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    Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

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    George1
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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  George1 on Thu May 12, 2016 10:31 am

    Indian Navy completely replaced outdated deck Sea Harrier fighter aircraft with MiG-29Ks

    Подробнее на ТАСС:
    https://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?depth=1&hl=en&rurl=translate.google.com&sl=auto&tl=en&u=http://tass.ru/mezhdunarodnaya-panorama/3272859&usg=ALkJrhi4z4Wo0U_A4lebgR5I4txsy5EzpQ


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    Pinto
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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  Pinto on Fri May 13, 2016 1:50 pm

    George1 wrote:Indian Navy completely replaced outdated deck Sea Harrier fighter aircraft with MiG-29Ks

    Подробнее на ТАСС:
    https://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?depth=1&hl=en&rurl=translate.google.com&sl=auto&tl=en&u=http://tass.ru/mezhdunarodnaya-panorama/3272859&usg=ALkJrhi4z4Wo0U_A4lebgR5I4txsy5EzpQ

    MIG 29K is going to be mainstay of indian navy for long time to come and all the medial sponsored news abt Rafale-N, US naval planes is turning out to be farce

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    Bye-bye Sea Harriers, hello MiG-29K: Navy de-inducts vertical take-off jets

    Post  Pinto on Fri May 13, 2016 2:48 pm

    Chief of the Naval Staff Admiral R K Dhowan was the chief guest of the ceremony held at Goa's INS Hansa base in Vasco to bid adieu to Sea Harriers after their 33 years of service to the nation.

    Here is all you need to know about Sea Harriers

    Chief of the Naval Staff Admiral R K Dhowan was the chief guest of the ceremony held at Goa's INS Hansa base in Vasco to bid adieu to Sea Harriers after their 33 years of service to the nation.

    The Sea Harriers displayed a vertical landing formation at INS Hansa during the de-induction event today.

    "It's a distinct honour and proud privilege to induct multi-role supersonic MiG 29K in the 300 squadron. It marks the induction of multi-role supersonic technology in Indian Navy," Admiral Dhowan said addressing the gathering.

    Admiral Dhowan hailed all the pilots who flew Sea Harriers, which was considered as one of the most difficult aircraft to fly. "Today is also the day to salute the pilots who flew Sea Harrier aircraft which made a mark for itself by protecting our seas," he added.

    Sea Harriers were inducted in the Indian Navy following phasing out of then obsolete Seahawks.

    In September 1980, the Sea Harrier Project (SHARP) was formed with select naval aviators and technical personnel for coordination of trials, testing, acceptance and training.

    The first newly-built Sea Harrier for the Indian Navy (IN 601) was ready on December 21, 1982, the Navy said in a statement issued in Panaji.
    The first three Sea Harriers flying via Malta, Luxor and Dubai, led by Lt Cdr Arun Prakash VrC, landed at Dabolim on December 16, 1983.
    This was followed by the first deck landing on the carrier, INS Vikrant, on December 20, 1983, and the arrival of the first Sea Harrier T Mk 60 trainer, on March 29, 1984.

    "In last few years, the Harriers added a new dimension to their operations with the increased multinational exercises in which the Indian Navy participates," the statement added.

    https://youtu.be/exh5hFE9EwY

    http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/indian-navy-bids-adieu-to-sea-harriers/1/665218.html

    max steel
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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  max steel on Thu Jun 02, 2016 11:43 am

    Scorpenes to become Navy’s mainstay

    French Scorpenes will replace Russian Kilo class vessels as the mainstay of the Navy’s conventional submarine fleet in a few years. Mazgaon Dock Ltd., Mumbai, commissioned a second submarine assembly workshop on Saturday. Six Scorpenes are under construction in the first one.

    Second workshop

    “This second workshop will cater to building additional submarines as and when the government takes a decision. We will be in a position to quickly begin work once approved,” an MDL official said.

    Having once abandoned the German HDW submarine line in the past, government sources said they were determined not to lose the technical expertise and skilled manpower gained from construction of the six Scorpenes. In view of that, the number of additional Scorpenes could go beyond nine, one official said.

    Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar, who inaugurated the facility, said that overall level of indigenisation in the next line of submarines “must be substantially higher” compared with the Scorpenes which have around 35 per cent indigenous content.

    He had already stated on several occasions that the government would order two or three additional Scorpenes to keep the production line running and maintain the force levels on the fleet.

    The new assembly workshop built at a cost of Rs.153 crore is a pre-engineered building structure to handle construction of five submarines simultaneously, MDL officials said. It can be used to construct additional Scorpenes or the new line of submarines under Project-75I as and when it is selected.

    But the Request for Proposal (RFP) for P-75I is held up for want of clarity on Strategic Partnerships under the new Defence Procurement Procedure. The proposal from the Ministry intended to promote domestic manufacturing capabilities in critical areas has generated a mixed response and consultations are on to get a consensus. With current platforms fast ageing, Scorpenes will play a major role in ensuring fleet strength.

    The first of the Scorpenes, Kalvari, is currently undergoing sea trials and is scheduled to be commissioned in October and the remaining are expected to be rolled out at nine-month intervals. This means that the present line is occupied till 2020, officials said and the new assembly line will speed up construction of additional submarines to meet timelines. Incidentally the Scorpenes will roll out without their major weapon, heavy weight torpedoes, which are caught up due to allegations of corruption in other defence deals.


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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  Militarov on Sat Jun 04, 2016 6:18 pm


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    Russia to strengthen India's submarine fleet

    Post  Pinto on Tue Jun 21, 2016 11:20 am

    21 June 2016 ELENA KISELEVA, IVAN SAFRONOV, KOMMERSANT

    Russia is ready to give India access to improved Kilo-class (Project 636 ‘Varshavyanka’) non-nuclear submarine construction technology. It has not been decided yet which of two Indian shipyards – Pipavav or Larsen & Toubro – will assemble the submarines under licence.



    The Rostec CEO Sergey Chemezov first told Kommersant-Vlast of India's interest in improved Kilo-class (Project 636 ‘Varshavyanka’) diesel-electric submarine (DES) construction technology.

    "We are now coming to an arrangement for them to initially repair previously acquired submarines, in which they will be assisted by experts from the ‘Zvyozdochka’ Shipbuilding Centre," Chemezov said. "Later, construction of the submarines will start at a joint venture between USC (United Shipbuilding Corporation), Rosoboronexport and an Indian shipyard: first the major assembly work, and then the localisation."

    Industry sources said the option of supplying India with two Improved Kilo-class submarines was under discussion until recently. According to a source, the issue was raised in November 2015 during a visit by Indian Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar to Admiralty Shipyards in Saint Petersburg. The Indian military, however, decided not to buy the submarines ready-made, but to assemble them in India under licence.

    Organisations involved in arms exports received a request from India for the technology to be transferred and production localised in India. According to a shipbuilding industry executive, negotiations are on directly between the Russian and Indian governments, underlining the "special status of the relationship between Moscow and New Delhi".

