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    Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

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    Vladimir79
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    Signs of Russian economic recovery

    Post  Vladimir79 on Fri Nov 20, 2009 1:51 pm

    Gazprom: Russia Gas Demand In Nov Up 8% On Year

    MOSCOW (Dow Jones)--Russian domestic demand for natural gas so far in November is 8% higher than in the same period last year, the country's state-controlled gas company OAO Gazprom (GAZP.RS) said Wednesday.

    "We see stable growth in demand in Russia," Gazprom's Chief Executive Alexei Miller said.

    Gazprom also expects "significantly higher" European exports in November compared to November last year, Miller said.

    Company Web site: www.gazprom.ru

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    Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  Austin on Sat Dec 18, 2010 4:28 pm

    Russia Energy Data - Oil, Gas, Electricity,Coal ( November 2010 )

    GarryB
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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  GarryB on Sun Dec 19, 2010 8:06 am

    Ironic really.

    After over a century of ensuring international dependency on fossil fuels... because western countries controlled the main sources so it was a cheap energy supply for the west, the fact that Russia has reserves of gas and coal and oil will likely lead the west to suddenly start properly investing in alternative energy technologies.
    Ironically China has invested in this area and has been criticised by the US... it seems they want to develop new clean energy technologies and sell them to everyone else... they don't want China to beat them to the goal.
    Their likely reasoning for developing alternative energy sources is not because of a shortage, or to reduce pollution, but to prevent Russia from making too much money from energy exports.

    Smile Just because I am paranoid it doesn't mean the western world isn't out to get Russia. Smile

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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  IronsightSniper on Sun Dec 19, 2010 9:17 am

    Well with all that land out back (Eastern Siberia), you can do what I always suggest and build Algae plantations or Solar farms and the like. That's probably the only thing Russia has on the rest of the world, large pieces of uninhabited land, because otherwise we'd have to shove Las Vegas out of the way for new Solar farms Very Happy Either way, Energy is going to be the only thing driving Russia's economy for a few decades, so I'd suggest they start diversifying now when there'll be a time when Fossil fuels are null and void. Rusnano seems quite promising too, but they'll need more than nanotech to expand their Economics. One trivial way for me to see what countries are not at the peak of their economies is their Export/Import ratios. For example, we in the U.S., and they in China, are importing more USD worth of goods than we are exporting. Russia on the other hand, is Exporting almost a $100b USD more than they are Importing.

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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  Austin on Wed Mar 23, 2011 1:49 am

    Russia opting for ‘fast reactors’ for fourth-generation nuclear power

    Russia’s State Atomic Energy Corpor-ation (Rosatom) has decided to focus on the development of fast neutron reactors (FNRs) to provide the Generation IV component of its future nuclear energy policy. FNRs are designed to burn uranium 238 (U-238) while conventional reactors, such as pressurised water reactors (PWRs), use uranium 235 (U-235) as their fuel.

    However, U-235 makes up only 0,7% of natural uranium, whereas U-238 accounts for the remaining 99,3%. Thus, most nuclear power today makes use of less than 1% of the energy available in uranium.

    FNRs also burn actinides (which include uranium and plutonium) as fuel – these are the long-lasting high-level radioactive by-products of nuclear fission in other reactor designs.
    (If they are not used as fuel for FNRs or reprocessed, actinides become the most difficult category of nuclear waste.)

    FNRs can be designed to produce more plutonium than they consume. Such FNRs are called fast breeder reactors (FBRs), which ‘breed’ fuel for other FNRs.

    FNRs thus maximise the use of uranium ore and, in their FBR form, allow the creation of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. An open nuclear fuel cycle requires a constant input of fresh uranium, but a closed fuel cycle greatly reduces this need, with FBRs producing fuel for other reactors, whose waste products, in turn, help fuel the FBRs and other FNRs.

    FNRs/FBRs are not new concepts and the world has some 400 reactor years experience in operating such units, but earlier versions suffered from some technical problems and were uneconomic in an era of very low uranium prices. But technology has advanced, and uranium prices have risen again.

