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    Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

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    Pinto

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    Indian Navy keenly interested in Russian naval equipment — Russian ministry

    Post  Pinto on Tue Mar 29, 2016 8:49 am

    QUITOL /India/, March 28. /TASS/. The Indian Navy is keenly interested in purchasing Russian surface and submarine equipment and localization of the vessels’ manufacturing in India, Russian Deputy Minister of Industry and Trade Alexander Potapov told reporters on Monday, commenting on his meeting with the Indian Navy representatives.

    "The Indian Navy have displayed a keen interest in cooperating with us both in the sphere of surface and submarine fleet, starting from issues of purchasing ready-made equipment and localization of its production in India," Potapov said on the sidelines of the Defexpo India 2016 exhibition. He did not specify the equipment in question

    The Defexpo India 2016 international exhibition is held in Quitol in the state of Goa in India on March 28-31. During the exhibition, the Russian arms exporter Rosoboronexport is planning to hold talks with Indian partners to discuss joint projects for the Indian Armed Forces’ further upgrade.

    The deputy industry and trade minister also said that during the exhibition he also intended to meet Indian Defense Minister Manohar Parrikar and his deputy who is in charge of industrial production and the "Make in India" concept. "I think that during these discussions we’ll outline the plans that are now being implemented and the implementation of which will be accelerated," Potapova added.

    According to previous reports, the relevant issues for the sides’ negotiations were leasing to India of the second nuclear-powered submarine of Project 971 (the first such submarine was received by the Indian Navy in 2012), as well as the supply of three frigates of Project 11356 (six ships of the Talwar project have entered service). Earlier in March, President of the Russian United Shipbuilding Corporation Igor Ponomaryov said that Russia was in negotiations on the sale to India of three frigates that had been designed for the Russian Black Sea Fleet. Russia’s Rosoboronexport arms exporter said later that negotiations started on organizing the manufacturing of ships of this class in India.


    In case of the technology transfer, the ships may be co-produced either in both countries or in India alone. India had acquired from Russia six Talwar-class frigates - three built by Baltiisky Zavod in St. Petersburg and three more by Yantar in Kaliningrad from 2003 to 2013.


    A TASS source close to military-technical cooperation said previously that the Russian Defense Ministry had decided to reallocate the money earmarked for the second troika of Project 11356 frigates to pay for other ships it badly needs. The discussions between the military and the Federal Service for Military-Technical Cooperation led to the opinion that the frigates can be offered for export.

    All of the components of the first three Project 11356 frigates, including the Ukrainian-made propulsion plants, have been received. At the same time, the other three frigates lack propulsion plants, the production of which is to be launched by defense contractor Saturn in the city of Rybinsk under the import substitution program. Saturn can manufacture the power plants in 2019-2020 at the earliest, but the schedule does not suit the Russian Navy.



    More:
    http://tass.ru/en/defense/865491
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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  max steel on Fri Apr 01, 2016 9:40 am

    Rs 64,000-cr Project to Build Submarines In India Creates Buzz

    A Rs 64,000-crore (approx. $10 billion) project to build high-tech submarines in the country has created a buzz at a military systems’ exhibition in Goa, with foreign manufacturers eyeing alliances with domestic shipyards in hopes of kicking off one of the costliest projects under the Make in India programme.

    Six advanced submarines will be built under project P-75I to scale up the navy’s undersea warfare capabilities and counter the swift expansion of China’s submarine fleet.

    Russia, one of the competitors for the project, on Tuesday said it had begun its homework on the project aimed at building a second line of submarines in India.

    “Negotiations are on...we are working on different proposals. We are open to cooperating with both public and private sector yards under the Make in India plan,” said Vladimir Drozhzhov, who heads military technical cooperation for Rostec Corporation. Rostec deals with manufacture and export of high-end products. Russia will compete for the project with its Amur 1650 submarines.

    Five Indian shipyards have been shortlisted by a top government committee for the project.

    The Germans, who supplied HDW Class 209 submarines to the Indian Navy, are also strong contenders for the project. German conglomerate Thyssenkrupp Marine Systems has offered India its HDW Class 214 submarine.

    “It’s a very significant project for us. The Class 214 is a proven platform and we are ready to transfer critical technology on which we have spent a lot of money,” ThyssenKrupp managing director Gurnad Singh Sodhi said at DefExpo-2016. Foreign vendors are waiting for the defence ministry to release its policy on “strategic partners” to allow joint ventures with local firms for building warplanes, advanced submarines and helicopters.

    The shipyards shortlisted by the high-powered panel are Mazagon Dock Limited, Hindustan Shipyard Limited, Cochin Shipyard Limited and private sector yards Pipavav and Larsen & Toubro. The new submarines will have the capability to operate underwater for several weeks with air-independent propulsion systems, greater strike power against land targets and improved stealth features that make them harder to detect. French firm DCNS plans to compete the the project with an advanced version of its Scorpene submarine.

    Six Scorpene submarines are currently being built at the Mazagon Dock Ltd in Mumbai with technology from DCNS under a Rs 23,562-crore project codenamed P-75. Kalvari, the first of six diesel-electric attack submarines, is likely to be inducted into the navy by the year-end. The remaining five boats will be delivered by 2020. The 66-metre submarine can dive up to a depth of 300 metres to elude enemy detection.

    The Scorpene project, plagued by cost overruns and missed deadlines, is important to the navy as its underwater capabilities have blunted over time. India operates 13 ageing conventional submarines and an Akula-II nuclear-powered attack boat leased from Russia. In contrast, China possesses 53 diesel-electric attack submarines, five nuclear attack submarines and four nuclear ballistic missile submarines.

    Spain’s Navantia S-80 class and Sweden’s Saab Kockums’ with its A26 submarines have also shown interest in the P-75I. The exhibition in Goa is being attended by 1,055 Indian and foreign firms eyeing alliances under the Make in India initiative for the defence sector.

    On Monday, Parrikar unveiled India’s new defence procurement rules aimed at accelerating the indigenisation plan and speeding up critical acquisitions.
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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  max steel on Sat Apr 02, 2016 8:32 am

    Amadya Tube launched UUV developed by L&T

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    Russian shipyard repairs Indian sub, in India

    Post  Pinto on Thu Apr 07, 2016 8:35 am

    Russia’s defence shipyard, the Zvezdochka Ship Repair Centre (Severodvinsk), has repaired, refitted and modernized the ‘INS Sindhukirti’, the Indian Navy’s diesel-electric submarine, at the Vishakhapatnam shipyard, a press release stated. The exercise, which took 10 years to complete, was the first time that such a feat has been accomplished successfully. The shipyard’s press release noted that the repairs to the ‘Sindhukirti’ were the first experience of a capital overhaul and modernization of a Russian-built submarine in an Indian shipyard. The works lasted almost 10 years.

    In the end, the ship was re-equipped with a Club-S modern missile system, becoming a full-fledged multi-purpose submarine, able to strike surface targets from the water. The Indian submarine has also been provided with the latest motion control system, an automated information management system, and a series of general ship management systems. The Russian shipbuilders did not specify how much the work cost to complete.

    The Zvezdochka specializes in the repair and decommissioning of nuclear submarines, and since 1997, it has modernized five diesel-electric submarines for the Indian Navy; the ‘Sindhuvir’, ‘Sindhuratna’, ‘Sindhughosh’, ‘Sindhuvijay’, and ‘Sindhurakshak’ at its own shipyard. This summer, it is set to take in another Indian submarine, the ‘Sindhukesari’ to modernize. All these submarines are Project 887EKM ships built in Russia (NATO classification – Kilo), designed by the Rubin Central Design Bureau for Marine Engineering (St. Petersburg). They are designed for combat against enemy submarines and surface ships, as well as for the defence of naval bases, coastal and marine communications, as well as reconnaissance and patrol activities.

    These kilo-class submarines have a displacement of 2,300 tons; length – 72.6 m, submerged speed – 19 knots (about 35 km/hour), diving depth – 300 m, crew – 52 people, and cruising capacity – 45 days. Armaments aboard the vessel include six 533-mm calibre torpedo tubes. With the completion of modernization, each submarine now carries modern Russian Club-S cruise missiles systems (export version of the Calibre system developed by NPO Novator) with a range of around 200 km.

