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    Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

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    Sujoy
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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Sujoy on Mon Mar 24, 2014 3:28 pm

    RusHydro wins tender for design of hydroelectric station in INDIA


    Russia & India Report wrote:JSC RusHydro said it signed a contract with India’s state-owned North Eastern Electric Power Corporation Limited (NEEPCO) to design the second phase of Upper Siang hydropower project – one of the largest hydroelectric plants in Asia and the largest in India. The facility will have installed capacity of 3,750 MW and is regarded by the Indian government as a high priority national project, the company said.

    In addition, representatives of the company announced that it will participate in the tender for the construction of the same hydroelectric station – the project as a whole is estimated at $16 billion. The company’s Asian expansion has been nurtured for nearly 10 years. In the face of deteriorating conditions with the West, this vector becomes increasingly imperative.
    Under the tender, won by RusHydro, and the Hydroproject institute, the research and design will take 24 months.
    “RusHydro’s affiliate – RusHydro International India – will be the operator of the given project. This is a joint Russian-Indian enterprise with the control on the Russian side,” George Rizhinashvili, Deputy Chairman of the Management Board of RusHydro, said. “We have been preparing a long time for this and, after 20 years, Russia returns to the Indian market and the markets of the Asia-Pacific region.”


    Rizhinashvili said RudHydro would try to win a tender for the actual construction and, if successful, this would be the company’s largest overseas project. At present, RusHydro is working on two large-scale international projects. Since 2011 the company controls the cascade hydroelectric station in Armenia. In 2012 construction began on the Upper-Naryn cascade station in Kyrgyzstan, which will be commissioned in 2019.

    In the last decade, RusHydro had plans to branch out to India, Laos, Nepal and Bhutan. However, the company RusSUNHydro Limited (established in 2007 in collaboration with the Indian group SUN) did not proceed with a planned project because the projects’ indicators did not meet the demands of the shareholders’ investment policies.

    Nikita Maslennikov, an analyst from the Institute of Contemporary Development believes the new project gives an additional stimulus to the development of bilateral Russian-Indian economic relations. Against the backdrop of strained relations between Russia and the West, the revitalization of Russian companies in Asia seems logical – especially considering the Indian position on the Crimean issue. It is widely believed that India will not support US and EU sanctions on Russia.


    New engineering university in Arunachal

    RusHydro is also preparing to open a new university in the country. Rizhinashvili said, by 2015, a hydro engineering university will be opened in Arunachal Pradesh.

    This educational institution, which will have Russian faculty, will train personnel for the stations, dams, and other objects of significance. Many Russian specialists who work on Rushydro projects could double up as faculty at the institute.


    “Our Indian colleagues approached us because Russian engineering schools are considered world class. The training scheme and work of the university is being discussed, but I can already say that it will be a typical hydro engineering institute with elements of energy efficiency with different departments for the design of dams and objects of hydro technical significance,” he explained.
    Rizhinashvili did not disclose information on the number of students or departments.

    A member of the RusHydro board also said that the standards of Russian design incorporated into the Indian objects will enable Russia to enter into a leading position in the Asia-Pacific region.

    “We want to create a springboard for a group of Russian companies which will develop their construction bases in the region and implement infrastructure projects in the next 20-30 years. This is our strategic commitment,” added Rizhinashvili.


    http://indrus.in/economics/2014/03/24/rushydro_wins_tender_for_design_of_arunachal_pradesh_hydroelectric__33961.html

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    Americans worried over India's "open" support to Russia :A must read!

    Post  Indian Flanker on Mon Mar 24, 2014 3:36 pm

    http://thediplomat.com/2014/03/indian-foreign-policy-the-cold-war-lingers/


    Indian Foreign Policy: The Cold War Lingers
    By Andrew J. Stravers and Peter Harris
    The Diplomat
    March 24, 2014




    In the wake of the Vladimir Putin’s incursion into Crimea, almost every member of the international community voiced concern over Russia’s actions. While the U.S. and European Union were the most forceful in their criticism, non-Western states such as China and even Iran also made clear their support for the principles of non-intervention, state sovereignty and territorial integrity – oblique criticisms of Moscow’s disregard for cornerstone Westphalian norms. For the most part, support for Russia has been confined to the predictable incendiaries: Cuba, Venezuela and Syria, for example. Yet there is one unusual suspect among those lining up behind Putin that requires further investigation: India.

    On its face, New Delhi’s enunciation of respect for Russia’s “legitimate interests” in Crimea is a surprising blow to the prevailing U.S. policy of reaching out to India. As the largest democracy in the world, a burgeoning capitalist economy and an increasingly important military power, India has been viewed as a counterweight to China’s rise and an anchor of the U.S.-led international order. India’s support for Russia’s revisionism in Crimea, then, is something that should trouble U.S. policymakers. In the long run, India’s response to the Crimean crisis might even be remembered as one of the more important implications of the whole episode. For how India aligns in the coming multipolar world will have enormous ramifications.

    India’s support for Putin is a reminder that the West should not take India’s friendship for granted. To be sure, India made a necessary shift in tone towards the West following the collapse of the Soviet Union. India has liberalized its economy and become a strategic partner in several key areas. But the past two decades of broad cooperation should not be taken as an inexorable trend towards a complete harmonization of interests between India and the West. Amid all the talk of a renewed Cold War in Europe it has been forgotten that, for India, Cold War international relations never truly ended. In particular, the Indo-Russian relationship remains an important mainstay of Indian grand strategy – a hangover from that bygone era.

    The years following the collapse of the Soviet empire saw the U.S. mainly concerned with a failed attempt to curb India’s nuclear program. After 9/11, America’s attention was focused on partnership with India while still maintaining the confidence and cooperation of Pakistan. Both periods of engagement, however, left the Indo-U.S. relationship well short of the kind of deep cooperation that marked Indo-Soviet relations during the Cold War. The result has been that Moscow still enjoys a thoroughly positive relationship with New Delhi.