    Rosatom points out that no less than 86,7% of the energy potential of Russia’s natural resources is contained in U-238, while coal contains 8,7%, gas 3,4%, oil 0,8% and U-235 a mere 0,4%. The Russian group also has some 30 years of experience in operating the sodium-cooled BN-600 FNR, which was preceded by the BN-350, BR-5/10 and BN-1/2 FNRs (the last operating during the 1950s). The BN-600 has a capacity of 600 MWe and provides power to the grid and is expected to operate until 2020. Rosatom is now busy with its next FNR, the 880 MWe capacity BN-800, which is expected to enter operation in 2014. However, over the next decade at least, Rosatom will continue to build PWRs (known as VVERs in Russia).

    Nuclear power contributed 16% of Russia’s, and 29% of European Russia’s, energy output in 2008. In terms of installed capacity, the national share of nuclear power was 11%. Total installed capacity was 23,2 GW, spread around ten nuclear power plants (NPPs) equipped with 31 reactors.

    Russia plans to increase the share of nuclear produced energy to about 23% of total energy production for the whole country, and to about 32% for European Russia, by 2020.
    The plan is to achieve this by commissioning 2 GW of capacity a year after 2013 through the construction of standardised nuclear reactors. With funding that is guaranteed, Russia should have 32,3 GW of new nuclear capacity by 2020 – with additional funding, this would rise to 38,1 GW – while 3,7 GW of nuclear capacity would be decommissioned.

    Rosatom is also one of the international companies interested in South Africa’s proposed new NPP programme. Like its competitors, it is offering this country a Generation III PWR design, namely the latest generation of its VVER-1000 reactor in the AES-91/99 NPP design. (The Russians have separate designations for reactors and for the NPPs). In 2003, the AES-91/99 design (including the reactor) was certified as complying with European Union standards by Finnish experts.

    South Africa has well-established relations with Rosatom. Techsnabexport (under the brand name Tenex), a subsidiary of Rosatom, has supplied South Africa with low-enriched uranium to manufacture fuel for Eskom’s only NPP, at Koeberg, near Cape Town. In more general terms, South Africa has cooperated with Russia in the nuclear sector for some years now and the two countries have a Joint Coordination Committee on cooperation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy.

    Edited by: Martin Zhuwakinyu

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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  GarryB on Wed Mar 23, 2011 8:52 am

    In more general terms, South Africa has cooperated with Russia in the
    nuclear sector for some years now and the two countries have a Joint
    Coordination Committee on cooperation in the peaceful uses of nuclear
    energy.

    In addition to the money earned by building NPPs for other countries Russias economy will certainly benefit from a reliable supply of energy.

    As an aside the Australians are worried because they have an enormous amount of Uranium and export it widely, but one of their main clients is Japan, which seems to be reconsidering its policy on nuclear power.

    The Aussies refused to sell Uranium to the Russians on ethical grounds... perhaps they might reconsider... but if the Russians are turning to Fast Breeder designs they perhaps might not be so interested any more.

    The Tsunami in Japan and the Earthquake raise questions about NPP safety but the new concepts proposed by Russia for NPPs in ships that could be sailed to a remote region and connected to the local power grid to supply electricity without having to lay and maintain thousands of kms of cable perhaps offers an interesting option. Being an Island nation Japan could use ship based NPPs that sit in protected harbours, and with the threat of a Tsunami could be sailed immediately to deeper water when the wave heights will be minimal.
    Being ship based apart from a Tsunami these types of reactors would not be effected by even very serious earth quakes.
    It could be possible to have very long underwater cables out to deep water piers for the ships to dock and connect to the local power grid and in case of a storm have similar connections in a protected harbour... so the vessels spend most of their time moored offshore in deep water connected to the local power grid... the ship and the reactor manned all the time so that at short notice it can uncouple and in a storm sail into harbour and reconnect to ride out the storm in the safety of the harbour. Earthquakes would not effect it in the Harbour or out in deep water... the only potential problems would be Tsunamis and storms.

    In fact the safest place to locate them would be inland on lakes where there would be no serious threat of Tsunamis and of course being on water earthquakes would not effect them and even serious storms would not be enough to make a lake rough enough for the risk of losing the boat.