    .http://idrw.org/russian-shipyard-repairs-indian-sub-in-india/
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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  max steel on Sat Apr 09, 2016 3:01 pm

    Killer K-4 Undersea Missile test fired From Arihant Submarine





    Not withstanding international pressures India has secretly conducted the maiden test of its nuclear capable undersea ballistic missile, code named K-4, from homegrown submarine INS Arihant at an undisclosed location in the Bay of Bengal.

    A reliable source on Friday told ‘The New Indian Express’ that the test conducted on March 31 nearly 45 nautical miles away from Vishakhapatnam coast in Andhra Pradesh was highly successful. The indigenously developed weapon with a dummy payload was reportedly launched from the submarine in full operational configuration.

    The trial was carried out with the support of the personnel of Strategic Forces Command (SFC) while the DRDO provided all logistics. The missile was fired from 20-meter deep and it pierced into the sky after breaking the water surface. INS Arihant had first successfully fired a prototype of K-15 (B-05) missile in November last year.

    The K-4 missile was fired from onboard silos of the ship submersible ballistic, nuclear (SSBN) submarine demonstrating the capability of the newly built underwater warship to fire long range nuclear capable missiles and the killing efficiency of the most advanced state-of-the-art weapon system.

    “Having an operational range of nearly 3,500 km, the missile was fired towards north for a shorter range. It covered more than 700 km before zeroing on the target with high accuracy reaching close to zero circular error probability (CEP),” informed the source.

    DRDO officials however refused to speak on the mission. While the officials associated with K-4 mission and Arihant project were tight-lipped, Director General of DRDO Selvin Christopher did not respond calls from this paper.

    On March 7, this missile was test fired from a submerged pontoon (replica of a submarine) positioned nearly 30 feet deep sea offshore Vizag coast. Although, the DRDO didn’t officially confirm about the secret mission, it was learnt that the test was a roaring success.

    Even as the DRDO had reportedly conducted the first test of the missile system, which was developed under a secret project, in 2010, it officially admitted to have a missile named K-4 with a video footage of the missile launch in the Aero-India show in January last year.

    Reports indicated the K-4 missile with the features of boost-glide flight profiles is designed to defeat any anti-ballistic missile systems. Equipped with the satellite updates to modify accumulated errors from its inertial navigation system, the weapon system is claimed to be quite dangerous and one of its kind in the world.

    The 111-metre-long INS Arihant has four vertical launch tubes, which are capable of carrying 6 torpedoes of 533 mm and 12 B-05 (K-15) missiles or 4 K-4 missiles.

    Powered by an 85 MW capacity nuclear reactor with enriched uranium fuel, this submarine can achieve surface speeds of 12 knots to 15 knots, and submerged speeds of up to 24 knots, carrying a crew of 95.

    Apart from Arihant, the K-4 will also arm another Arihant class submarine INS Aridhaman which is currently under construction along with two others. These submarines will have eight launch tubes each.


    How nervous is Pakistan? I think the Pakistani's have come to the conclusion that they can no longer go toe-to-toe with India in a conventional fight. That is the reason for their alliance with terrorist groups. They can only fight an insurgency...any direct conflict will lead to the destruction of the govt.

    India is becoming interesting Cool
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    INS Arihant undergoing sea acceptance trails: Top Navy official

    Post  Pinto on Mon Apr 18, 2016 9:38 am

    Country’s first armed nuclear submarine, INS Arihant, is currently undergoing sea acceptance trials, a senior Naval official said on Sunday.INS Arihant is now undergoing sea acceptance trials as it had already passed several deep sea diving drills, Flag Officer-Commanding-in-Chief, Eastern Naval Command, Vice-Admiral HCS Bisht told reporters here.

    “The submarine will be commissioned after completing all the sea-trials,” he added.INS Arihant, a 6,000-tonne submarine, is country’s first indigenous nuclear submarine and can launch nuclear weapons from underwater.

    The vessel was built under the Advanced Technology Vessel Project at the Ship Building Centre here.

    Stating that India Navy has presently adequate strength of ships, submarines and manpower, Bisht said 45 ships are under-construction in various shipyards in the country.

    The Navy had successfully conducted the International Fleet Review with the support of various agencies including the Andhra Pradesh government and the Vizag district administration, he informed.

    To a question, Vice Admiral Bisht said the Indian Navy’s warship INS Viraat will be decommissioned this year and it will be converted into a maritime museum.After decommissioning the ship will be handed over to the Andhra Pradesh government,” he added.

    Meanwhile, the local MP, MLAs and several residents sailed on-board the Eastern Fleet ships and witnessed various Naval exercises as part of the ‘Day at Sea’.Eight ships including the indigenous stealth frigate INS Satpura, fleet support ship INS Sakthi, Landing Platform Dock INS Jalashwa, Landing Ship Tank(Large) INS Airavat, Missile Corvettes IN Ships Kanjhar and Nishank, Inshore Support Vessels T-36, T-39 and submarine INS Sindhukirti of the ENC participated in the event, a defence release said.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/INS-Arihant-undergoing-sea-acceptance-trails-Top-Navy-official/articleshow/51868002.cms
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    INS Arihant, India’s only indigenous nuclear submarine, to debut as soon as May

    Post  Pinto on Wed Apr 27, 2016 8:20 am

    INS Arihant has completed all trials and weapon launch tests, and is soon going to be inducted in India's Navy fleet.

    This is a big fillip to PM Narendra Modi's Make-in-India campaign as INS is India's first indigenously developed nuclear armed submarine.

    Top government sources said Modi is likely to announce the formal induction in the Indian Navy anytime soon.

    Sources said the induction of this 6000 tonne plus indigenous nuclear submarine should coincide with the completion of Modi government's two years in office on May 26.

    "The submarine has passed all deep water and other tests and is ready for induction. It is just a matter of time that its formal induction (which is closely being monitored by the Prime Minister's Office) will be announced," said a source close to the development.

    With the induction of INS Arihant, India will join one of the few super powers in the world that possess the knowledge of designing, engineering and operating a nuclear submarine.

    Arihant is the lead ship of the five nuclear powered ballistic missile submarines launched in 2009.

    Built at Vishakhapatnam, Arihant has been designed, developed and engineered by various agencies including the Defence Research and Development Organisation, the Department of Atomic Energy and the Submarine Design Group of the Directorate of Naval Design, besides private companies such as Larsen & Toubro (L&T).

    As against a conventional diesel-electric submarine, nuclear submarines have the capability to stay out at sea longer and without the need to come up to the surface.

    Arihant draws its design from design consultations with Russian design bureaus and possesses capabilities to be equipped with short range missiles as also the K4 long range ballistic missile.

    "The indigenous nuclear submarine has passed all major tests," sources said.

    India currently operates Russian-origin nuclear-powered submarine INS Chakra, which it leased for 10 years from Russia in 2012. However, the INS Chakra does not carry nuclear weapons.

    http://www.businessinsider.in/INS-Arihant-Indias-only-indigenous-nuclear-submarine-to-debut-as-soon-as-May/articleshow/51974543.cms
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    Naval Attachment Set Up in Lakshadweep

    Post  Pinto on Wed Apr 27, 2016 8:23 am

    ANDROTH ISLAND: A naval detachment aimed at enhancing the Navy's reach and surveillance of Arabian Sea waters was inaugurated in the island of Lakshadweep here.

    The setting up of a naval detachment will extend Indian naval presence at Androth Island, provide communication network connectivity with mainland, enable Sea Lanes of Communication (SLOC) monitoring and function as an Observance and reporting organisation, besides radar surveillance, Vice Admiral Girish Luthra said.

    "Lakshadweep and Mnicoy Islands occupy a strategic location in the Arabian Sea. A number of shipping lanes pass close to these islands. Setting up of a naval detachment at Androth Island will enhance the Navy's reach and surveillance, and contribute significantly to strengthen maritime security and stability," he said.

    A number of infrastructure facilities at naval units located on Kavaratti, Minicoy, Agatti and Androth islands are also being progressively upgraded.

