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    US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

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    max steel
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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  max steel on Thu May 19, 2016 10:30 pm

    HAAWC enables the P-8 to track and kill enemy submarines from high altitudes

    The HAAWC, which stands for High Altitude Anti-Submarine Warfare Weapon Capability, is an add-on kit for the Navy’s Mark 54 lightweight torpedo that gives the weapon the ability to glide through the air high above the clouds. Boeing is aiming to have the technology on the Navy’s submarine-hunting P-8 in 2017.




    US ASW Skil : http://www.russiadefence.net/t4301p100-india-and-russia-joint-military-projects-news#134896

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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  Militarov on Fri May 20, 2016 12:08 am

    AlfaT8 wrote:
    Militarov wrote:
    AlfaT8 wrote:
    max steel wrote:U.S. Navy tests Raytheon's SeaRAM system

    In the testing, the system took out several targets in a variety of scenarios, including one in which two supersonic missiles were inbound simultaneously, flying in complex, evasive maneuvers. The targets were intercepted with Rolling Airframe Block 2 missiles.

    "SeaRAM achieved a new level of success, intercepting targets under high-stress conditions," said Rick Nelson, vice president of Raytheon's Naval and Area Mission Defense product line. "The system demonstrated once again that it can provide the sophisticated protection warfighters need."

    The tests were conducted on the Navy's Self Defense Test Ship off the coast of Southern California.

    SeaRAM is the development of key attributes of the Phalanx Close-In Weapon System and the Rolling Airframe Missile Guided Weapon System, replacing the 20mm Phalanx gun system with an 11-missile RAM launcher assembly. It combines RAM's superior accuracy, extended range and high maneuverability with the Phalanx Block 1B's high-resolution search-and-track sensor systems and quick-response capability against close-in and extended range threats.


    US is too confident in one system and being cheap is going to cost them later not using the Phalanx also for redundancy,back up, layered affects, as well as other reasons. CIWS can only protect for approximately 1 nautical mile (2000 yards). SeaRAM provides a close in protection at 5 - 11 NM (10,000) yards. Not as proficient as the old Sea Sparrow, with a slightly better range, but the war head is different.



    When did they develop supersonic AnSh missiles??

    Its not anti-ship missile, at least not in its primary role, it can be used aganist surface targets but its extremly limited in that role. Its RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile Block 2, used for ships SHORAD.


    No, what i meant was the "two supersonic missiles" that it shot down.

    Ah, my bad then, well i anyways have answer for you.

    GQM-163 Coyote is training platform for US Navy.

    https://www.orbitalatk.com/flight-systems/missile-defense-systems/ascm-targets/docs/BR06007_3862%20Coyote_R3.pdf

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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  AlfaT8 on Fri May 20, 2016 6:23 pm

    Militarov wrote:
    AlfaT8 wrote:
    Militarov wrote:
    AlfaT8 wrote:
    max steel wrote:U.S. Navy tests Raytheon's SeaRAM system

    In the testing, the system took out several targets in a variety of scenarios, including one in which two supersonic missiles were inbound simultaneously, flying in complex, evasive maneuvers. The targets were intercepted with Rolling Airframe Block 2 missiles.

    "SeaRAM achieved a new level of success, intercepting targets under high-stress conditions," said Rick Nelson, vice president of Raytheon's Naval and Area Mission Defense product line. "The system demonstrated once again that it can provide the sophisticated protection warfighters need."

    The tests were conducted on the Navy's Self Defense Test Ship off the coast of Southern California.

    SeaRAM is the development of key attributes of the Phalanx Close-In Weapon System and the Rolling Airframe Missile Guided Weapon System, replacing the 20mm Phalanx gun system with an 11-missile RAM launcher assembly. It combines RAM's superior accuracy, extended range and high maneuverability with the Phalanx Block 1B's high-resolution search-and-track sensor systems and quick-response capability against close-in and extended range threats.


    US is too confident in one system and being cheap is going to cost them later not using the Phalanx also for redundancy,back up, layered affects, as well as other reasons. CIWS can only protect for approximately 1 nautical mile (2000 yards). SeaRAM provides a close in protection at 5 - 11 NM (10,000) yards. Not as proficient as the old Sea Sparrow, with a slightly better range, but the war head is different.



    When did they develop supersonic AnSh missiles??

    Its not anti-ship missile, at least not in its primary role, it can be used aganist surface targets but its extremly limited in that role. Its RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile Block 2, used for ships SHORAD.


    No, what i meant was the "two supersonic missiles" that it shot down.

    Ah, my bad then, well i anyways have answer for you.

    GQM-163 Coyote is training platform for US Navy.

    https://www.orbitalatk.com/flight-systems/missile-defense-systems/ascm-targets/docs/BR06007_3862%20Coyote_R3.pdf

    thanks man. thumbsup

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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  max steel on Fri May 20, 2016 11:22 pm

    US Navy Takes Ownership of Stealth Destroyer Zumwalt

    Shipbuilder General Dynamics Bath Iron Works formally delivered the stealth destroyer Zumwalt (DDG 1000) to the US Navy Friday, marking a turnover of ownership from the ship’s status as a private vessel to become a government-owned warship.

