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    Russian Navy: Status & News #3

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    George1
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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  George1 on Thu Aug 13, 2015 12:19 am

    Security Council: A new edition of the Maritime Doctrine will help to strengthen the position of Russia


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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  George1 on Thu Aug 13, 2015 12:47 am

    The day-by-day story of Kursk submarine tragedy:
    http://rbth.com/multimedia/pictures/multimedia/2015/08/12/timeline-kursk_383011


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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  Maximmmm on Thu Aug 13, 2015 5:56 am

    Bunch of news:

    We got the second buyan out on the black sea: Buyan

    Work has resumed on the 4th 5th and 6th (!) Grigorovitch class frigates. Delivery dates will depend on when the new turbines get in: http://flotprom.ru/2015/%D0%AF%D0%BD%D1%82%D0%B0%D1%80%D1%8C25/

    Podmoskovie has been launched after overhaul: http://flotprom.ru/2015/%D0%97%D0%B2%D0%B5%D0%B7%D0%B4%D0%BE%D1%87%D0%BA%D0%B042/

    People are kicking around the idea of making zaporozhie a museum (which I totally suport): http://flot.com/2015/%D0%9A%D1%80%D1%8B%D0%BC13/

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  Cucumber Khan on Thu Aug 13, 2015 8:53 pm

    Maximmmm wrote:Bunch of news:

    Work has resumed on the 4th 5th and 6th (!) Grigorovitch class frigates. Delivery dates will depend on when the new turbines get in: http://flotprom.ru/2015/%D0%AF%D0%BD%D1%82%D0%B0%D1%80%D1%8C25//

    That's really interesting. Wonder were that will mean for the 22800, that were supposed to replace the 11356?

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  artjomh on Thu Aug 13, 2015 9:14 pm

    Cucumber Khan wrote:That's really interesting. Wonder were that will mean for the 22800, that were supposed to replace the 11356?

    22800 was never going to replace 11356. That was just nonsense.

    Remember, the Russian Navy is the ugly stepdaughter of the Russian military budget. The top brass got so good (or so bad, from another POV) at begging for money that they have to invent patently ridiculous reasons to build particular ships.

    There are several crossing interests here:

    - Navy wants money for more ships. Government won't pay for ships that will never get finished because of uncertainty with Ukraining propulsion. So Navy pretends that this other completely unrelated ship class will somehow replace the 11356 frigate. Just ignore the strategic utility and give us more money.

    - Almaz is looking to sell new ships. They see that the government seems to be paying for a lot of 800-900 ton missile boats. They get to thinking, well, we can't have Zelenodolsk get all that cash, let's draw up a project of our own. Hence we got 22800.

    Because there is no clear long-term (30-40 year) government strategy in shipbuilding that would translate into concrete plans, a lot of these decisions get made completely ad hoc, in the spur of the moment. Which is why you get a lot of wastefully similar designs (1161 vs 20380, 11356 vs 22350, 22800 vs 21361, etc) that get built not because they fulfill some strategic purpose for the Russian Navy, but because of the result of bureaucratic maneuvering by Navy and industry apparatchiks.

    Those are just a couple examples of this kind of bureaurocratic maneuvering. There are lots more idiocy in decision making. It's pretty disfunctional. "Only mass shootings will save Russia" and all that jazz.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  PapaDragon on Fri Aug 14, 2015 4:13 pm

    artjomh wrote:
    Cucumber Khan wrote:That's really interesting. Wonder were that will mean for the 22800, that were supposed to replace the 11356?

    22800 was never going to replace 11356. That was just nonsense.

    Remember, the Russian Navy is the ugly stepdaughter of the Russian military budget. The top brass got so good (or so bad, from another POV) at begging for money that they have to invent patently ridiculous reasons to build particular ships.

    There are several crossing interests here:

    - Navy wants money for more ships. Government won't pay for ships that will never get finished because of uncertainty with Ukraining propulsion. So Navy pretends that this other completely unrelated ship class will somehow replace the 11356 frigate. Just ignore the strategic utility and give us more money.

    - Almaz is looking to sell new ships. They see that the government seems to be paying for a lot of 800-900 ton missile boats. They get to thinking, well, we can't have Zelenodolsk get all that cash, let's draw up a project of our own. Hence we got 22800.