    The naval detachment at Kavaratti was commissioned as a naval establishment, INS Dweeprakshak in 2012. Suitable ships are also being based at the islands to provide enhanced surveillance and immediate response capability.

    http://www.newindianexpress.com/nation/Naval-Attachment-Set-Up-in-Lakshadweep/2016/04/26/article3401505.ece
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    DCNS conducts FAT of ECA-built convertors for Indian Scorpene submarines

    Post  Pinto on Sat Apr 30, 2016 10:42 am

    French shipyard DCNS has conducted the factory acceptance test (FAT) of eight converters designed by ECA Group, to be installed on-board Indian Scorpene-class fifth and sixth submarines.During FAT, the ECA team is said to have assisted DCNS in controlling and validating the functionality of the equipment.The test has resulted in the acceptance of the whole equipment, which is slated to be incorporated first into the fifth submarine.

    The ECA-built convertors were delivered last month to DCNS, while the convertors for the sixth submarine will be used to support training within the of on-board crew framework.

    The static converter 60kVA is designed to operate in the demanding environment of a submarine. It offers a constant 115V/60Hz network out of the submarine battery pack.

    The convertor features a front panel, which enables easy access to various parameters, and the whole unit is electrically and thermally protected for both user and equipment safety.

    ECA’s compact static converter 5KVA 400HZ produces a steady 115V/400Hz network out of the submarine battery pack.

    Its front panel features a touch screen with easy access to various parameters. A series of electrical and thermal protections have been included in the converter to protect both users and the equipment.

    With a displacement of 1,550t, the Indian Navy’s 67m-long Scorpene submarines will be equipped with anti-ship missiles and long-range guided torpedoes, along with a modern sensor suite.

    The submarines can engage in multiple missions, including anti-surface warfare, anti-submarine warfare, intelligence gathering, operations by Special Forces, and mine laying.

    India’s Mazagon Dock is currently building six Scorpene-class submarines, with DCNS being their technology partner.

    ..http://idrw.org . Read more at India No 1 Defence News Website , Kindly don http://idrw.org/dcns-conducts-fat-of-eca-built-convertors-for-indian-scorpene-submarines/ .
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    Nirdesh all set to design vessels for Indian Navy

    Post  Pinto on Sat Apr 30, 2016 10:44 am

    The National Institute for Research and Development in Defence Shipbuilding (Nirdesh), an autonomous body under the aegis of the Department of Defence Production, Union Ministry of Defence, in Kozhikode, is all set to begin designing of vessels for the Indian Navy.

    Official sources said that Nirdesh would begin with preparing standard designs for a range of small vessels used by Navy for patrolling.

    Besides, it would also design harbour vessels, tugs, ferries and survey ships. A design expert would be engaged on contractual basis for two years to set up the design centre and to commence designing of ships.

    Former Defence Minister A.K. Antony had laid the foundation stone for the ambitious Rs.600-crore project at Chaliyam in 2011 aimed at achieving “complete self-reliance in the strategic areas of research and development, technology development, design, skill development and related avenues leading to indigenous construction of warships, submarines and related platforms.”

    However, its activities have been confined to imparting training on shipbuilding and other corporate social responsibility till now.

    Captain Ramesh Babu, project director of Nirdesh, said that the design expert would be responsible for undertaking design of vessels and structures for various applications and to set up the Nirdesh design facility by identifying and procuring, inducting hardware, software, standards and other necessary facilities, equipment and personnel.

    “The expert will be assisted by two young naval architects, who also will be engaged for two years on contract basis,” he said.

    He said that Nirdesh also planned to set up a Centralised Shipbuilding Data Centre, which would become a hub of shipbuilding information, to be shared by all shipyards, Navy, Coast Guard, DRDO and other stakeholders. A data management expert is being engaged on contract for two years for this purpose, Captain Babu said.

    The expert will be responsible for setting up the Nirdesh Data Centre, with appropriate hardware and software, prepare structure of data bases to be created and procure appropriate software and hardware. He/she will collate, process, store data on shipbuilding and related areas with adequate security and make the same available to authorised users.


    http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-national/nirdesh-all-set-to-design-vessels-for-indian-navy/article8539048.ece
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    ndia's First Conventional Submarine, The Kalvari, Goes To Sea For The First Time In 15 Years

    Post  Pinto on Sun May 01, 2016 10:23 am

    It's a time to rejoice in the Indian Army. It's first French-designed conventional, diesel-electric submarine in more than 15 years, the Kalvari, will finally hit the sea. Credible sources associated with the project, that has been code named Project 75, has confirmed the same according to India Today. It is also confirmed that the Kalvari's Harbour Acceptance Trials (HATs) are pretty much complete, and she has been readied for 'Sea Trials', post which, she will become a part of the fleet.

    "The process will play out over a period of 5-6 months, after which comes the commissioning" a source was quoted saying. The test was supposed to have been done over the weekend but had to be rescheduled due to "minor, logistical reasons".

    HATs are done to check the nitty-gritties of the submarines. From diving to navigating and carrying out maneuvers, all possibilities are tested. The Kalvari will also have to prove how capable it is as far as carrying missiles and torpedoes are concerned.

    The Kalvari joined the Navy in 2012 but is finally set for commissioning in September this year. Project 75 consists of six submarines but the one that comes first among the six will face the most gruelling tests. Project 75 costs a whopping $3.5 billion.

    The Kalvari is 67 metres in length, is 6.2 metres wide and weighs a considerable 1550 tonnes. The beast can fire torpedoes and tube-launched anti-launch missiles both from underwater or from the surface. But what's worrying is the time delay, since the average age of an Indian submarine still remains 25 years, which isn't very impressive keeping in mind the technological advancements India has made.


    http://www.indiatimes.com/news/india/india-s-first-conventional-submarine-the-kalvari-goes-to-sea-for-the-first-time-in-15-years-254304.html
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    Zvezdochka shipyard in Severodvinsk ready for Sindhukesari

    Post  Pinto on Sun May 01, 2016 11:10 am

    29 April 2016 ALEXANDER YEMELYANENKOV, SPECIALLY FOR RIR
    Like five diesel-electric submarines earlier, the Indian Navy’s Sindhukesari submarine will also be sent for a refit and repairs to the Zvezdochka shipyard at Severodvinsk in Russia.


    Another diesel-electric submarine owned by the Indian Navy, the Sindhukesari, will be in the Zvezdochka ship repair centre for repairs in Russia later this summer. It is being awaited at the Severodvinsk centre, where five similar Russian- built submarines of the Indian Navy were earlier sent to undergo repairs and modernization.

    The India Embassy in Moscow sent a delegation headed by the naval attaché Commodore Tarun Sobti recently for an inspection visit to Severodvinsk, RIR has learnt. The authorized Indian representatives have checked the enterprise’s industrial and consumer sites for readiness to receive the Sindhukesari diesel-electric submarine for repair.

    During the visit, Sobti examined the ship lifting facilities and main production plants, which will be involved in the repair of the Indian submarine, Eugene Gladyshev, official representative of the CA Zvezdochka, said. The inspection crew paid special attention to the readiness of the premises designed to house the submarine crew, officers of the observation group and their families, as well as to the social and sports infrastructure sites - the Belomorets stadium, the indoor ice arena and our Science and Technology Centre.

    The decision to send another Indian Navy submarine for repair to Russia was made after a thorough analysis of all the "pros" and "cons", in particular taking into account the “Make in India” national programme. RIR has learnt that two of the four Indian submarines included in the programme for modernized factory repairs will undergo these ‘refit’ procedures at Indian shipyards with technical participation and help from the Russian Zvezdochka.

    The question about another one remains open. The Sindhukesari diesel-electric submarine, will be repaired in Severodvinsk. This integrated solution will reduce the total repair time to allow all four submarines to return to the Indian Navy’s combat forces as quickly as possible.

    Under the contracts earlier concluded by Zvezdochka, no more than 26 months were allowed for repair of submarines of this type.

    This time too, the deadlines are rigid. At the shipyard, they are sure that they will cope. However, the representatives of the Indian side as the customer, decided to personally verify the actual readiness of the Russian shipyard to receive the Sindhukesari submarine for repair. After this inspection, the arrival of the ship to Severodvinsk has been confirmed in June 2016.

    http://in.rbth.com/economics/defence/2016/04/29/zvezdochka-shipyard-in-severodvinsk-ready-for-sindhukesari_589325
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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  max steel on Wed May 04, 2016 1:32 pm

    India Crafts Naval Technology Plan

    The Indian Navy has finalized a plan to acquire 100 cutting-edge technologies in the next 15 years to build its war-fighting capabilities, but how realistic that will be is a million-dollar question.