    “Today represents a significant achievement for not only the DDG 1000 program and shipbuilding team but for the entire US Navy,” Capt. Jim Downey, the Zumwalt-class program manager at Naval Sea Systems Command, said in a statement. “This impressive ship incorporates a new design alongside the integration of sophisticated new technologies that will lead the Navy into the next generation of capabilities.”

    Delivery represents a major milestone in the design and development of the ships, conceived in the late 1990s as the epitome of stealth in warship design. At various times the Navy envisioned 32 ships in the class, then 28, then seven, then two, and back up to three – the class size of today. Laughing

    Concept and design work has been taking place on the Zumwalt class since the late 1990s, when it was known as the Land Attack Destroyer variant of the Surface Combatant 21 (SC 21) program. It was known as the DD(X) program in 2002 when Northrop Grumman and Raytheon were chosen as the prime contractors, and recast as the DDG 1000 in April 2006.

    For a variety of reasons prime contractor responsibility shifted to the Navy, with General Dynamics Bath Iron Works overseeing the hull, mechanical and engineering (HM&E) portion of the shipbuilding contract. Raytheon retains overall responsibility for the combat system.

    A construction contract was awarded for the Zumwalt in Feb. 2008, when the ship was expected to be delivered in July 2014. A keel-laying ceremony was held in November 2011 at Bath’s Maine shipyard, and the destroyer was launched in October 2013.

    The Zumwalt first went to sea in December 2015 for Alpha trials, a series of tests run by the shipbuilder to test the ship’s HM&E components. A second Bravo trial was held in March, and the Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) completed out a two-day acceptance trial on April 21.

    With delivery, the Zumwalt’s Navy crew has officially moved aboard and taken up residence. She’s expected to sail away from Bath this fall and will likely operate for a few weeks from the fleet base at Norfolk, Va., travelling to Baltimore, Md., for an October 15 commissioning ceremony. After that, the Zumwalt will leave the US East Coast for her homeport of San Diego.

    Work on the Zumwalt is by no means finished. A new phase will begin in 2017 as Raytheon and the Navy work to complete the ship’s combat systems – an array of radars, sensors and weapons. By late 2017 or the first part of 2018, the Zumwalt should be ready for combat system operational testing (CSQT), when the weapons and sensors will be fully tested. Only after the successful completion of CSQT will the Zumwalt work up for a deployment.

    Two more Zumwalt-class ships, the Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) and Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG 1002), are under construction at Bath.

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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  JohninMK on Wed May 25, 2016 5:12 pm

    Lockheed Martin claims that its guidance and control systems will greatly improve the MK 48 torpedoes' effectiveness and provide the weapon with advanced counter-measure capabilities.

    WASHINGTON (Sputnik) — The US Navy is expected to order up to 250 of the heaviest, self-guided torpedoes in the next five years, which will be steered toward enemy targets by an advanced sonar system, defense contractor Lockheed Martin announced in a press release on Monday.

    Lockheed noted it will provide the sonar-based guidance systems for the torpedoes under a $475 million contract with the Navy.

    "The Lockheed Martin guidance and control systems will equip the heavyweight torpedoes with increased bandwidth and streamlined targeting and tracking capabilities," the release explained. "These systems will increase the MK 48's effectiveness and provide advanced counter-measure capabilities."

    The MK 48 is described as a heavyweight torpedo that can be launched from virtually all military submarines. It has the ability to track and destroy surface ships, and other submarines in shallow water and at depths of more than 1,000 feet.

    The Navy could potentially order up to 250 MK 48s in the next five years for anti-submarine warfare and anti-surface warfare, the release noted.


    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/us/20160525/1040245347/navy-torpedo-guidance-systems-purchase.html#ixzz49gl1bdVB

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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  max steel on Wed May 25, 2016 11:25 pm

    SeaRAM is a 11-shot magazine. If double or triple-tapping to ensure a missile-kill, it is good for 3-5 incomings. If there is a 6 inbound, there might be problem. Also, SeaRAM is a modified sidewinder (which originally was intended for larger and slower-to-respond fighter plane). At mach 2+ speed, it is same or slower than the latest supersonic ASCM (such as Klub, Brahmos, or YJ-18) with manoeuvrable terminal phase. Can a '180-lb defensive back' running full speed and head-on at a bobbing and charging '250-lb running back' and trying to stop it? I don't see many tackles made that way (head on, full speed, and 1-on-1)

    SeaRAM is a rotating missile like a bullet out of rifle. That mean there is added rotational inertia it must overcome if it wants to keep up with a weave-and-bob incoming.

    The Sidewinder was originally designed to zoom up the exhaust port of a larger, and less manoeuvrable target going, more or less, in the same direction (that means, the net closing speed is the missile speed itself ~mach 2). Here we are talking about a combine closing speed of Mach 4-5 against a much smaller (and presumably harder jinking) target.

    btw, I just wiki 'sidewinder missile', and look at its kill ratio,

    "The Sidewinder is the most widely used missile in the West, with more than 110,000 missiles produced for the U.S. and 27 other nations, of which perhaps one percent have been used in combat. It has been built under license by some other nations including Sweden. The AIM-9 is one of the oldest, least expensive, and most successful air-to-air missiles, with an estimated 270 aircraft kills in its history of use. "

    That means 1100 missiles fired for 270 kills. A 4:1 kill ratio. That means, of the SeaRAM's 11-shot magazine, it can statistically kill 2-3 attacking fighters from rear end...this looks worse and worse as I type. I think the Navy owes taxpayer a real scenario of shooting 2 inbounding supersonic target drones, and see if 11 missiles can knock down 2.