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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  Austin on Fri Mar 25, 2011 11:51 am

    An interesting concept in modular reactor design.

    Russia targets 100 MW fast-neutron SVBR-100 reactor for 2017

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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  nightcrawler on Fri Mar 25, 2011 3:29 pm

    Thnx Austin

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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  Austin on Sat Mar 26, 2011 8:57 pm

    International Crises Boost Russia's Energy Posture

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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  Austin on Sat Mar 26, 2011 9:05 pm

    GarryB wrote:
    The Aussies refused to sell Uranium to the Russians on ethical grounds...

    What kind of ethical grounds ? They refused to sell uranium to India for proliferation concerns , what yard stick did they apply to Russia ?

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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  GarryB on Sun Mar 27, 2011 11:24 am

    Oops, my mistake.

    Apparently the Aussies changed their minds in early 2010 and are now agreeing to sell Uranium to Russia.

    Here is a quote:

    While exports to Russia will go ahead, Australia doesn’t allow uranium
    to be sent to India for energy use because the South Asian country
    hasn’t signed the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

    http://www.businessweek.com/news/2010-04-23/australia-will-allow-exports-of-uranium-to-russia-update2-.html

    "We've come to the conclusion that we can safely export uranium to
    Russia and it won't be diverted for military purposes," Smith said.

    http://gsn.nti.org/gsn/nw_20100319_4537.php

    I rather doubt their public reasons for releasing U to be exported to Russia as the Aussies are very Russophobic... It is most likely the political power of the mining industry in Australia that changed their minds as their mining industry is very powerful... probably why Gillard got into the drivers seat to be honest.

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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  Austin on Sun Mar 27, 2011 11:55 am

    Well Initially Aussie was go hung to sell Uranium to India after the Indo-US nuclear deal , later they changed their mind and added not signing NPT as their concern but then i suppose its their sovereign right on who should they sell their resources.

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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  GarryB on Sun Mar 27, 2011 12:27 pm

    Their supposed reason for not selling to Russia was that they thought the Russians would use it to make nuclear weapons.

    The reason everyone is interested in Aussie U is because it is plentiful and cheap so you can order big.

    Apparently the Howard government changed its mind and was going to sell to India but the Gillard government decided to block it when it got into power.

    I agree it is all their choice and they have the right to sell to whoever they want, but I think it is quite funny the double standard... I wonder what the Australian reaction would be to all the oil states deciding not to sell oil to Australia because of its poor human rights record.
    It wasn't till the 1967 Aussie census that they stopped counting Aborigines as flora and fauna...

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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  Austin on Sun Apr 03, 2011 11:32 pm

    GarryB wrote:Their supposed reason for not selling to Russia was that they thought the Russians would use it to make nuclear weapons.

    I think they have enough Plotonium to make nuclear weapons at one time they had 30 thousand nuclear weapons.

    And any uranium transaction that happen between NPT and non-NPT countries are under IAEA safeguard , so there is no way Russia or any other country can divert those to weapons use.

    The reason everyone is interested in Aussie U is because it is plentiful and cheap so you can order big.

    Apparently the Howard government changed its mind and was going to sell to India but the Gillard government decided to block it when it got into power.

    Indeed but hopefully its not a bottle neck to India , India has largest reserves for thorium (suffiecient to provide energy for next 200 years ) and its 3 stage Nuclear program is suppose to use thorium in 3rd stage.

    I wonder what the Australian reaction would be to all the oil states deciding not to sell oil to Australia because of its poor human rights record.
    It wasn't till the 1967 Aussie census that they stopped counting Aborigines as flora and fauna..

    Laughing

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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  GarryB on Mon Apr 04, 2011 9:00 am

    I think they have enough Plotonium to make nuclear weapons at one time they had 30 thousand nuclear weapons.

    And
    any uranium transaction that happen between NPT and non-NPT countries
    are under IAEA safeguard , so there is no way Russia or any other
    country can divert those to weapons use.

    Exactly, which is why I suggested there were probably other Russophobic reasons.

