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    The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

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    PapaDragon
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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  PapaDragon on Thu Oct 08, 2015 7:54 pm

    Khepesh wrote:Igor Mosiychuk rushed to hospital critically ill with internal bleeding.  thumbsup
    http://dnr-news.com/dnr/26205-u-mosiychuka-obnaruzhili-distroficheskoe-zabolevanie.html



    Who is that? Hard to keep track of everyone....

    JohninMK
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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  JohninMK on Thu Oct 08, 2015 8:00 pm

    PapaDragon wrote:
    "Klitschko Announces Kiev to Default on Eurobond Debt"

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/europe/20151008/1028227442/kiev-default-eurobonds-klitschko.html#ixzz3nzu9e5xD
    That is the relatively small Kiev City debt, $250m due at the end of November and $300m mid 2016. There is also the $3B national debt due to Moscow at the end of December. Russia is arguing that this is not commercial, it is sovereign debt. If it is then under current IMF rules if Ukraine defaults the IMF can't lend it any more money. This refers, also today

    WASHINGTON (Sputnik) — Ukraine is expected to discuss its $3 billion outstanding Eurobond debt to Russia on the sidelines of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank meetings this week, US Assistant Secretary of State for European Affairs Victoria Nuland said on Thursday.

    "My understanding is that the Ukrainian government is now approaching the Russian government and that conversation may begin in the coming days," Nuland said at a US Senate hearing on the Ukrainian economy.

    Nuland noted that she was not aware of formal discussions between Russia and Ukraine on the Eurobond issue.

    The IMF-World Bank conference is taking place this week in Lima, Peru.


    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/europe/20151008/1028227183.html#ixzz3o03zH2Pg

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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  Khepesh on Thu Oct 08, 2015 8:34 pm

    PapaDragon wrote:
    Khepesh wrote:Igor Mosiychuk rushed to hospital critically ill with internal bleeding.  thumbsup
    http://dnr-news.com/dnr/26205-u-mosiychuka-obnaruzhili-distroficheskoe-zabolevanie.html



    Who is that? Hard to keep track of everyone....
    Heavy duty nazi Rada deputy in Lyashko's radikal party, often confused with the now dead "Sotnik Mykola" from Odessa. He is currently serving 60 days prison for corruption and today collapsed in the the courtroom at an appeal hearing. Also former deputy commander of "Azov"


    Last edited by Khepesh on Thu Oct 08, 2015 8:43 pm; edited 1 time in total

    JohninMK
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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  JohninMK on Thu Oct 08, 2015 8:42 pm

    Khepesh wrote:
    PapaDragon wrote:
    Khepesh wrote:Igor Mosiychuk rushed to hospital critically ill with internal bleeding.  thumbsup
    http://dnr-news.com/dnr/26205-u-mosiychuka-obnaruzhili-distroficheskoe-zabolevanie.html



    Who is that? Hard to keep track of everyone....
    Heavy duty nazi Rada deputy in Lyashko's radikal party, often confused with the now dead "Sotnik Mykola" from Odessa. He is currently serving 60 days prison for corruption and today collapsed in the the courtroom at an appeal hearing.
    Maybe a little too left wing for some of the other inmates? Smile

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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  PapaDragon on Thu Oct 08, 2015 9:30 pm

    Khepesh wrote:
    PapaDragon wrote:
    Khepesh wrote:Igor Mosiychuk rushed to hospital critically ill with internal bleeding.  thumbsup
    http://dnr-news.com/dnr/26205-u-mosiychuka-obnaruzhili-distroficheskoe-zabolevanie.html



    Who is that? Hard to keep track of everyone....
    Heavy duty nazi Rada deputy in Lyashko's radikal party, often confused with the now dead "Sotnik Mykola" from Odessa. He is currently serving 60 days prison for corruption and today collapsed in the the courtroom at an appeal hearing. Also former deputy commander of "Azov"

    This pig clown looks exactly opposite of master race... Razz

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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  JohninMK on Thu Oct 08, 2015 11:11 pm

    Fascinating article about what the Normandy Four in Paris and a background piece on Ukraine's leadership. These are the end and most interesting paras. Some of the events that have happened since then now start to make sense.