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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  max steel on Sun May 29, 2016 9:24 pm

    U.S. Naval Aviation’s Readiness Crisis

    The U.S. Navy’s strike fighter squadrons are in dire straits with only one out of three Boeing F/A-18 Hornet airframes being ready for war at any given time. In order to meet its operational requirements, the service is routinely raiding squadrons that are not deployed to secure enough jets for the air wings at are about to go to sea.

    “If I have to ensure that I have ten like strike fighters are in a single squadron on that aircraft carrier and they need the same capability, I will tax units that are back here at home,” Adm. Philip Davidson, commander of U.S. Fleet Forces Command testified before the House Armed Services Committee on May 26. “If I need ten forward, I do routinely operate four aircraft in squadrons in the rear.”

    Within the Navy, only one out of four Hornets is fully mission capable. “That one in four is currently deployed,” Capt. Randy Stearns, Commodore of Strike Fighter Wing Atlantic told the committee. “The other three in four are the aircraft that are back in the maintenance phase or going through another FRP [fleet response plan].”

    The Navy currently has four air wings that are ready for war, but it has no ability to surge any additional forces. In previous years, it would have taken the Navy about 90 days to ready another air wing for deployment—now it takes roughly three times as long. If tasked to surge another air wing, Stearns said that it would take between six months and a year to gather enough aircraft and pilots to get another air wing ready for war. “There is no chance of getting those ready,” Stearns said. “There is nothing to pull from in the back, we’ve already put everything forward. There’s nothing left.”

    Though cannibalization of operational Hornets is a last resort, such measures are now routine throughout the fleet, Stearns said. And its not just the legacy A through D model Hornets, the newer, more capable Super Hornets have also been suffering from a lack of spare spares over the last three years due to automatic sequestration budget cuts. “We’ve never caught up,” Stearns said.

    Part of the problem was caused by repeated delays to the Lockheed Martin F-35C Joint Strike Fighter—but also wartime usage of the Hornet fleet, Stearns said. As a result, the service has a backlog in its depots of older Hornets because those facilities were never intended to extend the life of the F/A-18 airframe past 6000 hours. The service is now flying those older aircraft—of which the service has five remaining squadrons—out to 10,000 hours, far longer than anticipated.

    Moreover, the Navy—because of the F-35C’s continual delays—was forced to transition additional squadrons onto the Super Hornet by raiding its attrition reserves. “We’ve transitioned about 10 squadrons of Super Hornets unexpectedly to get out of legacy and also to meet the gap for the JSF just to meet operational demands,” Stearns said. “So now we’re taxing hours and utilization on our attrition aircraft.”

    The Navy needs more aircraft to either come off the Boeing production line or to come out of depot overhaul. But it’s not even just the deployed forces; the Navy cannot shortchange its fleet replacement squadrons—its “seed-corn”—that trains new aviators to fly the Hornet. “We’re chewing up about 40 aircraft worth of hours a month and if we’re not buying that much or putting that much through the depot – we’re falling behind,” Stearns said.

    The lack of fully combat-capable Hornets—both classic and Super—is damaging the Navy’s overall readiness and training. Indeed, the situation is so bad that the Navy will be forced to reduce the flying hours for one of its non-deployed air wings (CVW-1) to zero to make up for the shortfall—and save money. In other words—the Navy will shut down an entire air wing for four months.

    However, the proposal—if enacted—will have a devastating readiness impact on that air wing and its pilots and maintainers. “Never going to get those hours back,” Stearns said—noting there are knock-on impacts to overall fleet readiness that will occur as result of such a “cold iron” shutdown.

    But while naval aviation seems to be on the verge of collapse—the Navy’s surface ships and submarines are not doing much better. Indeed, even the newest and most capable Navy warships are being cannibalized so that other vessels can put to sea. Effectively, the Navy is facing what can only be described as a readiness disaster.


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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  Militarov on Sun May 29, 2016 10:05 pm

    "Two U.S. Navy warplanes collided off the North Carolina coast on Thursday and crashed in the Atlantic, where the four crew were rescued by a commercial fishing boat and flown by helicopter to a Virginia hospital, the Coast Guard said.

    The two F/A-18 fighter jets belonged to strike fighter squadron VFA-211, based at Naval Air Station Oceana in Virginia Beach, Virginia, officials said. The crew members appeared to be in good condition, MSNBC reported, adding that one person had a leg injury.

    "We had three Coast Guard helicopters, one Coast Guard C-130, naval vessel Mesa Verde, all involved in the rescue effort," Pentagon spokesman Peter Cook said.

    The fishing boat Tammy recovered some of the crew about 25 miles (40 km) east of Oregon Inlet, North Carolina, the Coast Guard said.

    A Coast Guard helicopter from Elizabeth City, North Carolina, flew to the fishing vessel, hoisted the Navy fliers aboard and took them to Norfolk Sentara General hospital, the Coast Guard said.

