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    Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

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    AlfaT8
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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  AlfaT8 on Wed Sep 03, 2014 4:49 am

    Mike E wrote:Yep, that "nucluur stuff" sure is valuable! At least until Thorium comes along...
    On that note, has there been any news on the progress the thorium research lately?

    sepheronx
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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  sepheronx on Wed Sep 03, 2014 5:00 am

    It is mostly just for Uranium itself. As Uranium is one of Australias main exports.

    Mike E
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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Mike E on Wed Sep 03, 2014 5:09 am

    AlfaT8 wrote:
    Mike E wrote:Yep, that "nucluur stuff" sure is valuable! At least until Thorium comes along...
    On that note, has there been any news on the progress the thorium research lately?
    Unfortunately not.... - There is this; http://www.investing.com/analysis/thorium:-an-alternative-source-of-energy-224358

    Thorium R&D needs to be started, it hasn't been research thoroughly since the 60's!

    magnumcromagnon
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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  magnumcromagnon on Wed Sep 03, 2014 5:17 am

    Mike E wrote:
    AlfaT8 wrote:
    Mike E wrote:Yep, that "nucluur stuff" sure is valuable! At least until Thorium comes along...
    On that note, has there been any news on the progress the thorium research lately?
    Unfortunately not.... - There is this; http://www.investing.com/analysis/thorium:-an-alternative-source-of-energy-224358

    Thorium R&D needs to be started, it hasn't been research thoroughly since the 60's!

    China is heavily investing in LFTR's, but it's been kept under wraps. Even though you can't make nukes with LFTR's, they still have immense dual-use potential. Because of how efficient they are they have unparalleled scalability, I even went as far as suggesting to create a compact LFTR fitted to the PAK-DA next generation bomber, giving it the ability to stay in the sky for weeks at a time! Something like that can come in handy in Thermonuclear hot war.

    Mike E
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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Mike E on Wed Sep 03, 2014 5:33 am

    Yeah, knowing China is will probably always be secretive. <- Unfortunately, this tech needs to be shared for the sake of mankind...

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Vann7 on Wed Sep 03, 2014 5:59 pm

    GarryB wrote:Australia is only involved because it exports Uranium.

    Once Russia gets some fast breeder reactors into service enriched Uranium should not be in short supply...

    But Russia exports Uranium too.. is actually six major power in the world exporting Uranium.. have to be something
    else..

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_uranium_production

    India also produce Uranium but not a lot.. but still have.

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Mike E on Wed Sep 03, 2014 6:03 pm

    Yeah, many countries do.... However, Australia is known to be a reliable source, and has the largest reserves of Uranium.

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Sujoy on Sat Sep 06, 2014 6:44 pm

    Vann7 wrote:What up with India , they now siding with Australia for a nuclear project and Not Russia?
    Is this the first sign of things to come between India - Russian relations?  That is
    India no longer being a close partner with Russia?

    Russia is building Nuclear Reactors in India. BUT.........it's for India to find the Uranium.This is why Australia is important.



    Vann7 wrote:You see NATO nations always give preference to buy things withing the organization and not to the competition..


    Russia's trade with EU is far, far more than it's trade with India.

    Vann7 wrote:But when it comes to India .. they marry no one.. and its total neutrality make them an unreliable partner in times
    of of crisis.

    India did side with Russia during the Crimea crisis. Check the records.

    http://thediplomat.com/2014/03/india-backs-russias-legitimate-interests-in-ukraine/

    Russia has not asked any support from India beyond this.


    Vann7 wrote:India sealed a deal with France for $10 billions and another with Americans for helicopters ditching Russia .. that created a major distance between Russia and India relations ..making Russia to look into pakistan to sell the weapons to them.. Something that alarmed India leadership for the colding in the relations.

    India also signed a $35 billion dollar deal with Russia for the PAK-FA without going for any competitive bidding.The same applies for the MTA as well.So, where is the disconnect?

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  RTN on Sat Sep 06, 2014 6:57 pm

    Vann7 wrote:
    Is this the first sign of things to come between India - Russian relations?  That is
    India no longer being a close partner with Russia?