    The situation began to change only after the second Minsk. After the second Minsk it became apparent to the Federal Chancellor of Germany and the President of France that Poroshenko was not only shamelessly lying, but trying to make them accomplices to his lies. And when they do not show sufficient enthusiasm – he complains to the United States. And if Hollande, who will not be running for president, does not care much, for Merkel it is important to be reelected. Poroshenko has become an irritating factor for Angela Merkel – a leader of the country which represents the European Union. So irritating that even Washington's arguments could not get her to close her eyes to the escapades of the Ukrainian president.

    In Paris, Merkel, who did not want her peace initiative (Norman and Minsk formats) to fail because of the lying confectioner, took a position that could be called pro-Russian. Even after the departure of Putin and Poroshenko during the press conference Merkel and Hollande clearly defined their requirements to Kiev:

    1. To introduce changes to the constitution with a real, not phony decentralization.
    2. To ensure a defrosting of the law on the special status of Donbass.
    3. To make changes in the legislation of Ukraine ensuring the realization of the right of Donbass.
    4. To coordinate all these constitutional and legislative changes with the DPR/ LPR.
    5. To adopt a law on the general and complete amnesty for militia and leaders of the DPR/ LPR.

    Now Poroshenko must fulfill all of these requirements. Then he will have to enshrine in law Ukraine’s refusal from Donbass (in fact, the law on the special status makes the presence of the DPR/ LPR within Ukraine more formal than of Canada belonging to the British Crown), and recognize the legitimacy of the current governments of the DPR/ LPR. Or he can try to lie again. But this time he would be lying directly to Merkel. It was Merkel, not Putin, who voiced the demands to Poroshenko. Therefore, these are not Russia's, but the EU’s demands. It is unlikely that the daughter of a pastor would forgive the confectioner such abuse of her ideas about morality.

    The only problem was that in order to implement these requirements Poroshenko needs time. About half a year, if he follows the Ukrainian legislation. To give Peter Alekseevich these six months the DPR/ LPR agreed to postpone the local elections till the end of the winter or even till March-April 2016. Kiev has already welcomed this decision.

    Once Kiev agreed to the initiative of the DPR/ LPR it stepped into another trap. Now, whether it will carry out the reforms required by Minsk or not, the Minsk process is extended to 2016 (at least as long as the DPR/ LPR do not hold elections). And any attempt by Kiev to change something will be interpreted by Merkel as a derangement of the Minsk process through the fault of Poroshenko.

    Let me remind you that the extension of Minsk was persistently demanded by Paris and Berlin without any objections from Russia and Donbass. Only Kiev and Washington wished to close the format in 2015. The reason is simple – Kiev cannot implement the Minsk format. But it put its signature on it. And the longer Poroshenko plays games with Merkel and Hollande, the weaker is the European support for Ukraine. In fact, it is nonexistent. To escape this trap, Kiev had to destroy the Minsk format and then talk about the creation of the new one.

    Washington would be eager to join the new format and to squeeze the DPR/ LPR out of it. The only opportunity for Kiev to break up the Minsk format without entering into a conflict with Europe was a termination of the format, which was due to expire in 2015. After Paris and today's agreement to postpone the election in the DPR/ LPR Kiev no longer has this possibility.

    As a bonus, now our European friends and partners have a good understanding who they are dealing with in Ukraine and do not have any illusions any more.


    The rest is at http://fortruss.blogspot.no/2015/10/ishchenko-what-are-real-issues.html

    HeNeArKrXeRn_
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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  HeNeArKrXeRn_ on Fri Oct 09, 2015 12:46 am

    Khepesh wrote:Igor Mosiychuk rushed to hospital critically ill with internal bleeding.  thumbsup
    http://dnr-news.com/dnr/26205-u-mosiychuka-obnaruzhili-distroficheskoe-zabolevanie.html



    Exactly like Sharij predicted when the corruption story broke out. This is the Tymoshenko in a wheelchair circus again. Tho I have to say, I really wish the worst for this individual.