    Local TV images showed a second U.S. Coast Guard helicopter arriving at the local hospital in Norfolk, Virginia. Two service members wearing olive green jumpsuits and white helmets were seen walking without assistance toward the hospital alongside medical staff. (Reporting by Idrees Ali, David Alexander, Suzannah Gonzales, Letitia Stein, Susan Heavey and Megan Cassella; Editing by Jeffrey Benkoe and Alan Crosby)"

    Source: http://wncy.com/news/articles/2016/may/26/us-coast-guard-seeks-downed-military-planes-near-north-carolina-coast/

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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  max steel on Sun May 29, 2016 10:23 pm

    Russian Naval Expert Calls US Navy’s New Stealth Destroyer ‘Giant Washtub’ Wink

    Russian military experts have been belittling the U.S. Navy’s next generation guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt, the largest and most technologically sophisticated destroyer in U.S. naval history, which will be handed over to the U.S. Navy tomorrow, in Russian state media. Speaking to Russian state-owned media outlet Radio Sputnik, a prominent Russian military analyst, critically examines the Zumwalt program and its high price tag:

    With an annual defense budget of over $600 billion, the Pentagon can take the liberty of conducting various kinds of experiments, including spending $4.4 billion on a single destroyer. By comparison, one US [Virginia-class] nuclear submarine, the newest in the fleet, costs about $2.2 billion. In other words, they used the budget for two nuclear subs to build one Zumwalt. What can be said? Americans love grandiose projects which sometimes go beyond the scope of reason.

    The future guided-missile destroyer is allegedly 50 times harder to detect than current U.S. Navy destroyers. However, the Russian analyst is also taking issue with the destroyers’ stealth capabilities:

    With regard to its stealth, this is just a fairy tale for fools. Imagine a colossus with a solid wall the height of a sixteen-story building. Given the capabilities of current weapons using space and aerial reconnaissance, in addition to those of UAVs, this giant washtub cannot remain an inconspicuous target on the sea surface.

    Once inducted into the U.S. Navy, the USS Zumwalt will be one of the most heavily armed surface ships in the world, capable of striking its targets far inland. Yet, another Russian military expert speaking to Sputnik Radio says that the United States has been exaggerating the ships combat capabilities:

    The Americans have presented the Zumwalt as the best warship in history; this of course is an exaggerated characterization. The ship really is interesting in terms of innovation, when looking at its power plant, the types of weapons installed, and its control system. All this really is a breakthrough. But taken altogether, this does not turn the destroyer into a super-menacing weapon. This is a floating supercomputer with missiles…It doesn’t alter the balance of forces.

    The USS Zumwalt, the lead ship of the U.S. Navy’s new destroyer class is slated to achieve initial operational capability in October, 2016. One can expect disparaging remarks from Kremlin-influenced Russian media outlets about the U.S. Navy’s newest stealth warship to continue in the months ahead.

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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  Militarov on Tue May 31, 2016 12:55 am

    "The U.S. Marine Corps’ newest helicopter, the CH-53K, completed its first external load flight test carrying a 20,000 lb. load May 26 at Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation’s Development Flight Center in West Palm Beach, Fla.

    Envelope expansion tests will continue with incrementally increasing speeds with the 20,000 load, and then on to the CH-53K’s requirement, a 27,000-lb. external payload.

    The first two CH-53K heavy lift helicopters achieved their first flights on October 27, 2015, and January 22, 2016, respectively. To date these helicopters have achieved over 50 flight hours combined including one flight at speeds over 140 knots. The third and fourth King Stallion aircraft will join the flight test program this summer.



    As the King Stallion flight test program proceeds, both of the current flying aircraft will be exercised to expand the external load envelope. Initial external payloads weighing 12,000 pounds will be flown first in hover and then incrementally to speeds up to 120 knots. The aircraft will then carry 20,000 and 27,000 pound external payloads.

    The CH-53K King Stallion is a large, heavy-lift cargo helicopter currently being developed by Sikorsky Aircraft for the United States Marine Corps (USMC). The design features three 7,500 shp(5,590 kW) engines, new composite rotor blades, and a wider aircraft cabin than previous CH-53 variants. It will be the largest and heaviest helicopter in the U.S. military."


    Source: http://defence-blog.com/news/ch-53k-heavy-lift-helicopters-completes-first-20k-lift.html

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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  max steel on Tue May 31, 2016 10:52 pm

    New U.S. Navy Transport Osprey Will Reach an Insane 280 Miles Per Hour

    The Navy is in the early stages of building its own variant of the V-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft to perform its critical Carrier-Onboard-Delivery mission to delivery forces, supplies and weapons to forward-stationed ships at sea.

    The service plans to procure 44 new CMV-22B Ospreys for the COD mission, replacing the 1960’s era C-2 Greyhound aircraft.

    Unlike the C-2 fixed wing aircraft, which requires a catapult to lift off of the deck of a carrier, the Osprey tiltrotor can both reach airplane speeds of 220mph and also hover like a helicopter such that it can come in for vertical landings on the carrier deck.

    “280mph is the maximum speed,” Rick Lemaster, Director for Business Development, Bell Boeing, told Scout Warrior in an interview.

    The Navy has contracted Bell-Boeing to develop the engineering changes needed to meet this range requirement, as well as the other changes, to enable the CMV-22B to fulfill Navy's COD mission.

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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  GarryB on Wed Jun 01, 2016 10:00 am

    Hahahahaha... and when those transport aircraft are moving at 280mph what will be supporting them and giving them top cover?