    Kommersant has learned that the main issue lies in the choice of Indian partner. India's non-nuclear submarine fleet is in urgent need of modernisation, and it is not clear which local shipyard is capable of carrying out the work soonest. The Indian Navy currently has just nine Russian-built Kilo-class (Project 877EKM ‘Paltus’) DESs and four German-built Type-209 ‘Shishumar’ class submarines. The former have a service life of 25 years, which is over for the first six Indian DESs. For the remaining three the service life gets over in the next ten years.

    Repairs to the Kilo-class submarines are carried out at the ‘Zvyozdochka’ shipyard in Severodvinsk, where five such Indian submarines have been refitted since 1997, and Admiralty Shipyards, where two such submarines have been repaired.

    The ‘Sindhukesari’, which entered its 28th year of service in 2015, is currently at the Zvyozdochka shipyard. Built by the Leningrad Admiralty Association (now Admiralty Shipyards) in 1988, it underwent first intermediate maintenance and upgrade there, from1999-2001.

    Of the ten Russian-built Kilo-class submarines, nine are in operation; one of them, Sindhurakshak, exploded at Mumbai dockyard in August 2013. After a second round of maintenance, their service life could be extended by another ten years, which experts see as a sign of the reliability of the design. However, the Indian Navy has acquired no new DESs in the last 15 years.

    Meanwhile, India's geopolitical rival, Pakistan, ordered eight advanced Type 041 non-nuclear submarines from China at the end of 2015 (of which four will be built in Karachi and the rest in China). India is being offered a hybrid option, with construction of at least one Improved Kilo-class submarine at Russian shipyards: with testing, it takes up to three years to build one submarine of this class. To develop such facilities in India would take "significant time", said a source. "They want to acquire the new submarines as quickly as possible."

    Kommersant understands that possible shipyards for the joint Indo-Russian venture are the privately owned Pipavav, part of Reliance Defence enterprises, and Larsen & Toubro. Sources close to the negotiations said the owner of the former, business magnate Anil Ambani, has strong lobbying powers with the Indian government, and direct access to Prime Minister Modi. From a technical point of view, the latter is more favourable for Russia, but India's military and government officials will put together the final proposal.

    "Of course, it would be more beneficial to us to sell the submarines without transferring the technology, then we would receive 'hard' cash," said a high-ranking official involved in military technical cooperation. “But the system has changed. Everyone wants access to reproduce the product, not to make one-off purchases. And we have to give that access, otherwise we will lose the market."

    http://in.rbth.com/economics/defence/2016/06/21/russia-to-strengthen-indias-submarine-fleet_604531

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    Amur-1650 offered to India under Project-75I is best of Several Submarines : Rubin CEO

    Post  Pinto on Wed Jun 22, 2016 7:30 pm

    Igor V Vilnit,CEO Rubin Design Bureau in a recent Interview to Indian media house has said that ” Russia has offered State-of-the-art Amur-1650 conventional submarines based on Lada-Class under Make in India programme under Project 75(I) .

    Igor also added that Amur-1650 offered to India will take best of Lada-Class submarines currently under construction at Admiralty Shipyards in St Petersburg but also will carry forward several refinements of Lada-Class and further developments from little known Kalina-Class conventional submarines project .

    Kalina-Class conventional submarines project is further refinement of Lada-Class submarines based on suggestions provided by Russian Navy . Kalina-Class submarines will be designed from the outsets as AIP-equipped vessels which will be more capable than previous versions and will come incorporating all the improvements asked by Russian Navy.

    Amur-1650 proposed under Project 75(I) is essentially a highly customised vessel with attributes coming in from Lada/Amur-class and also from proposed refinements of Kalina-Class. Igor also confirmed that AIP system has cleared land-based trials and he is hopeful that underwater trials would go off as smoothly as they had on shore-based trials

    http://idrw.org/amur-1650-offered-to-india-under-project-75i-is-best-of-several-submarines-rubin-ceo/

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    MiGs make a comeback – at sea

    Post  Pinto on Sun Jun 26, 2016 2:25 pm

    After dominating the Indian Air Force for more than 40 years, MiGs will now be a key element of the Indian Navy's strike force.


    Former Air Marshal Sumit Mukerji holds a rare distinction. The Indian Air Force officer, who was Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Southern Air Command, is the only air force pilot to have commanded MiG-21, MiG-23, MiG-25, MiG-27 and MiG-29 units. "The only pilot," he says. "There’s no one even in Russia.”

    Mukerji’s achievement was possible because of the dominance of MiG aircraft in the IAF fleet. Currently the IAF has 245 units of the MiG-21 interceptor and 120 units of the MiG-27 ground attack jet. The MiG-23 fighter-bomber and the MiG-25, of which the IAF had eight units of the reconnaissance version, are long retired.

    Although MiG-21s are still in use in as many as 19 air forces worldwide, the frequent crashes of these older IAF MiGs led to a trial by media and furore in parliament, after which the IAF announced it would retire MiG-21s and MiG-27s in the near future.

    However, early retirement looks unlikely as replacement aircraft aren’t coming in fast enough. The Rafale deal with the French has hit cost turbulence and the locally made Tejas is not a proven design – at least not yet. Also, HAL’s Tejas production rate is too low – 12 per year although it could go up next year – for the ‘Made in India’ jet to replace all MiG-21s
    Navy Fulcrums
    But even as hundreds of older MiGs are set to fly into the sunset, the Mikoyan-Gurevich presence in India will continue for several more decades. This is because of the presence of the powerful MiG-29 multirole fighter - codenamed Fulcrum by NATO - in both the IAF and the Indian Navy.

    The IAF currently has 69 MiG-29s, which are expected to serve at least until 2030. India was the first international customer of the MiG-29. The IAF placed an order for more than 50 MiG-29s in 1980 while the aircraft was still in its early development phase.

    While the IAF may not place further orders for the aircraft, the Indian Navy has ordered as many as 45 naval variants. In fact, Russia revived the MiG-29K programme in the late 1990s in response to the Indian Navy's decision to acquire the aircraft carrier Admiral Gorshkov, refurbished as INS Vikramaditya.

    The Indian Navy is currently looking at the MiG-29K as an option for its future aircraft carrier INS Vishal. Russian Aircraft Corporation MiG has expressed its readiness to supply the required number of MiG-29Ks. According to senior MiG executive Anastasia Kravchenko, India’s Ministry of Defence has asked four countries to send proposals for the supply of fighter jets for the country’s second indigenously built aircraft carrier, which will carry more than 50 aircraft.

    INS Vishal could be the first Indian carrier to field a catapult launched but arrest landing (CATOBAR) aircraft launch system. The CATOBAR would allow the MiG-29K to take off at near maximum payload and fuel, which would allow the aircraft to utilise its range of 1300 km.

