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    Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

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    GarryB

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  GarryB on Mon Aug 15, 2016 3:21 am

    The Tu-22 is a very old bomber type with externally mounted podded engines near the vertical tail surface.

    The Tu-22M3, which is the aircraft we are talking about is a heavy theatre bomber with half the range of the strategic Soviet/Russian bombers, but a rather decent bomb payload.

    If India reequips these aircraft with inflight refuelling systems they their range performance would be greatly increased.

    Needless to say on the Auspower website there is a chart comparing the Tu-22M3 with the F-111, which is Mr Kopps favourite aircraft and the Backfire is shown in comparison to equivalent alternative Australian options... namely one Tu-22M3 is equivalent to two F-111s with an inflight refuelling tanker, or four F-35s and two inflight refuelling tankers... and that assumes the Tu-22M3 has no inflight refuelling capability...

    In Indian service there is no reason why inflight refuelling capability could not be reinstalled.


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    Pinto

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    India’s needs helped power Russian military innovation

    Post  Pinto on Fri Aug 19, 2016 12:18 pm

    Being at the crossroads of politics, diplomacy and commerce, Russia-India defence cooperation has always occupied a special place in the entire structure of bilateral relations.

    On the one hand, the supply of Russian arms to India is a clear indicator of intensive political cooperation between the two countries, as well as a high level of trust between New Delhi and Moscow.

    On the other hand, against the backdrop of rather modest economic cooperation, trade in military goods fills the relations of strategic partnership with real commercial content.

    After India surpassed China as the largest buyer of Russian defence products in 2007, New Delhi has remained the largest foreign customer of the Russian defence establishment. On average, according to estimates, India makes up almost 35% of Russian arms exports.

    In the 1990s, Indian orders gave a powerful impetus to the innovative development of the Russian defence industry. India was one of the first to shift to a new paradigm of demand on the arms market when non-standard mass production systems were ordered, and arms were made to order according to individual customer requirements. The Indian armed forces were able to articulate very high, but realistic requests.

    While projects such as the Su-30MKI fighters, carrier-based MiG-29K fighters, Talwar-class frigates were being executed, Indian military requirements stretched to the limit the design and technological capabilities of Russian developers and manufacturers. However, they did not exceed their capabilities, thereby creating weapons systems required by India within a reasonable time.

    Indian buyers at the time ran high, but reasonable technical risks. As a result, the Indian and then the Russian Armed Forces received first-class weapons systems, which still remain modern today. No other Russian arms importer has had such a positive innovation impact.

    The vast majority of India’s economic, industrial, technological and military strengthening also meets Russia's national interests.

    China, for example, which was the leading buyer of Russian weapons till 2007, usually bought either the standard system, or the systems, that had passed conservative modernization. The only segment where Chinese demand was most concentrated was modern solutions in air defence, for which China has become the first customer for the C-300PMU-2 and is likely to be the first foreign operator of the C-400.

    Russia is a significant source of weapons and technologies for India. Russia has always been willing to transfer to India not just finished products, but production technologies. The re-assignment of licences and organization of production of defence products of Soviet and Russian design is not a recent phenomenon, but a practice that began in the 1970s, when licenced production of India’s MiG-21s was organized.

    In this sense, Russia has been implementing the ‘Make in India’ a policy for nearly half a century. It is not altruism on Russia’s side. The fundamental basis of Moscow’s attitude to the question of the transfer of military technology to India is the phenomenal complementarity of the Russian and Indian military-political interests.

    India’s maximum economic, industrial, technological and military strengthening meets Russia's national interests. In addition, Russia has been cooperating with India not only in the segment of conventional tactical weapons, but also in sub-strategic and strategic systems. This cooperation is of vital importance for India’s development of military capabilities and its transformation into a global military player.

    The classic examples of this are, of course, the leasing of the Soviet and Russian multipurpose nuclear submarines and the construction for the Indian Navy of the ‘Vikramaditya’ aircraft carrier. This kind of cooperation can and should develop.

    The preservation of a large group of non-nuclear submarines is a closed chapter for the Indian Navy. When economic opportunities allow, military needs and geography dictate the need to establish a nuclear submarine fleet. After all, attack nuclear submarines and aircraft carriers, along with the weaponry provide dominance in the seas, while the conventional submarine is rather a solution for defensive tasks. There is no doubt that Russia will provide India with all the necessary assistance in the building of nuclear submarines.

    Finally, unlike some other major players in the Indian defence products market, Russia has consistently limited itself in the deployment of large-scale military-technical cooperation with Pakistan. Neither the US, supplying Pakistan with the modern and effective F-16 fighter, which is the strike core of the Pakistan Air Force, nor France, whose submarines form the basis of Pakistan's submarine fleet, take into account the concerns of India's rising military power vis-à-vis this artificial and unstable state.