    The 15-year prospective plan unveiled last month calls for acquiring a range of futuristic technologies. These include naval missiles and guns, propulsion and power generation, surveillance and detection systems, torpedoes and directed energy weapons, submarines and anti-submarine warfare systems, naval aviation, network-centric warfare and combat management systems.

    "By 2027, we want 200 warships and around 600 aerial assets, hypersonic and loitering missiles, and laser weapons," said Rear Adm. Dinesh Tripathi, the Indian Navy's assistant chief of naval staff for policy and plans.

    The navy has 138 warships and submarines and about 230 aerial assets, he said.

    "In addition, we need to reduce import content for our sensors and weapons and need a high-range of hypersonic and loitering missiles and laser and directed energy weapons," Tripathi added.

    Future naval technologies will be built domestically under the "Make in India" a "Indigenization" categories.

    The Make in India policy encourages foreign defense companies to collaborate with Indian companies to set up manufacturing facilities for transfer and absorption of cutting-edge manufacturing technology. This is intended to boost jobs and skill development in the country.

    The Indigenization policy is largely meant for domestic [defense] companies, encouraging them to develop products that are currently sourced through imports.

    Analysts are divided about how this will work.

    "It is true that whereas weapons and sensors and their associated software suites are concerned, there has been sub-optimal indigenization," said Pradeep Chauhan, a retired Indian Navy vice admiral.

    Several electronic warfare suites, including Ajanta, Ellora and Porpoise, all of which are fitted on the Navy's latest frontline surface, airborne and subsurface combatants, and which are designed to detect the presence of enemy combatants without disclosing one's position or identity, are an unqualified success, he said.

    Likewise, the Indian Navy's family of advanced underwater-sensors, including Advanced Panoramic Sonar Hull mounted (APSOH), Hullmounted Sonar Advanced (HUMSA) and USHUS, are a huge success.

    "In the future, high-definition radars, sonars, infra-red seeker and electronic warfare suites will be required," said Birinder Singh Randhawa, retired Indian Navy vice admiral said.

    "Immediately, larger-caliber guns, 127mm and anti-missile guns (Vulcan Phalanx type), extended range and guided munitions would also be required. To start with these would need to be built under license," Randhawa said.

    Chauhan further argues that the future cannot be assured by resting upon past success, particularly since both government and private industry spent pathetically small amounts of money on research and development.

    To build future naval war-fighting capabilities, Chauhan said, the navy will need to acquire disruptive technologies, including electromagnetic rail guns and kinetic energy projectiles; laser-directed weapons, weapon-control systems and communication suites; hypersonic missiles and space planes; blue-green lasers for submarine detection; directed-energy weapons; autonomous advanced drones and unmanned combat vehicles that are truly autonomous and fusion-based power sources.

    "However, aviation-based R&D in India has been particularly poorly funded and overseen," Chauhan said. "The only way that new naval aviation assets — such as carrier-borne fixed-wing aircraft, ship-borne multirole rotary-wing aircraft, ship/carrier-launched-and-recovered UAVs and UCAVs can be meaningfully built in India is through the Make in India program."

    As regards the network-centric warfare capabilities, Randhawa said the building blocks are in place; data links are produced indigenously, and a naval communication satellite is in place. The capability can be built on and foreign collaboration may be resorted to for initial catch-up.

    "The Indian Navy will also require directed energy weapons and laser weapon systems, Chauhan said. "The short-term answer is to exploit the potential of the 'Make in India' policy initiative. The long-term answer is to invest heavily in highly paying R&D."
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    Indian Navy to bid adieu to Sea Harriers on May 11 in Goa

    Post  Pinto on Wed May 04, 2016 3:26 pm

    PANAJI: The Indian Navy will de-induct its ageing Sea Harriers, replacing them with MiG 29K fighter aircraft, on May 11 at INS Hansa base in Vasco at Goa.

    "With the scheduled decommissioning of INS Viraat and great difficulty in maintenance of the ageing Sea Harrier fighters, they are scheduled to be de-inducted on May 11, 2016. The squadron will be operating the advanced MiG 29K fighters," the Navy said in a statement here today.

    Admiral R K Dhowan, Chief of the Naval Staff will be the Chief Guest for the ceremony.

    The Sea Harriers were inducted in the Indian Navy following phasing out of then obsolete Seahawks.

    "In November 1979, post government approval, Naval HQ placed an order for 06 Sea Harrier FRS Mk 51 fighters and 02 T Mk 60 Trainers, for delivery in 1983," a naval spokesman said.


    "In September 1980, Sea Harrier Project (SHARP) was formed with select naval aviators and technical personnel for coordination of trials, testing, acceptance and training. The first newly-built Sea Harrier for the Indian Navy (IN 601) was ready on December 21, 1982.

    The first three Sea Harriers flying via Malta, Luxor and Dubai, led by Lt Cdr Arun Prakash VrC, landed at Dabolim on December 16, 1983. This was followed by first deck landing on the carrier, INS Vikrant, on December 20, 1984," the spokesman said.

    He said the reborn white tigers of the Indian Navy were now a totally professional outfit and came out with flying colours during frequent embarkations, joint exercises, Dissimilar Aircraft Combat Training and Air to Air gunnery exercises.

    "The squadron was embarked on the carrier during Operations Vijay and Parakram providing the essential offensive posture to the country and ensuring readiness to react to any escalation by the enemy," he said.

    "The Sea Harriers had undergone a weapon and avionics upgrade since 2007 to match up with any opposition. The upgraded Sea Harrier christened LUSH (Limited Upgrade Sea Harrier) was a shot in the arm for the Indian Naval aviation," the naval spokesman stated.

    "The Sea Harriers, in their 'new avatar', were a formidable force to reckon with. LUSH aircraft, with their new inventory of armament were ever ready for the present day Beyond Visual Range environment in which modern aircraft operate," he claimed.

    "Post limited upgrade in which the aircraft was fitted with a new Multimode Radar, Beyond Visual Range (BVR) missile and a Datalink, the Sea Harrier fleet had redeemed itself as the best carrier borne 'air defence fighter/interceptor' in the Indian Ocean Region.

    "The flexibility offered by the aircraft's capability to undertake short/vertical takeoffs and landings had enabled it to operate from any fixed wing carrier and had regularly conducted cross deck landilandings on ships of foreign navies," the Navy said

    Read more at:
    http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/52108761.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst
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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  Pinto on Fri May 06, 2016 7:52 am

    In a departure from its traditional approach to business in India, Germany is for the first time offering a military deal under the government-government umbrella for its new-generation conventional submarines that have exceptional underwater endurance.

    While in the past the German government had kept away from contracts being bagged by its arms industries in India, the HDW 214 submarines are being offered as a special case for Indian Navy’s requirement of six boats, which are to be made in India at an estimated cost of over Rs 60,000 crore.

    Sources told ET that the formal proposal is being shared with the defence ministry in which the German government will give assurances on fair price, technology transfer and quality.

    Russian and French submarines are, too, competing for the mega P 75I project, which is likely to see a private sector yard in India carry out a major chunk of the work. India will be mandating Air Independent Propulsion (AIP) – a technology that enables the submarine to remain underwater for several days at a stretch instead of coming up to surface frequently to replenish oxygen needed to burn the fuel — for the submarines.

    “The offer has certain assurances that the product will meet Indian requirements,” an official involved in the process told ET. Russia, which is developing its own AIP system, has already advised India to conclude the P 75I project under a government deal as it has too many complexities of technology transfer.

    German company Thyssenkrupp Marine Systems that manufactures the submarine said it “is not in a position to comment on talks between the governments of the two nations”, but said it was interested in offering its 214 class boats with “robust transfer of technology, training and meeting offset obligations”. “We define this as a ‘no-holds barred’ transfer of technology in line with Modi government’s ‘Make in India’ push,” the company spokesperson said in response to a detailed questionnaire by ET.

    http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/defence/germany-offers-india-deal-for-next-generation-submarines/articleshow/52138779.cms
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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  max steel on Wed May 11, 2016 12:56 am

    Germany Ready to Offer India Six Subs With High Underwater Endurance

    Germany stands ready to offer six diesel-electric submarines with high underwater endurance at the total cost of $9 billion under a government program to replenish the Indian Navy’s ageing fleet.