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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  Cyberspec on Fri Oct 09, 2015 7:27 am

    Somebody asked a Ukr. troll (whose been spewing anti Russian crap on a Syria theme) whether the following map reminds him of something closer to home Laughing (hint: cauldron)



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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  auslander on Fri Oct 09, 2015 9:42 am

    Cyberspec wrote:Somebody asked a Ukr. troll (whose been spewing anti Russian crap on a Syria theme) whether the following map reminds him of something closer to home Laughing (hint: cauldron)



    Debaltsyevo ring a bell, anyone? angel

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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  Khepesh on Fri Oct 09, 2015 9:48 am

    Potential problems in Kiev on Wednesday 14. That day has a number of celebrations, the religious Pokrov, foundation of UPA, Defender of the Fatherland Day and day of Ukranian Cossacks. Pravy Sektor has said they will march in Kiev on Wednesday, presumably with the clowns pretending to be Cossacks as there are no "Ukranian Cossacks", only fantasist actors. Apart from Don Cossacks whose territory stretched into Donbass, the last surviving Cossack Host to inhabit the area temporarily occupied by modern Ukraine was the short lived Novorossiyan Cossack Host who had formed from remnants of Zaporozhian Cossacks who remained when everybody else departed for the Kuban. Novorossiyan Cossacks disbanded in mid 19th Century. I mention that to show how fake "Ukranian" history is.
    http://dnr-news.com/dnr/26219-na-pokrova-v-kieve-gotovyatsya-k-besporyadkam-iz-za-marsha-pravogo-sektora.html

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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  higurashihougi on Fri Oct 09, 2015 10:10 am

    Seems like even Western media lost its patience about the silence of MH investigation

    https://www.rt.com/news/318051-dutch-media-mh17-lawsuit/

    Three Dutch media companies have filed a joint lawsuit against the country’s Security and Justice Ministry, demanding that it disclose more documents relating to the MH17 catastrophe investigation after the ministry’s refusal to release the information.

    The Netherlands Broadcasting Foundation (NOS); the Dutch subsidiary of the European TV, radio and production company RTL Group; and the Dutch daily Volkskrant have joined forces to appeal the Netherlands Security and Justice Ministry’s refusal to make public “many documents” concerning the Malaysian Airlines MH17 crash in Eastern Ukraine last year, NOS said in a press release.

    The three media companies had previously appealed to the ministry separately, asking it to disclose MH17 investigation data based on the Freedom of Information Law (WOB). The aim of the companies was to bring to light the details of the tragedy, as well as to reconstruct the actions of Dutch officials after the catastrophe.

    The three media companies asked for the reports of ministerial and other official committees that were involved in the MH17 investigation to be released. In response to the media outlets’ request, the ministry reportedly released about 575 documents related to the MH17 case, including the correspondence of the members of the national crisis group that was formed immediately after the tragedy.

    However, the media companies called the result of their requests “disappointing” in statements published on their websites. They said the ministry refused to release many of the MH17-related documents and rendered lots of other documents unreadable by blurring large pieces in them.

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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  KoTeMoRe on Fri Oct 09, 2015 10:13 am

    Militarov wrote:
    KoTeMoRe wrote:It looks like a Luna. But the problem is that it isn't concealed and that missile goes well beyond the MAZ TEL so it's an export model? The hell would LNR/DNR use an export Luna for?

    Lunas M that i had pleasure seeing here were on Zil 135.

    Yes Zil 135, pointed out R-17, my bad.

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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  Khepesh on Fri Oct 09, 2015 10:23 am

    Blockade of Crimea has so seriously backfired that the price farmers get for milk has collapsed in Ukraine. In Kherson region most milk production went to Crimea. This seems at face value good news for shoppers as surely the price in the shops will fall, but no, the price in fact rises for dairy products in the shops in order to maintain the profit margins for the middle men, well well....
    Anyway, small and medium size dairy farms in the Kherson region cannot survive with milk prices so low and if the blockade continues much longer they will have to start making workers redundant and slaughtering cows they cannot afford to keep. It's situations like this that breed revolution..... http://antifashist.com/item/blokada-kryma-prevratilas-v-blokadu-hersona-moloko-v-ubytok-korov-na-myaso.html#ixzz3o3Rf1MQ3

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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  higurashihougi on Fri Oct 09, 2015 3:44 pm

    Quite a way to get attention lol! lol!

    http://fortruss.blogspot.com/2015/09/poroshenko-russia-is-destabilizing.html

    The Video (in Russian ?) https://youtu.be/11JKyRF7ILw

    Peter Poroshenko today talked to journalists, well how did he talk - there were three bodies nodding their heads, asking questions, to which Poroshenko already had written down the answers. But it didn't smell of journalism, perhaps of alcohol, because Poroshenko said "Russia is destabilizing the situation in the Islamic state".