    As a person who has visited Russia( especially urban Russia) several times what I can say is that the Russian public is rather oblivious to India.India does not figure in the scheme of things in Russia.

    And this is natural.Russia is an European country. Russians consider themselves to be Europeans and value their relationship with Europe far more than their relationship with India, a country completely un-compatible with Russia culturally. In fact,just like in other parts of Europe, India captures news in Russia for all the wrong reasons.....poverty,unemployment,terrorism, the whole nine.

    Ergo, the Russian public has a negative image about India and Indians.

    India really does not have anything to offer to Russia,as on this date.Which explains why Russia trades more with Turkey than India.

    Truth is Russians have far more favorable opinion about Australia than India.That is why there are thousands of Russians who are living in Australia. In other words, Australia is more important to Russians than India is.COme down here to the US.In the west coast of US alone there are 2 million Russians.

    Why do you think Putin spends just 30 mins in India, but 3 to 4 days in the US or EU? Read between the lines and you will find the answer.

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Mike E on Sat Sep 06, 2014 9:33 pm

    RTN wrote:
    Vann7 wrote:
    Is this the first sign of things to come between India - Russian relations?  That is
    India no longer being a close partner with Russia?

    As a person who has visited Russia( especially urban Russia) several times what I can say is that the Russian public is rather oblivious to India.India does not figure in the scheme of things in Russia.

    And this is natural.Russia is an European country. Russians consider themselves to be Europeans and value their relationship with Europe far more than their relationship with India, a country completely un-compatible with Russia culturally. In fact,just like in other parts of Europe, India captures news in Russia for all the wrong reasons.....poverty,unemployment,terrorism, the whole nine.

    Ergo, the Russian public has a negative image about India and Indians.

    India really does not have anything to offer to Russia,as on this date.Which explains why Russia trades more with Turkey than India.

    Truth is Russians have far more favorable opinion about Australia than India.That is why there are thousands of Russians who are living in Australia. In other words, Australia is more important to Russians than India is.COme down here to the US.In the west coast of US alone there are 2 million Russians.

    Why do you think Putin spends just 30 mins in India, but 3 to 4 days in the US or EU? Read between the lines and you will find the answer.

    Yeah, and the US public is oblivious to Sudai, so what?

    That is totally "wrong". Russia doesn't care that India is a part of Asia or whatever. They care about their needs, which India wants to be from Russia. 

    Ergo, everybody has a negative image about the US and Americans.

    Yes, they have industry, a large population that can do business with Russia, forces that buy Russian weapons etc. India is one of Russia's "best" allies, and their relationship only continues to grow.

    The heck! Are you making this crap up, or are you just....... Russians I know do give a crap about Australia.

    Wrong, wrong, and wrong again... 

    A) Where do you find this propaganda, errr, "information"?

    B) That could be becuase Russia has a shaky relationship with Europe, and is trying to work this out etc....

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  George1 on Sat Sep 27, 2014 3:22 am

    Russia, India to make innovative projects cooperation priority

    NEW DELHI, September 26. /ITAR-TASS/. Russia and India will make innovative projects a priority and will monitor their implementation, said Oleg Fomichev, Russian Deputy Minister of Economic Development.

    Fomichev participated on Friday in a round table meeting on scientific and technological cooperation between the two countries, organised by the Skolkovo Foundation.

    Vladimir Putin: It is time to raise the BRICS' role to a new level
    “There is a working group for priority investment projects within the bilateral intergovernmental commission on trade, economic, scientific, technological and cultural cooperation,” Fomichev told ITAR-TASS. “We should put innovative projects on the agenda for economic cooperation between Russia and India. We will add them to the list of priority projects and will monitor their implementation.”

    “Russia has already accumulated extensive experience of partnership with India in the area of high technology,” he said. “Our countries work to promote projects and programs for cooperation in knowledge-intensive industries, connected, first of all, with telecommunications, information technology and nanotechnology, nuclear and space industries, aircraft engineering, pharmaceuticals and biotechnology.”

    The next meeting of the working group for priority investment projects is scheduled for October 27.