    The Project-75 India (P-75I) program announced in 2010 allocates over 500 billion rupees for the construction of submarines with mandated air-independent propulsion (AIP) systems to enable longer periods of submersion without resurfacing for oxygen to burn fuel.

    Germany’s ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (TKMS) private naval vessel holding company told the newspaper it was "not in a position to comment on talks between the government of the two nations." The company spokesperson said, however, it was interested in offering its 214 class boats with increased underwater endurance and low detection risk.


    Russia and France are reportedly also competing for the P-75I project. In 2010, Russia’s Rosoboronexort and France’s DCNS/Armaris were expected to receive invitations to a foreign contractor tender alongside German and Spanish companies.

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    Bye-bye Sea Harriers, hello MiG-29K: Navy de-inducts vertical take-off jets

    Post  Pinto on Fri May 13, 2016 2:48 pm

    Chief of the Naval Staff Admiral R K Dhowan was the chief guest of the ceremony held at Goa's INS Hansa base in Vasco to bid adieu to Sea Harriers after their 33 years of service to the nation.

    Here is all you need to know about Sea Harriers

    Chief of the Naval Staff Admiral R K Dhowan was the chief guest of the ceremony held at Goa's INS Hansa base in Vasco to bid adieu to Sea Harriers after their 33 years of service to the nation.

    The Sea Harriers displayed a vertical landing formation at INS Hansa during the de-induction event today.

    "It's a distinct honour and proud privilege to induct multi-role supersonic MiG 29K in the 300 squadron. It marks the induction of multi-role supersonic technology in Indian Navy," Admiral Dhowan said addressing the gathering.

    Admiral Dhowan hailed all the pilots who flew Sea Harriers, which was considered as one of the most difficult aircraft to fly. "Today is also the day to salute the pilots who flew Sea Harrier aircraft which made a mark for itself by protecting our seas," he added.

    Sea Harriers were inducted in the Indian Navy following phasing out of then obsolete Seahawks.

    In September 1980, the Sea Harrier Project (SHARP) was formed with select naval aviators and technical personnel for coordination of trials, testing, acceptance and training.

    The first newly-built Sea Harrier for the Indian Navy (IN 601) was ready on December 21, 1982, the Navy said in a statement issued in Panaji.
    The first three Sea Harriers flying via Malta, Luxor and Dubai, led by Lt Cdr Arun Prakash VrC, landed at Dabolim on December 16, 1983.
    This was followed by the first deck landing on the carrier, INS Vikrant, on December 20, 1983, and the arrival of the first Sea Harrier T Mk 60 trainer, on March 29, 1984.

    "In last few years, the Harriers added a new dimension to their operations with the increased multinational exercises in which the Indian Navy participates," the statement added.

    https://youtu.be/exh5hFE9EwY

    http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/indian-navy-bids-adieu-to-sea-harriers/1/665218.html
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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  max steel on Thu Jun 02, 2016 11:43 am

    Scorpenes to become Navy’s mainstay

    French Scorpenes will replace Russian Kilo class vessels as the mainstay of the Navy’s conventional submarine fleet in a few years. Mazgaon Dock Ltd., Mumbai, commissioned a second submarine assembly workshop on Saturday. Six Scorpenes are under construction in the first one.

    Second workshop

    “This second workshop will cater to building additional submarines as and when the government takes a decision. We will be in a position to quickly begin work once approved,” an MDL official said.

    Having once abandoned the German HDW submarine line in the past, government sources said they were determined not to lose the technical expertise and skilled manpower gained from construction of the six Scorpenes. In view of that, the number of additional Scorpenes could go beyond nine, one official said.

    Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar, who inaugurated the facility, said that overall level of indigenisation in the next line of submarines “must be substantially higher” compared with the Scorpenes which have around 35 per cent indigenous content.

    He had already stated on several occasions that the government would order two or three additional Scorpenes to keep the production line running and maintain the force levels on the fleet.

    The new assembly workshop built at a cost of Rs.153 crore is a pre-engineered building structure to handle construction of five submarines simultaneously, MDL officials said. It can be used to construct additional Scorpenes or the new line of submarines under Project-75I as and when it is selected.

    But the Request for Proposal (RFP) for P-75I is held up for want of clarity on Strategic Partnerships under the new Defence Procurement Procedure. The proposal from the Ministry intended to promote domestic manufacturing capabilities in critical areas has generated a mixed response and consultations are on to get a consensus. With current platforms fast ageing, Scorpenes will play a major role in ensuring fleet strength.

    The first of the Scorpenes, Kalvari, is currently undergoing sea trials and is scheduled to be commissioned in October and the remaining are expected to be rolled out at nine-month intervals. This means that the present line is occupied till 2020, officials said and the new assembly line will speed up construction of additional submarines to meet timelines. Incidentally the Scorpenes will roll out without their major weapon, heavy weight torpedoes, which are caught up due to allegations of corruption in other defence deals.

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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  Militarov on Sat Jun 04, 2016 6:18 pm

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    Russia to strengthen India's submarine fleet

    Post  Pinto on Tue Jun 21, 2016 11:20 am

    21 June 2016 ELENA KISELEVA, IVAN SAFRONOV, KOMMERSANT

    Russia is ready to give India access to improved Kilo-class (Project 636 ‘Varshavyanka’) non-nuclear submarine construction technology. It has not been decided yet which of two Indian shipyards – Pipavav or Larsen & Toubro – will assemble the submarines under licence.



    The Rostec CEO Sergey Chemezov first told Kommersant-Vlast of India's interest in improved Kilo-class (Project 636 ‘Varshavyanka’) diesel-electric submarine (DES) construction technology.

    "We are now coming to an arrangement for them to initially repair previously acquired submarines, in which they will be assisted by experts from the ‘Zvyozdochka’ Shipbuilding Centre," Chemezov said. "Later, construction of the submarines will start at a joint venture between USC (United Shipbuilding Corporation), Rosoboronexport and an Indian shipyard: first the major assembly work, and then the localisation."

    Industry sources said the option of supplying India with two Improved Kilo-class submarines was under discussion until recently. According to a source, the issue was raised in November 2015 during a visit by Indian Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar to Admiralty Shipyards in Saint Petersburg. The Indian military, however, decided not to buy the submarines ready-made, but to assemble them in India under licence.

    Organisations involved in arms exports received a request from India for the technology to be transferred and production localised in India. According to a shipbuilding industry executive, negotiations are on directly between the Russian and Indian governments, underlining the "special status of the relationship between Moscow and New Delhi".

    Kommersant has learned that the main issue lies in the choice of Indian partner. India's non-nuclear submarine fleet is in urgent need of modernisation, and it is not clear which local shipyard is capable of carrying out the work soonest. The Indian Navy currently has just nine Russian-built Kilo-class (Project 877EKM ‘Paltus’) DESs and four German-built Type-209 ‘Shishumar’ class submarines. The former have a service life of 25 years, which is over for the first six Indian DESs. For the remaining three the service life gets over in the next ten years.

    Repairs to the Kilo-class submarines are carried out at the ‘Zvyozdochka’ shipyard in Severodvinsk, where five such Indian submarines have been refitted since 1997, and Admiralty Shipyards, where two such submarines have been repaired.

    The ‘Sindhukesari’, which entered its 28th year of service in 2015, is currently at the Zvyozdochka shipyard. Built by the Leningrad Admiralty Association (now Admiralty Shipyards) in 1988, it underwent first intermediate maintenance and upgrade there, from1999-2001.

    Of the ten Russian-built Kilo-class submarines, nine are in operation; one of them, Sindhurakshak, exploded at Mumbai dockyard in August 2013. After a second round of maintenance, their service life could be extended by another ten years, which experts see as a sign of the reliability of the design. However, the Indian Navy has acquired no new DESs in the last 15 years.

    Meanwhile, India's geopolitical rival, Pakistan, ordered eight advanced Type 041 non-nuclear submarines from China at the end of 2015 (of which four will be built in Karachi and the rest in China). India is being offered a hybrid option, with construction of at least one Improved Kilo-class submarine at Russian shipyards: with testing, it takes up to three years to build one submarine of this class. To develop such facilities in India would take "significant time", said a source. "They want to acquire the new submarines as quickly as possible."