    Indeed but hopefully its not a bottle neck to India , India has largest
    reserves for thorium (suffiecient to provide energy for next 200 years )
    and its 3 stage Nuclear program is suppose to use thorium in 3rd stage.

    At a time when the US is sucking up to India the aussies are giving you the finger... will those convicts never learn manners... Twisted Evil
    Of course even NZ has large amounts of Uranium on the East Coast of the South Island, but it is not worth mining yet. If Russia really does follow through with fast breeder reactors it will reduce waste problems and eliminate fuel requirements.

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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  Austin on Sat Apr 09, 2011 12:11 am

    Russias Oil Income to Reach USD 40.37b

    Oil price: no panacea for Russia

    Russia Stocks Soar on Rising Oil Prices

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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  Austin on Mon Apr 11, 2011 12:48 am

    Russia’s Ivanov ‘Not Happy’ With Oil Above $100, Prefers $80

    Oil prices above $100 a barrel are discouraging Russia from diversifying its economy, Deputy Prime Minister Sergei Ivanov said.

    Ivanov said the current price was unsustainable and that Russia’s budget will fall into a deficit when it drops. He would prefer oil and gas prices to be “around maybe $80 per barrel,” which is a “more realistic” level.

    “When the gold rain is pouring on your head, you are not motivated to diversify,” Ivanov said in an interview yesterday in Miami, where he was speaking at the Everest Capital Emerging Markets Forum. “I wouldn’t say I hate high oil and gas prices, but I am not happy with them.”

    Oil today climbed above $111 in New York for the first time in 30 months. Crude for May delivery rose $1.25, or 1.1 percent, to $111.55 a barrel at 11:10 a.m. on the New York Mercantile Exchange.

    Higher oil prices have helped boost Russia’s international reserves to $504.5 billion, the most since 2008. The cost of protecting Russian bonds against default also fell to its lowest level yesterday since August 2008, according to data provider CMA.

    Once prices fall, running a long-term budget shortfall is not an option for Russia, Ivanov said. “We can’t live for long with a deficit budget. We are not like the” U.S., he said.
    Space, Nuclear

    He said that even with high oil prices, the country was taking steps to diversify, including investing in technology industries, space and aviation programs, and nuclear energy.

    Ivanov stopped in Miami after meeting with U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Trade Representative Ron Kirk and several lawmakers to discuss Russia’s entrance into the World Trade Organization.

    The “political window of opportunity” for Russia to enter the WTO may “start to close down” at the end of the year as the U.S. and Russia enter election years, Ivanov said. He is hopeful an agreement will be reached before then, he said.

    Ivanov said Russian arms exports, which doubled to $10 billion in 2010 over the previous five years, may rise to $10.6 billion to $11 billion this year.

    Ivanov, 58, was appointed first deputy prime minister in 2007 after serving as the country’s defense minister since 2001, according to the Russian government’s website. The former KGB officer was regarded as a potential successor to then-President Vladimir Putin before the 2008 election.

    Ivanov also said he would resign as chairman of the board of Rosavtodor, a federal toll-road operator, and United Aircraft Corp., an airplane manufacturer, after Russian President Dmitry Medvedev called for government officials to step down from their posts at state-owned companies and be replaced by independent directors.

    “I will leave with a light heart because apart from those two boards I have lots of other fish to fry,” he said. Whether the independent directors will improve corporate governance “remains to be seen” he said.


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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  Russian Patriot on Mon Apr 11, 2011 2:02 am

    Austin wrote:
    Russia’s Ivanov ‘Not Happy’ With Oil Above $100, Prefers $80

    Oil prices above $100 a barrel are discouraging Russia from diversifying its economy, Deputy Prime Minister Sergei Ivanov said.

    Ivanov said the current price was unsustainable and that Russia’s budget will fall into a deficit when it drops. He would prefer oil and gas prices to be “around maybe $80 per barrel,” which is a “more realistic” level.

    “When the gold rain is pouring on your head, you are not motivated to diversify,” Ivanov said in an interview yesterday in Miami, where he was speaking at the Everest Capital Emerging Markets Forum. “I wouldn’t say I hate high oil and gas prices, but I am not happy with them.”