    George1
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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  George1 on Sat Sep 27, 2014 3:23 am

    Russia’s Rosatom to build irradiation centers in India

    MOSCOW, September 26. /ITAR-TASS/. Rusatom Overseas, a unit of Russian nuclear power corporation Rosatom, will receive a 49% stake in India’s Gamma Tech to jointly build irradiation sterilization centers in the country, Rusatom Overseas said late Thursday.

    The companies plan to open first two pilot irradiation centers in the Tamil-Nadu state. Further centers will be opened in the Kerala, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, and Maharashtra states.

    The centers will carry out sterilization of food and medical purpose products via ionizing radiation.

    Now Rusatom Overseas is finishing building two irradiation sterilization centers in Russia.

    GarryB
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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  GarryB on Sat Sep 27, 2014 8:19 am

    In November 2013, the “Vikramaditya” Russian aircraft carrier (formerly known as the “Admiral Gorshkov”) was commissioned to India. The warship was purchased for a record-breaking $2.35 billion.

    Why do they keep going on about the cost?

    2.35 billion is not that much for a carrier plus air wing.

    If it had Rafales on board instead of MiG-29Ks, at $22 billion for 126 Rafales, that means 174 million dollars per aircraft it would cost just over $2 billion just for 12 Rafales... and that would not include Helicopters... AEW, SAR, and ASW models, and it would not include a catapult system to allow the Rafales operate from a ship that small.

    If the French were building the carrier for India they likely would have gotten it done much quicker but it likely would have cost $10 billion without aircraft.


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    Sujoy
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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Sujoy on Fri Oct 10, 2014 4:22 pm

    India to establish PSU to buy stake in Russian potash firm

    The Indian Government will soon sign a protocol with its Russian counterpart, under which a newly established Indian public sector undertaking (PSU) will buy a 30 percent in Russian fertiliser and potash manufacturer, Acron, the Business Standard reported on Wednesday. The protocol will be over and above the agreement which Indian Potash Limited has with Uralkali, the paper added.

    Russia offered the stake along with a buyback agreement for exclusively supplying the produce back to India, the paper cited sources close to the development as saying. The new PSU will be a consortium of undertakings led by National Mineral Development Corporation with Rashtriya Chemical Fertiliser Krishak Bharti Cooperative, Fertiliser and Chemicals Travancore and National Fertiliser Ltd. The protocol between India and Russia could be one of the big ticket announcements made when Russian President Vladimir Putin visits India in December for the 15th annual bilateral summit.

    Acron is a global mineral fertiliser producer with a diversified product portfolio consisting of complex fertilisers such as NPK and bulk blends, and nitrogen fertilisers such as urea, ammonium nitrate and urea-ammonium nitrate.
    India is one of the world’s largest importers of potash. In the 2013-14 financial year, the country imported 3 million ones of the fertiliser.

    Earlier this year, Uralkali the world’s largest potash producer by output, agreed to supply 800,000 tonnes of the fertiliser to India between April 2014 and March 2015. Under Uralkali’s deal with Indian Potash Limited valued at $258 million, the Indian company is buying potash at $322 per tonne, around 25 percent less than what it paid in 2013.


    Prices started crashing last year with the advent of a Russian-Belarusian potash war, when Uralkali announced it was pulling out of a partnership with Belaruskali, and, in particular, terminating joint sales of fertilizer through the Belarusian Potash Company (BPC).
    Then the whole marketing strategy of Uralkali completely changed. Previously, the company exported fertilizer on the principle of “price before volume” and preferred to reduce production volumes rather than give consumers a discount. The Russian company then announced it would increase production capacity to 100 percent. Belarus even detained and arrested Uralkali Chief Executive Vladislav Baumgertner last year, before sending him back to Russia.

    http://in.rbth.com/economics/2014/10/09/india_to_establish_psu_to_buy_stake_in_russian_potash_firm_38907.html

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  George1 on Fri Oct 31, 2014 10:09 am

    Russia and India Discuss Cooperation on GLONASS Technologies

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  George1 on Mon Nov 10, 2014 7:37 am

    Dmitry Rogozin: India is interested in joint production of Sukhoi SuperJet 100 and operation of MS-21
    Russian Aviaton » Monday November 10, 2014 08:56 MSK

    Russia and India discussed the possibility of starting joint production of short-haul Sukhoi SuperJet 100 aircraft, ITAR-TASS reports with reference to the statement made by Deputy Chairman of the Russian Government, Dmitry Rogozin, at the meeting of Russian-Indian intergovernmental commission on trade and economic, scientific-technical and cultural cooperation.