    AH-64s will be too slow and F-35 will burn a lot of fuel flying at such low speed...


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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  Militarov on Wed Jun 01, 2016 10:33 am

    GarryB wrote:Hahahahaha... and when those transport aircraft are moving at 280mph what will be supporting them and giving them top cover?

    AH-64s will be too slow and F-35 will burn a lot of fuel flying at such low speed...

    Well normally over sea they would fly from supply ships to forward deployed forces so they will rarely require aerial support, most likely would fly most of the time under own shipborne air defences, and when they would it would be given from high altitude on aircrafts "normal" speeds, they would fly circles over transport routes.

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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  max steel on Thu Jun 02, 2016 2:45 pm

    U.S. Navy's New Lethal Torpedo Is Almost Ready


    The U.S. Navy and Lockheed Martin are restarting production of the latest version of the Mk-48 heavyweight torpedo. The new Mod 7 version— which is being upgraded under the Common Broadband Advanced Sonar System (CBASS) program—will help the Navy’s attack boats take on the threat from advanced Russian and Chinese-built ships and submarines.

    “The latest guidance and control technologies for Mk-48 torpedo are thanks in part to Lockheed Martin’s $10 million investment in manufacturing efficiencies, facilities, and laboratories to ensure navies can pace the threats in littoral and deep sea environments,” said Tom Jarbeau, Lockheed Martin Mk-48 program director. “We are building on our five decades of experience in undersea systems and our strong record of providing complex electronic systems to our customers on schedule and on budget.”

    Lockheed Martin developed the new version of the Mk-48 under a five-year $425 million contract that was awarded in 2011. While the Mod 7 upgrade will be applied to new torpedoes, it can also be used to upgrade older weapons to the new standard. Under the terms of the contract, Lockheed Martin will deliver 20 Mod 7 CBASS kits to the Navy per month. The company expects that it could sell as many as 250 torpedoes to the Navy over the next five years.

    Compared to older versions of the venerable Mk-48, the new modular Mod 7 variant increases sonar bandwidth. It can transmit and receive pings over a wider frequency band and it takes advantage of broadband signal processing techniques to greatly improve the weapon’s search, acquisition and attack effectiveness. The new weapon is also much more resistant to advanced enemy counter-measures. Perhaps most significantly, the Mod 7 uses modern open-architecture computers, which means it will be easier to integrate new hardware and software upgrades.

    The new upgrades will keep the venerable 21-inch diameter, 3500lbs weapon—which incorporates a 650lbs warhead—relevant well into the future. The original version of the weapon was designed during the 1960s and entered service in 1971 with the U.S. Navy. Over the years the Mk-48 has been upgraded many times and remains the principal anti-ship and anti-submarine weapon onboard American submarines—and indeed many allied navies. Versions of the Mk-48 are in service with the Canadian, Australian, Dutch and Brazilian fleets.

    The Mk-48 will remain the U.S. submarine fleet’s primary weapon for the foreseeable future.

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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  GarryB on Fri Jun 03, 2016 10:42 am

    Well normally over sea they would fly from supply ships to forward deployed forces so they will rarely require aerial support...

    So landing troops in forward areas don't require attack helo support... are they really that fast? Razz


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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  max steel on Mon Jun 06, 2016 11:14 am

    Submarine Launched Blackwing Drone to Enable Strikes in Denied, Contested Environment




    The U.S. Navy plans to deploy unmanned aerial systems (UAS) on board submarines, to provide covert intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance and target acquisition to support special operations and full-scale warfare, on sub-surface and surface operations. According to the Navy’s plans, attack and guided missile submarine will be equipped with a miniature UAS known as ‘Blackwing,’ produced by Aerovironment Inc. The Navy plans to buy 150 such systems. The company introduced the new unmanned vehicle at the Sea Air Space event in Washington DC.

    Typical operation will see the Blacking deployed in the vicinity of targets in contested or denied airspace, where activities of other manned or unmanned platforms would be too risky. From its forward position, the Blackwing will provide target acquisition and battle damage assessment, in support of strikes performed from stand-off range.

    Blackwing is believed to be a derivative of Aerovironment’s Switchblade Lethal Miniature Aerial Missile System (LMAMS), redesigned to fit the submarine’s 3” torpedo decoy launcher. It was developed under the Navy’s Advanced Weapons Enhanced by Submarine UAS against Mobile targets (AWESUM) Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) launched in 2013. During the demonstration phase (2013-2015) the AWESUM “demonstrates submarine launch, data sharing and control across naval, special operations and air-force units,” the Navy announcement. This JCTD ended in September 2015 with a strong recommendation to transition the capability into the fleet.

    The Navy also plans to evolve the submarine-launched drone concept with larger vehicles, launched through 21” torpedo tubes. In 2013, the Navy Research Lab (NRL) demonstrated a submerged launch of the Sea Robin UAV, from a modified Tomahawk cruise missile canister.

    According to Aerovironment, The Blackwing drone is not limited to a submarine platform, and can also be integrated with and deployed from a variety of surface vessels and mobile ground vehicles to provide rapid response reconnaissance capabilities.

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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  Militarov on Sat Jun 11, 2016 3:24 am

    GarryB wrote:
    Well normally over sea they would fly from supply ships to forward deployed forces so they will rarely require aerial support...