    Because there is no clear long-term (30-40 year) government strategy in shipbuilding that would translate into concrete plans, a lot of these decisions get made completely ad hoc, in the spur of the moment. Which is why you get a lot of wastefully similar designs (1161 vs 20380, 11356 vs 22350, 22800 vs 21361, etc) that get built not because they fulfill some strategic purpose for the Russian Navy, but because of the result of bureaucratic maneuvering by Navy and industry apparatchiks.

    Those are just a couple examples of this kind of bureaurocratic maneuvering. There are lots more idiocy in decision making. It's pretty disfunctional. "Only mass shootings will save Russia" and all that jazz.

    Now that Grigorevich class is back in business I think that 22800 is a goner. Once remaining three frigates are completed Gorskhovs will be next for very long time.

    Also, 800/900 ton space will be filled with remaining Buyan-Ms and their successor, the Sarsar class.

    Not much room for 22800 left now.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  Austin on Fri Aug 14, 2015 5:33 pm

    Russia's new maritime doctrine

    Russian president Vladimir Putin used the occasion of the Navy Day festivities on 26 July to announce the approval of a new 'Maritime Doctrine-2015' for the Russian Federation. Nikolai Novichkov assesses the key changes.

    The last time Russia issued a maritime doctrine - which codifies the country's naval priorities, strategy, and procurement - was in 2001, so a new document was thus overdue. According to Russian deputy prime minister Dmitry Rogozin there were two main reasons behind changes the 2015 doctrine brings into play: the changed international situation and improvements to Russia's navy since the last doctrine.

    Regional focus

    Maritime Doctrine-2015 divides Russian naval policy between six regions: Atlantic, Arctic, Antarctic, Caspian, Indian Ocean, and Pacific. Within each region the doctrine assesses four naval functions: operations, transport, marine science, and the development of natural resources. The focus of the doctrine is on two of these regions: the Arctic and the Atlantic.

    The national maritime policy in the regions is to be enforced by the navy's strategic and operational units of the Northern, Pacific, Baltic, and Black Sea fleets and the Caspian flotilla.

    Rogozin notes the Atlantic has been emphasised because of NATO expansion, the need to integrate Crimea and the Sevastopol naval base into the Russian economy, and to re-establish a permanent Russian Navy presence in the Mediterranean.

    Meanwhile, the Arctic focus is down to the growth of the Northern Sea Route, the need for free entry into the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and the wealth of the continental shelf.

    To implement the doctrine's provisions related to the Atlantic and Arctic regions, the structure and performance of the Baltic, Black Sea and Northern fleets will be improved. Enhancements to the combat capabilities of the fleets are also planned. For example, the Black Sea Fleet's infrastructure in Crimea and Novorossiysk will be bolstered.

    Shipbuilding strategy

    The 2015 doctrine adds a new section to the mix: shipbuilding. This, the doctrine states, is due to the re-emergence of the Russian shipbuilding sector over the past 10-15 years.

    Admiral Victor Chirkov, commander-in-chief of the Russian Navy states that the navy's priority is to develop and deploy advanced equipment to enable Russia to make up for lost ground (against rivals) and to become superior to them in certain areas. In addition to refitting the fleets, the navy is looking to build up stocks of weaponry and materiel; improve naval command and control (C2); integrate joint force C2 into the various theatres; and improve the navy's basing and support systems.

    Among these, priority will be given to supporting Russia's ballistic missile submarines (SSBNs) and nuclear attack submarines (SSNs) within the Northern and Pacific fleets.

    Additionally, the doctrine seeks to create a general-purpose marine force armed with long-range and high-precision strike systems capable of providing a non-nuclear deterrent.

    The navy's future surface fleet is to be divided between long-range multirole vessels and short-range vessels with modular capabilities. Looking ahead, the service intends to field a multi-service naval strike force capable of quick relocation to threatened areas.

    The doctrine also foresees the introduction of new and innovative technologies such as: artificial intelligence systems, unmanned aerial, surface and underwater vehicles (UAVs, USVs, UUVs), non-lethal weapon systems, and new weapon types such as directed-energy weapons.