    “This refers to launching the production of Sukhoi SuperJet 100 in India, - he noted. – The jets manufactured here may be delivered to Indian market and third-party countries”.

    According to him, “India also showed interest in medium-haul MS-21 passenger aircraft”, which “meets the requirements of Indian market”, in terms of passenger capacity (180 seats) and range (up to 5000 km).

    Rogozin reminded that “maiden flight of MS-21 is scheduled for 2016 and its mass production will be started in 2017”.

    He added that Russia “sees potential in cooperation with India in the area of helicopters”. “We suggest using Ka-226 helicopters for both civil and military purposes”, - Rogozin said.

    According to him, Russia and India may also launch joint production of GLONASS satellite navigation system receiver modules.

    “We have considered the possibilities for cooperation in the area of space and agreed to hold additional meeting on the matter, - he added. – This refers to manned flights and projects connected with joint use of Russian satellite navigation system GLONASS, in particular, joint production of GLONASS receiver modules”.

    According to him, Russia thinks that the joint production of modules is possible, especially “if India agrees to implement ERA GLONASS system”. This system is intended for transport monitoring and alerting emergency response services in case of emergencies.

    Rogozin also called “joint production of electronic components” promising as well as bilateral “projects in the area of space instrumentation”. “I think that we will have the clear understanding of how to combine our space programs by the official visit of president Vladimir Putin to India scheduled for December or right after it”, - he said.

    Sushma Swaraj is the Indian Minister of External Affairs and the Co-Chairman of the intergovernmental commission. Dmitry Rogozin also met with Narendra Modi, Prime-Minister of India, in the network of his official visit to India.

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  George1 on Tue Dec 09, 2014 2:20 pm

    Putin to pay visit to India on December 11

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Sujoy on Thu Dec 11, 2014 11:44 am

    RUSSIA to construct 12 Nuclear Power Plants in INDIA

    Russia will construct 12 Nuclear Power plants in India over the next 20 years. Approximate value will be $ 3billion per plant. This translates into $36 billion approximately for 20 plants.

    NEW DELHI, December 11 (Sputnik) – Russia and India have agreed on the construction of at least 12 new nuclear energy blocks within the next 20 years to include two new blocks for the existing Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant in India’s southern tip in 2016, Russia’s Rosatom head Sergei Kiriyenko said Thursday.

    "This morning a general framework agreement was signed on the construction and equipment delivery for the third and fourth blocks of the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant at the present site. Cement foundations [for the new blocks] will be poured in the beginning of 2016," Kiriyenko said.
    India and Russia also agreed on a long-term project to build at least 12 more energy blocks over the next two decades.

    “Today we will sign a strategic document that foresees the construction of no less than 12 energy blocks over the next 20 years, or in other words this would be no less than two nuclear energy facilities,” Kiriyenko added.

    http://sputniknews.com/business/20141211/1015722525.html

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  sepheronx on Thu Dec 11, 2014 2:04 pm

    So current 12 with a possible further 12? Wow. GJ on contract!

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Sujoy on Fri Dec 12, 2014 6:15 am

    RUSSIA & INDIA SIGN 20 PACTS AMOUNTING TO $100 BILLION


    http://www.firstpost.com/world/putins-daylong-sojourn-to-india-leaves-both-nations-with-deals-with-100-bn-1845487.html


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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Austin on Fri Dec 12, 2014 1:58 pm

    Vladimir Putin’s Productive India Visit

    By Saurav Jha

    Russian President Vladimir Putin’s annual summit visit to India this year was a brief affair. Putin came looking for assurances that an India led by Prime Minister Narendra Modi would have no truck with Western attempts to isolate Russia and will continue to be a “time tested and reliable” partner, especially at a time of economic difficulties for Russia.