    Oil today climbed above $111 in New York for the first time in 30 months. Crude for May delivery rose $1.25, or 1.1 percent, to $111.55 a barrel at 11:10 a.m. on the New York Mercantile Exchange.

    Higher oil prices have helped boost Russia’s international reserves to $504.5 billion, the most since 2008. The cost of protecting Russian bonds against default also fell to its lowest level yesterday since August 2008, according to data provider CMA.

    Once prices fall, running a long-term budget shortfall is not an option for Russia, Ivanov said. “We can’t live for long with a deficit budget. We are not like the” U.S., he said.
    Space, Nuclear

    He said that even with high oil prices, the country was taking steps to diversify, including investing in technology industries, space and aviation programs, and nuclear energy.

    Ivanov stopped in Miami after meeting with U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Trade Representative Ron Kirk and several lawmakers to discuss Russia’s entrance into the World Trade Organization.

    The “political window of opportunity” for Russia to enter the WTO may “start to close down” at the end of the year as the U.S. and Russia enter election years, Ivanov said. He is hopeful an agreement will be reached before then, he said.

    Ivanov said Russian arms exports, which doubled to $10 billion in 2010 over the previous five years, may rise to $10.6 billion to $11 billion this year.

    Ivanov, 58, was appointed first deputy prime minister in 2007 after serving as the country’s defense minister since 2001, according to the Russian government’s website. The former KGB officer was regarded as a potential successor to then-President Vladimir Putin before the 2008 election.

    Ivanov also said he would resign as chairman of the board of Rosavtodor, a federal toll-road operator, and United Aircraft Corp., an airplane manufacturer, after Russian President Dmitry Medvedev called for government officials to step down from their posts at state-owned companies and be replaced by independent directors.

    “I will leave with a light heart because apart from those two boards I have lots of other fish to fry,” he said. Whether the independent directors will improve corporate governance “remains to be seen” he said.


    Finally we realize this.. it took 20 years of bad management by the liberals.

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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  GarryB on Mon Apr 11, 2011 10:24 am

    What a sourpuss that guy is.

    They should be taking advantage of the extra revenue to make some things happen quicker.

    All the diversification programs should benefit from the extra investment, plus at a time when European countries are being forced to adopt austerity measures Russia should be glad it is getting extra income that can be put into education, and health and infrastructure, and invested in new tooling or new equipment to make diversification easier and quicker.

    Don't ignore the silver lining and see clouds.

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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  Austin on Mon Apr 11, 2011 12:12 pm

    Ivanov has not known to be a reformer or some one who can bring in new ideas , no wonder he was not chosen to succeed Putin although he was a very strong candidate and Putin loyalist , I think he still holds the position that he does because he is a Putin Loyalist.

    Having said that he is also a system man and knows how the system thinks its strength and weaknesses , he must have seen through his long stay that more money just makes the system go easy and it gets lethargic to reforms , lets hopes thats not the case.

    They can use that extra dollar and save it for bad days or use it for health care , reforms , education and infrastructure to improve peoples life , More money is not bad as long as they are wisely used.

    I would assume if there is some problem in Saudi , Oil Prices will sky rocket, probably right time for Iran to pay in kind and support movements in saudi Smile

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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  GarryB on Mon Apr 11, 2011 3:15 pm

    No point in doing anything now while the price of oil is high.

    Wait till it starts falling again and then do something.

    Having oil 200 dollars a barrel is not good for Russia either.

    For the moment while Russia is not part of the WTO it can subsidise the price of energy for its own people and any lackeys that can earn that privilege.

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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  Austin on Mon Apr 11, 2011 3:24 pm

    GarryB wrote:No point in doing anything now while the price of oil is high.

    Wait till it starts falling again and then do something.

    I disagree , reforms should go on in a planned manner irrespective if oil prices are high or low , they should push for privatisation and reforms as planned.

    The fear that Ivanov is expressing is they may just slow reforms if prices are high there by affecting the plans to reduce budgetary dependency on oil dollars.

