Lol US only have japan , australia and s.korea as its slaves . He is coming to India for providing aircraft carrier tech under DTTI . They are going to singapore probably to arm twist them so that usa can block malaca straits . Fcuk the uS hegemony .
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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  max steel on Wed Apr 08, 2015 9:12 pm

    I know its russian defense forum. But guys you seriously don't keep an eye on US latest happenings .


    DARPA's Unmanned Submarine Stalker Could Change Naval Warfare Forever


    ACTUV concept, a possible solution for persistently tracking enemy submarines, especially the diesel AIP kind, with maximum affordability in mind.

    Meet The Sea Hunter:




    Sea Hunter will be a trimaran design, with the vast majority of its hull and superstructure built of lightweight and radar-translucent carbon-composite materials. It will have a length of around 130 feet and its center hull will be long and streamlined. The trimaran design lends itself to endurance, sea keeping, and speed, which will be necessary for keeping up with sprinting diesel submarines as well as those that are running slow and quiet for long periods of time. The first ACTUV prototype, named Sea Hunter, is currently under construction at Oregon Iron Works and will be tested on the Columbia River later this year. Oregon Iron Works have become something of a Scaled Composites-like boutique manufacturing house for exotic, experimental and stealthy naval vessels.

    The unmanned, unarmed, and highly autonomous ship's design is largely based around a series of plug-and-play modular components, allowing the vessel to be reconfigured for different missions with relative ease. Periphery sensors will include multiple types of radar, electro-opitcal systems for viewing the ship's surroundings in day and night, and electronic support measures used to sniff out enemy radio and sensor transmissions. The Sea Hunter's most potent sensors will be its mid-frequency sonar, built into a bulbous enclosure that juts out below the ship's keel, used for locating undersea targets at longer ranges while its high-frequency active sonars, mounted in small protrusions below its main hull, will better refine tracking and make it extremely hard for the object being pursued to slip away. These high-frequency sonar systems will also be able take a synthetic 'picture' of the sub's target so that Sea Hunter's computers can help classify and identify it by comparing the target to images and sound signatures stored in its memory banks. From there, on-board automation helps predict what the target will do next and will send updates to controllers thousands of miles away when the target does something of significance or when it observes something in its area worth noting.

    http://foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com/darpas-unmanned-submarine-stalker-could-change-naval-wa-1695566032
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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  GarryB on Thu Apr 09, 2015 9:58 am

    Yeah... think about it... why go for unmanned?

    Because current Russian diesel electrics are too quiet to be reliably detected at useful ranges with passive sonar so they have to use active sonar... which makes them look like the guy who wore a three piece suit to a Toga party thinking it was formal.

    these super remote sub killers will be picked off at long range... most SSKs are coastal and coastal batteries of Uran/Bal will paste these defenceless robots fairly easily. If not a single torpedo from the sub being chased would do.


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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  George1 on Sat Apr 11, 2015 12:51 pm

    US Navy 30-year shipbuilding plan
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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  George1 on Tue Apr 14, 2015 2:57 pm

    New SSBN(X) project to replace Ohio class submarines. 12 submarines that will have 16 launchers. Construction will begin in 2021
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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  George1 on Fri Apr 17, 2015 2:54 pm

    End of Top Gun? Navy Sees Future Not in F-35s, But in Unmanned Aircraft

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/military/20150417/1020996417.html#ixzz3XZQpjy3v
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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  max steel on Mon Apr 27, 2015 12:06 pm

    MAKE THIS THREAD ACTIVE FELLAS !Suspect

    Drone Swarms: How the US Navy Plans to Fight Wars in 2016  

    Swarmbots’ could mean a new era in autonomous warfare

    http://thediplomat.com/2015/04/drone-swarms-how-the-us-navy-plans-to-fight-wars-in-2016/

      Last week, the Office of Naval Research (ONR) released a video showcasing the U.S. Navy’s latest technology for conducting autonomous warfare: LOCUST, or the Low-Cost Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Swarming Technology program.

    The LOCUST system can launch up to 30 small pre-programmed drones out of a rocket-launcher type mechanism under a minute, the video illustrates. Once airborne, the drones start communicating with each other autonomously and begin to fly in formation either to reconnoiter or attack an enemy target. “The breakthrough technology  utilizes information-sharing between the UAVs, enabling autonomous collaborative behavior in either defensive or offensive missions,” an ONR press release said.

    The strategy behind “swarmbots” is simple: assault the adversary with a cloud of cheap and disposable drones and paralyze defenses by the sheer quantity of unmanned attackers in the air.

    In comparison to other air-attacks this can be done on the cheap. “Lowering costs is a major benefit of UAVs . Even hundreds of small autonomous UAVs cost less than a single tactical aircraft — and having this capability will force adversaries to focus on UAV swarm response,” ONR emphasizes.

    “The recent demonstrations are an important step on the way to the 2016 ship-based demonstration of 30 rapidly launched autonomous, swarming UAVs,” said ONR program manager Lee Mastroianni.“This level of autonomous swarming flight has never been done before. UAVs that are expendable and reconfigurable will free manned aircraft and traditional weapon systems to do more, and essentially multiply combat power at decreased risk to the warfighter,” he added.

    While this new generation of autonomous drones will be able to operate completely independently once launched, ONR is at pains to emphasize that there will always be a human monitoring the mission, able to step in and take control as desired.

    However, despite ONR citing a new “breakthrough technology,” one of the key obstacles remains communication with unmanned autonomous fighting systems, as many engineers acknowledge.