    These, he received. India has given the Russians both official as well symbolic reassurance that it does not support Western sanctions. In return, India has got its own set of guarantees at the highest level from the Russians for spares for existing Russian-origin military hardware, with Moscow agreeing to move more quickly on transferring technology for the equipment to Indian firms. Keen to retain its position in the Indian defense sector, Russia has also become the first major arms exporter to come on board with India’s military-aerospace industrial goals under the “Make in India” program, with an initiative to produce and even export Russian origin helicopters from Indian soil being announced during the visit itself. At a time when Russia needs India’s high-end human resources and its market size and India requires more high-value manufacturing elements, the long-standing trust between the two sides seems to be helpful.

    While the joint vision document released during the visit explicitly notes that India and Russia oppose economic sanctions that do not have the approval of the United Nations Security Council, it was perhaps the fact that a business delegation led by the Crimean prime minister accompanied Putin on his visit that was more revealing of India’s stance on Ukraine. The Indian government is apparently encouraging Indian businesses to engage more deeply in Crimea, in a clear signal that it stands with Russia irrespective of American positions. In fact India is going even further than China is in making its support for Russia clear.

    And that of course is by design, since India does not want Russia to step back from its traditional role of maintaining a power balance in Eurasia. Of course, India will need to offer more than just support on Crimea if it is to prevent Russia from becoming overly dependent on China at a time when Moscow needs to re-orient itself away from Western markets. It is here that Modi’s statement on Russia remaining India’s primary defense partner despite other options for his country becomes important. The Russian embassy in India has been rather voluble of late in denouncing India’s turn towards the United States and France as defense partners, while Russian spares support for existing programs had become rather uneven – leading to calls in India to scale back its military partnership with Russia. That moment has now passed.

    Already a private company in India has snagged a contract for maintaining Mig-29s, and more such arrangements are being pushed forward. During talks, Modi is known to have conveyed to Putin the very crucial need to locate spares manufacturing facilities for Russian origin weapons in India. For its part, Russia seems at ease with the overall “Make in India” policy that Modi’s government is emphasizing. In light of India’s liberalized regime for “FDI in Defense,” Russia will tie up with an Indian partner to produce as well export up to 400 Mi-17 medium lift and Ka-226 light utility helicopters (LUH) in India each year. The Ka-226 incidentally was the Russian entry for the Indian military’s global LUH tenders, before that process was cancelled by the Modi government in favor of a home-made initiative where foreign majors could tie-up with Indian partners to build the helicopters in India.

    Recognizing that India has adopted an automotive sector-type strategy to boost its aerospace industry at a time when China is spending heavily in this arena, Russia is also looking to locate MS-21 and Sukhoi Superjet 100 production facilities in India, taking advantage of the availability of cheaper but trained manpower locally. Russia has known for a while that it needs greenfield locations for its high-end industries outside its own territory, and India with its immense market size seems the best prospect. Going forward, the output from Russian industrial arrangements in India should also service the domestic market back in Russia, given the need to hold down costs at a time of tighter state budgets. Moreover, with the prospect of Western sanctions lingering for the foreseeable future, Russia may require export partners such as India to circumvent the sanctions. However, as with every such initiative in India, any Russian investment in the aerospace industry will be tied to localization clauses as well as support for India’s own civil airliner development program.

    Although the visit did not bring any announcement on ambitious co-development programs, such as the fifth generation fighter aircraft project or the medium transport aircraft initiative, Modi’s statement on Russia’s status as the most important defense partner for India means that there will be new impetus in sorting out the workshare issues holding back a final agreement on these two initiatives. Of course, Russia will have to be far more amenable to Indian demands on technology development if these projects are to proceed, given the spends involved.

    Continuing negotiations also meant that hydrocarbons did not become a centerpiece of the visit, in contrast to initial expectations. The visit did see an agreement signed between India’s Essar and Rosneft on the long-term supply of some 10 million tons of crude annually at a discount that will see the former drawing down imports from Iran. However, no agreement was reached on Indian state-owned ONGC purchasing a stake in Rosneft’s East Siberian oil and gas fields, including the prized Vankor estate, which will feed assured markets in China via the ESPO pipeline, since the Indians want a 25 percent stake while Rosneft is offering only 10 percent. The haggling may reflect the fact that Indian hydrocarbon majors want equity stakes in lucrative fields and tax breaks for existing assets in Russia where production has tapered off, while the Russians want India to make up-front off-take commitments for risky offshore fields in the Arctic as well as for LNG export projects. Putin even commented just prior to the visit that LNG is likely to prove cheaper than a gas pipeline from Russia to India, and this too is going to be explored. Given India and Russia’s needs in the current oil-to-gas transition, much bigger deals can be expected in the future, current negotiations notwithstanding.