    So landing troops in forward areas don't require attack helo support... are they really that fast?  Razz

    Flying from supply ship to landing ships near shore, those would provide further payload deployment and support, they wouldnt fly supply missions ashore with these probably unless its safe. But where their speed would count, above sea they will be safe most of the time.

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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  Militarov on Sat Jun 11, 2016 3:24 am

    Delays with the F-35 program has forced the U.S. Marine Corps to bring 30 legacy Hornets out from the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) facility at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base to cover shortfalls, Jane’s reported.

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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  JohninMK on Sun Jun 12, 2016 8:29 pm

    Noticed a strange design feature on this LCS compared to a 'normal' bridge as per the destroyer behind it. Although it has an angled bridge there are no side looking bridge windows. They have to open the door.



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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  JohninMK on Sun Jun 12, 2016 9:12 pm

    An article from last month with a US view on the Chinese DF-21D and forthcoming DF-26 anti ship missiles. The article seems balanced but the comments are..........well it is a US site.

    http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/chinas-df-26-anti-ship-ballistic-missile-what-does-the-16260


    Also a 'journalists' view on the top 5 attack submarines of the Cold War, one from each of US/UK/Germany and two from Russia. Only 13 comments with what seems to be a Russian poster standing his ground.

    http://nationalinterest.org/feature/the-five-best-submarines-the-cold-war-10314

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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  max steel on Tue Jun 14, 2016 10:16 pm

    JohninMK wrote:An article from last month with a US view on the Chinese DF-21D and forthcoming DF-26 anti ship missiles. The article seems balanced but the comments are..........well it is a US site.

    http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/chinas-df-26-anti-ship-ballistic-missile-what-does-the-16260


    Also a 'journalists' view on the top 5 attack submarines of the Cold War, one from each of US/UK/Germany and two from Russia. Only 13 comments with what seems to be a Russian poster standing his ground.

    http://nationalinterest.org/feature/the-five-best-submarines-the-cold-war-10314

    The National Interest magazine seriously--most of its publications are wet dreams of "professionals" from political pseudo-science and technophile amateurs who love those big guns and sexy planes. But once in a while even TNI publishes a  good piece.

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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  max steel on Wed Jun 15, 2016 3:41 pm

    Navy helicopter crashes in river

    An MH-60S helicopter crashed in the James River in Virginia during a training mission Tuesday but all crew members were rescued, the Navy said.

    The three crew members were taken to Naval Medical Center Portsmouth with non-life threatening injuries, the Navy said in a press release, while adding that the helicopter was based at Norfolk Navy Station Chambers Field.

    The Navy announced an investigation to look into Tuesday's incident in Virginia to determine its cause.

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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  max steel on Wed Jun 15, 2016 5:28 pm

    Boeing confident of extending Super Hornet and Growler production

    Boeing anticipates an extension of its F/A-18E/F Super Hornet and EA-18G Growler production lines as a result of an increased operational tempo by the US Navy (USN) and strong international interest in procuring the platform, company officials told reporters on 10 June.

    Speaking at Boeing's Global Sustainment and Support (GS&S) site at Cecil Field in northern Florida, Dan Gillian, Vice President of the F/A-18 and EA-18G programmes, said that, with the USN burning through airframe hours at a far higher rate than originally intended and with additional exports expected in the near term, the company is confident of extending production from the current mid-2018 cut-off point through into the next decade.

    "I believe that we will continue to build new Hornets and Growlers. We have slowed production down to two aircraft per month, and we will keep it at that level through to mid-2018. There is strong domestic and international demand that we see sustaining production through to the mid-2020s," Gillian said.

    The US Navy's current programme of record is for 568 Super Hornets and 160 Growlers. As Gillian noted, however, the service has identified a 'Super Hornet shortfall' that will materialise in the 2030s/2040s as aircraft prematurely reach the end of their 6,000 hour airframe lives owing to the high operational tempo being flown today. To try and mitigate this, additional aircraft have already been requested in the fiscal year defence budget, and Gillian expressed his confidence that these will be approved.

    On the international front, Gillian noted that a deal with Kuwait is currently going through the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) process with the US government and should be finalised in the not-too-distant future. Current legacy Hornet operator Finland has issued a request for proposals (RfP) that Boeing is preparing its response to, as has Belgium. Spain, which also now flies the Hornet, is in the early stages of a fighter procurement project for which Boeing will bid the Super Hornet, while India and Canada are being offered the platform to fulfil their respective requirements also.

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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  max steel on Sat Jun 18, 2016 4:35 pm

    LCS Survives First Shock Test, Preps For More


    The new littoral combat ship (LCS) Jackson was showered by spray and shaken by a large explosion June 10 as she endured the first of a series of controlled tests intended to prove the design’s ability to withstand and survive combat and damage.

    A 10,000-pound explosive charge was set off about a hundred yards from the Jackson – the Navy wouldn’t say exactly how close, saying the actual distance is classified – in waters off Florida’s Atlantic coast.

    So was there any damage?

    “Nothing unexpected,” said Capt. Thurraya Kent, a spokesperson for the Navy’s acquisition directorate. She acknowledged that minor damage was expected, such as items falling to the deck or glass cracking, and some components could be stressed.