    As I reported last week (see: “’Unmanned Killer Robots’: A New Weapon in the US Navy’s Future Arsenal?”), the U.S. Marine Corps seeks inspiration from nature, particularly the way termites coordinate without communicating to address this problem.

    “Without communicating they sense the environment change around them, and they instinctively know which way to go,” Brig. Gen. Kevin Killea, head of the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory in Quantico notes. Termites release scents for other members of the hive to sniff, allowing each termite to react instinctively to danger.

    The Pentagon’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has also been working on swarmbots for a while now with its Collaborative Operations in Denied Environment (CODE) program, although in comparison to the prototype tube-launched LOCUST UAV no public demonstration has been given so far.

    For all those who are concerned about the ethical dilemma autonomous weapon systems will pose in the future, I recommend reading this study done by the Center for New American Security (CNAS) entitled “Meaningful Human Control in Weapon Systems.”  Autonomous warfare will most definitely pose various moral and ethical problems in the years ahead.    


    The strategy behind “swarmbots” is simple: assault the adversary with a cloud of cheap and disposable drones and paralyze defenses by the sheer quantity of unmanned attackers in the air." Apparently ONR forgot all the lessons learned from the national wargames the last decade.This is exactly what the Red Team was proposing the other side would be doing in the next 10-20 years.They can't afford to go head to head with the US on spending, so why not build swarms of unmanned systems. It doesn't even matter if they all work, they'll be cheap enough to be disposable dunno
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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  GarryB on Tue Apr 28, 2015 3:19 am

    “The breakthrough technology utilizes information-sharing between the UAVs, enabling autonomous collaborative behavior in either defensive or offensive missions,” an ONR press release said.

    WOW... dem Ruskies wont have that sort of future technology till the 1980s...



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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  George1 on Wed Apr 29, 2015 12:15 am

    Navy Tests New Software to Make it Easier to Land Jets on Carriers

    The United States Navy on Tuesday successfully field-tested its new software system for F-18 fighter jets, designed to make it easier for the aircraft to land on carriers at sea.

    A pilot landed an F-18 equipped with the aptly named “Magic Carpet” software program on the deck of the Navy's Nimitz-class supercarrier USS George H W Bush, naval-technology.com reported.
    An X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System (UCAS) demonstrator flies near the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush.

    "This underway marked the first use of the Magic Carpet technology on an aircraft carrier. This software greatly reduces misses and wave-offs, which translates into more time on-mission and makes us an overall more effective force,” said Navy Assistant Air Operations Officer Lieutenant Commander Dan Marzluff.

    The at-sea tests will continue, and follow recent successful land-based tests at Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland.

    The software name is an acronym for Maritime Augmented Guidance with Integrated Controls for Carrier Approach and Recovery Precision Enabling Technologies. The technology is slated to deploy by 2019 on F/A-18E/F Super Hornets and E/A-18G Growler electronic jamming aircraft.

    The software maintains a commanded glideslope and angle of attack, allowing the pilot to concentrate on holding a proper line-up, the Navy said in a statement.

    “A pilot can take symbology on the HUD (heads up display) and he can move it to a symbol or a place on the flight deck and let go of the controls. The airplane knows with that symbol that is where I want to land. It will continually land on that spot,” explained Rear Admiral Michael Manazir, Director of Air Warfare.

    Pilots attempting to land on a carrier have to account for the speed of the aircraft speed and the ship, as well as weather. Magic Carpet reduces the number of adjustments the pilot must make while landing.

    “When we land an aircraft on an aircraft carrier, it is kind of a three connection thing,” Manazir said. “You see the deviation, you correct, you re-correct and then you correct one more time as you go so there you are kind of chasing the parameters.”

    “With Magic Carpet, the pilot can move the stick and move reference point and the stick does not have to re-correct. That is where the airplane is going to go. It is control-law software – and it actually moves the flight control surfaces to make that work to where the aircraft is going to go. It is not just symbology,” Manazir added.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/us/20150429/1021498660.html#ixzz3Ye1iaqb7
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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  TR1 on Wed Apr 29, 2015 1:10 am

    GarryB wrote:
    “The breakthrough technology  utilizes information-sharing between the UAVs, enabling autonomous collaborative behavior in either defensive or offensive missions,” an ONR press release said.

    WOW... dem Ruskies wont have that sort of future technology till the 1980s...



    Granit...

    Apples and oranges.

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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  Guest on Wed Apr 29, 2015 3:33 am

    George1 wrote:End of Top Gun? Navy Sees Future Not in F-35s, But in Unmanned Aircraft

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/military/20150417/1020996417.html#ixzz3XZQpjy3v

    Not surprising especially when considering the lighter, smaller, and most importantly cheaper design that UCAVs offer. US Navy Doctrine must be changing and understandably so when considering the last time the USN was tasked with achieving air supremacy by themselves.
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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  GarryB on Wed Apr 29, 2015 10:10 am

    Apples and oranges.

    Read the quote... the Soviets had that sort of datalink technology in the 1980s where a group of missiles would operate as a team and even adapt to battle damage and unexpected situations.

    The fact is that the US is trying to use it for a large number of weapons to penetrate a capable air defence system just makes it more alike... that is what Granit was designed for too.

    the difference is that the US wants to go small and light and cheap and in huge numbers, while the Soviet solution is to use very high speed to shorten the reaction time and low altitude flight to limit engagement time.


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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  max steel on Fri May 08, 2015 3:57 pm

    I guess its a good strategy by usa with that they can penetrate russian air defenses and chinese air defenses . Russian /Chinese air defense system cant engage against such huge swarm of bots all together successfully isn't it ?

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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

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