    Russia will now look to create a single, integrated, and jam-proof fleet-wide C2 system for use at all levels from the strategic to the tactical. This is intended to be adaptable and to form a single information control complex to enable network-centric command of diverse naval and joint-service assets in any theatre of operations.

    In connection with the maritime doctrine, and amendments in some aspects of force development, the Russian Navy is expected to gain some additional resources because the creation of a well-balanced and equipped naval force is a long-term effort of 30-40 years. Considering this and the duration of ship design/construction work, the conceptual approach to the development of the navy will be an ongoing issue for 45-50 years.

    To take account of the implementation time and existing/forecast resource and technology restrictions, the creation of the new-model navy has been divided into three phases: up to 2020; 2021-2030; and 2031-2050. The content of each phase was outlined by Adm Chirkov for the various elements of the navy.

    Strategic nuclear forces

    Up until 2020 the maritime strategic nuclear force will focus on completing the development and launching of its fourth-generation Borey-class (Project 955/955A) SSBNs, while maintaining its remaining Delta III/IV-class (Project 667BDR/667BDRM) SSBNs in operational service.

    During the 2021-2030 phase work will proceed on replacing the Delta class with fourth-generation SSBNs. Within this second phase Russia will also work on developing a new ship-based (in fact submarine-based) strategic missile system and a fifth-generation SSBN class. The doctrine sets out that series production of the fifth-generation SSBN will then commence in the final 2031-2050 phase.

    General-purpose force


    The general-purpose marine force inventory will include in its first phase the creation of a strategic non-nuclear deterrent force, enhancements to its SSN and diesel-electric submarines (SSKs), the build-up of the inventory and capability of its surface forces, and the creation of the new marine rapid-response force. In the mid term the non-nuclear deterrent will be provided by Yasen-class (Project 885M) SSNs and Oscar-class (Project 885M) nuclear-powered guided missile submarines (SSGNs). Meanwhile, the capability of Russia's non-strategic submarines will be ensured by upgrading its third-generation SSNs and building a new generation of SSKs.

    During the 2021-2030 phase Russia's existing SSN/SSK fleet is planned to be improved by adding unmanned technologies, while construction of a new-generation SSN class is also planned.

    Surface fleet

    In the first phase Russia's Admiral Gorshkov-class (Project 22350) frigates and Steregushchy-class (Project 20380) corvettes and their variants will become the core of the surface force for long- and short-range operations.

    In the mid term a new-generation destroyer featuring advanced strike, air defence and missile defence capabilities will become the navy's main oceangoing ship. Between 2021 and 2030 a new class of modular multirole surface combat ship will be designed and enter series production as the successor to the Project 22350/20380 classes. It is envisaged that these will be armed with novel weapon systems and will carry unmanned vehicles of various sorts.

    The marine rapid-response force is intended to be capable of conducting missions in the maritime, aerial and land domains in any part of the world. For this, new aircraft carriers will be the core of its capability, along with multirole landing ships. Work to design a new class of Russian aircraft carrier is to be completed before 2020, with construction and entry into service planned for the second phase of the doctrine (2021-2030).

    Unlike the heavy aircraft cruisers of the previous generation of Russian aircraft carriers, the new carrier design will be multirole. It is envisaged to be equipped with manned and unmanned combat systems operating in the air, at sea, underwater and possibly in space. The carrier's air groups will include radar surveillance and C2 aircraft, alongside reconnaissance and strike UAVs.

    Naval Aviation

    For the Russian Naval Aviation the focus in the first phase will be the development and serial production of an advanced maritime patrol aircraft (MPA) by 2020.

    Additionally, Russia will look to develop and produce a new shore/ship-based multirole helicopter (to replace the Ka-27) and acquire a ship-based combat helicopter (the Ka-52K). Russia will also seek to develop advanced airborne strike systems.

    The second phase will see the deployment of the new Russian ship-based radar surveillance aircraft, ship-based UAVs, and ship-based strike aircraft. The 2021-2030 period will see the Russian Naval Aviation transition to optionally piloted aircraft, including those derived from existing manned aircraft. Obsolete aircraft are to be replaced by modern, multirole manned and unmanned aircraft. During the 2031-2050 phase naval aviation focus will switch to a new generation of multirole aircraft and UAVs and field a new generation of airborne precision weapon systems.