    Kommersant understands that possible shipyards for the joint Indo-Russian venture are the privately owned Pipavav, part of Reliance Defence enterprises, and Larsen & Toubro. Sources close to the negotiations said the owner of the former, business magnate Anil Ambani, has strong lobbying powers with the Indian government, and direct access to Prime Minister Modi. From a technical point of view, the latter is more favourable for Russia, but India's military and government officials will put together the final proposal.

    "Of course, it would be more beneficial to us to sell the submarines without transferring the technology, then we would receive 'hard' cash," said a high-ranking official involved in military technical cooperation. “But the system has changed. Everyone wants access to reproduce the product, not to make one-off purchases. And we have to give that access, otherwise we will lose the market."

    http://in.rbth.com/economics/defence/2016/06/21/russia-to-strengthen-indias-submarine-fleet_604531
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    Amur-1650 offered to India under Project-75I is best of Several Submarines : Rubin CEO

    Post  Pinto on Wed Jun 22, 2016 7:30 pm

    Igor V Vilnit,CEO Rubin Design Bureau in a recent Interview to Indian media house has said that ” Russia has offered State-of-the-art Amur-1650 conventional submarines based on Lada-Class under Make in India programme under Project 75(I) .

    Igor also added that Amur-1650 offered to India will take best of Lada-Class submarines currently under construction at Admiralty Shipyards in St Petersburg but also will carry forward several refinements of Lada-Class and further developments from little known Kalina-Class conventional submarines project .

    Kalina-Class conventional submarines project is further refinement of Lada-Class submarines based on suggestions provided by Russian Navy . Kalina-Class submarines will be designed from the outsets as AIP-equipped vessels which will be more capable than previous versions and will come incorporating all the improvements asked by Russian Navy.

    Amur-1650 proposed under Project 75(I) is essentially a highly customised vessel with attributes coming in from Lada/Amur-class and also from proposed refinements of Kalina-Class. Igor also confirmed that AIP system has cleared land-based trials and he is hopeful that underwater trials would go off as smoothly as they had on shore-based trials

    http://idrw.org/amur-1650-offered-to-india-under-project-75i-is-best-of-several-submarines-rubin-ceo/
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    MiGs make a comeback – at sea

    Post  Pinto on Sun Jun 26, 2016 2:25 pm

    After dominating the Indian Air Force for more than 40 years, MiGs will now be a key element of the Indian Navy's strike force.


    Former Air Marshal Sumit Mukerji holds a rare distinction. The Indian Air Force officer, who was Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Southern Air Command, is the only air force pilot to have commanded MiG-21, MiG-23, MiG-25, MiG-27 and MiG-29 units. "The only pilot," he says. "There’s no one even in Russia.”

    Mukerji’s achievement was possible because of the dominance of MiG aircraft in the IAF fleet. Currently the IAF has 245 units of the MiG-21 interceptor and 120 units of the MiG-27 ground attack jet. The MiG-23 fighter-bomber and the MiG-25, of which the IAF had eight units of the reconnaissance version, are long retired.

    Although MiG-21s are still in use in as many as 19 air forces worldwide, the frequent crashes of these older IAF MiGs led to a trial by media and furore in parliament, after which the IAF announced it would retire MiG-21s and MiG-27s in the near future.

    However, early retirement looks unlikely as replacement aircraft aren’t coming in fast enough. The Rafale deal with the French has hit cost turbulence and the locally made Tejas is not a proven design – at least not yet. Also, HAL’s Tejas production rate is too low – 12 per year although it could go up next year – for the ‘Made in India’ jet to replace all MiG-21s
    Navy Fulcrums
    But even as hundreds of older MiGs are set to fly into the sunset, the Mikoyan-Gurevich presence in India will continue for several more decades. This is because of the presence of the powerful MiG-29 multirole fighter - codenamed Fulcrum by NATO - in both the IAF and the Indian Navy.

    The IAF currently has 69 MiG-29s, which are expected to serve at least until 2030. India was the first international customer of the MiG-29. The IAF placed an order for more than 50 MiG-29s in 1980 while the aircraft was still in its early development phase.

    While the IAF may not place further orders for the aircraft, the Indian Navy has ordered as many as 45 naval variants. In fact, Russia revived the MiG-29K programme in the late 1990s in response to the Indian Navy's decision to acquire the aircraft carrier Admiral Gorshkov, refurbished as INS Vikramaditya.

    The Indian Navy is currently looking at the MiG-29K as an option for its future aircraft carrier INS Vishal. Russian Aircraft Corporation MiG has expressed its readiness to supply the required number of MiG-29Ks. According to senior MiG executive Anastasia Kravchenko, India’s Ministry of Defence has asked four countries to send proposals for the supply of fighter jets for the country’s second indigenously built aircraft carrier, which will carry more than 50 aircraft.

    INS Vishal could be the first Indian carrier to field a catapult launched but arrest landing (CATOBAR) aircraft launch system. The CATOBAR would allow the MiG-29K to take off at near maximum payload and fuel, which would allow the aircraft to utilise its range of 1300 km.

    Having long-range strike and reconnaissance aircraft translates into better survivability for carriers because they can operate further away from enemy shores. Also, enemy hunter killer submarines will have to operate in the open seas, increasing their vulnerability to carrier-borne aircraft.

    MiG dominance

    MiG series aircraft formed the backbone of the IAF’s strike element for more than four decades. The first dogfight between supersonic aircraft took place during the December 1971 War with Pakistan when two MiG-21s over Jamnagar, Rajasthan, chased two American built F-104 Starfighters of the Pakistan Air Force. While one Starfighter escaped, the other was shot down by the MiG over the Arabian Sea.
    Military analyst Edward Coggins writes in ‘Wings That Stay On: The Role of Fighter Aircraft in War’ that by the time the hostilities came to an end, the IAF MiG-21s had claimed four Pakistani F-104s, two F6 jets, one F-86 Sabre and one Lockheed C-130 Hercules. The Russian fighter had clearly won the much anticipated air combat between the MiG-21 and the F-104, he writes.

    Thrilled with the MiG-21’s success, India went on to acquire newer MiG models.

    Pack attack

    One the most glorious chapters in MiG fighter history was during the 1999 Kargil War when the IAF threw all its MiGs in a massive offensive against the Pakistani intruders.

    In the report ‘Airpower at 18,000 feet: IAF in the Kargil War’ published by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Benjamin Lambeth explains in detail how the IAF ground down both the Pakistan Army and the PAF.

    In the early hours of May 26, 1999 six attacks in succession by MiG-21, MiG-23 and MiG-27 fighters were launched against intruder camps, material dumps, and supply routes in the areas overlooking Dras, Kargil and Batalik.

    The MiG-21bis squadron at Srinagar was joined by additional MiG-21M, MiG-23BN and MiG-27ML squadrons, while additional squadrons of MiG-21Ms and MiG-29s deployed northward to Avantipur. While the MiG-29s kept the Pakistani F-16s bay, the other IAF aircraft (including the French Mirage 2000) carried out ground sorties.

    An example of Indian ‘jugaad’ – or improvisation – was the use of stopwatches and handheld GPS receivers in their cockpits by MiG-21 pilots lacking sophisticated onboard navigation suites. According to Prasun K. Sengupta in “Mountain Warfare and Tri-Service Operations”, another novel technique developed by the IAF for use in the campaign entailed selecting weapon impact points so as to create landslides and avalanches that covered intruder supply lines.

    The IAF used the MiG-25R – which normally flies at 80,000 ft – in a medium altitude role to improve the resolution of its pictures, something that the aircraft’s Russian designers may not have thought possible.

    Lambeth emphasises the complete dominance achieved by India’s MiG-dominated fleet. “Throughout the campaign, whenever IAF reconnaissance or ground attack operations were under way in the immediate combat zone, Western Air Command ensured that MiG-29s or other air-to-air fighters were also airborne on combat air patrol stations over the ground fighting on India’s side of the Line of Control to provide top cover against any attempt by the PAF to enter the fray in a ground attack role. PAF F-16s to the west typically maintained a safe distance of 10 to 20 miles on the Pakistani side, although they occasionally approached as close as 8 miles away from the ongoing ground engagements.”

    The PAF’s director of operations during the Kargil War later reported that there had been isolated instances of IAF and PAF fighters locking on to each other with their onboard fire control radars, but that caution had prevailed on both sides and that “no close encounters took place”.