    Poroshenko: "Nothing will work out. Everyone knows well the role of Russia as a destabilizing factor in the Islamic State, Syria, Ukraine and other places."

    That person called a journalist, instead of drinking water, should have asked: "Where, where is it destabilizing the situation?"

    Poroshenko:

    "In the Islamic state"

    "In the Islamic state"

    No more drinks for him.

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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  JohninMK on Fri Oct 09, 2015 5:15 pm

    Khepesh wrote:Potential problems in Kiev on Wednesday 14. That day has a number of celebrations, the religious Pokrov, foundation of UPA, Defender of the Fatherland Day and day of Ukranian Cossacks. Pravy Sektor has said they will march in Kiev on Wednesday, presumably with the clowns pretending to be Cossacks as there are no "Ukranian Cossacks", only fantasist actors. Apart from Don Cossacks whose territory stretched into Donbass, the last surviving Cossack Host to inhabit the area temporarily occupied by modern Ukraine was the short lived Novorossiyan Cossack Host who had formed from remnants of Zaporozhian Cossacks who remained when everybody else departed for the Kuban. Novorossiyan Cossacks disbanded in mid 19th Century. I mention that to show how fake "Ukranian" history is.
    http://dnr-news.com/dnr/26219-na-pokrova-v-kieve-gotovyatsya-k-besporyadkam-iz-za-marsha-pravogo-sektora.html
    Its also the day after the MH-17 report and the Russian Buk test on an old Boeing results are published.

    Whatever they say, Monday will be a disappointment for someone.

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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  Cowboy's daughter on Fri Oct 09, 2015 8:40 pm



    for what it's worth, in the globe and mail

    GEORGE PETROLEKAS
    Time is running out for U.S. policy in Syria


    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/time-is-running-out-for-us-policy-in-syria/article26728301/

    George Petrolekas is a fellow with the Canadian Global Affairs Institute. He has served in Bosnia and Afghanistan and has been an adviser to senior NATO commanders.

    The failure of American strategy in Iraq and Syria threatens faith in U.S. leadership. As the situation develops, allies need to exchange frank views without diplomatic niceties or political spin.

    Rather than sustaining what appears to be a failing strategy a wiser course would be to recalibrate and alter course, much as the United States did in Bosnia 20 years ago. There are parallels, ranging from air support to moral support of the Bosnian Muslims. But the U.S. needs to take stock of its present strategy.

    The air campaign against Islamic State, insufficiently resourced from the start, has had limited effect. The Iraqi Army shows no sign of life or effectiveness. Last year, the liberation of Mosul was promised, yet that seems nowhere in sight.

    Recently, a U.S. Congressional report castigated the failure to stem the flow of foreign fighters to IS, including from the U.S. Like moths to a flame, the attraction remains and the financial wherewithal of IS rests untouched.

    About $500-million (U.S.) was spent to train 5,000 anti-IS fighters but instead produced just 60. Fifty-five of them disappeared, leading U.S. General Lloyd Austin to say “only five anti-IS fighters remain.” At $100-million per person, someone needs to be fired.

    On Syria, the U.S maintains a simplistic policy of “Assad must go” without any in-depth plan for what would follow. The presumption is that a rebel government would attain legitimacy. To sustain this fiction, the rebels are painted as moderate, when in fact they are anything but. We forget that the core of President Bashar-al Assad’s support is the Shia/Alawite and Christian minorities in Syria – they will not survive retribution by rebel factions penetrated by extremists. Moderate Sunnis, upon whose support a viable new government might have been built, are now more likely to be found fleeing to Europe. The resulting depopulation of Syria ensures a perilous future.

    The arrival of Russian forces has understandably upset the U.S., but its reaction has been petulant, with Russian actions simplistically painted in a Cold-War-like context. The reaction in U.S. media and by government so far seems to be, “Russia is acting from weakness, acting to distract attention from Ukraine, acting to preserve its naval base, and it’s helping Assad and not striking the IS.” The complaints against Russia are distractions at best; we need to move beyond rhetoric to realpolitik.

    The painful idea that must be faced is that Mr. al-Assad will not be removed by force and opposition groups and neighbouring states must accept that reality. A transition plan that protects minority rights and disarms rebels like the Nusra Front is only possible with Russian co-operation.