    India and Russia maintain deep cooperation on political, military and economic dimensions. Russian trade with India rivals the latter’s trade with the United States, and Indian companies have made huge investments in Russian energy firms and energy projects in the Bay of Bengal. In addition, the two nations are developing a southern route from Russia to the Arabian Sea that will increase Russian trade in the whole of the Indian Ocean region.

    Russia still provides India’s military with more than 70 percent of its weapons systems and armaments and the two are currently cooperating in the development of cruise missile systems, strike fighters and transport aircraft. Russia is one of only two countries in the world that have annual ministerial-level defense reviews with India. The two cooperate on the advancement of a space program and they have bilateral nuclear agreement worth potentially tens of billions of dollars. Such deep and expansive ties with Russia complicate India’s multifarious importance from the perspective of Washington (as a cog in the U.S. “pivot” to Asia, an indispensable ally in the War on Terror and a bustling hub of the global economy).

    After the Bush administration left office, India was heralded as one of the foreign policy success stories of his presidency. Economic relations had been deepened, diplomatic ties strengthened, a nuclear agreement signed. All indications were that India would be a stalwart American ally at a strategic nexus between the Middle East and the new focus on Asia. Historically poor relations with China would keep India safely out of the Chinese orbit. India could be relied upon to help encircle China, a vital link in a twenty-first century cordon sanitaire around the muscular Middle Kingdom.

    But India never lost sight of its historic Cold War ally and the Indian people have never fully lost their suspicion of Western powers and creeping colonialism. American policymakers may have been overly naïve in thinking that economic growth, increased trade and a nuclear deal could move India safely into the American camp. Perhaps it is true that India will never cement itself on China’s side, but the fact is that nothing has been done to erase the deep Indo-Russian ties that formed during decades of Cold War.

    Putin’s stratagem in Crimea has reminded the world that China is not the only rising or resurgent Great Power deserving of attention. As such, officials need to reconsider India’s place in American grand strategy. There is no doubt that India (itself a rising state with the potential to become a geopolitical pole in its own right) will remain a prominent player in the decades ahead. India occupies a crucial geostrategic location between a rising China, the energy producing regions of the Middle East and a newly vigorous African economy. An expanding Indian navy featuring 150 ships and multiple aircraft carriers will possess the capability to exercise veto power over key shipping choke points in the Persian Gulf, Strait of Malacca, and Suez region. Economic forecasts suggest India will surpass the GDP of the United States somewhere in the middle of the century.

    It should greatly concern the American foreign policy establishment that, at a moment when international norms are under assault by Moscow, India has chosen to (at least partially) throw its lot in with Russia. How strong can a norm of territorial integrity be without the world’s largest nation and the world’s largest democracy? How stable can the American-led global order be with such a prominent repudiation of American foreign policy preferences? The answer to both of these questions is, unfortunately, “not very.”

    What should be done? The past decade has seen a consistent focus by Washington to integrate and contain a rising China, but not enough has been done to integrate and build ties with a rising India. Simply because India is a democracy does not mean that it will automatically align itself to American preferences, and the United States must make a concerted effort to win India’s favor and goodwill in a lasting way. Until now, closeness with India has been compromised by competing demands to remain faithful to Pakistan, America’s own Cold War-era ally. Indeed, Russia’s historic support for Indian claims over Kashmir (sometimes explicit, sometimes implicit) has been no small part of Moscow’s appeal to New Delhi. Sooner or later, a new balance must be struck between U.S. commitments to these two nations. While Pakistan is integral to regional security, India’s cooperation will be essential to sustain the American vision of global governance.

    The Obama administration can lay the groundwork for a more intimate relationship with India by doing three things. First, and easiest, the United States must clear up the detention and mistreatment of Devyani Khobragade. Far greater crimes have been excused for much less than would be gained in terms of Indian public opinion if the U.S. were to show flexibility towards Khobragade. Whether charges truly are warranted or not, Washington must at least apologize for her treatment in order to mitigate the blow that has been dealt to Indian impressions of the United States.

    Second, the U.S. needs to commit itself to the establishment of a free trade agreement with India. India presents an enormous opportunity for American investment, with its stable system of property rights, consolidated democracy, and English-speaking population. An agreement will benefit both the Indian and American peoples, and intertwine the two nations to the high degree that their statures in the global economy mandate.

    Third, the United States should seriously reconsider its support for a permanent Indian seat on the United Nations Security Council. If time is running out on the post-WWII international order, it makes sense for the U.S. to exploit its waning preponderant influence and play a major role in fashioning the future of the multipolar order. By seizing the agenda and winning the friendship and trust of rising countries (especially India and Brazil) that generally abide by an American-friendly set of global rules, the United States can promote the existence of a favorable global environment of peace and prosperity for generations to come.

    Washington has been warned: India’s expression of sympathy for Russian interests in Crimea should serve as an alarm bell for American officials that a crucial player in world affairs has gone neglected. India’s enlistment as a card-carrying supporter of the existing international order simply cannot be counted upon going forward. If the U.S. wants India to serve as a bulwark of the international status quo, some form of policy change will be required. By shifting India to the front and center of American foreign policy, the United States can help to assure for itself – and the wider world – a future based on prevailing global norms rather than the designs of revisionist, illiberal and undemocratic states like Russia.


    Indian Foreign Policy: The Cold War Lingers | The Diplomat

    Indian Flanker
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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Indian Flanker on Mon Mar 24, 2014 3:41 pm

    lol! lol1

    The moment India came out "publically" in support of Russia, I knew this would happen. Look how frustrated the Yanks sound in this article. They even call Russia undemocratic.

