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    Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

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    George1
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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  George1 on Mon Nov 28, 2016 4:36 am

    India and Russia chose most feasible site for building new nuclear power plant

    More:
    http://tass.com/economy/914745


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    Pinto
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    Can Moscow retain the Indian arms market?

    Post  Pinto on Sat Dec 03, 2016 9:04 am

    http://in.rbth.com/economics/defence/2016/12/02/can-moscow-retain-the-indian-arms-market_652979

    2 December 2016 LEONID NERSISYAN, FORBES.RU

    Russia, for many years, has occupied second place, after the United States, in sales of weaponry in the global arms market. India has played a major role in this, being Russia’s biggest arms export market. What does the future look like for these two countries in the sphere of defence cooperation?

    Make in India: Russia always ready to share its technologies

    A major reason for the success of Russian arms in India was that Moscow has always been willing to work on the ‘Make in India’ or localised production concept, which New Delhi has been promoting for many years.

    The Government of India in November approved the signing of a new contract for licensed production of 464 T-90MS tanks – the most modern modification of this combat vehicle.

    The contracts for the supply of T-90 tanks to India have allowed Russia to retain a share of around 56% of world tank sales market.

    There are several reasons for the success of the T-90, which practically captured the entire Indian market. First, the price: even the newest T-90MS costs markedly less than any of its competitors. The price tag of Western tanks is $6 to 8 million, depending on the model and the configuration. This also happens to be around the same price as the ‘Arjun’ Indian-made tank.

    Second, the significantly lower weight of the T-90, compared to Western tanks (because, instead of a place for the fourth crewmember, Russian tanks have an automatic loader), making it lighter and more mobile, which is very important in the Indian landscape.This is why the Indian military has decided not to purchase the Arjun – it weighs a little less than 60 tons (the T-90 weighs 46-48 tons, depending on the version) and has problems with running reliability.

    Finally, with the help of Uralvagonzavod, experts in India have managed to build an enterprise to assemble and manufacture some of the components of the T-90. The contract is valued at approximately $2 billion. One T-90MS tank will cost the Indian budget $4.3 million – almost twice the price they paid for the earlier model – the T-90S ($2.5 million). According to the existing contracts (1,657 T-90S tanks) and the new agreement, India will receive a total of 2,121 T-90 tanks in total.


    Will the FGFA make Russian aviation industry rich?


    Perhaps the most successful deal for the Russian defence industry in India was the sale of the multi-role Su-30MKI – dual-seat upgraded version of the Russian Su-27, designed specifically to meet Indian requirements. Most of these aircraft, as well as the T-90 tanks, are assembled under licence in India. India will pay almost $12 billion for 272 Su-30MKI aircraft. The Indian Air Force is already flying approximately 230 fighters of this type at the moment. The new contract is expected to be completely fulfilled in 2018-2019.

    Development of the FGFA (fifth generation fighter aircraft) is the cornerstone for the future of the Russian military aircraft industry in the world arms market. Like the Su-30, this machine is a two-seater – the Indian military prefers this, believing that two crew members can work more effectively than one, especially when performing attack missions. New Delhi plans buy around 200 aircraft of these aircraft in the future.

    However, not everything is proceeding smoothly with the FGFA. India signed a contract in 2010 for the preliminary design of the aircraft, worth around $300 million, after which work on the project stalled. The Indian media voiced concerns that this Russian fighter jet, according to the local military, did not correspond to the set technical-tactical characteristics. At various times, complaints were voiced against the AL-41F1 engine (insufficient thrust) and the capabilities of radar technologies to reduce radar visibility of the aircraft.

    Delhi rescues Russian ships

    The Ukrainian crisis has led to Kiev cancelling all its military-technical cooperation with Russia. The Russian defence industry was able to cope quite quickly when it came to replacement of the majority of products earlier made in Ukraine. One exception was the gas turbine engines for Project 11356 frigates.

    The most convenient way out of this situation, was to sell these ships to India, to which New Delhi agreed – because the country had earlier bought similar products from Russia. The frigates of Project 1135.6 ‘Talwar’ are the predecessors of Project 11356, and were developed specifically for India in the early 1990s, with New Delhi buying 6 of these ships.

    India has purchased two unfinished ships (they will be finished in Russia), as well as two new ones, which will be built in India within the framework of the ‘Make in India’ programme. Ukraine has agreed to supply the required engines to India. The big plus is also the fact that these ships will be equipped with the BrahMos anti-ship missiles (ASM). These ASM will soon also equip the Su-30MKI fighter jets and, in the future, the FGFA.

    A fly in the ointment

    These collaborations may appear as though defence cooperation between Russia and India has been smooth sailing and hardly any problems exist for Moscow in this direction. However, this has not been the case for quite a while now. All major arms exporters are actively seeking to break into the tempting Indian market. The USA and France have significantly increased their share in the Indian market, largely due to the weakness of Russian proposals for certain items.