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel said last week that it would be possible to end the civil war in Syria only with the help of Russia, and Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said that “perhaps” Mr. al-Assad could be involved in a “transition” to a new Syria.”

    The vacuum of power that Russia fears most would leave IS as best positioned to profit. For many, the unpalatable – a managed transition including Mr. al Assad – is better than the unthinkable: an IS victory.

    But all is not lost. The U.S. could demonstrate remarkable course corrections, as it has many times in its past by turning a focused eye toward realistic objectives.

    In 1995, as the Bosnian conflict raged, the U.S. altered course, promising to commit forces in conjunction with diplomatic wherewithal to resolve the conflict. The United States realized then that if a deal was to be struck, it could not simply support the Bosnian Muslims at the expense of the Bosnian Serbs. The success of a political deal hinged on the credible threat of force against all parties, otherwise Russian-backed Serbs and U.S. backed Muslims would never bend.

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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  Cowboy's daughter on Fri Oct 09, 2015 9:27 pm

    Graham W Phillips ‏@GrahamWP_UK 9h9 hours ago Ukraine

    I got interrogated by UK police for 4 for work as a journalist, now the UK is welcoming over Ukrainian neo-Nazis -

    http://www.ukrainianlondon.co.uk/deputy-speaker-of-the-ukrainian-parliament-andriy-parubiy-open-meeting-23-10-2015/

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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  PapaDragon on Fri Oct 09, 2015 10:02 pm


    Someone is reading this forum!!! lol1

    BREAKING NEWS:

    1) Winter is coming!

    2) Ukraine needs more money! Razz


    Winter Is Coming. And So Is Ukraine’s Far Right.

    http://news.yahoo.com/winter-coming-ukraine-far-204508814.html

    There’s a reason most revolutions in Eastern Europe begin in the winter, from Russia in 1905 to Ukraine’s Maidan in 2013. Once the cold settles in, a government’s empty promises are laid bare. Over the next several days, forecasters are predicting, the temperature in Ukraine will plunge to freezing. When President Petro Poroshenko looks at the thermometer, he should be worried.

    Ukrainians are seething with anger over the plunging quality of life and the government’s failure to purge the country of oligarchy and corruption, the very issues that ignited the 2013-2014 Maidan uprising in the first place. This is not Kremlin propaganda. A Washington Post article in August spoke of the “sense that last year’s wave of protests delivered little but fresh misery.” A recent Atlantic Council report states that “[i]f the Ukrainian government does not follow through with an ambitious reform agenda, public support for reforms will wane while dissatisfaction will increase, threatening political stability and the country’s successful future.” Even George Soros, a stalwart backer of Kiev, wrote this month that “the general population is increasingly dissatisfied both with the slow speed of reforms and the continued decline in living standards.”

    If Ukraine were a stable country, this mounting public disillusionment would manifest itself through an unseating of the ruling party in the next election or perhaps through a referendum of no confidence in the administration. But Ukraine — fresh off a revolution followed by 19 months of war — is far from stable. Its citizens have more weapons than they do trust in their government. If the average Ukrainian can’t scrape together enough money to feed and heat his family in the brutal Ukrainian winter, he will blame Kiev (and the West) and express his outrage not at the polls, but in the streets.

    Russian President Vladimir Putin is not the only one who would love to see the Poroshenko government fail. Ukraine has an active far-right movement composed of ultranationalist groups, organizations that combine radical political agendas (with racist and homophobic overtones) with sizable paramilitary formations. Some of these groups, such as Svoboda, began as far-right political parties that were on the margins of Ukraine’s politics before Maidan. Others, like Right Sector, were formed out of paramilitary groups of street fighters that merged into a movement during the uprising. As the war against Russia-backed separatists unfolded, these organizations formed volunteer battalions that proved crucial in containing the separatists.

    As with many things in Ukraine, the far right’s numbers, as well as the extent of Kiev’s control over their battalions, remains nebulous. In July, Right Sector’s Dmytro Yarosh was able to call up around 5,000 members for a march in Kiev, though how many of the participants were fighters as opposed to party supporters is unclear. Likewise, the Azov Battalion, which has been banned from receiving U.S. training and weapons by Congress, has been nominally under Kiev’s control when it comes to fighting separatists; where Azov’s loyalty lies when it comes to facing Kiev is an open question.