    Also, the Americans want the decades old Indo-Russian ties to end, is very obvious from this article. They have so much malice against Russia. And India coming out openly in Putin's support has hit a nerve it seems Very Happy

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  TR1 on Mon Mar 24, 2014 9:28 pm

    America talking about global norms, LOL!

    These people have very selective memories.

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  GarryB on Tue Mar 25, 2014 9:37 am

    Hahahaha.. so India supporting Russia in this situation is a case of INDIA NOT BEING ABLE TO GET PAST THE COLD WAR!!!

    That is hilarious!

    The west has abused the sovereignty of all countries via its NSA listening stations all round the world. It has seen fit to remove regimes and indeed called such actions regime change as the goals were to remove governments by military force... countries that have nothing to do with the US.

    The idea that the US will drop its cold war alliance with Pakistan to improve relations with India should show India what sort of loyalty it should expect from the US in the future.

    The US policy seems to be based on the premise that all democratic countries will eventually see things the way the US sees them and become a staunch US ally... the critical issue here is that US foreign policy is about the US's best interests and therefore nothing to do with peace and democracy and stability and all the BS they go on about.

    If they want India to support them then they should not have ignored their principles and tried an orange coup in the Ukraine. the Orange revolution didn't work and now they are seizing power illegally and trying to make Russia out to be the bad guy.

    It is the emperors new clothes and his so called friends wont tell him he is an idiot and an A$$hole... India and Russia will tell him... but he doesn't listen to them. The question of course is are the US allies laughing when they support him and tell him what nice clothes he wears today, or do they just want to keep him happy so they can stay close and get as many crumbs from his table as they can.


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    ― Samuel P. Huntington, The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Viktor on Tue Mar 25, 2014 10:17 am

    They would not be the best pals to World most un-democratic nation if they where all freedom and democracy about


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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Indian Flanker on Wed Mar 26, 2014 9:19 am

    Russia is a regional power: Obama

    President Barack Obama has described Russia as no more than a "regional power" whose actions in Ukraine are an expression of weakness rather than strength, as he restated the threat from the G7 western allies and Japan that they would inflict much broader sanctions if Vladimir Putin went beyond annexation of Crimea and moved troops into eastern Ukraine.

    "Russia is a regional power that is threatening some of its immediate neighbours, not out of strength but out of weakness," the president said. The US also has influence over its neighbours, he added, but: "We generally don't need to invade them in order to have a strong cooperative relationship with them.

    http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/mar/25/barack-obama-russia-regional-power-ukraine-weakness


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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  TR1 on Wed Mar 26, 2014 9:52 am

    Yeah, the US sticks to invading nations thousands of miles away usually.


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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  flamming_python on Wed Mar 26, 2014 11:23 am

    America is just upset that it's hegemony that it has enjoyed since 1991 is now under serious threat.
    Like the barbarian kings who stopped paying tribute to and gaining the approval of Rome, so too will countries stop listening to the US.
    China in particular is going to start being more assertive and doing more of what it wants. Iran will be emboldened too, Argentina, Venuzuela, etc... that's what really scares America.
    Just a month ago in Venezuela there was another US-sponsored revolution attempt fueled by youth anger (present in many countries of course). Venezuela is going to give even less of a damn of the US after this, if that's even possible.

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    Russia - India Strategic Partnership news:

    Post  George1 on Mon Apr 07, 2014 11:54 pm

    Russia and India

    Political relations

    The first major political initiative, since the collapse of the Soviet Union, between India and Russia began with the Strategic Partnership signed between the two countries in 2000. President Vladimir Putin stated in an article written by him in the Hindu, "The Declaration on Strategic Partnership between India and Russia signed in October 2000 became a truly historic step".[17][18] Prime Minister Manmohan Singh also agreed with his counterpart by stated in speech given during President Putin's 2012 visit to India, "President Putin is a valued friend of India and the original architect of the India-Russia strategic partnership".[19] Both countries closely collaborate on matters of shared national interest these include at the UN, BRICS, G20 and SCO where India has observer status and has been asked by Russia to become a full member.[8] Russia also strongly supports India receiving a permanent seat on the United Nations Security Council.[9] In addition, Russia has vocal backed India joining the NSG[20] and APEC.[21] Moreover, it has also expressed interest in joining SAARC with observer status in which India is a founding member.[11][22]

    Russia currently is one of only two countries in the world (the other being Japan) that has a mechanism for annual ministerial-level defence reviews with India.[1] The Indo-Russian Inter-Governmental Commission (IRIGC), which is one of the largest and comprehensive governmental mechanisms that India has had with any country internationally. Almost every department from the Government of India attends it.

    The Indo-Russian Inter-Governmental Commission (IRIGC) is the main body that conducts affairs at the governmental level between both countries.[7] Some have described it as the steering committee of Indo-Russia relations.[7] It is divided into two parts, the first covering Trade, Economic, Scientific, Technological and Cultural Co-operation. This is normally co-chaired by the Russian Deputy Prime Minister and the Indian External Affairs Minister. The second part of the commission covers Military Technical Co-operation this is co-chaired by the two countries respective Defence Ministers. Both parts of IRIGC meet annually.[7]

    In addition, to the IRIGC there are other bodies that conduct economic relations between the two countries. These include, the Indo-Russian Forum on Trade and Investment, the India-Russia Business Council, the India-Russia Trade, Investment and Technology Promotion Council and the India-Russia Chamber of Commerce.[23]

    Military relationship

    Defence relations between India and the Russian Federation have a historical perspective. The Soviet Union was an important supplier of defence equipment for several decades, and that relationship was inherited by Russia after the break-up of the Soviet Union. In 1997, Russian and India signed a ten-year agreement for further military-technical cooperation. That agreement encompassed a wide range of activities, including the purchase of completed weaponry, joint development and production, and joint marketing of armaments and military technologies.[24]