    India, for example, held a tender for an MMRCA (Medium multi-role combat aircraft), for the supply of 126 light fighter jets to the country. The Russian MiG-35, which is a much modernized version of the current MiG-29, in fact existed only on paper, so it was not even seriously considered.

    Eventually the French won this tender with their ‘Rafale’ fighter jet. However, the Indian government has bought only 36 of these aircraft, as the French arms dealers revised their prices, making them higher than those of the heavy Su-30MKI, and refused to share their production technologies with India.

    Thus, the need for a lightweight fighter jet still exists in Delhi, but Russia still has nothing special to offer here – the MiG-35 being too expensive for a light fighter (largely due to the use of two engines), while other alternatives are not available. Therefore, India’s choice, logically, may fall on the long proven American single-engine F-16 fighter jet.

    Another troublesome project is the MTA (Multi-role Transport Aircraft) – a tactical military transport aircraft, which was to replace more than 100 old An-32 transporters being used by the Indian Air Force, as well as the AN-12, AN-26 and AN-72 in the Russian Aerospace Forces. The project promised great profits and huge production volumes, but misunderstandings arose between the parties, even before one prototype “in the metal” could be built.

    In 2015, India officially withdrew from the project. Judging by what appeared in the media, the main problem was the difference when it came to the engines that were to be used in the aircraft. Russia proposed to install a new modification of the time-tested PS-90, while India sought the creation of a completely new engine, fitted with a digital control system (FADEC), which ensured minimum fuel consumption.

    This loss for the United Aircraft Corporation has been a big setback, because the Russian Aerospace Forces also needed the MTA. With reduced funding, because of the economic crisis, building such an aircraft without external financing will be very difficult. It may be worthwhile to try to revive this project, especially since India does not have many alternatives – either purchase a rather expensive American C-130, which they will hardly allow to be assembled in India, or the rather poor-performing European A-400M.

    First published in Russian by Forbes.ru.

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    GarryB
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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  GarryB on Sat Dec 03, 2016 10:14 am

    Thus, the need for a lightweight fighter jet still exists in Delhi, but Russia still has nothing special to offer here – the MiG-35 being too expensive for a light fighter (largely due to the use of two engines), while other alternatives are not available. Therefore, India’s choice, logically, may fall on the long proven American single-engine F-16 fighter jet.

    If the MiG-35 is too expensive then buy MiG-29M2 and upgrade it when the expensive bits get cheaper.

    But the reality is that they never intended to buy MiGs... they wanted M2ks and were only offered Rafales... 12 billion for 272 Su-30s.... why piss around with Rafale when they could just spend the 10 billion for the MRCA contract and buy 240 more Flankers...

    Single engined F-16s... yeah right... Flanker pilots will shoot them down...


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    India, Russia To Sign GPA On Kudankulam Units 5,6 In December

    Post  Pinto on Sun Dec 04, 2016 3:39 pm


    http://www.ndtv.com/india-news/india-russia-to-sign-gpa-on-kudankulam-units-5-6-in-december-1633758

    NEW DELHI: India and Russia are likely to sign the General Framework Agreement (GFA) on Kudankulam units 5 and 6 by this month.
    "Leaders of the two countries (Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Russian President Vladimir Putin) had set a deadline to sign the General Framework Agreement for units 5 and 6 by the end of this month. The work is on and we are trying to stick to deadline," a top official of Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) said.
    The joint statement, during Mr Putin's visit to India this year, had stated that the two countries will try to complete the GFA by the end of the year.

    Negotiations for the contract are still on and details are being worked out by Nuclear Power Corporation of India (NPCIL) and Rosatom, nuclear power agency of Russia.

    Work on the ground breaking ceremony for unit 3 and 4 was held early this year.

    The agreement for the project was inked by former Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi and then Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev in 1988, but the actual work started only in 1997.

    The unit 1 and 2 of Kudankulam plant were built at a cost of Rs. 20,962 crore. A major share of power generated in the plant goes to Tamil Nadu, followed by Karnataka, Kerala and Puducherry. Unit 1 was started in October 2013, while the second unit was connected to grid in August this year. Unit 3 and 4 of the Kudankulam are expected to be commissioned by 2022-23.

    The Russian built Water-Water Energetic Reactor (VVER) reactor Kudankulam unit 1 and 2 are the largest power generating stations in the country. After all the units (1-6) of the plant are commissioned, the nuclear park will have the power generating capacity of 6,000 MW.


    (This story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)
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    miketheterrible
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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  miketheterrible on Sun Dec 04, 2016 10:26 pm

    GarryB wrote:
    Thus, the need for a lightweight fighter jet still exists in Delhi, but Russia still has nothing special to offer here – the MiG-35 being too expensive for a light fighter (largely due to the use of two engines), while other alternatives are not available. Therefore, India’s choice, logically, may fall on the long proven American single-engine F-16 fighter jet.