    Other sources indicated that initial results show the ship withstood the explosion better than expected, although evaluations continue.

    About 260 instruments are placed throughout the ship to measure various aspects of the blast, which strikes above and below the water. After the test, the Jackson returned to the Mayport Naval Station where engineers downloaded instrument data, examined the ship and made necessary repairs, Kent said.

    Another test is scheduled to take place around June 22, she said. A third and final shot planned for July 8. Each test will use the same 10,000-pound explosives charge, but the ship will be moved progressively closer to the explosion.

    The test schedule, Kent noted, is volatile, subject to weather conditions, traffic in the vicinity of the blast and marine fish and mammal activity. The first test, she noted, was delayed several days by weather.

    The ship’s crew of about 50 and a number of engineers and observers – many from the Pentagon’s Office of Test and Evaluation (OT&E) -- were on board during the test. Kent added that a veterinarian was included “to assess sea mammal’s safety and security.”

    “We take the safety and security of marine mammals seriously,” Kent added. “We have to keep in mind migration patterns in addition to the other variable of sea state and weather. We also have additional lookout, more than you would normally have when you’re out to sea. We do not conduct test shots if a marine mammal is in the proximity.”

    Full Scale Shock Trials (FSST) are performed on most new US Navy ship designs, although Congress – at the urging of Pentagon OT&E director Michael Gilmore – actually wrote into law a requirement for the LCS tests. Thus, the tests are coming earlier in the LCS production line than originally planned.

    Gilmore himself is expected to be aboard for the third test shot on Jackson.

    The last time the Navy conducted FSSTs was in 2008 with Mesa Verde, the third ship of the San Antonio-class of amphibious transport docks.

    Kent noted that a great deal of testing already has been accomplished on individual components built into the ships.

    “Individual equipment shock trials, modelling and testing and other surrogate testing already have been done. They give you an idea of what to expect,” she said.

    “Shock trials become the validation of those tests and demonstrate the ship’s ability to withstand an explosion. Shock trials are actually the culmination of all the trials that have been done to date.”

    With two different LCS designs in production, there will be two series of shock trials. Jackson represents the Independence LCS 2 class, while the Milwaukee will test the Freedom LCS 1 design.

    The Milwaukee recently completed a maintenance period and is also operating from Mayport. Her first test shot is scheduled for Aug. 9 and the last on Sept. 13. The ship recently completed a firing exercise using her 57mm gun.

    The full series of LCS shock trials will cost about $65 million, Kent said, using research, development, testing and evaluation funding.

    In the Pacific, meanwhile, the Freedom and another Independence-class ship, the Coronado, are preparing to take part in Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercises that begin in late June.

    The Coronado completed the initial operational testing and evaluation of the SeaRAM Rolling Airframe Missile weapon system for its class on June 2, and is expected to leave San Diego for Hawaii June 22, fitted with launch canisters for the Harpoon missile, the first installation of a new over-the-horizon (OTH) capability developed by the Navy.

    After taking part in RIMPAC, the Coronado will continue to Singapore to begin the first deployment of an LCS 2-class ship. She’s expected to operate in the region up to 18 months or more.

    The Freedom will not travel to Pearl Harbor, but rather will take part in a Southern California series of RIMPAC exercises with five other ships. This fall, she will be fitted with launchers for the Raytheon/Kongsberg Naval Strike Missile, a Norwegian weapon that is being considered, along with Harpoon, as the OTH weapon for LCSs and the follow-on LCS frigate.

    And in Singapore, engineers are working to restore as much of the Fort Worth’s engineering capability as possible before the ship leaves for San Diego.

    The Fort Worth’s power plant was severely damaged Jan. 12 in a pier side accident at Singapore’s Changi naval base, in which the ship’s engines were mistakenly engaged and the combining gear, a complex piece of equipment that allows the ship’s two gas turbines and two main propulsion diesel engines to be cross-connected to propulsion shafts, was wrecked.

    In a combined diesel and gas turbine plant, ships routinely travel on economical diesel engines, bringing on the less-efficient gas turbines for high speeds. Travelling long distances on gas turbines alone is inefficient, potentially damaging to the plant, and requires frequent refueling. Nevertheless, the Navy decided in April the ship would return to San Diego for full repairs, even if she could only use her turbines. At that time, it was hoped the Fort Worth could leave Singapore as early as June.

    But, according to several sources, engineers now believe they’re able to get at least one of the diesels on line for the passage, using a combination of software reconfiguration and partial mechanical repairs. Some are reportedly hopeful both diesels can be used.

    A test configuration already has been successfully evaluated aboard the Fort Worth’s sister ship Freedom.

    Reconfiguring the engineering plant, however, will add to the time needed to prepare the Fort Worth for the long trans-Pacific voyage. Combined with the need to provide an escorting oiler – many of which will be engaged in RIMPAC – it’s now likely the Fort Worth won’t leave Singapore at least until sometime in August. That raises the possibility that the Coronado could arrive at Changi before Fort Worth leaves.


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    Re: US Navy and Naval Aircraft: News

    Post  max steel on Sat Jun 18, 2016 7:03 pm

    U.S. Navy’s AMDR Radar Arrives At Pacific Missile Range

    The U.S. Navy installed a new AN/SPY-6 Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR) in its Advanced Radar Development Evaluation Laboratory (Ardel) at the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) off Hawaii.