    What is clear is that these groups are capable of sowing immense chaos and carnage, as was proved on Aug. 31, when grenade-wielding thugs from Svoboda killed four Ukrainian National Guardsmen and wounded 138 others in front of the parliament building in Kiev. This attack was far from the first time that the far right has threatened Kiev or spilled blood: On July 11, Right Sector was involved in a deadly shootout with police in the western Ukrainian town of Mukacheve, and members of several battalions have threatened a coup after the fighting in the east is concluded.

    Up to this point, more or less, the far right and Kiev have shared a common enemy: Russian-backed separatists in eastern Ukraine. But as the violence in the eastern regions abates, the ultranationalists — including their affiliated (and heavily armed) battalions — are turning their attention inward. Over the past several months, these groups have been increasingly ratcheting up the pressure on Poroshenko, declaring his administration to be an “internal occupation” and calling, as Right Sector put it, for the “new phase” of the revolution.

    Kiev and the far right are at a stalemate. Poroshenko doesn’t have the power to disband the ultranationalists (the administration’s response to the Aug. 31 bloodshed has been restricted to a handful of arrests), but the far-right factions aren’t able to openly move on Kiev either. For that, they’ll need to have everyday people protesting in the streets. They need another Maidan.

    This is why two narratives are currently battling each other in Ukraine — across op-eds, social media, and news conferences. Poroshenko is exhorting his compatriots to stay calm and look to the future. The far right, meanwhile, is exploiting frustration and anger amid economic hardships and urging people to take to the streets.

    In September, IMF chief Christine Lagarde wrapped up her visit to Kiev by praising reforms carried out by Ukraine as “astonishing” and urging Poroshenko and Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk to stay the course. From a big-picture perspective, Lagarde is correct: Kiev’s accomplishments are remarkable considering that it had inherited a country saddled with debt, paralyzed with corruption, and bleeding from a devastating war with Russian-backed rebels. The fact that Ukraine hasn’t imploded is in itself a testament to both the Ukrainian people and Western aid.

    But the average Ukrainian doesn’t have the luxury of looking at the big picture. Utility tariffs have skyrocketed, as have prices for goods and services and the unemployment rate. The eastern regions are in the middle of a humanitarian crisis, with more than 1.5 million internally displaced people subsisting on the mercy of volunteers and sporadic funding from Kiev’s strained coffers. A July poll showed that only 3 percent of the country is satisfied with the pace of change, while Yatsenyuk, the man responsible for carrying out the IMF’s reforms, has an approval rating of 11 percent.

    Each week brings winter closer, making austerity measures such as reduced social services and raised utility fees bite harder. Meanwhile, the far right’s cry will resonate more and more. Perhaps the clearest indicator of this has come from the way in which some of Ukraine’s bigger parties have taken up ultranationalist talking points while distancing themselves from Poroshenko. In early September, Oleh Lyashko, the leader of the Radical Party, which officially split from Poroshenko’s coalition, denounced the president as Ukraine’s biggest criminal. Poroshenko’s rival Yulia Tymoshenko went even further, telling the Independent that the administration’s unpopular reforms are going to trigger “an uncontrolled uprising that could sweep Ukraine away as a country.”

    This is exactly what the far right needs. Groups like Svoboda function best when they can mix in with crowds, presenting themselves as fighters against corruption and injustice; when a crowd is gathered, any imprudent move on the government’s part will be seen as a move against “the people.” Throngs of protesters are the far right’s fuel, and once they are in place, the country has no shortage of explosives.

    Under the most optimistic scenario, a far-right uprising would greatly destabilize Ukraine; Poroshenko wouldn’t be able to continue implementing IMF reforms if he were busy fending off an armed insurrection in the middle of Kiev. At worst, this would set off a chain of events that would rapidly turn the country into a fractured, failed state of 45 million people in the middle of Europe.

    To give democratic Ukraine the best chance to survive, Washington must minimize the chances of citizens rising up once winter hits. Statements of solidarity aren’t enough. What’s needed are food, clothing, medicine — tangible, visible, and immediate relief, all stamped with “Courtesy of Kiev and the United States” — to ensure that the people of Ukraine continue to believe that they have a positive future with the West.