    Today, the co-operation is not limited to a buyer-seller relationship but includes joint research and development, training, service to service contacts, including joint exercises. The last joint naval exercises took place in April 2007 in the Sea of Japan and joint airborne exercises were held in September 2007 in Russia. The last military exercise between Russian and Indian army units were held in Uttarakhand in October 2010. However, the bilateral relations seem to be strained with Russia cancelling both its 'Indra' series of military exercises with India for the year 2011. In April 2011, a flotilla of five warships from the Indian navy's eastern fleet that went for joint naval exercises to Vladivostok in the Russian far-east, was turned back without any manoeuvres. The joint army exercises scheduled to be held in Russia in June, 2011 was also cancelled shortly afterwards. One of the reasons given was that the MoD had not informed Moscow of the army exercises in advance.[25]

    An Inter-Governmental commission on military-technical co-operation is co-chaired by the defence ministers of the two countries. The seventh session of this Inter-Governmental Commission was held in October 2007 in Moscow. During the visit, an agreement on joint development and production of prospective multi-role fighters was signed between the two countries.

    An India–Russia co-operation agreement was signed in December 1988. It has resulted in the sale of a multitude of defence equipment to India and also the emergence of the countries as development partners as opposed to purely a buyer-seller relationship. Two programmes that evidence this approach are the projects to form Indian-Russian joint ventures to develop and produce the Fifth Generation Fighter Aircraft (FGFA) and the Multirole Transport Aircraft (MTA). The agreement is pending a 10-year extension.

    India and Russia have several major joint military programmes including:

    BrahMos cruise missile programme
    5th generation fighter jet programme
    Sukhoi Su-30MKI programme (230+ to be built by Hindustan Aeronautics)
    Ilyushin/HAL Tactical Transport Aircraft

    Additionally, India has purchased/leased various military hardware from Russia:

    T-90S Bhishma with over 1000 to be built in India
    Akula-II nuclear submarine (2 to be leased with an option to buy when the lease expires)
    INS Vikramaditya aircraft carrier programme
    Tu-22M3 bombers (4 ordered)
    US$900 million upgrade of MiG-29
    Mil Mi-17 (80 ordered)
    Ilyushin Il-76 Candid (6 ordered to fit Israeli Phalcon radar)

    In May 2011, Russia cancelled joint army and naval exercises with India allegedly in response to the elimination of Mikoyan MiG-35 from the Indian MRCA competition.[25][27] An Indian Navy report to the Ministry of Defence referred to Russia as a fair-weather friend and recommended the review of Russia's status as a strategic partner.[25] Both countries signed a defence deal worth $2.9 billion during President Putin's visit to India in December 2012. The 42 new Sukhois, to be produced under licence by defence PSU Hindustan Aeronautics, will add to the 230 Sukhois earlier contracted from Russia. Overall, the price tag for the 272 Sukhois - three of the over 170 inducted till now have crashed - stands at over $12 billion.The medium-lift Mi-17 V5 helicopters (59 for IAF and 12 for home ministry/BSF) will add to the 80 such choppers already being inducted under a $1.34 billion deal inked in 2008. The value of India's defence projects with Russia will further zoom north after the imminent inking of the final design contract for the joint development of a futuristic stealth fifth-generation fighter. This R&D contract is itself pegged at US$11 billion, to be shared equally by the two countries. So if India inducts over 200 of these 5th Gen fighters, as it hopes to do from 2022 onwards, the overall cost of this gigantic project for India will come to around US$35 billion since each of the jets will come for upwards of US$100 million at least.

    Economic relations

    Bilateral trade turnover is modest and stood at US$3 billion in 2006–07, of which Indian exports to Russia were valued at US$908 million. The major Indian exports to Russia are pharmaceuticals; tea, coffee and spices; apparel and clothing; edible preparations; and engineering goods. Main Indian imports from Russia are iron and steel; fertilisers; non-ferrous metals; paper products; coal, coke & briquettes; cereals; and rubber. Indo-Russian trade is expected to reach US$10 billion by 2010.

    The India-Russia Inter-Governmental Commission on Trade, Economic, Scientific, Technological and Cultural Co-operation (IRIGC) is co-chaired by India's External Affairs Minister and the Russian Deputy Prime Minister. There are six Joint Working Groups [WG] under the IRIGC, namely, WG on Trade and Economy [trade and financial matters], WG on Energy [oil and gas, thermal and hydel power, non-conventional energy], WG on Metallurgy and Mining [steel, non-ferrous metal, coal], WG on Science & Technology; WG on Communication and Information Technology; and WG on Culture and Tourism. The 13th of the IRIGC was held in Moscow on 12 October 2007.
    The India Trade Promotion Organization in Moscow, Russia

    The two countries have set up India-Russia Forum on Trade and Investment at the level of the two Commerce Ministers to promote trade, investment and economic co-operation. The first Forum was held in New Delhi on 12–13 February 2007, which was attended by the Minister of Commerce and Industry and the Russian Minister of Economic Development and Trade, apart from a large number of business representatives from both sides. The Minister of Commerce & Industry, Shri Kamal Nath participated in the 11th Saint Petersburg International Economic Forum on 9–10 June 2007.