    Coastal forces

    The first phase of the doctrine concerning Russia's coastal troops and marine force aims to achieve: the completion of development of advance coastal-defence missiles and the issuing of them; and the enhancement of the marine brigade's ability to operate in different climates, including extreme Arctic conditions.

    Between 2021 and 2030 the doctrine plans the introduction of a highly mobile amphibious combat vehicle for the coastal troops so that they can support the marines' operations. The marines are also earmarked to begin receiving unmanned platforms during this period, possibly armed with directed-energy weapons or powered by alternative energy sources.

    Long term

    The direction of the final 2031-2050 phase is currently being analysed, according to Adm Chirkov. However, it is envisaged that during this final phase the following will be undertaken: series production of new-generation submarines; ongoing series production of the new aircraft carrier class; the start of series production of the new multirole ship class; the creation of a new generation of multirole unmanned systems; and the arming of coastal defence troops with new-generation unmanned missile systems capable of striking air, surface, sub-surface and space targets.

    Long-term plans (by 2050) also call for a transition to modular combat platforms for both surface ships and submarines.

    Nikolai Novichkov is a JDW Correspondent, reporting from Moscow

    TheArmenian
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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  TheArmenian on Fri Aug 14, 2015 10:10 pm

    PapaDragon wrote:
    artjomh wrote:
    Cucumber Khan wrote:That's really interesting. Wonder were that will mean for the 22800, that were supposed to replace the 11356?

    22800 was never going to replace 11356. That was just nonsense.

    Remember, the Russian Navy is the ugly stepdaughter of the Russian military budget. The top brass got so good (or so bad, from another POV) at begging for money that they have to invent patently ridiculous reasons to build particular ships.

    There are several crossing interests here:

    - Navy wants money for more ships. Government won't pay for ships that will never get finished because of uncertainty with Ukraining propulsion. So Navy pretends that this other completely unrelated ship class will somehow replace the 11356 frigate. Just ignore the strategic utility and give us more money.

    - Almaz is looking to sell new ships. They see that the government seems to be paying for a lot of 800-900 ton missile boats. They get to thinking, well, we can't have Zelenodolsk get all that cash, let's draw up a project of our own. Hence we got 22800.

    Because there is no clear long-term (30-40 year) government strategy in shipbuilding that would translate into concrete plans, a lot of these decisions get made completely ad hoc, in the spur of the moment. Which is why you get a lot of wastefully similar designs (1161 vs 20380, 11356 vs 22350, 22800 vs 21361, etc) that get built not because they fulfill some strategic purpose for the Russian Navy, but because of the result of bureaucratic maneuvering by Navy and industry apparatchiks.

    Those are just a couple examples of this kind of bureaurocratic maneuvering. There are lots more idiocy in decision making. It's pretty disfunctional. "Only mass shootings will save Russia" and all that jazz.

    Now that Grigorevich class is back in business I think that 22800 is a goner. Once remaining three frigates are completed Gorskhovs will be next for very long time.

    Also, 800/900 ton space  will be filled with remaining Buyan-Ms and their successor, the Sarsar class.

    Not much room for 22800 left now.

    No.

    The 800T project 22800 has nothing to do with the 4000T project 11356.
    The 22800 will be built at Almaz in St. Petersburg, while the 11356 will continue to be built in Kaliningrad.
    The first 22800 will be laid out no sooner than next year.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  Maximmmm on Fri Aug 14, 2015 10:54 pm

    artjomh wrote:
    Cucumber Khan wrote:That's really interesting. Wonder were that will mean for the 22800, that were supposed to replace the 11356?

    22800 was never going to replace 11356. That was just nonsense.

    Remember, the Russian Navy is the ugly stepdaughter of the Russian military budget. The top brass got so good (or so bad, from another POV) at begging for money that they have to invent patently ridiculous reasons to build particular ships.

    There are several crossing interests here:

    - Navy wants money for more ships. Government won't pay for ships that will never get finished because of uncertainty with Ukraining propulsion. So Navy pretends that this other completely unrelated ship class will somehow replace the 11356 frigate. Just ignore the strategic utility and give us more money.