    This isn’t a novel idea. During the Cold War, the State Department turned it into an art form. From the Berlin Airlift in 1948 to the Russian-language Voice of America broadcasts beamed into the Soviet Union through the 1980s, the United States has a long history of analyzing the situation on the ground, predicting the needs of the population, and acting to win over hearts, minds, and stomachs.

    America’s current Ukraine policy has mostly neglected this kind of aid. That’s a shame. Washington has an opportunity to mitigate what the United Nations describes as an impending humanitarian disaster while combating the destabilizing power of Ukraine’s far-right radicals. It’s an opportunity that shouldn’t be ignored, because if angry, starving people take to the streets of Kiev, the result is likely to be most unpleasant, both for Ukrainian and American interests in the region. Meanwhile, the temperature is continuing to drop.

    Razz cry

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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  PapaDragon on Fri Oct 09, 2015 10:17 pm


    Something went of in Kiev:




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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  Godric on Fri Oct 09, 2015 11:07 pm

    Cowboy's daughter wrote:Graham W Phillips ‏@GrahamWP_UK 9h9 hours ago Ukraine

    I got interrogated by UK police for 4 for work as a journalist, now the UK is welcoming over Ukrainian neo-Nazis -

    http://www.ukrainianlondon.co.uk/deputy-speaker-of-the-ukrainian-parliament-andriy-parubiy-open-meeting-23-10-2015/

    their in describes the UK in a nutshell Geert Wilders is banned from the UK a dutch MP, founder and leader of the Party for Freedom no less and they invite a real Nazi from Ukraine .... f**king priceless

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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  Lenny1983 on Sat Oct 10, 2015 1:53 am

    PapaDragon wrote:
    Something went of in Kiev:




    Is it one of those lost Russian Rockets from the ships in the Caspian Sea? lol! cheers russia welcome

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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  PapaDragon on Sat Oct 10, 2015 2:07 am


    Hey Lenny, long time no see, good to have you back! thumbsup russia

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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  Khepesh on Sat Oct 10, 2015 10:33 am

    This is what part of Ukranian media are saying about the blockade of Crimea. Well, really it seems to be a blockade of Kherson as it is only the farmers of Kherson that suffer, as I said yesterday. What is interesting about this article is that it says, ironically, that this blockade could bring about the "People's Republic of Kherson", and that the farmers are on the brink of survival and that if the traditional links between Kherson and Crimea are not restored, then "serious forces" could emerge that wish to restore them. Also, it is now clear that what happened at Kuibishevsky about three days ago and then Kievsky two days ago and the re-emerge of ukrops UAV is now a pattern of slowly building up small incidents, and also at Lugansk. This is not over and, with the elections now aparrently to be held in February and then March, the next move will be from Kiev, and I think it unwise to assume there will be no move.
    http://ukraina.ru/news/20151003/1014456609.html

    Edit: Elections in Donetsk now confirmed for 20 April 2016 http://sputniknews.com/europe/20151010/1028312786/donetsk-local-elections.html

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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  Cowboy's daughter on Sat Oct 10, 2015 5:18 pm

    Khepesh wrote:This is what part of Ukranian media are saying about the blockade of Crimea. Well, really it seems to be a blockade of Kherson as it is only the farmers of Kherson that suffer, as I said yesterday. What is interesting about this article is that it says, ironically, that this blockade could bring about the "People's Republic of Kherson", and that the farmers are on the brink of survival and that if the traditional links between Kherson and Crimea are not restored, then "serious forces" could emerge that wish to restore them. Also, it is now clear that what happened at Kuibishevsky about three days ago and then Kievsky two days ago and the re-emerge of ukrops UAV is now a pattern of slowly building up small incidents, and also at Lugansk. This is not over and, with the elections now aparrently to be held in February and then March, the next move will be from Kiev, and I think it unwise to assume there will be no move.
    http://ukraina.ru/news/20151003/1014456609.html

    Edit: Elections in Donetsk now confirmed for 20 April 2016 http://sputniknews.com/europe/20151010/1028312786/donetsk-local-elections.html

    Right Sector is there on the blockade??

    Yes, Lenny, it's great to see you back! Very Happy Cool

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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

    Post  Khepesh on Sat Oct 10, 2015 6:15 pm

    Cowboy's daughter wrote:Right Sector is there on the blockade??
    Yes, and seen as a serious problem.

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    Re: The Situation in the Ukraine. #22

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