    In February 2006, India and Russia also set up a Joint Study Group to examine ways to increase trade to US$10 billion by 2010 and to study feasibility of a Comprehensive Economic Cooperation Agreement (CECA). The group finalised its report after its fourth meeting in Moscow in July 2007. It has been agreed that a Joint Task Force would monitor the implementation of the recommendation made in the Joint Study Group Report, including considering CECA. The second BRIC summit was held in Brasília in April 2010. India and Russia agreed to jointly study a Comprehensive Economic Co-operation Agreement with Belarus-Kazakhstan with the aim of boosting trade ties and achieving the ambitious trade target of $20 billion by 2015.[28] Prime Minister Manmohan Singh stated in speech given during President Putin's 2012 visit to India, "Our bilateral trade has grown by over 30 per cent this year. There is still untapped potential in areas such as pharmaceuticals, fertilisers, mining, steel, information technology, civil aviation, telecommunications, infrastructure, food processing, innovation and services, which we will work to exploit".[29]

    Due to India simplifying recent visa rule changes for Russians travelling to India, the number of tourists increase by over 22%.[30] In 2011 the Indian consulates in Moscow, Vladivostok and St. Petersburg issued 160,000 visas an increase of over 50% compared to 2010.[31]

    The table below shows the recent Indo-Russian bilateral trade performance:
    Indo-Russian trade (2009-12)
    Year Trade Volume (Billion $) Annual Change
    2009 $7.46[32]
    2010 $8.53[33] +14.34%
    2011 $8.87[34] +3.98%
    2012 $11.04[35] +24.50%

    Co-operation in the Energy sector

    Energy sector is an important area in Indo-Russian bilateral relations. In 2001, ONGC-Videsh acquired 20% stake in the Sakhalin-I oil and gas project in the Russian Federation, and has invested about US $1.7 billion in the project. The Russian company Gazprom and Gas Authority of India. have collaborated in joint development of a block in the Bay of Bengal. Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project with two units of 1000 MW each is a good example of Indo-Russian nuclear energy co-operation. Both sides have expressed interest in expanding co-operation in the energy sector.

    In December 2008, Russia and India signed an agreement to build civilian nuclear reactors in India during a visit by the Russian president to New Delhi.[36]
    Space Co-operation
    India and Russia both have signed agreements for cooperation and use of GLONASS

    Space is another key sector of collaboration between the two countries. During President Vladimir Putin's visit to India in December 2004, two space-related bilateral agreements were signed viz. Inter-Governmental umbrella Agreement on co-operation in the outer space for peaceful purposes and the Inter Space Agency Agreement on co-operation in the Russian satellite navigation system GLONASS. Subsequently a number of follow-up agreements on GLONASS have been signed. In November 2007, the two countries have signed an agreement on joint lunar exploration. These space co-operation programmes are under implementation. Chandrayaan-2 is a joint lunar exploration mission proposed by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the Russian Federal Space Agency (RKA) and has a projected cost of 4.25 billion (US$90 million). The mission, proposed to be launched in 2013 by a Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) launch vehicle, includes a lunar orbiter and a rover made in India as well as one lander built by Russia.
    Science and Technology

    The ongoing collaboration in the field of science & technology, under the Integrated Long-Term Programme of Co-operation (ILTP) is the largest co-operation programme in this sphere for both India and Russia. ILTP is coordinated by the Department of Science and Technology from the Indian side and by the Russian Academy of Sciences and Russian Ministry of Industry & Science and Technology from the Russian side. Development of SARAS Duet aircraft, semiconductor products, super computers, poly-vaccines, laser science and technology, seismology, high-purity materials, software & IT and Ayurveda have been some of the priority areas of co-operation under the ILTP. Under this programme, eight joint Indo-Russian centres have been established to focus on joint research and development work. Two other Joint Centres on Non-ferrous Metals and Accelerators and Lasers are being set up in India. A Joint Technology Centre based in Moscow to bring cutting edge technologies to the market is also under processing. An ILTP Joint Council met in Moscow on 11–12 October 2007 to review co-operation and give it further direction. In August 2007, an MoU was signed between Department of Science and Technology and Russian Foundation of Basic Research, Moscow to pursue scientific co-operation.

    The "North-South" Transport Corridor Agreement [INSTC] has been ratified by all the three original signatory states, viz. India, Iran and Russia, and has come into force since 16 May 2002. This route is expected to reduce the cost of movement of goods between India and Russia and beyond. The 3rd Coordination Council Meeting of the INSTC was held in October 2005 in New Delhi and the 4th meeting was held in Aktau, Kazakhstan in October 2007 to discuss further streamlining the operation of the corridor.[37]

    In 2011, Iran and Russia agreed to make every effort to develop bilateral and multilateral cooperation in road, rail, air and marine transportation.[38] In 2012, Rasia FZE was awarded the Armenia-Iran railway project and the southern section of the North-South Road Corridor, which will complete the key missing link in the International North–South Transport Corridor.

    Cooperation in the Cultural Sphere

    India–Russia relations in the field of culture are historical. Prominent Russian painter and philosopher Nicholas Roerich was influenced by the philosophy of Ramakrishna and Vivekananda, the poetry of Rabindranath Tagore, and the Bhagavad Gita. He spent his last life in Kullu, Himachal Pradesh. The 130th birth anniversary of Nicholas Roerich and 100th birth anniversary of Svetoslav Roerich were celebrated in India in October 2004. Notable Russian Indologists like Eugene Chelyshev and Gury Marchuk were awarded the Sahitya Akademi Fellowship by the Government of India.
    Russian President Dmitry Medvedev on the sets of Ra.One

    Days of Russian Culture were held in India in November 2003, in Delhi, Kolkata and Mumbai. "Days of Indian Culture" in Russia were organised from September to October 2005 in Russia. Chief Minister of National Capital Territory of Delhi led a delegation for participating in the event "Days of Delhi in Moscow" from 28 May 1 June 2006. The "Year of Russia in India" was held in 2008. It was followed by the "Year of India in Russia" in 2009. There is a Hindi Department, in the University of Moscow along with five Chairs relating to Indology in Moscow, Saint Petersburg, Kazan and Vladivostok.
    Terrorism

    On international terrorism, India and Russia agree that there is no justification for terrorism, and this must be fought against, without compromise and wherever it exists. Russia has supported the Indian draft at the UN on Comprehensive Convention on International Terrorism [CCIT]. The two sides signed a MoU on co-operation in combating terrorism in December 2002. A Joint Working Group on Combating International Terrorism meets from time to time and its fourth meeting was held in Delhi on 24 October 2006.Both Russia and India have faced the problem of terrorism, India has seen it in the context of its military presence in Kashmir and Russia has seen it in Chechnya and both the countries are supportive of each other on the issue of terrorism.
    Nuclear Deals

    Construction of the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant in 2009

    On 7 November 2009, India signed a new nuclear deal with Russia apart from the deals that were agreed upon by the two countries earlier.India and Russia are in discussion for construction of two more nuclear power units at Kudankulam. The two units already set up are ready for operation.[40] During Russian president Vladimir Putin's visit to India for the 13th annual summit, a co-operative civilian nuclear energy road map was agreed to. Running until 2030, sixteen to eighteen new reactors will be constructed, with installed capacity of 1000 MW each. A 1000 MW reactor costs around $2.5 billion so the deal may touch $45 billion in worth.