    If the MiG-35 is too expensive then buy MiG-29M2 and upgrade it when the expensive bits get cheaper.

    But the reality is that they never intended to buy MiGs... they wanted M2ks and were only offered Rafales... 12 billion for 272 Su-30s.... why piss around with Rafale when they could just spend the 10 billion for the MRCA contract and buy 240 more Flankers...

    Single engined F-16s... yeah right... Flanker pilots will shoot them down...

    This tender was to simply cater to Narendra Modi's corrupt friends who got paid a suitcase of money by Lockheed. This entire tender from the get go was to purchase the jets from them but they are making a scene by making it look like they are catering to all sides but in reality it isn't going to do anything other than make people highly suspicious of India's business deals.

    This should have been quite noticeable when they made it clear for a single jet engine fighter. Everyone knows Russia doesn't make single jet engine fighters anymore. Add to that, there really isn't anything special about single jet engine fighters as the engine needed to power it is about as expensive or more so than two RD-33 engines, and maintenance will be the same. All the while, the two jet engines are more reliable so that if 1 fails, you do not drop to the earth.

    While F-16 is a good jet, India isn't doing its service by buying new ones. On contrary, they are replacing an old jet with a new jet that is just old as well in terms of design. The Teja's in all purpose was about same quality as F-16 and at least it is ready for production already instead of holding another tender. Some people here will think that they can do both, but that would end up making India worst than Saudi Arabia for commonality and logistics, and will end up a further blight to its airforce than anything else.

    Yes, those Sukhois are far better, and India even proved it so during exercises. But when it comes to the corrupt base of India and its politics, there is no limit. If the US and Brits handed them enough cash to retire their Su-30MKI's for less capable F-18S/H or even significantly less capable F-16's (This was tested by Indonesia and proven by them of how good the Sukhois where), they would do it without a second thought. Indian's have a price, and no longer have pride. I don't blame them, I blame the British who left behind such a system that they created since Indian's weren't always like this throughout history. But they are now and Indians who post otherwise cannot see beyond their own two feet.
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    Russia still India's largest defence partner

    Post  Pinto on Wed Feb 22, 2017 2:34 pm

    NEW DELHI: Despite India expanding its military ties with the US, Europe and Israel, Russia remains New Delhi's number one supplier of weapons with America at a distant second, according to a report on global arms trade in the last five years.

    From 2012 to 2016, Russia supplied 68 per cent of India's arms import, as per the survey by Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) - an international think-tank that researches on conflict, armaments, arms control and disaarmament.

    In the same period, the US supplied 14 per cent of arms to India, followed by Israel (7.2 per cent).

    The SIPRI report also foresees Russia maintaining the lead in supplying weapons to India - which has emerged as the biggest importer of major arms with overseas procurements exceeding that of China and Pakistan.

    "Based on existing orders and weapons, Russia will remain, by far, the main supplier of major arms to India for the foreseeable future," it said.

    "However, India expects increasing deliveries due to several major orders from France (another traditional supplier) and from the US, South Korea and Spain - all of which only recently became suppliers of major weapons to India," said the report.

    Prime Minister Narendra Modi has been making increasing efforts towards his flagship "Make in India" initiative that also endeavours to modernize the country's ageing military equipment.

    Modi has pledged $250 billion for the domestic defence industry to manufacture fighter jets, guns and submarines locally.

    But the SIPRI reports hints that India will be overwhelmingly reliant on foreign imports, mainly from Russia, the US and Israel -- as has been the trend in the last five years.

    "A major reason for the high level of imports is that India's arms industry has largely failed to produce competitive indigenously designed weapons," said the report.

    According to it, India is also the largest buyer of Russian weapons, taking home 38 per cent of Moscow's exports. It is also the largest buyer of Israel's weapons with a 41 per cent share of its exports.

    For the UK, India is the second largest buyer, with 11 per cent share of its exports.

    Significantly, India does not figure in the top three buyers of US weapons although Washington has designated New Delhi as its Major Defence Partner.

    According to the SIPRI report, 47 per cent of US weapons went to countries in the Middle East.

    Read more at:
    The five biggest arms exporters were the US, Russia, China, France and Germany, together accounting for 74 per cent of the total volume of trade in weapons in the last five years.

    Read more at:
    http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/57290157.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst
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    GarryB
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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  GarryB on Thu Feb 23, 2017 8:59 am

    Single engined F-16s... yeah right... Flanker pilots will shoot them down...

    Sorry... I now realise my above comment might have been misunderstood.

    What I was trying to suggest is that an Indian Flanker pilot sees an F-16 he will assume it is an "enemy" aircraft and his natural instinct will be to shoot it down.

    People get mistaken for game and shot all the time... it is a psychology thing.


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