    In any case, delays on the hydrocarbon front are not getting in the way of building more Russian-origin nuclear reactors in India. Neither is India’s nuclear liability law, with the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) agreeing with Rosatom to build a further 12 reactors of Russian design in India by 2035 in addition to the two existing facilities at Kudankulam. To accommodate more Russian design reactors, another reactor site will be identified soon along India’s eastern coast. The first of this new wave of reactors will be Kudankulam units 3 & 4, with construction commencing in 2016. Again, the Russians will have to localize most of the components for the VVER-1200 reactors that will be built under these arrangements. The visit has also seen forward movement on settling a dispute between Indian Rare Earth’s Limited, a DAE undertaking, and Russia for recoveries from a titanium plant in India.

    The minerals outlook does seem to be brightening, with Indian investment in Russian potash mines set to grow and Indian companies inking a 2.1 billion dollar pact to source diamonds directly from Russia’s world-leading diamond consortium Alrosa. The diamond industry in India is a significant employer and the world’s largest manufacturing center for cut and polished diamonds. It can now reduce its dependence on diamond trading centers in the West and Dubai. Interestingly, this move is similar to the Chinese decision to locate production facilities in Modi’s home state of Gujarat, the center for India’s diamond industry, since it directly increases the power of a business constituency entrenched in Modi’s region of origin. Clearly, Modi looms large as a personality to be courted now in the Indian political spectrum by major foreign countries.

    With both sides looking to grow trade in strategic sectors and minerals, the working group on India’s participation in the Eurasian customs union now looks more significant. More so because Russia’s food security in the future will also depend on cheap Indian exports of processed dairy and meat products as well as commodities such as rice, given that Moscow has embargoed Western suppliers. At the same time, Russia is instituting “import substitution” policies at home and free trade arrangements with India will allow two-way trade to grow regardless. In fact, it would also be a source of encouragement for Indian industries to use Russia’s own water resources to produce certain categories of goods.

    To do that, Indian and Russian business will have to talk more efficiently and directly with each other. There is solid ground for that now, with Russia rather keen to enter the Indian market with a view to finding innovative partners that can overcome traditional weaknesses in bringing inventions to market. The vision document calls for the creation of a “direct investment fund of $2 billion between Rosnano and suitable Indian investment partners for implementation of high-tech projects.” Besides this, the Skolkovo foundation is now scouring India for startups in the high-tech spectrum to fund as an angel investor. Russia and India will also ease visa rules for businesses and students to facilitate the movement of financial and human capital. Overall, given the urgent need to boost trade (which languishes at a mere $10 billion) and private investment, both sides are moving forward on rupee-ruble trade with their central banks working out the modalities and export-import banks discussing new credit guarantees that would facilitate loans in local currencies for Indian and Russian companies seeking to participate in each other’s economies. This is of course in sync with BRICS efforts to trade in bilateral currencies in a bid to reduce the influence of the dollar. Of course, it will ultimately also depend on how quickly bilateral economic activity grows between the two sides.

    In the multilateral sphere, India wants the 2015 Shanghai Cooperation Organization Summit in Ufa to be the moment it finally becomes a member of that organization. With China having supported India’s membership and Russia presiding over SCO at the moment, this will be a key test of India-Russia ties. No wonder Putin’s special representative remarked recently that Moscow will do whatever it can to secure India’s membership.

    Just as India does not want to push Russia into China’s grip, Russia doesn’t want to see China become too dominant. With this in mind, Russia’s partnership with India in strategic deterrence programs will grow in strength, already evident in their nuclear agreement and the fact that Russia has made available military GLONASS signals to India for ballistic missile targeting.

    Follow Saurav Jha on twitter @SJha1618.