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Indian Flanker on Tue Apr 08, 2014 10:28 am

    Russians are very proud people. So, after what happened in 2011(India going for Rafale), did strain the relationship. However, now everything seems to be back on track. Very Happy

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Sujoy on Sat Apr 12, 2014 10:50 am

    India, Russia sign $ 5 Billion agreement to construct 2 units of Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant project

    Times Of India wrote:After years of deadlock on liability issue, India and Russia have signed an agreement for building units 3 and 4 of the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant project (KKNPP) at a cost of Rs 33,000 crore.

    The Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd (NPCIL) signed a general framework agreement (GFA) with its Russian counterpart on Thursday, sources said here today.

    However, some permissions are required from Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AREB) before work on the project could actually start, they said.

    Units 3 and 4 of the KKNPP have stuck over the "Right to Recourse" clause of the Civil Liability Nuclear Damage Act 2010 (CLND) as the Russians have been apprehensive over it.

    In October last year, the deal could not be signed over the same issue when Prime Minister Manmohan Singh visited Russia due to lack consensus over the issue between both the countries.

    However, the issue has been sorted out after hectic negotiations.

    Last month, DAE secretary R K Singh along with other senior officers of the department had a meeting here with the Russian counterparts in which the breakthrough was made.

    Things were expedited and the proposal was moved before the Cabinet Committee on Security last month. The atomic energy department wanted to seek permission of the Election Commission as polls were declared a week later.

    "We wanted to play safe and did not want any kind of hurdle as the project has already been delayed for a long time," the sources said.

    "KKNPP 1 and 2 also got commissioned during the Manmohan Singh tenure and the government wanted this agreement to be signed at the earliest," the sources added.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/India-Russia-finally-sign-agreement-on-Kudankulam-3-4-units/articleshow/33623262.cms

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Viktor on Sat Apr 12, 2014 11:41 am

    Great  thumbsup 

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Cyberspec on Sun Apr 13, 2014 8:34 am

    Yeah good news

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  George1 on Thu May 22, 2014 10:34 pm

    Russia, India sign deal to build two units of Kudankulam NPP

    Russia and India have signed a general framework agreement to build the third and fourth units of the Kudankulam nuclear power plant, Rosatom director-general has said, according to Itar-Tass.

    Earlier, Indian mass media reported on the signing of the agreement.

    "We'll be able to settle all disagreements. On April 19 the agreement was signed," Sergei Kiriyenko said on Thursday.

    In early May the Kudankulam nuclear power plant's first unit reached 90% of its operating capacity.

    After the permission is gotten it will reach full capacity (1,000 MWt).

    India has approved a large-scale programme for developing nuclear power engineering. Till 2017 nineteen nuclear power plants’ units with the capacity of 17,400 MWt are planned to be built. Eight units will be constructed with the participation of other countries.

    In 2010 Russia and India signed a roadmap for building up to 14-16 Russian-design power units in India.

    The Kudankulam nuclear power plant being built with Russia’s assistance can withstand a strong earthquake or tsunami, members of the government committee for the evaluation of the nuclear power plant's safety said.

    However the commissioning of the first stage of the Kudankulam nuclear power plant scheduled for late 2011 was delayed by mass protests that demanded its closure.

    India is planning to build 19 nuclear power units with a combined capacity of 17,400 MWe by 2017. Eight of them will be built in cooperation with other countries. Russia will help to build units 3 and 4 at the Kudankulam nuclear power plant. Each will have a capacity of 1,000 MWt.

    The construction of Unit 2 is almost completed. Rosatom Head Kiriyenko said earlier that Unit No. 2 would be commissioned by the summer of 2013. “All the rest depends on when the Indian side makes the decision,” he added.

    He also said that the coordination of commercial terms of building units 3 and 4 at the Kudankulam nuclear power plant had been completed. “We earlier signed an agreement on a loan to India to build Units 3 and 4. The technical parameters have also been approved,” he said.

    The Kudankulam NPP will supply electricity not only to the state of Tamil Nadu, where it is located, but also the whole south of India.
    Read more: http://voiceofrussia.com/news/2014_05_22/Russia-India-sign-deal-to-build-two-units-of-Kudankulam-NPP-9546/

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Sujoy on Fri Jul 18, 2014 7:40 pm

    Two space satellites for India to be made in Russia

    Private sector cooperation between Russia and India received a boost on Wednesday July 16, when an agreement for the manufacture of two space satellites was signed between Dauria Aerospace and Bangalore-based Aniara Communications.
    A contract on the on the design and production of the satellites was signed on the sidelines of the Farnborough International Airshow in the UK.

    “Small satellites are an ideal solution if there is the lack of the needed volumes of satellite communication and broadcasting that India has at present,” Aniara President Raghu Das said.

    “Small spacecraft make it possible to profitably service small markets that are unprofitable for heavier and costly geostationary systems,” Dauria Aerospace added in a statement.

    Deputy head of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) Denis Lykov said that the agency supports new private players in the sector as this would improve Russia’s export potential. “The signing of the deal is an important step for the formation of Russia’s new space economy and we are ready to support such companies as Dauria Aerospace in the national market and outside it,” he said.