    Having long-range strike and reconnaissance aircraft translates into better survivability for carriers because they can operate further away from enemy shores. Also, enemy hunter killer submarines will have to operate in the open seas, increasing their vulnerability to carrier-borne aircraft.

    MiG dominance

    MiG series aircraft formed the backbone of the IAF’s strike element for more than four decades. The first dogfight between supersonic aircraft took place during the December 1971 War with Pakistan when two MiG-21s over Jamnagar, Rajasthan, chased two American built F-104 Starfighters of the Pakistan Air Force. While one Starfighter escaped, the other was shot down by the MiG over the Arabian Sea.
    Military analyst Edward Coggins writes in ‘Wings That Stay On: The Role of Fighter Aircraft in War’ that by the time the hostilities came to an end, the IAF MiG-21s had claimed four Pakistani F-104s, two F6 jets, one F-86 Sabre and one Lockheed C-130 Hercules. The Russian fighter had clearly won the much anticipated air combat between the MiG-21 and the F-104, he writes.

    Thrilled with the MiG-21’s success, India went on to acquire newer MiG models.

    Pack attack

    One the most glorious chapters in MiG fighter history was during the 1999 Kargil War when the IAF threw all its MiGs in a massive offensive against the Pakistani intruders.

    In the report ‘Airpower at 18,000 feet: IAF in the Kargil War’ published by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Benjamin Lambeth explains in detail how the IAF ground down both the Pakistan Army and the PAF.

    In the early hours of May 26, 1999 six attacks in succession by MiG-21, MiG-23 and MiG-27 fighters were launched against intruder camps, material dumps, and supply routes in the areas overlooking Dras, Kargil and Batalik.

    The MiG-21bis squadron at Srinagar was joined by additional MiG-21M, MiG-23BN and MiG-27ML squadrons, while additional squadrons of MiG-21Ms and MiG-29s deployed northward to Avantipur. While the MiG-29s kept the Pakistani F-16s bay, the other IAF aircraft (including the French Mirage 2000) carried out ground sorties.

    An example of Indian ‘jugaad’ – or improvisation – was the use of stopwatches and handheld GPS receivers in their cockpits by MiG-21 pilots lacking sophisticated onboard navigation suites. According to Prasun K. Sengupta in “Mountain Warfare and Tri-Service Operations”, another novel technique developed by the IAF for use in the campaign entailed selecting weapon impact points so as to create landslides and avalanches that covered intruder supply lines.

    The IAF used the MiG-25R – which normally flies at 80,000 ft – in a medium altitude role to improve the resolution of its pictures, something that the aircraft’s Russian designers may not have thought possible.

    Lambeth emphasises the complete dominance achieved by India’s MiG-dominated fleet. “Throughout the campaign, whenever IAF reconnaissance or ground attack operations were under way in the immediate combat zone, Western Air Command ensured that MiG-29s or other air-to-air fighters were also airborne on combat air patrol stations over the ground fighting on India’s side of the Line of Control to provide top cover against any attempt by the PAF to enter the fray in a ground attack role. PAF F-16s to the west typically maintained a safe distance of 10 to 20 miles on the Pakistani side, although they occasionally approached as close as 8 miles away from the ongoing ground engagements.”

    The PAF’s director of operations during the Kargil War later reported that there had been isolated instances of IAF and PAF fighters locking on to each other with their onboard fire control radars, but that caution had prevailed on both sides and that “no close encounters took place”.

    IAF fighters never joined in aerial combat with the PAF F-16s due to the A.B. Vajpayee government’s strict injunction that Indian forces not cross the Line of Control. Seven years later, however, Air Chief Marshal A.Y. Tipnis recalled that he had personally authorised his escorting fighter pilots to chase any Pakistani aircraft back across the Line of Control in hot pursuit were those pilots to be engaged by enemy fighters in aerial combat.

    Looking forward, with the IAF’s Sukhoi Su-30 fleet set to touch a figure of 300 or more in the next decade, the MiGs will be reduced to a small – albeit important – component of India’s strike forces. They may have ceded space in the IAF to the superior firepower of the Sukhois, but the MiGs are now about to stamp their dominance over the seas.

    http://in.rbth.com/blogs/stranger_than_fiction/2016/06/24/migs-make-a-comeback-at-sea_605923

    max steel
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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  max steel on Sun Jul 03, 2016 9:26 pm

    RM Hands Over Varunastra Torpedo to Indian Navy


    The Defence Minister Shri Manohar Parrikar today handed over “Varunastra,” a ship-launched heavy weight torpedo also known as underwater missile to the Indian Navy in a befitting ceremony here today.

    Speaking on the occasion, Shri Manohar Parrikar congratulated DRDO for the achievement and appreciated the efforts made in this regard. He asked the DRDO to ensure its participation in the production process and to keep adequate quality control of their products so that it can meet the international standards.

    The Minister also stated that in these high technology areas, DRDO’s contribution with 95 per cent of indigenous content is an apt example of Indigenously Designed Developed and Manufactured (IDDM) category.

    The Chief of the Naval Staff, Admiral Sunil Lanba termed the occasion as momentous and described it as yet another feather in the DRDO’s cap. He applauded DRDO and Naval Science and Technological Laboratory (NSTL) for rendering yeomen service to the nation in achieving self-reliance in defence and underwater technologies. He said the Navy’s partnership with DRDO laboratories has strengthened and matured over the years. ‘The fact that three of the premier DRDO labs NPOL, NMRL and NSTL carry the prefix ‘Naval’ in their names highlights the close relationship between the Indian Navy and the DRDO in our joint efforts’, Admiral Lanba stated.

    Secretary, DD R&D and DG DRDO Dr. S Christopher in his address described the induction ceremony of Varunastra as a proud moment for the nation as India has joined in the elite group of only a handful of countries. He commented that the development of submarine launched heavy weight torpedo is in advanced stage for user trials.

    Dr. Christopher mentioned that Varunastra, the shipborne anti-submarine torpedo has got the goodwill of Navy as a user which has decided to produce 73 of them, immediately. He briefly mentioned that last year Mareech – Advanced Torpedo Defence System was handed over to Indian Navy. He also highlighted the DRDO developed LCA – Tejas, the first Squadron of which is being raised by IAF on July 01, 2016. The AEW&C is also striding towards induction into IAF this year.

    Recently, another milestone has been achieved by BrahMos, a Joint Venture of DRDO which successfully demonstrated captive trials with Su30 aircraft, he stated.

    Varunastra has been developed by NSTL, a premier DRDO laboratory based at Visakhapatnam. M/s Bharat Dynamics Ltd has been associated as a production partner in concurrent engineering mode.

    Varunastra, a versatile naval weapon which can be fired from the Rajput class destroyers, Delhi-class and all future Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) ships capable of firing heavy weight torpedoes and is capable of targeting quiet and stealthy submarines both in deep and littoral waters, even in intense countermeasure atmosphere.