    - Almaz is looking to sell new ships. They see that the government seems to be paying for a lot of 800-900 ton missile boats. They get to thinking, well, we can't have Zelenodolsk get all that cash, let's draw up a project of our own. Hence we got 22800.

    Because there is no clear long-term (30-40 year) government strategy in shipbuilding that would translate into concrete plans, a lot of these decisions get made completely ad hoc, in the spur of the moment. Which is why you get a lot of wastefully similar designs (1161 vs 20380, 11356 vs 22350, 22800 vs 21361, etc) that get built not because they fulfill some strategic purpose for the Russian Navy, but because of the result of bureaucratic maneuvering by Navy and industry apparatchiks.

    Those are just a couple examples of this kind of bureaurocratic maneuvering. There are lots more idiocy in decision making. It's pretty disfunctional. "Only mass shootings will save Russia" and all that jazz.

    Yeah, it brings to mind what one of those "experts" said, that the navy is so used to promising a 10 and delivering a 6. It hurts our strategic planning when we spend ages talking about carrier groups when we don't even have frigate production up to speed and destroyers exist solely on paper.
    I've been reading Kuznetsov's memoir on the war years ("Kursom k popede") and one of the interesting things he laments about is how the navy had trouble with finding its place thoughout the early years of the conflict. They had invested in the wrong ship classes and neglected cooperation with the rest of the armed forces. A great example was how he talked about the navy needing a huge number of minesweepers that had to be jury-rigged from all kinds of incompatible ships because the naval construction plans of the 30s completely ignored minesweepers in favour of getting back to larger ships. They ended up being bottled up by minefields and losing more ships than they should have. Another good point was the realization they had early on that the Navy would have to be a junior partner and act like it, throwing its resources to support the army's flanks and maintain shipping lanes.

    Great book for anybody looking for a nice read. Lots of little nifty stuff you don't think about like river flotillas and the organization of several evacuations.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  medo on Sat Aug 15, 2015 9:31 am

    22800 project is in the same class as Buyan-M. It is only a question, if this new project is designed to operate on the open sea or is river-sea class as Buyan-M is. If it is open sea class, than it will be more suitable for Baltic, Northern and Pacific fleets than Buyans, which is good for Black Sea and Caspian fleets.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  flamming_python on Sat Aug 15, 2015 8:44 pm

    AFAIK there were never any plans to buy Buyan-Ms for anything other than the BSF and Caspian Flottila, so yeah, 22800s could have a role here indeed.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  artjomh on Sun Aug 16, 2015 4:53 pm

    flamming_python wrote:AFAIK there were never any plans to buy Buyan-Ms for anything other than the BSF and Caspian Flottila, so yeah, 22800s could have a role here indeed.

    And yes, Project 20380 corvettes are being built both in St-Petersburg and in K-n-A. There is literally nothing preventing Zеlenodolsk from licensing the project 20361 from being built in either St.-Petersburg or Kaliningrad.

    Nothing... other than Zelenodolsk greed and Almaz's desire to get in on that sweet gravy train.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  2SPOOKY4U on Wed Aug 19, 2015 5:09 am

    Our corvette situation is so fucked up its unbelievable.

    We have Buyans, Buyan-M, Steregushi, Gepard, and all sorts.

    We need one, not companies trying to get on the gravy train.

    At least frigate wise, it is not so bad with Gorshkov and Grigorovich, although I do not see why we need two classes.

    Destroyers seem ok, if a bit nonexistent at this time.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  Mike E on Wed Aug 19, 2015 5:25 am

    Project 22800 will become the universal corvette when it arrives. Buyan is a vessel only usable in gentle waters, like the Caspian, so that single design isn't enough. Gepard seems to be mostly for export, and Stere is more frigate than corvette. 

    I think the same thing for the larger frigates...don't forget they are going to two different locations. 

    22800 will take over from the Grigorovich.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  Austin on Wed Aug 19, 2015 8:42 am


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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  Glyph on Wed Aug 19, 2015 11:52 pm

    Mike E wrote:Project 22800 will become the universal corvette when it arrives. Buyan is a vessel only usable in gentle waters, like the Caspian, so that single design isn't enough. Gepard seems to be mostly for export, and Stere is more frigate than corvette. 