    Having oil 200 dollars a barrel is not good for Russia either.

    Oil prices are manipulated by US and OPEC to keep it low , so if the oil prices rises based on demand and supply no one should complain.


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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  Austin on Mon Apr 11, 2011 11:17 pm

    Libyan chaos will benefit Russia’s economy

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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  GarryB on Tue Apr 12, 2011 12:00 am


    I disagree , reforms should go on in a planned manner irrespective
    if oil prices are high or low , they should push for privatisation and
    reforms as planned.

    Hahahaha... privatisation is the solution is it?

    What a freakin joke privatisation is here.

    The government used to control the electricity generation and delivery and also the telecommunications network.

    Then another government got into power and the economy wasn't so good and the brilliant solution was to privatise stuff.

    Telecom was the first thing to get sold and we were told it was OK because ma and pa investors in NZ would buy it and everything would be ok.

    What actually happened was that NZers were initially sold shares but eventually foreign companies made offers and bought up majority share holdings and now Telecom is foreign owned.

    The initial price was something pathetic... and in their first year of operation they fired all the staff and rehired the 1/3rd that were actually doing the work and made that one third do the work of all the workers laid off.

    Prices didn't go down, they went up... because the next thing they did was allow competition and blamed Telecom for having a monopoly because it owned all the lines and infrastructure... not really a surprise... they did have to buy it.

    Now competition has pushed prices up, not down.

    It is even worse with electricity... here in New Zealand we have a few hydro electric dams and in the far north some dirty coal fired power stations. Way back when it was all government run it was fine... use hydro and only fire up the dirty coal plants when the lake levels were low.
    Now that all the power stations and power lines have been sold the coal fired stations run all the time because the company that owns them doesn't own the hydro power stations and only makes money when coal is burning...
    Workers are fired and a skeleton staff are rehired for the same or less pay to do the work of all the people fired and their own work.
    Money is saved by not doing maintainence and when lines go down they just cut the power.

    Trust me... privatisation is only good when it goes so far... the reality is that private companies can fu#$ things up just as easily as any government department, but private companies are not as publicly accountable as a government department is.

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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

    Post  Austin on Tue Apr 12, 2011 12:12 pm

    Well privatisation does not mean the Government has to sell the entire stake to private investors but it can part sell and diversify its equity , for eg if the government owns 100 % in Power Trans mission and Distribution , it can sell 49 percent stake to private players and keep the 51 % as majority holders or do it vice or verse.

    That would help government raise money and improve its performance in such organisation by bringing in competition , sure people would be fired because they could be over staffed or not working to its full potential.

    I can tell you from my experience in India privitisation has done wonders , I remember a time when all banks were government owned and depositing money in a bank or withdrawing it would be half a day job with long queues and poor work ethics.

    With the entry of private players in banking sector in the market , they have brought a very welcome relief , although government still owns most of the banks 100 % , there is a big difference in the way bank work these days ,compared to how they used to 15 years back because of competition that private players brought in , it simply made government bank work more efficient and be more responsive to customers.

    Another example is power supply , with the coming in of private player prices have gone up but services are much better and then there is more than one player in one city or couple of them in city that brought in competition between them.

    The same goes for telecom revolution in my country , I remember we got out first phone after 3 years of applying for it like 20 years back and 3 years was considered quick other wise they would normally take 5 ! these days you could get a phone within a day and get connected. thanks to privatisation that made the change.

    Same with out government postal service , they used to very inefficient but with private courier service like DHL and many other things have gone better and today I have a choice.

    I can give you many such example how privitisation has done more good than bad to my country and even today the most ineffecient sectors in my country are the government owned one.

    Russia too would have its own experience with its drive , as long as its done via competitive bidding process and fair play .Russia and Russian people in general in the long run would gain more from it and loose less.

    I always believed Government should do pump in money where it should like infrastructure , education , health care and some strategic sectors for the rest they can be completely privately owned by many players or jointly owned by government and private players.

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    Re: Russian Oil and Gas Industry: News

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      Current date/time is Sun Dec 11, 2016 12:36 am