    The function was also attended by Defence Secretary Shri G Mohan Kumar, Secretary, (Defence Production) Shri AK Gupta, Scientific Advisor to Raksha Mantri Dr. G Sateesh Reddy and senior functionaries of Ministry of Defence, Indian Navy, DRDO, Production & Industry partners.

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    IAF aircraft AN-32 goes missing

    Post  Pinto on Fri Jul 22, 2016 12:37 pm

    IAF's AN-32 missing: The Defence Ministry has launched a full-scale search and rescue operation in the Bay of Bengal and has put into force four warships of the Indian Navy and two aircraft.

    By: Express Web Desk | New Delhi | Updated: July 22, 2016 3:00 pm
    IAF, Aircraft missing, IAF Aircraft missing, Chennai aircraft, port blair aircraft, An-32, India News, Defence ministry, news, india news,
    The Defence Ministry has launched a full-scale search and rescue operation in the Bay of Bengal and has put into force four war ships of the Indian Navy and two aircraft.
    The Indian Air Force on Friday reported that its AN-32 aircraft has gone off the radar while on its way from Chennai to Port Blair. The Indian Air Force claims it was in touch with the aircraft till about 9.30 am post which it could not establish contact. The ETA or expected time of arrival of the flight was 11.30 am. The Chennai ATC claimed it was in touch with the aircraft till 8.12 am.
    The Defence Ministry has launched a full-scale search and rescue operation in the Bay of Bengal and has put into force four war ships of the Indian Navy and two aircraft. “One P8 I and one Dornier have been launched. Four ships – Karmukh, Gharual Jyoti and Kuthar – have been diverted to join in the search and rescue operation at full speed.
    IAF Captain DK Sharma told reporters: “We termed it as overdue, and have launched full force (search and rescue operation). We will get results soon.” Media reports claim that bad weather could have played a role in the aircraft going off the radar.
    Here’s a quick look at the AN-32 and what its features are
    * The Indian Air Force reportedly has a fleet of 105 AN-32s in service.
    * The AN-32, a twin-engine aircraft, is primarily used as a cargo flight.
    * In this case, it was carrying 29 people on board – 23 personnel and six crew.
    * The aircraft has the capacity to transport either 7.5 tonnes of cargo or fifty passengers.
    * There are ten variants of the AN-32: An-32A, An-32B, An-32B-100, An-32B-110, An-32B-120, An-32B-300, An-32LL, An-32MP, An-32P firekiller and An-32B-200.
    Click here for LIVE updates on IAF’s missing AN-32 aircraft
    * The AN-32 aircraft can fly at a maximum speed of 530km/hour. The aircraft weighs around 16,800kg and its maximum take-off weight is 27,000 kg.
    * The aircraft is designed to be used in both – civilian as well as military situations.
    * The An-32 prototype took its maiden flight in July 1976.

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    Does India really need Russia’s ‘Backfire’ bomber?

    Post  Pinto on Wed Jul 27, 2016 5:42 pm

    Lacking strategic vision, the Indian Air Force remains content to operate at the theatre level, but perhaps the fearsome Cold Warrior from Russia can help change that mindset.

    The Indian Air Force has a variety of specialised fighters, ground attack jets and multirole aircraft in its fleet, but a strategic bomber has never figured in its war plans. According to the Russian wire service Interfax, that could change as India’s Ministry of Defence has reportedly sought to buy four Tupolev Tu-22M3 maritime strike bombers from Russia.

    This isn’t the first time reports have surfaced that India is interested in acquiring this fearsome Cold Warrior – codenamed Backfire by NATO. According to the Federation of American scientists, “In December 1999 it was announced that India would lease four Tu-22M3 Backfire bombers, with the aircraft slated to arrive in India as early as June 2000.” They never did.

    However, the first time the Backfire was set to fly into the subcontinent was in mid-1971 when Russia offered it as a strategic bomber. However, Air Chief Marshal P.C. Lal rejected the offer.

    Defence analyst Bharat Karnad said, the “reasons trotted out verged on the farcical”. Karnad explains: “As Wing Commander (later Air Marshal) C.V. Gole, member of the Air Marshal Shivdev Singh Mission to Moscow and test pilot, who flew the Tu-22(M) informed me, he was appalled by the fact that he had to be winched up into the cockpit, and that the plane would have to take off from as far east as Bareilly to reach cruising altitude over Pakistan!”

    Although the Backfire has been creating panic in American carrier groups for decades (the Chinese have also tried hard to buy the bomber or its design blueprints), which is an indication of its utility, the IAF has refused to accept what has been offered to it on a platter. It prefers to remain bogged down at the theatre level while steadfastly refusing to grow a strategic wing.

    Armed and dangerous

    To be sure, the Backfire is a completely different species of aircraft compared with the IAF’s current fleet, and a doctrinal transplant would have to happen before the IAF brass can envision a role for a long-range strike bomber.

    The Tu-22M is an extremely large aircraft flown by a four-man crew of a pilot, co-pilot, navigator and weapon systems operator. With its phenomenal combat range of 2400 km, and a blistering speed of over 2300 kph (faster than most jet fighters), the Tu-22M is ideal for targeting aircraft carriers and large ships
    .
    Russian tests reveal that when a shaped charge warhead weighing 1000 kg was used in the Kh-22 missile, the resulting hole measured 16 ft in diameter and 40 ft deep. Not even the largest US Navy CVNs can survive such an impact, and at the very least will be out of commission of months.

    The bomber is designed to take off from secure inland bases, be vectored towards US aircraft carrier groups and fire its complement of up to six – often nuclear-tipped – cruise missiles from safe standoff distances.


    The Backfire’s primary weapon is the supersonic Raduga Kh-22 cruise missile. In high-altitude mode, it climbs to the edge of space (89,000 ft) and makes a near hypersonic speed dive towards its target. In low-altitude mode, it climbs to 39,000 ft (higher than most commercial airliners) and makes a shallow dive at Mach 3.5, making the final approach at an altitude under 1600 ft.


    Bill Sweetman and Bill Gunston write in ‘Soviet Air Power’ that the Kh-22 missile could be “programmed to enter the correct Pentagon window”. In fact, during the 1980s, Russian Naval Aviation was so sure about the accuracy of these missiles that the Backfire carried only one Kh-22, armed with a nuclear warhead.

    Today’s Backfires are also equipped with the more advanced Kh-15. This missile climbs to an astounding 130,000 ft and then dives in on the target, accelerating to Mach 5, which makes it the world’s fastest aircraft-launched missile.


    Just like the MiG-25 spooked western air force pilots of a previous generation, the Backfire was a big scare word in western military circles during the 1970s. American experts involved in arms limitation talks believed it was an intercontinental strategic bomber. Russian secrecy about the aircraft’s capabilities added to the speculation, leading American intelligence and US aircraft manufacturers (for obvious reasons) to suggest inflated ranges. This led to fears that the Backfire could strike the continental US.