    I think the same thing for the larger frigates...don't forget they are going to two different locations. 

    22800 will take over from the Grigorovich.


    I thought Sarsar being replacement for Buyan?

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  Mike E on Thu Aug 20, 2015 12:56 am

    Glyph wrote:
    Mike E wrote:Project 22800 will become the universal corvette when it arrives. Buyan is a vessel only usable in gentle waters, like the Caspian, so that single design isn't enough. Gepard seems to be mostly for export, and Stere is more frigate than corvette. 

    I think the same thing for the larger frigates...don't forget they are going to two different locations. 

    22800 will take over from the Grigorovich.
    I thought Sarsar being replacement for Buyan?
    I'm not sure what is the replacement of Buyan, but Project 22800 will be it's rough water alternative.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  Glyph on Thu Aug 20, 2015 12:57 am

    Mike E wrote:
    Glyph wrote:
    Mike E wrote:Project 22800 will become the universal corvette when it arrives. Buyan is a vessel only usable in gentle waters, like the Caspian, so that single design isn't enough. Gepard seems to be mostly for export, and Stere is more frigate than corvette. 

    I think the same thing for the larger frigates...don't forget they are going to two different locations. 

    22800 will take over from the Grigorovich.
    I thought Sarsar being replacement for Buyan?
    I'm not sure what is the replacement of Buyan, but Project 22800 will be it's rough water alternative.

    Interesting

    It just a corvette, having two classes is not ending of the world.

    Thanks.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  artjomh on Thu Aug 20, 2015 2:09 pm

    Oxidizer (N2O4) spill reported today in Vilyuchinsk during loading of a disposed R-29 SLBM.

    http://militarynews.ru/story.asp?rid=1&nid=386503

    Missile was reported to be shipping for decommissioning without warhead when a spill was discovered. No casualties reported (or expected) at this time.

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  JohninMK on Thu Sep 03, 2015 11:35 pm

    Not sure if this is the correct place for this item but it seems to fit. My highlight

    Conducting a routine scientific study of ocean environments, a lone Russian research vessel has attracted a lot of attention from the Pentagon. Despite the fact that it’s moving through international waters, the Yantar is being monitored by US Navy ships, aircraft, and even reconnaissance satellites. Last May, the Russian Navy christened its latest oceanographic research vessel. Built for deep sea research and rescue operations, it’s currently conducting operations in the Atlantic Ocean.

    "The Yantar is equipped with a unique on-board scientific research complex which enables it to collect data on the ocean environment, both in motion and on hold," said Alexei Burilichev, head of the deepwater research department at the Russian Defense Ministry. "There are no similar complexes anywhere."

    But despite the Yantar’s peaceful purpose, its presence has put the US military on high-alert. Senior defense officials speaking to Fox News say they have been monitoring the vessel since it was first spotted by satellites in the North Atlantic, believing it to be a spy ship. Now that it’s nearing its destination of Cuba, officials have raised panic over the fact that the Yantar is 300 miles off the coast of a US submarine base in Kings Bay, Georgia. Never mind that the ship’s location is in international waters and part of an ordinary sea route to Cuba.

    According to the Washington Free Beacon, Pentagon officials believe that the ship’s research equipment is being used to surveil the seafloor for sensors, and may even be cutting underwater communication cables. "It seems more likely they’d use their underwater sensors to map out defenses to prepare for future operations, and to avoid, blind, or destroy the sensors," Steffan Watkins, an intelligence analyst who monitors Russian ship movements, told the Free Beacon.

    No justification was offered for those claims, and officials gave no indications that any cables were, in fact, severed. The Pentagon would surely notice that kind of damage immediately. These suspicions seem to be based entirely on the fact that the Yantar contains gear capable of cutting cables, but as the Free Beacon points out, those are “used to rescue submarines if they become entangled” in underwater obstacles.

    This could in fact be a case of the US military projecting its own actions onto others.

    When asked by Fox News if the US used scientific research vessels to conduct covert reconnaissance missions, an anonymous senior defense official gave an interesting response.

    "Of course we do," he said, "what do you think all those 'oceanographic ships' are doing, studying whales?"


    US intelligence will likely continue to monitor the Yantar as it continues its operations.