    The Navy's Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR) is a next-generation radar system designed to provide ballistic missile defense, air defense, and surface warfare capabilities. AMDR will initially support DDG 51 Flight III. The AMDR suite consists of an S-band radar (AMDR-S) for ballistic missile and air defense, X-band radar, and a Radar Suite Controller (RSC). AMDR-S is a new development Integrated Air and Missile Defense radar providing sensitivity for long range detection and engagement of advanced threats. The X-band radar is a horizon-search radar based on existing technology. The RSC provides S and X band radar resource management, coordination, and interface to the combat system. The Navy expects AMDR to provide a scalable radar architecture that can be used to defeat advanced threats.

    The Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR) was initially developed to support Theater Air and Missile Defense requirements as part of a next generation cruiser, CG(X), radar suite.

    The AMDR will provide multi-mission capabilities, supporting both long range, exoatmospheric detection, tracking and discrimination of ballistic missiles, as well as Area and Self Defense against air and surface threats. For the BMD capability, increased radar sensitivity and bandwidth over the current SPY-1 system is needed to detect, track and support engagements of advanced ballistic missile threats at the required ranges.

    For the Area Air Defense and Self Defense capability, increased sensitivity and clutter rejection capability is needed to detect, react to, and engage stressing Very Low Observable / Very Low Flyer (VLO/VLF) threats in the presence of heavy land, sea, and rain clutter. This effort provides for the development of an active phased array radar with the required capabilities to pace the evolving threat. Modularity of hardware and software, a designed in growth path for technology insertion, and Open Architecture (OA) Compliance are required for performance and technology enhancements throughout service life.

    AMDR provides greater detection ranges and increased discrimination accuracy compared to the AN/SPY-1D(V) radar onboard today’s destroyers. The system is built with individual ‘building blocks’ called Radar Modular Assemblies. Each RMA is a self-contained radar transmitter and receiver in a 2’x2’x2’ box. These RMAs stack together to fit the required array size of any ship, making AMDR the Navy’s first truly scalable radar.

    This advanced radar comprises:

    S-band radar – a new, integrated air and missile defense radar
    X-band radar – a horizon-search radar based on existing technology
    The Radar Suite Controller (RSC) – a new component to manage radar resources and integrate with the ship’s combat management system
    AMDR Advantages

    1)Scalable to suit any size aperture or mission requirement
    2)Over 30 times more sensitive than AN/SPY-1D(V)
    3)Can simultaneously handle over 30 times the targets than AN/SPY-1D(V) to counter large and complex raids
    4)Adaptive digital beamforming and radar signal/data processing functionality is reprogrammable to adapt to new missions or emerging threats.


    AMDR’s performance and reliability are a direct result of more than 10 years of investment in core technologies, leveraging development, testing and production of high-powered Gallium Nitride (GaN) semiconductors, distributed receiver exciters, and adaptive digital beamforming. AMDR’s GaN components cost 34% less than Gallium Arsenide alternatives, deliver higher power density and efficiency, and have demonstrated meantime between failures at an impressive 100 million hours.

    .AMDR has a fully programmable, back-end radar controller built out of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) x86 processors. This programmability allows the system to adapt to emerging threats. The commercial nature of the x86 processors simplifies obsolescence replacement – as opposed to costly technical refresh/upgrades and associated downtime – savings that lower radar sustainment costs over each ship’s service life. AMDR has an extremely high predicted operational availability due to the reliable GaN transmit/receive modules, the low mean-time-to-repair rate, and a very low number of Line Replaceable Units. Designed for maintainability, standard LRU replacement in the RMA can be accomplished in under six minutes – requiring only two tools.

    Inefficiencies in radar transmitters lead to large prime power and cooling requirements for radars. The resulting RADAR prime power and cooling needs have a significant impact on radar weight, deckhouse volume, and cost and in turn can drive platform design. These problems are exacerbated for Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) applications requiring long pulse lengths. Power amplifier (PA) inefficiencies are the driving factor for transmitter inefficiencies and improvements in power amplifier efficiency will provide significant Radar and platform benefits.

    Plans for the Air and Missile Defense Radar are to leverage research and development investments, integrate sufficiently matured fundamental advanced technologies from technology risk reduction efforts and allies, and incorporate Open Architecture approaches to develop a scalable radar design with major improvements in power, sensitivity, resistance to natural and man-made environments over curren radar systems for multi-mission TAMD (BMD and Area AAW). System design will be accomplished using proven advanced technologies and commercial standards to lower schedule risk and develop a product with the lowest life-cycle cost.

    The total quantity of systems to sustain is 22. Each system includes four fully populated AMDR-S array faces and a Radar Suite Controller (RSC). Each system will have an operational life of 40 years. The O&S Time Horizon is 50 years (FY 2021 – FY 2070). The antecedent system is AN/SPY-1D(V). AN/SPY-1D(V) has fielded 32 systems, each with a planned service life of 35 years. The planned sustainment strategy for AMDR includes post-delivery routine software maintenance, software updates every two years to address new threats and other emergent capability requirements, Commercial Off The Shelf processing equipment upgrades on an 8-year cycle, and a two-level maintenance philosophy (Organization and Depot).


    Does Russian Navy operate such S and X band Radars on their ships ?

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