    However, even when the Russians added in-flight refuelling capability, the Backfire wasn’t intended to strike the US, but rather its naval assets in the open sea. Russian Naval Aviation strategists envisioned up to a hundred Tu-22M bombers making a pack attack against US Navy carrier battle groups in the event of war.

    Backfire for India

    Built at the peak of the Cold War when speed, payload and range mattered more than cost, the heavy Backfire is expensive to operate and maintain. The general consensus was that deploying it against high value assets alone makes sense. However, Russia used it with devastating effect against the Afghan Mujahideen in the 1980s, and in the 2008 Georgian War, with its iconic moment when Georgia’s tie-chewing President MikheilSaakashvili runs for cover as Russian bombers fly overhead.

    Again, in the ongoing conflict in Syria, Backfires have rained freefall bombs, destroying Daesh assets as well as US-backed terror groups. These strikes have severely degraded Daesh strength in the region.

    Since the IAF has at least 400 attack aircraft, including the Sukhoi Su-30MKI, MiG-29 and Mirage-2000, that have Pakistan sorted, deploying the Backfire against Pakistan would be a huge overkill. Using limited numbers against Chinese land targets would be suicidal as Beijing has a robust air defence network bolstered by the Russian S-300 anti-aircraft missile and its Chinese knockoffs.

    The Backfire’s only conceivable deployment in India is as a maritime strike bomber against People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) assets, especially in the backdrop of growing Chinese naval activity in the Indian Ocean.

    Backfires operating from the Thanjavur Air Force Base in southern India – and armed with the 300 km range BrahMos – can comfortably strike naval assets up to Seychelles.
    They can also be used to target PLAN vessels operating in the South China Sea. The bomber’s ferry of 6800 km means it can reach Darwin, Australia, without aerial refuelling. Clearly, such an aircraft would be a huge force multiplier for India.

    If the media reports about India wanting a limited number of just four Backfires are true, then it would suggest they would be deployed in a maritime – rather than strategic – strike role. The bombers are equipped to receive data directly from spy satellites monitoring the oceans. India, which has a constellation of ocean survey and spy satellites, can access real time satellite intelligence and despatch the Backfires on ship hunting missions. The bombers can also be guided by scout aircraft.

    Forces rivalry

    While the IAF’s timidity in adopting a strategic role is a likely reason for the repeated rejection of the Backfire, another factor could be forces rivalry. Air forces are highly resistant to strategic bombing being done by the navy or army. The Tu-22M being a specialised maritime strike bomber, it could – in the IAF’s view – be the beginning of the navy’s strategic air arm. The air force clearly doesn’t want the Indian Navy poaching on its turf. In this backdrop, chances are the IAF will find another farcical excuse to scuttle Backfire talks.

    Operate with caution

    The Russian bomber is certainly a game changer, but it doesn’t mean India should rush headlong into a deal. In terms of size, firepower and reach, it dwarfs everything in India’s air arm, but it should not be forgotten that the Tu-22M is a 40 year old design. It last rolled off the assembly lines in 1993 and the aircraft is well out of guarantee, so the delivery of spares might be an issue.

    Flight Global reports that in 1991 the Tu-22M mission-capable rate was just 30-40 per cent, although it was not really a representative year because that’s when the Soviet command economy had collapsed.

    India should have bought these aircraft cheap as chips when the Soviet Union dissolved and Moscow was wondering what to do with 300 surplus Backfires. But costs aside, having a nascent fleet comprising just four bombers would still be a good idea as it would give India a rare glimpse into the world of strategic airpower.

    Endgame

    During the Cold War, only two organisations in the West had got the Backfire’s range right. The first was US aircraft maker McDonnell Douglas and the other was Flight International, where Sweetman, the defence analyst worked. Years later, in 1992, the Russians brought the Tu-22M to the Farnborough International Air Show, along with a one-page handout.According to Sweetman, “We’d hit the fuel capacity within 5 per cent.”

    When Flight International had published the Backfire’s range, an engineer from McDonnell Douglas had called them, wondering how the magazine had hit the same numbers his team had. Sweetman explains: “Later, I found out why that McDonnell Douglas guy was so surprised. His team had been working for what he preferred to call the Culinary Institute of America, which was quarrelling with the US Air Force. The Air Force claimed the Backfire had intercontinental range; the CIA said it could make it with inflight refuelling but could never get back.

    “US Air Force intelligence boss Major General George Keegan threatened to mess with the F-15 programme – a huge McDonnell Douglas contract – if McDonnell Douglas analysts, the ones feeding the CIA, didn’t find more fuel tanks in the Russian bomber so that their conclusions matched his. CEO Sanford “Sandy” McDonnell stood his ground. Keegan went on to start the Great Space Laser Panic of ’79. And the Tu-22M did what it did best, which wasn’t strategic bombing but scaring the bejeesus out of carrier groups.”

    http://in.rbth.com/blogs/stranger_t...ia-really-need-russias-backfire-bomber_615567



    Backfires operating from the Thanjavur Air Force Base in southern India – and armed with the 300 km range BrahMos – can comfortably strike naval assets up to Seychelles.


    One way distance to Seychelles is 3100 km approx. so thats a bit over estimated but with aerial refuelling of course its possible.
    His view of Brahmos missile is correct. One small point i wish to add is Tu22M3M also carries a MKU-6-1 rotary launcher in its bombing bay


    This bay carries 6 Kh15 missiles and each missile weighs around 1200 kgs and length of 478 cm and diameter of 0.46 cm with 150 kg warhead.
    The present Brahmos Air Launched version is 2500 kg and length 8.4 m, diameter of 0.6 and warhead 300 kg. As such the rotary launcher if it can accommodate then 3 Brahmos can be fitted . This along with 3 in wings and body makes this beast carry 6 Brahmos Air launched version at present condition

    In future, with Brahmos NG such numbers could be doubled in teh rotary bay meaning 6 Brahmos NG and the beast would be in a position to carry 9.

    Perhaps with the Zircon based Brahmos 2, the mission payload mix can change significantly

    But the critical question remains:

    Will we buy it or its just another feel good article about potential India Russia Relationships?

    Will IAF allow IN to have such maritime strike bombing platforms and change the whole aerial doctrine?

    Will 4 such Aircrafts be enough?



    Source: http://defence.pk/threads/does-india-really-need-russia%E2%80%99s-%E2%80%98backfire%E2%80%99-bomber.441381/#ixzz4Fcjc1bCq

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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  Pinto on Wed Jul 27, 2016 7:58 pm

    If India can really buy these high cost formidable planes.It appears as this is Russia strategy to sell these strategic weapons to a safe buyer as India, as they leased us nuke subs too and might lease one more this year

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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  sepheronx on Wed Jul 27, 2016 8:08 pm

    On keypub they are bitching about availability and quality of the MiG 29K's and state that they are loss poor quality. Issue I have is why isn't there a single mention of them by Russia who operates the MiG 29K's? A lot of it sounds like bullshit to me.