    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/us/20150904/1026566646.html#ixzz3kiIcHqM0



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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  kvs on Fri Sep 04, 2015 5:37 am

    JohninMK wrote:Not sure if this is the correct place for this item but it seems to fit. My highlight

    Conducting a routine scientific study of ocean environments, a lone Russian research vessel has attracted a lot of attention from the Pentagon. Despite the fact that it’s moving through international waters, the Yantar is being monitored by US Navy ships, aircraft, and even reconnaissance satellites. Last May, the Russian Navy christened its latest oceanographic research vessel. Built for deep sea research and rescue operations, it’s currently conducting operations in the Atlantic Ocean.

    "The Yantar is equipped with a unique on-board scientific research complex which enables it to collect data on the ocean environment, both in motion and on hold," said Alexei Burilichev, head of the deepwater research department at the Russian Defense Ministry. "There are no similar complexes anywhere."

    But despite the Yantar’s peaceful purpose, its presence has put the US military on high-alert. Senior defense officials speaking to Fox News say they have been monitoring the vessel since it was first spotted by satellites in the North Atlantic, believing it to be a spy ship. Now that it’s nearing its destination of Cuba, officials have raised panic over the fact that the Yantar is 300 miles off the coast of a US submarine base in Kings Bay, Georgia. Never mind that the ship’s location is in international waters and part of an ordinary sea route to Cuba.

    According to the Washington Free Beacon, Pentagon officials believe that the ship’s research equipment is being used to surveil the seafloor for sensors, and may even be cutting underwater communication cables. "It seems more likely they’d use their underwater sensors to map out defenses to prepare for future operations, and to avoid, blind, or destroy the sensors," Steffan Watkins, an intelligence analyst who monitors Russian ship movements, told the Free Beacon.

    No justification was offered for those claims, and officials gave no indications that any cables were, in fact, severed. The Pentagon would surely notice that kind of damage immediately. These suspicions seem to be based entirely on the fact that the Yantar contains gear capable of cutting cables, but as the Free Beacon points out, those are “used to rescue submarines if they become entangled” in underwater obstacles.

    This could in fact be a case of the US military projecting its own actions onto others.

    When asked by Fox News if the US used scientific research vessels to conduct covert reconnaissance missions, an anonymous senior defense official gave an interesting response.

    "Of course we do," he said, "what do you think all those 'oceanographic ships' are doing, studying whales?"


    US intelligence will likely continue to monitor the Yantar as it continues its operations.


    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/us/20150904/1026566646.html#ixzz3kiIcHqM0



    Good job. Russia needs to be proactive in undermining America's pathological imperial ambitions. The US has mined the whole
    sea floor with sensors to detect Russian submarines (but spews propaganda about them being noisy). Russia needs
    to tag every piece of spy junk that the US has polluted the oceans with and then have a plan to rapidly take them out
    of action.

    Big_Gazza
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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  Big_Gazza on Fri Sep 04, 2015 6:25 am

    kvs wrote:Good job.  Russia needs to be proactive in undermining America's pathological imperial ambitions.  The US has mined the whole
    sea floor with sensors to detect Russian submarines (but spews propaganda about them being noisy).   Russia needs
    to tag every piece of spy junk that the US has polluted the oceans with and then have a plan to rapidly take them out
    of action.

    More to the point, I'd like to see Russia install acoustic noise generators near the US hydrophone nodes and blanket them with shit 24-7 & 365 days a year. Then adopt a sanctimonious "what, us?" attitude when the orcs complain....

    franco
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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  franco on Fri Sep 04, 2015 1:48 pm

    Zvezda shipyard in the Far East to do upgrades and refits of 6 nuclear submarines. Would assume a mix of 949A SSGN and 971 SSN of which the Pacific Fleet has 5 each.

    http://tass.ru/en/russia/818879

    zg18
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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  zg18 on Fri Sep 04, 2015 4:56 pm

    "Yantar" oceanographic ship in visit to Havana harbor



    Very Happy

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    Re: Russian Navy: Status & News #3

    Post  jhelb on Fri Sep 04, 2015 7:20 pm

    CURRENT RUSSIAN NAVY CONSTRUCTION STATUS








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