    Russia's policy in relation to the supply of arms to Pakistan looks especially contrasting against this background. Islamabad is hugely interested in Russian weapons, including the cutting-edge systems such as the Su-35 fighter. However, one can say with confidence that Russia will never agree to the transfer of arms to Pakistan, which could disrupt the existing balance of forces in the region.

    What are the prospects for Russian-Indian military-technical cooperation? Most likely, it is an increase in the number and the scale of joint projects on the basis of risk-sharing.

    Several projects of this kind are already being implemented. Among them are the staggeringly successful BrahMos project, the unsuccessful MTA, and the recently launched FGFA. The Su-30MKI program is very close to such projects.

    At the moment, however, both countries face the task of carrying out the second generation joint projects, which were initially completed with the harmonized requirements of the armies of both countries. Financed on a parity basis, those were bought by both the Indian and Russian military, and are jointly marketed in the third countries.

    It is about creating a common element of the Russian-Indian military products market, and it is a far more ambitious goal than the ‘Make in India’ policy, in the paradigm that Russia and India have been operating for five decades.

    We can say with certainty that the most promising model is the Make in India 2.0, under which India is not a recipient of technology, but an equal partner in building new knowledge, competencies and products.

    Ruslan Pukhov is head of the Centre for Analysis of Strategies and Technologies, a member of the Public Council under the Ministry of Defence

    source-http://in.rbth.com/economics/defence/2016/08/17/indias-needs-helped-power-russian-military-innovation_621691
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    Pinto

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    PM Modi reaffirms time-tested ties with Russia

    Post  Pinto on Sat Aug 20, 2016 5:33 pm

    Minister Narendra Modi on Saturday reaffirmed India’s time-tested ties with Moscow when Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin called on him in New Delhi.

    “Prime Minister Modi described Russia as a time-tested and reliable friend and reaffirmed the shared commitment with President (Vladimir) Putin to expand, strengthen and deepen bilateral engagement across all domains,” a statement issued by the Prime Minister’s Office said.

    “He recalled his recent meeting with President Putin in Tashkent in June and via video-link for dedication of the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 at the beginning of this month,” it stated.


    On his part, Rozogin conveyed Putin’s greetings to Modi and briefed him on the progress in ongoing projects between India and Russia.
    Modi said that India was eagerly awaiting Putin’s visit to India later this year.

    http://indianexpress.com/article/india/india-news-india/pm-modi-reaffirms-time-tested-ties-with-russia-2987193/
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    Pinto

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    Russia keen to tap India as global aeronautics manufacturing base

    Post  Pinto on Sat Aug 20, 2016 5:34 pm

    Russia is ready to tap India as a global aeronautics manufacturing base and is willing to partner local firms in developing their technological and production capabilities in the aviation sector, an official representing a delegation from the country said during bilateral talks held here.

    India, on its part, expressed eagerness to jointly develop iron ore and coal mines in Russian territory and sought technical inputs on producing high-grade cold-rolled, grain-oriented steel, typically used in power transmission equipment.

    Ramesh Abhishek, secretary, department of industrial policy and promotion in the ministry of commerce and industry, led the bilateral talks held under the aegis of an India-Russia working group on modernization and industrial co-operation. The Russian delegation was headed by the deputy minister of industry and trade Alexander Potapov.

    While both sides acknowledged their mutual interest in expanding bilateral cooperation between Russian and Indian companies in different sectors, more focused discussions were held on modernization, mining, fertilisers and civil aviation.

    Civil aviation

    “In the civil aviation sector, Russian side declared its readiness to participate in the Make in India program in order to develop technological and production capabilities of the Indian side in this field and potential supplies of the jointly produced equipment to third countries,” according to a statement issued by the commerce and industry ministry.

    The Russians also reiterated their interest in the possible participation of Russian companies in the Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor.

    In mining and metallurgy, the two sides agreed to exchange information on potential areas for co-operation in view of India’s request to develop coal fields and iron ore mines in Russia, according to the statement.

    http://www.thehindu.com/business/In...nautics-manufacturing-base/article9003809.ece
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    Pinto

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    Russia to Enter $300 Bln Indian Civilian Aircraft Market in a Big Way

    Post  Pinto on Sat Aug 20, 2016 7:40 pm

    http://sputniknews.com/business/20160818/1044402254/russia-india-aircraft.html

    Russia is set to launch a production unit for aircraft parts and equipment in India under the ‘Make in India' program.