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Austin on Sat Dec 13, 2014 1:24 pm

    Putin in India: $100 billion in 24 hours

    [*]Smoothed over issues on defense cooperation, Russia will remain India's main source of arms.
    [*]Signed major long-term contracts to supply India with oil ($50 bn) and construct nuclear energy units ($40 bn)
    [*]A variety of other deals


    The economic burden of Western sanctions has pushed Russia to the east in search of business opportunities. Judging by the outcome of President Putin’s visit to India - 20 high-profile deals struck – Moscow’s ‘pivot to Asia’ is getting a warm welcome.

    Russian President Vladimir Putin achieved this during his visit to India spanning 23 hours and 15 minutes and at a summit meeting with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi that lasted barely a few hours.

    By the time the two leaders finished their business in New Delhi’s Hyderabad House, 20 pacts were signed in the presence of Putin and Modi on 11 December and the two sides ended with US$100 billion commercial contracts.

    Rich pickings by both sides included deals worth $40 billion in nuclear energy, $50 billion in crude oil and gas and $10 billion in a host of other sectors, including defense, fertilizers, space, and diamonds.

    All these deals are long-term in nature. For example, India and Russia agreed that Russia would be constructing 12 new nuclear reactors for India and India would soon be identifying a second site to host these plants, apart from Kudankulam in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu.

    Each of the new nuclear reactors will cost $3 billion apiece, triple the amount India spent on the two Kudankulam plant units which each cost just a billion dollars. The sharp hike in the costs is because of tough nuclear liability laws that the Indian parliament enacted four years ago.


    No foreign power has invested even a single dollar since the new Indian nuclear liability laws came into force. However with Russia wading into the vast Indian nuclear market despite its liability laws means that nations like the US, the UK, France and Canada will be in line.

    Indians will have to thank the Russians for that. But then Russia too has got the advantage of being the early mover in this regard.

    The $40 billion expenditure for construction of 12 new nuclear plants in India will be spaced out over two decades.

    Even then this is big money, and more so for Russia at this point of time when Russia is hemmed in by the West and isolated because of sanctions enforced by the West against Russia. An Asian country like Japan, the world’s third biggest economy, too has joined the West in implementing sanctions on Russia.

    The Western sanctions left little room for Russia and practically forced it to divert its direction of trade and business to Asia which offers far bigger and untapped markets.

    The two sides have also decided to revive their good old defense partnership, albeit in a new avatar. Not too long ago Russia used to command an over 80 per cent share of India’s defense arsenal. Today it has fallen to just about 60 per cent. The US has already taken over as India’s number one defense supplier, nudging Russia to the second position.

    The new Indo-Russian initiative involves Russia producing state-of-the-art multi-role helicopters in Indian factories to cut down on costs and time overruns. This deal, for which the two principals gave their approval on Thursday, will be worth $3 billion once formally signed.

    This will be the first major defense project under Prime Minister Modi’s pet scheme ‘Make-in-India’. What sweetens the deal further for India is that India will be at liberty to export these helicopters to third countries. The Indian Prime Minister assured that his government will follow up on the helicopter project quickly.

    sepheronx
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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  sepheronx on Sat Dec 13, 2014 5:24 pm

    How did US gain so much over Russia as #1 spot if they have 60% of India's defense market? That makes no sense (math wise). That said, did US do any JV with India on giving India the ability to manufacture any of the systems in India (The Apache helicopter for example)?

    $100B trade deals is very good! hope to hear from more. What about FGFA? No word on that yet? Cause that is very important for both sides.

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Austin on Sat Dec 13, 2014 5:34 pm

    The largest defence for US was for specific year. Russia still is top most.

    US no JV yet but POTUS is visiting India in Jan lets see what comes up.

    No FGFA and MTA deal yet we got to wait and see.

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  sepheronx on Sat Dec 13, 2014 6:02 pm

    Austin wrote:The largest defence for US was for specific year. Russia still is top most.

    US no JV yet but POTUS is visiting India in Jan lets see what comes up.

    No FGFA and MTA deal yet we got to wait and see.

    I hope that there will be a deal signed soon, or at least sooner than later.

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