    Dauria Aerospace is a multinational aerospace company providing global satellite-based remote sensing information services through the deployment of small satellite constellations. The company develops and manufactures new generation low-cost small satellites to bring Earth imaging data and communication services directly to its customers. Additionally, by using design innovation and leveraging the rapid technology advances in smallsat components, Dauria develops lower-cost and higher performing satellites. Dauria has two satellite development centres at NASA’s Research Park at Ames Research Centre in California and in Skolkovo, Russia.

    In early July, Russia placed into orbit the first Russian private satellite DX1, made by Dauria Aerospace for the automatic ship location system.

    Aniara was established in 2001 to advise and support global telecommunications and high technology enterprises expand their activities in emerging markets in Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. Aniara has offices in the United States and Bangalore, and concentrates on the communications and high technology industries and in particular the satellite sector, including satellite-based services and applications over fixed and mobile satellite systems and terrestrial networks. Aniara represents a variety of industry-recognised clients, including DTH and FTA broadcasters, telcos and carriers, system integrators, governments, and VSAT operators.

    The companies did not disclose the deal value. Russia and India have set a trade target of $20 billion over the next few years, and have put the onus on the burgeoning private sector in both countries.

    http://in.rbth.com/economics/2014/07/18/two_space_satellites_for_india_to_be_made_in_russia_36783.html

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Hannibal Barca on Fri Aug 01, 2014 9:20 pm

    I like the man who governs India. I was observing him during the Brazil summit and he was passionate. He meant for serious business!

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  George1 on Sat Aug 16, 2014 11:42 pm

    Russia, India to Start Construction of Passenger Airliner - United Aircraft Corporation

    MOSCOW, August 16 (RIA Novosti) - Russia’s Sukhoi Aviation Holding Company (JSC) and its Indian partners plan to embark on the joint construction of multipurpose transport airliner, United Aircraft Corporation's President Mikhail Pogosyan said Saturday.

    “In 2013 we finished the stage of preliminary design. Today we are at the stage of discussing further implementation program and shifting to engineering development,” Pogosyan said.

    He added that the final schedule has yet to be defined “based on the talks that will be held between us and our colleagues.”

    Sukhoi - is Russia’s major aircraft holding company, employing more than 26,000 people. 100 percent of stock of the Sukhoi Aviation Holding Company (JSC) belongs to the United Aircraft Corporation (JSC). The Company supports a complete cycle of work in aircraft engineering: from front end engineering to comprehensive aftersales support.

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  George1 on Tue Aug 26, 2014 1:32 am

    Russian-Indian Aviaindra air force maneuvers to begin August 29

    MOSCOW, August 25. /ITAR-TASS/. The Aviaindra joint Russian-Indian maneuvers will be launched on Friday, August 29, spokesperson for the Russian Air Force Igor Klimov told reporters on Monday.

    The active phase of the drills will be held at the Pogonovo range in the Voronezh region and Ashuluk range in the Astrakhan region.

    According to the official, Indian military have already arrived in Russia.

    “August 25-29, Indian pilots in the Lipetsk aviation centre will study the areas of the forthcoming flights and drill piloting on modern simulators, and air defense specialists will get familiarized with the air defense missile systems at the Gatchina training centre of the antiaircraft missile troops,” Klimov said.

    The exercise scenario envisages the Russian-Indian crews’ joint flights with firing on ground targets. The flights will be performed on the Sukhoi Su-30SM fighters and Mil Mi-35 and Mi-8 helicopters, with the fighters’ aerial refueling. “In addition, joint air defense crews at the Ashuluk range will repel a simulated enemy’s air attack with launches of missiles from the S-400, S-300, Buk-M1 air defense missile weapon systems and the Pantsir-S1 anti-aircraft missile and gun system.

    Klimov said the maneuvers will last until September 5. Commander-in-Chief of the Russian Air Force Colonel General Viktor Bondarev is in command of the exercise.

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  George1 on Tue Aug 26, 2014 12:15 pm

    Indian Troops Arrive in Russia for Air Force Drills

    MOSCOW, August 25 (RIA Novosti) - Indian troops have arrived in Russia’s Lipetsk to take part in the joint Air Force exercise Aviaindra 2014, held August 25 to September 5, Russian Defense Ministry spokesman Col. Igor Klimov told the press Monday.

    “From August 25 to September 5, 2014 a joint Russian-Indian exercise Aviaindra 2014 will be held on the Russian territory under the Air Force commander-in-chief’s leadership. The official starting date of the drills is August 29, 2014. Before that, the Indian pilots will examine the areas of the upcoming flights and practice piloting skills on modern simulators in the Lipetsk State Aviation Center, while anti-aircraft personnel will familiarize with anti-aircraft missile systems in the Air Force Training Center in Gatchina [Leningrad Region],” Klimov said.

    The drills’ scenario involves joint flights with mixed Russian-Indian crews on Su-30 SM “Flanker-C” aircraft, Mil Mi-35 “Hind E” and Mi-8 “Hip” helicopters at Pogonovo and Ashuluk testing ranges in the Voronezh and Astrakhan regions respectively. Su-30 SM “Flanker-C” crews will also carry out air refueling from the Ilyushin Il-78 “Midas” aerial refueling tanker while the mixed anti-aircraft teams will repel a simulated aggressor’s attack with the S-300 (SA-10) “Grumble” and S-400 (SA-21) “Growler” anti-aircraft systems, the Buk-M1 “Grizzly” surface-to-air missile system and the Pantsir-S1 (SA-22) “Greyhound” surface-to-air missile/anti-aircraft artillery systems.