    US and European aviation companies are likely to face major competition in India as Russia has proposed to set up a production line for India’s civil aviation sector. A Russian delegation headed by Alexander Potapov, Deputy Minister of Industry & Trade of the Russian Federation, put forward this proposal before Indian officials of the Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion in New Delhi.
    A statement released by India’s Ministry of Commerce and Industry says, “In the civil Aviation sector, the Russian side declared its readiness to participate in the “Make in India” program in order to develop technological and production capabilities of the Indian side in this field and potential supplies of the jointly produced equipment to third countries.”

    Russia wants to introduce Sukhoi Superjet 100 (SSJ100) civilian aircraft in India and has a target set to put out at least 50 SSJ100 in the next three to five years. Sukhoi expects to sign a deal this year with Tata Advanced System to manufacture key airplane parts in India.
    Russia’s proposal to take part in the ‘Make in India’ program comes soon after the announcement of the New Civil Aviation Policy by India which says,

    “India will provide fiscal and monetary incentives and fast-track clearances to global original equipment manufacturers and their ancillary suppliers. In the event that the cost of Made-in-India aircraft and components work out to be higher than those supplied from their original sources, the government will consider an incentive package to nullify the cost differential.”

    India is one of the fastest growing aviation markets in the world and is expected to displace the UK as the third largest market by 2026 while Centre for Asia Pacific Aviation, a consulting firm, predicts that domestic air traffic of Indian civil aviation market likely to surpass 100 million by 2018 as compared to 81 million in 2015-16.
    Keeping in mind the growth of the air traffic, Boeing, the US-based aircraft manufacturer, projects a demand for 1,850 new aircraft in India over the next 20 years. Value of this demand will be approximately worth USD 265 billion. However, Ministry of Commerce & Industry itself projected a demand of 800 aircrafts by year 2020.

    Apart from manufacturing aircraft, there are vast opportunities in Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul (MRO) as well. According to the Ministry of Civil Aviation, “The MRO business of Indian carriers is around USD 751 million, 90% of which is currently spent outside India – in Sri Lanka, Singapore, Malaysia, UAE etc.” The Indian government is keen to develop India as an MRO hub in Asia, attracting business from foreign airlines.
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    Pinto

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    Putin: Russia To Develop Indian Nuke Power Industry

    Post  Pinto on Sun Aug 21, 2016 10:02 am

    http://inserbia.info/today/2016/08/putin-russia-to-develop-indian-nuke-power-industry/

    Russian President Vladimir Putin has announced that Moscow will soon sign an agreement with New Delhi to construct the third stage of India’s Kudankulam nuclear power plant.

    Speaking at a media conference in the Russian capital, President Putin recently said: “We have big plans with our Indian friends in the area of nuclear energy. Construction work on the third and fourth blocks of the Indian nuclear power plant started in February. We expect to sign a general framework agreement and a credit line for the construction of a third stage by the end of this year.” He met the press after the handover of the plant’s first power unit to India. Earlier, President Putin and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi dedicated the first unit of the power plant to the South Asian nation via video-conferencing.

    The power station, situated in the southern Indian province of Tamil Nadu, is being built by Rosatom nuclear corporation of Russia on the basis of a deal signed between Moscow and New Delhi in 1998. Putin thanked Rosatom officials for building the plant, saying that the first and second reactors of the Kudankulam nuclear power plant would enhance India’s energy supply and also strengthen its economic position.

    For his part, Prime Minister Modi said that it was not possible for India to build the plant without Russia’s help, as 80% of the project’s financing was covered by a Russian loan. Revealing that India plans to build a number of 1,000-megawatt nuclear power plants jointly with Russia, the premier stressed: “I have always deeply valued our friendship with Russia and it is fitting that we jointly dedicate the first unit of Kudankulam nuclear power plant.” Modi added: “In the years ahead, we are determined to pursue an ambitious agenda of nuclear power generation. At Kudankulam alone, five more reactors of 1,000-megawatt each are planned. In terms of our co-operation with Russia, we plan to build a series of bigger nuclear power plants.”

    Currently, Russia is the only country that is co-operating with India on nuclear energy. The first reactor at the Kudankulam plant is one of the most powerful reactors in India and it meets the latest safety requirements. The second generator will start operating in the coming months.

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    Pinto

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Pinto on Sun Aug 21, 2016 10:37 am

    Russia has executed meticulously Kudankulam nuclear power project despite many hurdles geography, policies, regionalism, economy, infrastructure, agitations, 4 more rector to be built here

    6(1000MW)+6(1200MW)+4(1200MW) India will buy 20 Russian Reactors

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    George1

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  George1 on Sun Aug 21, 2016 3:07 pm

    Russia to Enter $300 Bln Indian Civilian Aircraft Market in a Big Way

    Russia is set to launch a production unit for aircraft parts and equipment in India under the ‘Make in India' program.