    I know Mikoyan had a history with its MiG-29's being so so and spare parts availability, but as of late, nothing of sort from Russia. Much like the supposed MKI problems but Russia, Algeria, etc don't face the same issues.

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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  Pinto on Wed Jul 27, 2016 8:31 pm

    sepheronx wrote:On keypub they are bitching about availability and quality of the MiG 29K's and state that they are loss poor quality. Issue I have is why isn't there a single mention of them by Russia who operates the MiG 29K's?  A lot of it sounds like bullshit to me.


    I know Mikoyan had a history with its MiG-29's being so so and spare parts availability, but as of late, nothing of sort from Russia.  Much like the supposed MKI problems but Russia, Algeria, etc don't face the same issues.

    well there have been some reports by CAG to parliamnet regarding this but these are of time when some parts frm ukraine were hard to come buy

    India media is sold to west and is pathetic now

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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  Pinto on Thu Jul 28, 2016 11:51 am

    can any one confirm ? t

    the backfires were there before ( on lease) now on sale. The Tu 's are going to be game changer for the Indian Navy with brahmos and k 15( will Russia give kh 15 to India? or perhaps india already using it in leased Tu) . It has been under the plans for quite some time, and they will use the already existing base in two coasts.

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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  GarryB on Fri Jul 29, 2016 9:34 am

    I would expect a new model Kh-15 would have been developed with newly developed rocket fuel, new materials that are light and strong and heat resistant... and of course more sophisticated electronics and sensors to make it much more effective.


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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  Pinto on Fri Jul 29, 2016 11:18 am

    GarryB wrote:I would expect a new model Kh-15 would have been developed with newly developed rocket fuel, new materials that are light and strong and heat resistant... and of course more sophisticated electronics and sensors to make it much more effective.

    Hmm cool Garry do you think this missile Kh 15 too can be transferred to india with this bomber ?


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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  Pinto on Sat Jul 30, 2016 7:13 pm

    Indian Navy's submarine-hunting Kamov-28 choppers to get major upgrade after Parrikar intervention

    After a contract signed between Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar and Russian manufacturer yesterday, India can now look forward to an enhanced and upgraded set of submarine hunting helicopters.

    Jugal R Purohit | Posted by Arpan Rai
    New Delhi, July 30, 2016


    Indian Navy to enhance the effectiveness of ten submarine hunting helicopters.

    Contract signed between the Ministry of Defence and Russian manufacturer.

    All ten copters will be modernized with upgraded sensors.

    Enemy submarines lurking in waters of India's interest will soon find their stay to be uncomfortable.

    Overcoming eight years of stalling and stagnation, Indian Navy (IN) has finally signed on the dotted line to enhance the effectiveness of its ten submarine hunting helicopters, the Russian Kamov-28.

    India Today has learnt that after a personal intervention and push by Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar, a contract to that effect was signed yesterday between the Ministry of Defence (MoD) and Russian manufacturer Rosoboronexport. All ten copters will be modernized, sensors upgraded and delivered at regular intervals over the coming five years.

    The total value of the contract is believed to be upwards of Rs 2000 crore. or 320 m $

    The manufacturer, contract says, will amalgamate these copters with state of the art sensors and equipment it will procure from a slew of European firms. It was learnt that such an effort has been attempted for the very first time. Towards that, the helicopters will be first sent to Kumertau in Russia at the facility of Russian Helicopters where they will undergo a technical overhaul to enhance the aircraft's life and performance.

    Once done, copters will be brought to Vizag, home of IN's Eastern Naval Command (ENC). At Vizag, naval air station Dega has been selected as the place where the sensors will be fitted and final assembly done. From that point, the copters will be available for the IN. Since Russia does not allow the import of European equipment, personnel from Russian helicopters will carry out the job in Vizag.


    Of the ten Kamov-28 helicopters that were procured from the then Soviet Union, in the mid-80s, only four are in flying condition today. The remaining have been mothballed for spares, it was learnt.

    "We are today making do with the technology of mid-80s, carrying out Anti Submarine Warfare (ASW) roles to detect modern enemy submarines. The importance of this chopper can be understood by the fact that they can operate from the five Rajput class destroyers, the Talwar and Teg class of frigates and are designated to perform ASW role for aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya," said a source.

    The biggest threat to India's maritime interests and its own fleet comes from enemy submarines. While every warship has a hull-mounted sonar for tracking submarines beneath, experts believe that few can match the potency of an ASW helicopter.

    It is also the case that in the waters of Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal and the Indian Ocean, due to composition and currents, hull-mounted sonar often lose their edge, a point where ASW helicopters with their dunking sonars come in handy. Another reason why helicopters are favoured is because while they can hunt a submarine, there is no way a submarine can detect, far less hunt down a chopper.

    The other helicopter that the Navy has for ASW roles is the Seaking Mk.42B which is rapidly ageing and is stretched.

    The case for the Mid Life Upgrade (MLU) of Kamov 28 was moved by the Navy in 2008, bids for which were opened in 2012. One of the reasons for the case staling was the VVIP helicopter scandal. As one of the firms which was to supply the radar, Selex Galileo, was a subsidiary of the tainted firm Finmeccanica, the MoD was careful about progressing.

    Following long-winding, inter-ministerial consultations the MoD moved ahead as Selex Galileo was a sub contractor of the Rosobornexport. "The MoD has nothing to do with them. This is as per the guidelines which have been promulgated by the ministry," explained a source. In fact, the MoD even sought a clearance from the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) for progressing in this case and managed one.

    WHAT DOES KAMOV 28 BRING TO THE NAVY?

    Maximum height achieved in flight 5000m

    Maximum range 900km

    Maximum flight speed 250km/hr

    Maximum take-off weight 12000kg


    Can person search and attack roles and to do so, it can carry bombs, torpedos and missiles on board



    NAVY'S HELICOPTER WOES

    Navy suffers from a massive gap in its ASW capabilities. But that is not it.

    There has been no sizeable acquisition in over a decade to boost its helicopter arm. With a requirement of over 100 helicopters across different categories, and yet going nowhere, the Navy's predicament is clear.

    The Indian Navy had to get 16 choppers as a direct replacement for Seaking Mk.42A helicopters which came with the INS Viraat in 1987 and were decommissioned by the end of the century. Categorised as 'Multi Role Helicopter' acquisition, it is yet to take off.

    Then there is the Naval Utility Helicopter (NUH) deal to replace the Chetaks, introduced to the Indian armed forces in the 60s, with choppers of 4.5 ton class. In addition, Indian Navy is also looking at Naval Multi Role helicopters of a larger tonnage. It is all hanging in balance, for now.