    IAF fighters never joined in aerial combat with the PAF F-16s due to the A.B. Vajpayee government’s strict injunction that Indian forces not cross the Line of Control. Seven years later, however, Air Chief Marshal A.Y. Tipnis recalled that he had personally authorised his escorting fighter pilots to chase any Pakistani aircraft back across the Line of Control in hot pursuit were those pilots to be engaged by enemy fighters in aerial combat.

    Looking forward, with the IAF’s Sukhoi Su-30 fleet set to touch a figure of 300 or more in the next decade, the MiGs will be reduced to a small – albeit important – component of India’s strike forces. They may have ceded space in the IAF to the superior firepower of the Sukhois, but the MiGs are now about to stamp their dominance over the seas.

    http://in.rbth.com/blogs/stranger_than_fiction/2016/06/24/migs-make-a-comeback-at-sea_605923
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    Re: Indian Navy and Naval Aicraft: News

    Post  max steel on Sun Jul 03, 2016 9:26 pm

    RM Hands Over Varunastra Torpedo to Indian Navy


    The Defence Minister Shri Manohar Parrikar today handed over “Varunastra,” a ship-launched heavy weight torpedo also known as underwater missile to the Indian Navy in a befitting ceremony here today.

    Speaking on the occasion, Shri Manohar Parrikar congratulated DRDO for the achievement and appreciated the efforts made in this regard. He asked the DRDO to ensure its participation in the production process and to keep adequate quality control of their products so that it can meet the international standards.

    The Minister also stated that in these high technology areas, DRDO’s contribution with 95 per cent of indigenous content is an apt example of Indigenously Designed Developed and Manufactured (IDDM) category.

    The Chief of the Naval Staff, Admiral Sunil Lanba termed the occasion as momentous and described it as yet another feather in the DRDO’s cap. He applauded DRDO and Naval Science and Technological Laboratory (NSTL) for rendering yeomen service to the nation in achieving self-reliance in defence and underwater technologies. He said the Navy’s partnership with DRDO laboratories has strengthened and matured over the years. ‘The fact that three of the premier DRDO labs NPOL, NMRL and NSTL carry the prefix ‘Naval’ in their names highlights the close relationship between the Indian Navy and the DRDO in our joint efforts’, Admiral Lanba stated.

    Secretary, DD R&D and DG DRDO Dr. S Christopher in his address described the induction ceremony of Varunastra as a proud moment for the nation as India has joined in the elite group of only a handful of countries. He commented that the development of submarine launched heavy weight torpedo is in advanced stage for user trials.

    Dr. Christopher mentioned that Varunastra, the shipborne anti-submarine torpedo has got the goodwill of Navy as a user which has decided to produce 73 of them, immediately. He briefly mentioned that last year Mareech – Advanced Torpedo Defence System was handed over to Indian Navy. He also highlighted the DRDO developed LCA – Tejas, the first Squadron of which is being raised by IAF on July 01, 2016. The AEW&C is also striding towards induction into IAF this year.

    Recently, another milestone has been achieved by BrahMos, a Joint Venture of DRDO which successfully demonstrated captive trials with Su30 aircraft, he stated.

    Varunastra has been developed by NSTL, a premier DRDO laboratory based at Visakhapatnam. M/s Bharat Dynamics Ltd has been associated as a production partner in concurrent engineering mode.

    Varunastra, a versatile naval weapon which can be fired from the Rajput class destroyers, Delhi-class and all future Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) ships capable of firing heavy weight torpedoes and is capable of targeting quiet and stealthy submarines both in deep and littoral waters, even in intense countermeasure atmosphere.

    The function was also attended by Defence Secretary Shri G Mohan Kumar, Secretary, (Defence Production) Shri AK Gupta, Scientific Advisor to Raksha Mantri Dr. G Sateesh Reddy and senior functionaries of Ministry of Defence, Indian Navy, DRDO, Production & Industry partners.
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    IAF aircraft AN-32 goes missing

    Post  Pinto on Fri Jul 22, 2016 12:37 pm

    IAF's AN-32 missing: The Defence Ministry has launched a full-scale search and rescue operation in the Bay of Bengal and has put into force four warships of the Indian Navy and two aircraft.

    By: Express Web Desk | New Delhi | Updated: July 22, 2016 3:00 pm
    IAF, Aircraft missing, IAF Aircraft missing, Chennai aircraft, port blair aircraft, An-32, India News, Defence ministry, news, india news,
    The Defence Ministry has launched a full-scale search and rescue operation in the Bay of Bengal and has put into force four war ships of the Indian Navy and two aircraft.
    The Indian Air Force on Friday reported that its AN-32 aircraft has gone off the radar while on its way from Chennai to Port Blair. The Indian Air Force claims it was in touch with the aircraft till about 9.30 am post which it could not establish contact. The ETA or expected time of arrival of the flight was 11.30 am. The Chennai ATC claimed it was in touch with the aircraft till 8.12 am.
    The Defence Ministry has launched a full-scale search and rescue operation in the Bay of Bengal and has put into force four war ships of the Indian Navy and two aircraft. “One P8 I and one Dornier have been launched. Four ships – Karmukh, Gharual Jyoti and Kuthar – have been diverted to join in the search and rescue operation at full speed.
    IAF Captain DK Sharma told reporters: “We termed it as overdue, and have launched full force (search and rescue operation). We will get results soon.” Media reports claim that bad weather could have played a role in the aircraft going off the radar.
    Here’s a quick look at the AN-32 and what its features are
    * The Indian Air Force reportedly has a fleet of 105 AN-32s in service.
    * The AN-32, a twin-engine aircraft, is primarily used as a cargo flight.
    * In this case, it was carrying 29 people on board – 23 personnel and six crew.
    * The aircraft has the capacity to transport either 7.5 tonnes of cargo or fifty passengers.
    * There are ten variants of the AN-32: An-32A, An-32B, An-32B-100, An-32B-110, An-32B-120, An-32B-300, An-32LL, An-32MP, An-32P firekiller and An-32B-200.
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    Pinto

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    Does India really need Russia’s ‘Backfire’ bomber?

    Post  Pinto on Wed Jul 27, 2016 5:42 pm

    Lacking strategic vision, the Indian Air Force remains content to operate at the theatre level, but perhaps the fearsome Cold Warrior from Russia can help change that mindset.

    The Indian Air Force has a variety of specialised fighters, ground attack jets and multirole aircraft in its fleet, but a strategic bomber has never figured in its war plans. According to the Russian wire service Interfax, that could change as India’s Ministry of Defence has reportedly sought to buy four Tupolev Tu-22M3 maritime strike bombers from Russia.

    This isn’t the first time reports have surfaced that India is interested in acquiring this fearsome Cold Warrior – codenamed Backfire by NATO. According to the Federation of American scientists, “In December 1999 it was announced that India would lease four Tu-22M3 Backfire bombers, with the aircraft slated to arrive in India as early as June 2000.” They never did.

    However, the first time the Backfire was set to fly into the subcontinent was in mid-1971 when Russia offered it as a strategic bomber. However, Air Chief Marshal P.C. Lal rejected the offer.

    Defence analyst Bharat Karnad said, the “reasons trotted out verged on the farcical”. Karnad explains: “As Wing Commander (later Air Marshal) C.V. Gole, member of the Air Marshal Shivdev Singh Mission to Moscow and test pilot, who flew the Tu-22(M) informed me, he was appalled by the fact that he had to be winched up into the cockpit, and that the plane would have to take off from as far east as Bareilly to reach cruising altitude over Pakistan!”

    Although the Backfire has been creating panic in American carrier groups for decades (the Chinese have also tried hard to buy the bomber or its design blueprints), which is an indication of its utility, the IAF has refused to accept what has been offered to it on a platter. It prefers to remain bogged down at the theatre level while steadfastly refusing to grow a strategic wing.

    Armed and dangerous

    To be sure, the Backfire is a completely different species of aircraft compared with the IAF’s current fleet, and a doctrinal transplant would have to happen before the IAF brass can envision a role for a long-range strike bomber.