    On July 17-19, Russia and India conducted the joint naval exercise Indra 2014 in Vladivostok. The Indian fleet included the INS Ranvijay destroyer, the INS Shivalik frigate and INS Shakti fleet tanker. Russia deployed the Varyag guided-missile cruiser, the Admiral Vinogradov destroyer and the Peresvet large landing ship.

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Mike E on Fri Aug 29, 2014 11:13 pm

    Russia, India to Continue Joint Air Force Drills in November - Moscow

    LIPETSK, August 29 (RIA Novosti) - The second phase of joint Russian-Indian Air Force exercise “Aviaindra-2014” is set to take place in India in November, deputy chief of the Russian Air Force's General Staff, Aleksandr Lyapkin, told reporters Friday.
    “The second phase of the exercise will take place in India after the end of monsoon season, on November 10-21. The location isn't known yet, this will become clear in October, when planning is finished,” Lyapkin said.
    Russia is currently hosting the first ever Russian-Indian air force drills, which involve joint flights with mixed Russian-Indian crews on Su-30 SM “Flanker-C” aircraft and Mil Mi-35 “Hind E” helicopters. The Indian troops arrived in Russia on August 25.
    The drills are taking place at the Pogonovo and Ashuluk testing ranges in Voronezh and Astrakhan regions. Flanker-C crews are to carry out air refueling training, while helicopter crews work on extinguishing fires and conducting search and rescue missions.
    According to Indian Air Commodore Ajay Rathore, the Indian Air Force uses Su-30MKI, MiG-21, Mi-35 and other types of Russian-produced aircraft at home, with which they are satisfied.
    “We have been using Russian military equipment for over 40 years, but this is the first time we conduct joint air drills, though we should have done it a long time ago. We have big hopes for this kind of pilot trainings. We would like to share our experience with our Russian colleagues and learn from their experiences using prospective aircrafts. I hope that ‘Aviaindra’ will be the first of many joint trainings,” Rathore said.
    Russia and India are major partners in the field of military cooperation. Over 70 percent of all military equipment used by the Indian Armed Forces was produced in Russia or the Soviet Union. According to estimates made by the Russian Federal Service for Military-Technical Cooperation, Russia provided India with $4.78 billion in military technology in 2013. In November 2013, the “Vikramaditya” Russian aircraft carrier (formerly known as the “Admiral Gorshkov”) was commissioned to India. The warship was purchased for a record-breaking $2.35 billion.
    Russia and India are currently working on contracts to export the newest Sukhoi and Mikoyan fighter aircraft to India. Russia intends to supply India with Beriev A-50 airborne early warning aircraft as well.
    The countries are also working together to develop new weapons. The Russian-Indian BrahMos Aerospace joint venture has created the “BrahMos” supersonic cruise missile, which has been used by the Indian Armed Forces since 2006. The countries have agreed to jointly develop a fifth-generation fighter jet and military transport aircraft.

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Mike E on Fri Aug 29, 2014 11:16 pm

    India to Take Part in Aviadarts-2015 Flight Skills Competition

    MOSCOW, August 29 (RIA Novosti) - India has confirmed its participation in the Aviadarts flight-skills competition hosted by Russia, Deputy Chief of the Main Staff of Russian Air Force Major General Alexander Lyapkin told RIA Novosti.
    “In 2015, another flight skills competition will take place, and an Indian crew plans to take part in it. As you can remember, this year China and Belarus participated in the contest,” Lyapkin said.
    Indian pilot Adzhai Rakhtor confirmed Lyapkin’s statement.
    Friday was the official opening ceremony for the Aviaindra-2014 joint Russian-Indian air force exercise, which last until September 5.
    During the opening ceremony, the Sokoly Rossii (Falcons of Russia) Russian aerobatic team performed for the Indian guests.
    The scenario for the exercise involves joint flights with mixed Russian-Indian crews on Su-30 SM “Flanker-C” aircraft, Mil Mi-35 “Hind E” and Mi-8 “Hip” helicopters at the Pogonovo and Ashuluk testing ranges in Voronezh and Astrakhan regions respectively. Su-30 SM “Flanker-C” crews will also carry out air refueling from the Ilyushin Il-78 “Midas” aerial refueling tanker while mixed anti-aircraft teams repel a simulated attack with the S-300 (SA-10) “Grumble” and S-400 (SA-21) “Growler” anti-aircraft systems, the Buk-M1 “Grizzly” surface-to-air missile system and the Pantsir-S1 (SA-22) “Greyhound” surface-to-air missile/anti-aircraft artillery systems.

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    India and Australia partnership?

    Post  Vann7 on Tue Sep 02, 2014 2:56 pm

    What up with India , they now siding with Australia for a nuclear project and Not Russia?
    Is this the first sign of things to come between India - Russian relations?  That is
    India no longer being a close partner with Russia?

    http://actualidad.rt.com/actualidad/view/139023-india-acuerdo-nuclear-australia-fukushima


    https://translate.google.com

    This is why i do not see a chance of BRICS nations to ever replacing the western financing system..
    You see NATO nations always give preference to buy things withing the organization and not to the competition..
    But when it comes to India .. they marry no one.. and its total neutrality make them an unreliable partner in times
    of of crisis.

    You have inner looking countries like China and India ,that do not think in terms allies...or making a difference
    in the world.. instead more interested in Self benefits ..regardless and loyal to no one.. it was just years ago..
    India sealed a deal with France for $10 billions and another with Americans for helicopters ditching Russia .. that created a major distance between Russia and India relations ..making Russia to look into pakistan to sell the weapons to them.. Something that alarmed India leadership for the colding in the relations.


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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  GarryB on Wed Sep 03, 2014 4:18 am

    Australia is only involved because it exports Uranium.

    Once Russia gets some fast breeder reactors into service enriched Uranium should not be in short supply...


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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Mike E on Wed Sep 03, 2014 4:23 am

    Yep, that "nucluur stuff" sure is valuable! At least until Thorium comes along...

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