    As a result of this, modern warships, often built at a staggering expense to the exchequer, are roaming the seas without vital helicopters on board. Many warships, which have two hangars on board are steaming past without even a single helicopter on board. "Overall availability of choppers is less than 20 per cent in the Navy".

    http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/...arine-hunting-kamov-28-choppers/1/727853.html

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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  GarryB on Sun Jul 31, 2016 10:25 am

    Hmm cool Garry do you think this missile Kh 15 too can be transferred to india with this bomber ?

    It would certainly need an upgrade in the guidance department... back in the 1980s there was no GLONASS guidance options and active radar homing would have been tricky with a dive from 40km altitude at mach 5 likely melting any radar transparent nose cone on the way down, so warhead was almost always a nuke, which could not be exported.

    An update with new ablative materials and seeker means smaller targets can be hit directly meaning a warhead becomes useful again, which would enable exports to good allies like India.



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    Indian Navy initiates steps to acquire Predator B Guardian, EMALS

    Post  Pinto on Sun Jul 31, 2016 8:42 pm

    New Delhi, July 31 (IANS) The Indian Navy has initiated the first steps towards acquiring the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) for carriers as well as the long-range Predator B Guardian surveillance drone by sending Letters of Request (LoRs) to the Pentagon under government-to-government deals.

    According to defence magazine India Strategic (www.indiastrategic.in) the LoRs, requesting price and availability for 22 Guardians and one EMALS, are now under consideration by the US Department of Defense (DOD) for clearance under the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) programme and according to sources in Washington, a positive view is likely to be taken and discussions between the two countries should begin soon. Once the process is through, the US Government (USG) will send its Letters of Acceptance (LOAs).

    The Predator B Guardian is a naval version for long-range surveillance over waters while the EMALS is being considered by the Indian Navy for its second indigenous aircraft carrier, INS Vishal, due by 2028. EMALS has been adopted by the US Navy as its next generation aircraft launch system, and again significantly, for its new generation aircraft carriers beginning with CVN 78 USS Gerald R Ford, due for delivery this year.

    Vivek Lall, Chief Executive (Global Commercial Strategic Development) for the San Diego-based General Atomics which makes these two systems, declined comment but said: "As far as General Atomics is concerned, we will be opening an office in the Indian capital to assist both the governments as required."

    Notably the Guardian is a high performance Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) aircraft and could only be sold to India after it cleared the Missile Technology Control regime (MTCR) regulations.
    Powered by a high-performance Honeywell TPE331-10 turboprop engine, it operates from a altitude of 50,000 feet and can fly for 27 hours before returning to its base.

    It is equipped with sophisticated day-night sensors, including Raytheon's SeaVue multi-mode maritime radar, to identify and track vessels of different sizes, signals and electronic intelligence systems, satellite communication and even the Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS).

    The EMALS uses the propulsion power of electromagnetic energy and its advantage is that it can adapt to launch different sizes of aircraft from a carrier deck with the flick of a switch. Using DC electricity, it is also being devised to launch satellites in the coming years.

    The existing generation of steam catapults, developed decades ago, are much slower.

    The EMALS system is accompanied by Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) to assist in secure landing of aircraft.

    The Indian Government has acted fast to acquire these assets towards securing the Indian waters against terrorist and hostile intrusions. The LoRs, in fact, were sent by the Indian Navy soon after Prime Minister Narendra Modi's official visit to Washington in June, just as the US also anchored India's entry into MTCR and declared India to be a Major Defense Partner (MDP).

    There are no confirmed financial figures for either the drones or the EMALs, but according to industry sources, the list price for the 22 Guardians should be around $2 billion.

    Overall though, General Atomics, the biggest privately-held US defence company, could land with big multi-billion dollar deals in the coming years as the Indian Air Force (IAF) has also expressed interest in acquiring more than 100 Predator C Avenger attack drones. IAF had sent a communication in September last year, and significantly during Modi's visit, this requirement was mentioned at the highest levels.

    The jet-powered Avenger is a high performance next-generation drone, or Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA), for time-sensitive strike missions. It fires missiles to neutralize multiple hostile targets with precision with the flick of a command sent through satellites.

    As the procedural paperwork for this drone could also begin only after the MTCR clearance, the Indian Ministry of Defence (MOD) should clear the proposal in due course. (India has just become the 35th Member of NTCR).
    Notably, FMS deals require government-to-government (g-to-g) negotiations but with active support from the industry which manufactures every system in the US. The process ensures reasonable pricing, largely in accordance with what the US armed forces would pay for similar systems.
    Drive With Care- A Road Safety Initiative By Chevrolet India
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    The Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) of the Department of Defense (DOD) however charges a fee within a band of 2.5 to 5 percent to facilitate the process.

    For instance, in the case of Boeing C 17 heavy lift transport aircraft, this was fixed at 3.8 percent. The fee varies for different deals, but will be the same for every country that buys the same system from the US.

    (Gulshan Luthra writes on strategic affairs. He can be contacted at gulshan.luthra@indiastrategic.in)
    --IANS

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    India Eyeing Deal With Russia to Buy Project 21300C Rescue Ship

    Post  Pinto on Thu Aug 04, 2016 2:37 pm

    India is considering buying Russian ships and submarines, a source close to the Indian Defense Ministry told RIA Novosti on Thursday.


    NEW DELHI (Sputnik) — India is considering buying a Russian-made deep-sea rescue vessel used to salvage ships and submarines, a source close to the Indian Defense Ministry told RIA Novosti on Thursday.

    "India is indeed exploring the possibility of buying a ship of this class," the source said.

    Russia’s Project 21300C rescue ship, the Igor Belousov, called on the eastern Indian port Visakhapatnam on Wednesday to restock food, water and fuel. During its four-day stay, the Indian military will have an opportunity to insect the vessel.

    India’s Economic Times daily reported last year that India was in talks with a Russian ship-building firm to purchase a rescue ship.

    The outlet said that the nation had no means of helping its nuclear and conventional subs should they run into trouble at sea and had to rely on foreign assistance for deep-sea rescue operations. The Igor Belousov has recently assisted the Indian Air Force in searching for a missing jet in the Bay of Bengal.

    http://sputniknews.com/asia/20160804/1043922284/russia-india-rescue-ship.html

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    India considering purchase of Russian transport aircraft worth $2bn

    Post  Pinto on Thu Aug 04, 2016 4:54 pm

    https://www.rt.com/business/354576-india-russia-planes-purchase/


    New Delhi is in talks with Moscow to acquire a number of Russian-made Ilyushin transport aircraft for its Air Force; Izvestia daily reported citing its sources. The total value of the contract could be as much as $2 billion.