    The Tu-22M is an extremely large aircraft flown by a four-man crew of a pilot, co-pilot, navigator and weapon systems operator. With its phenomenal combat range of 2400 km, and a blistering speed of over 2300 kph (faster than most jet fighters), the Tu-22M is ideal for targeting aircraft carriers and large ships
    .
    Russian tests reveal that when a shaped charge warhead weighing 1000 kg was used in the Kh-22 missile, the resulting hole measured 16 ft in diameter and 40 ft deep. Not even the largest US Navy CVNs can survive such an impact, and at the very least will be out of commission of months.

    The bomber is designed to take off from secure inland bases, be vectored towards US aircraft carrier groups and fire its complement of up to six – often nuclear-tipped – cruise missiles from safe standoff distances.


    The Backfire’s primary weapon is the supersonic Raduga Kh-22 cruise missile. In high-altitude mode, it climbs to the edge of space (89,000 ft) and makes a near hypersonic speed dive towards its target. In low-altitude mode, it climbs to 39,000 ft (higher than most commercial airliners) and makes a shallow dive at Mach 3.5, making the final approach at an altitude under 1600 ft.


    Bill Sweetman and Bill Gunston write in ‘Soviet Air Power’ that the Kh-22 missile could be “programmed to enter the correct Pentagon window”. In fact, during the 1980s, Russian Naval Aviation was so sure about the accuracy of these missiles that the Backfire carried only one Kh-22, armed with a nuclear warhead.

    Today’s Backfires are also equipped with the more advanced Kh-15. This missile climbs to an astounding 130,000 ft and then dives in on the target, accelerating to Mach 5, which makes it the world’s fastest aircraft-launched missile.


    Just like the MiG-25 spooked western air force pilots of a previous generation, the Backfire was a big scare word in western military circles during the 1970s. American experts involved in arms limitation talks believed it was an intercontinental strategic bomber. Russian secrecy about the aircraft’s capabilities added to the speculation, leading American intelligence and US aircraft manufacturers (for obvious reasons) to suggest inflated ranges. This led to fears that the Backfire could strike the continental US.

    However, even when the Russians added in-flight refuelling capability, the Backfire wasn’t intended to strike the US, but rather its naval assets in the open sea. Russian Naval Aviation strategists envisioned up to a hundred Tu-22M bombers making a pack attack against US Navy carrier battle groups in the event of war.

    Backfire for India

    Built at the peak of the Cold War when speed, payload and range mattered more than cost, the heavy Backfire is expensive to operate and maintain. The general consensus was that deploying it against high value assets alone makes sense. However, Russia used it with devastating effect against the Afghan Mujahideen in the 1980s, and in the 2008 Georgian War, with its iconic moment when Georgia’s tie-chewing President MikheilSaakashvili runs for cover as Russian bombers fly overhead.

    Again, in the ongoing conflict in Syria, Backfires have rained freefall bombs, destroying Daesh assets as well as US-backed terror groups. These strikes have severely degraded Daesh strength in the region.

    Since the IAF has at least 400 attack aircraft, including the Sukhoi Su-30MKI, MiG-29 and Mirage-2000, that have Pakistan sorted, deploying the Backfire against Pakistan would be a huge overkill. Using limited numbers against Chinese land targets would be suicidal as Beijing has a robust air defence network bolstered by the Russian S-300 anti-aircraft missile and its Chinese knockoffs.

    The Backfire’s only conceivable deployment in India is as a maritime strike bomber against People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) assets, especially in the backdrop of growing Chinese naval activity in the Indian Ocean.

    Backfires operating from the Thanjavur Air Force Base in southern India – and armed with the 300 km range BrahMos – can comfortably strike naval assets up to Seychelles.
    They can also be used to target PLAN vessels operating in the South China Sea. The bomber’s ferry of 6800 km means it can reach Darwin, Australia, without aerial refuelling. Clearly, such an aircraft would be a huge force multiplier for India.

    If the media reports about India wanting a limited number of just four Backfires are true, then it would suggest they would be deployed in a maritime – rather than strategic – strike role. The bombers are equipped to receive data directly from spy satellites monitoring the oceans. India, which has a constellation of ocean survey and spy satellites, can access real time satellite intelligence and despatch the Backfires on ship hunting missions. The bombers can also be guided by scout aircraft.

    Forces rivalry

    While the IAF’s timidity in adopting a strategic role is a likely reason for the repeated rejection of the Backfire, another factor could be forces rivalry. Air forces are highly resistant to strategic bombing being done by the navy or army. The Tu-22M being a specialised maritime strike bomber, it could – in the IAF’s view – be the beginning of the navy’s strategic air arm. The air force clearly doesn’t want the Indian Navy poaching on its turf. In this backdrop, chances are the IAF will find another farcical excuse to scuttle Backfire talks.

    Operate with caution

    The Russian bomber is certainly a game changer, but it doesn’t mean India should rush headlong into a deal. In terms of size, firepower and reach, it dwarfs everything in India’s air arm, but it should not be forgotten that the Tu-22M is a 40 year old design. It last rolled off the assembly lines in 1993 and the aircraft is well out of guarantee, so the delivery of spares might be an issue.

    Flight Global reports that in 1991 the Tu-22M mission-capable rate was just 30-40 per cent, although it was not really a representative year because that’s when the Soviet command economy had collapsed.

    India should have bought these aircraft cheap as chips when the Soviet Union dissolved and Moscow was wondering what to do with 300 surplus Backfires. But costs aside, having a nascent fleet comprising just four bombers would still be a good idea as it would give India a rare glimpse into the world of strategic airpower.

    Endgame

    During the Cold War, only two organisations in the West had got the Backfire’s range right. The first was US aircraft maker McDonnell Douglas and the other was Flight International, where Sweetman, the defence analyst worked. Years later, in 1992, the Russians brought the Tu-22M to the Farnborough International Air Show, along with a one-page handout.According to Sweetman, “We’d hit the fuel capacity within 5 per cent.”

    When Flight International had published the Backfire’s range, an engineer from McDonnell Douglas had called them, wondering how the magazine had hit the same numbers his team had. Sweetman explains: “Later, I found out why that McDonnell Douglas guy was so surprised. His team had been working for what he preferred to call the Culinary Institute of America, which was quarrelling with the US Air Force. The Air Force claimed the Backfire had intercontinental range; the CIA said it could make it with inflight refuelling but could never get back.

    “US Air Force intelligence boss Major General George Keegan threatened to mess with the F-15 programme – a huge McDonnell Douglas contract – if McDonnell Douglas analysts, the ones feeding the CIA, didn’t find more fuel tanks in the Russian bomber so that their conclusions matched his. CEO Sanford “Sandy” McDonnell stood his ground. Keegan went on to start the Great Space Laser Panic of ’79. And the Tu-22M did what it did best, which wasn’t strategic bombing but scaring the bejeesus out of carrier groups.”

    http://in.rbth.com/blogs/stranger_t...ia-really-need-russias-backfire-bomber_615567



    Backfires operating from the Thanjavur Air Force Base in southern India – and armed with the 300 km range BrahMos – can comfortably strike naval assets up to Seychelles.


    One way distance to Seychelles is 3100 km approx. so thats a bit over estimated but with aerial refuelling of course its possible.
    His view of Brahmos missile is correct. One small point i wish to add is Tu22M3M also carries a MKU-6-1 rotary launcher in its bombing bay


    This bay carries 6 Kh15 missiles and each missile weighs around 1200 kgs and length of 478 cm and diameter of 0.46 cm with 150 kg warhead.
    The present Brahmos Air Launched version is 2500 kg and length 8.4 m, diameter of 0.6 and warhead 300 kg. As such the rotary launcher if it can accommodate then 3 Brahmos can be fitted . This along with 3 in wings and body makes this beast carry 6 Brahmos Air launched version at present condition

    In future, with Brahmos NG such numbers could be doubled in teh rotary bay meaning 6 Brahmos NG and the beast would be in a position to carry 9.

    Perhaps with the Zircon based Brahmos 2, the mission payload mix can change significantly

    But the critical question remains:

    Will we buy it or its just another feel good article about potential India Russia Relationships?

    Will IAF allow IN to have such maritime strike bombing platforms and change the whole aerial doctrine?

    Will 4 such Aircrafts be enough?



    Source: http://defence.pk/threads/does-india-really-need-russia%E2%80%99s-%E2%80%98backfire%E2%80%99-bomber.441381/#ixzz4Fcjc1bCq

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