    The mid-air refueling aircraft would enhance the operational capabilities of the Su-30 fighter jets specially developed for India by Russia’s Sukhoi Design Bureau.
    The Indian Air Force is already equipped with Russian-built IL-78 mid-air refuelers.
    “For the first time Russia has offered New Delhi its IL-78MD-90A, which is a modernized version of the Il-76MD-90A military transport, also known as the IL-476,"the unnamed source told Izvestia.
    Negotiations with Russia follow India’s decision not to buy six Airbus 330 MRTT (multi-role tanker transport) due to the high cost. Airbus won the delivery tender in 2015, but last week the Indian government withdrew the tender.
    “The main reason for the cancellation of the tender is the very high life-cycle cost which was not calculated properly in the beginning,”the Financial Express cited the government’s letter to Airbus.


    Good decision by India, russia

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    India to acquire three Admiral Grigorovich-class frigates from Russia

    Post  Pinto on Fri Aug 05, 2016 3:22 pm

    http://www.janes.com/article/62776/india-to-acquire-three-admiral-grigorovich-class-frigates-from-russia

    Russia will supply three Admiral Grigorovich-class (Project 11356M) frigates to India that were originally intended for the Russian Navy's Black Sea Fleet, according to a source in the Russian defence industry.

    "The relevant concealed agreement has been achieved, and India will receive the second three of Project 11356 frigates being built for the Russian Navy. The Indian side has obtained 12 spare tool and accessory kits for the ships," the source said.

    The only issue at the moment is that the vessels, which are being constructed at the Kaliningrad-based Yantar Shipyard, use a Ukrainian Zorya-Mashproyekt gas-turbine propulsion plant. The 2014 Ukraine conflict slammed the door on co-operation between Moscow and Kiev over critical propulsion system components, especially marine gas turbine engines.

    While Russia has already received the propulsion systems for the first three frigates, Ukraine's termination of defence exports to Russia has left the final three without their turbines, with indigenous replacements possibly not be available before 2019.

    While Ukraine says it will not supply the engines to Russia, the source told IHS Jane's that India could use previously acquired Ukrainian engines. Alternatively India could acquire new engines directly from Kiev.

    Meanwhile Moscow and New Delhi are considering transporting the frigates' hulls from the Yantar Baltic Shipyard to India to enable the further construction of the ships and the installation of the engines in the country.

    The additional three Project 11356 frigates for the Indian Navy - No. 360 Admiral Butakov , No. 361 Admiral Istomin , and No. 362 Admiral Kornilov - will reportedly be equipped with the BrahMos cruise missile system.

    Admiral Grigorovich-class vessels are variants of the Talwar (Krivak III)-class frigates, of which six were built for the Indian Navy at the Yantar Baltic Shipyard between 2003 and 2013.

    Want to read more? For analysis on this article and access to all our insight content, please enquire about our subscription options ihs.com/contact


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    India planning joint shipbuilding venture with Russia

    Post  Pinto on Mon Aug 29, 2016 5:54 pm

    http://in.rbth.com/economics/defence/2016/08/29/india-planning-joint-shipbuilding-venture-with-russia_625083


    A delegation from the Indian Embassy in Russia recently visited the "Zvezdochka" ship repair centre, where the "Sindhukesari" submarine is currently undergoing renovations.

    Headed by Pankaj Saran, the Indian Ambassador to Russia, a delegation from the Indian Embassy in Russia visited the defence shipyards in Severodvinsk. They visited the "Sevmash" production association, where aircraft carrier Admiral Gorshkov was modernized into the "Vikramaditya" for the Indian Navy, and also the "Zvezdochka" Ship Repair Centre, where the "Sindhukesari" submarine is now undergoing a refit and repairs.

    The Severodvinsk shipbuilders gave the delegation a tour on the slip way and assembly workshop, where the actual works were being carried out.

    “I will be frank and say that our people have learned a lot from you, and without your help and support we would not be able to reach the level, where we are at now. And that is why we are now considering which way our cooperation will be further developed, which will allow us to move forward another 40 years in terms of maintenance and modernization of submarines,” Ambassador Saran said, speaking of further military-technical co-operation between the two countries.

    He said the question of establishment of a joint Russian shipbuilding venture in India is being looked into. It is possible that this will be done within the framework of the "Make in India" programme, which is now gaining momentum in the country. No time line has been set for the venture.

    “For the Government of India and the country itself, one of the main priorities is the development of domestic industry capable of meeting all the needs of the Navy, Army and other military institutions,” Saran said. “That is why today India and Russia want to reach a new level of cooperation – the establishment of joint partner companies, where the two parties have their companies join forces and work on the same project, in order for it to be profitable for the Russian companies too and so that it could work for the benefit of the military and shipbuilding industry in India,” said the Ambassador.

    The diesel-electric submarine "Sindhukesari" is the sixth submarine from the Indian Navy to have undergone warranty repairs in Severodvinsk. A contract for modernization of the sub was signed earlier this year and, in June, to supervise the repairs, a group of Indian naval officers and their families arrived in the northern city.

    Eugene Gladyshev, head of the press service of the CA "Zvezdochka" said the total number of Indians in Severodvinsk, staying for repairs of the "Sindhukesari," is 53, including 13 children.

    The school children are preparing for 1st September, when they will start studying in regular secondary school classes, said Gladyshev. “The wives of soldiers from India are also gradually learning Russian. Usually submarine repairs last about two years. We have special houses for the Indian families to stay, and there are also several other rooms, where they can find accommodation.”

    For 20 years now, Severodvinsk has been receiving Indian guests for quite a long stay. The first Indian Navy submarine came to Severodvinsk shipyard for repairs in the mid-90s. During this time, the company has upgraded and refitted five diesel-electric submarines, with roughly around 600 servicemen and monitoring teams working for them, and newcomers to Severodvinsk.

    Once a closed town, the people of Severodvinsk have, over this period, got accustomed to the Indian officers, and have fallen in love with many of the traditions associated with India and Indians. Today, no one city holiday is complete without Indian troops’ performances, while the wives always come for events wearing their festive saris.

    To ensure that the Indian sailors have a more comfortable stay with their families in the north, the Severodvinsk authorities and the Indian surveillance team leader have signed an agreement on cultural cooperation.


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    India Wants to Buy Russian Kalibr Cruise Missiles

    Post  Pinto on Thu Sep 01, 2016 1:50 pm

    http://sputniknews.com/military/20160901/1044837866/india-kalibr-cruise-missiles-purchase.html

    India plans to purchase the Kalibr cruise missiles from Russia, the Russian Izvestia newspaper reports.

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    MOSCOW (Sputnik) – Izvestia explains that the Kalibr export version will have a significantly reduced flight distance – as short as 300 kilometers (186 miles]), in order not to violate the provisions of international agreements that prohibit the export of missiles with a greater flight distance. "These will be, essentially, the same missiles as the ones used in Syria," a diplomatic source told the newspaper on Thursday. Last week, a diplomatic source told RIA Novosti that the Russian Black Sea warships equipped with Kalibr cruise missiles will remain in eastern Mediterranean at least until September. The missile ships have carried out several Kalibr launches against the Jabhat Fatah al Sham (also known as Jabhat al-Nusra, or Nusra Front) terrorist group in Syria.



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