    US and European aviation companies are likely to face major competition in India as Russia has proposed to set up a production line for India’s civil aviation sector. A Russian delegation headed by Alexander Potapov, Deputy Minister of Industry & Trade of the Russian Federation, put forward this proposal before Indian officials of the Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion in New Delhi.

    A statement released by India’s Ministry of Commerce and Industry says, “In the civil Aviation sector, the Russian side declared its readiness to participate in the “Make in India” program in order to develop technological and production capabilities of the Indian side in this field and potential supplies of the jointly produced equipment to third countries.”

    Russia wants to introduce Sukhoi Superjet 100 (SSJ100) civilian aircraft in India and has a target set to put out at least 50 SSJ100 in the next three to five years. Sukhoi expects to sign a deal this year with Tata Advanced System to manufacture key airplane parts in India.

    “India will provide fiscal and monetary incentives and fast-track clearances to global original equipment manufacturers and their ancillary suppliers. In the event that the cost of Made-in-India aircraft and components work out to be higher than those supplied from their original sources, the government will consider an incentive package to nullify the cost differential.”

    India is one of the fastest growing aviation markets in the world and is expected to displace the UK as the third largest market by 2026 while Centre for Asia Pacific Aviation, a consulting firm, predicts that domestic air traffic of Indian civil aviation market likely to surpass 100 million by 2018 as compared to 81 million in 2015-16.

    Keeping in mind the growth of the air traffic, Boeing, the US-based aircraft manufacturer, projects a demand for 1,850 new aircraft in India over the next 20 years. Value of this demand will be approximately worth USD 265 billion. However, Ministry of Commerce & Industry itself projected a demand of 800 aircrafts by year 2020.

    Apart from manufacturing aircraft, there are vast opportunities in Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul (MRO) as well. According to the Ministry of Civil Aviation, “The MRO business of Indian carriers is around USD 751 million, 90% of which is currently spent outside India – in Sri Lanka, Singapore, Malaysia, UAE etc.” The Indian government is keen to develop India as an MRO hub in Asia, attracting business from foreign airlines.

    http://sputniknews.com/business/20160818/1044402254/russia-india-aircraft.html


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    Pinto

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    Russia Propose Setting Up Il-114-300 Airliner Production in India

    Post  Pinto on Wed Aug 24, 2016 9:04 am

    http://sputniknews.com/business/20160823/1044557719/russia-india-il-114.html

    Russian Deputy Trade Minister Alexander Potapov said that Russia offered India to launch production of Ilyushin Il-114-300 regional airliners at India's Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) facilities.

    NEW DELHI (Sputnik) — Russia has made an offer on setting up the production of Ilyushin Il-114-300 regional airliners at India's Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) facilities, Russian Deputy Trade Minister Alexander Potapov said Tuesday.


    Earlier, the Indian Ministry of Commerce and Industry said that Russia agreed to take part in the Make in India program during a meeting of the Russian-Indian working group on industrial cooperation.

    "We have always talked about the feasibility and readiness to expand cooperation. This also applies to civil aviation. One such project could be the creation of an Indian regional aircraft. In accordance with a request from the Indian side, we sent our proposals on organizing the production of Il-114-300 aircraft at HAL facilities," Potapov said.

    Russia's RT-Chemical technologies and composite materials company (JSC RT-Chemcomposite), part of the Rostec state corporation, is also looking into projects on setting up the production of aircraft glazing as well as polymer composite materials for civil aviation in India, he added.

    Il-114-300 is a variant of the Ilyushin Il-114 regional airliner fitted with a Klimov TV7-117SM turboprop engine.
    modiu.png

    The Il-114 was developed by Ilyushin Design Bureau in the late 1980s for short-haul flights within the Soviet Union. Since then, 20 planes of this type have been manufactured. Mass production of the plane is expected to start in Russia in 2019.

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    Pinto

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    India and Russia: Keeping a special partnership on track

    Post  Pinto on Thu Aug 25, 2016 4:50 pm

    http://www.asianage.com/india/india-and-russia-keeping-special-partnership-track-248

    Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Russian President Vladimir Putin will meet at least twice over the coming two months. The first meeting will be on the margins of G-20 Summit in Hangzhou, China on September 4-5. Second interaction will be during Mr Putin’s visit to India to attend the Brics and annual bilateral summit in Goa on October 15-16.

    Russian deputy prime minister Dmitry Rogozin visited India to prepare for Mr Putin’s forthcoming visit. This was Mr Rogozin’s fourth visit to India since Mr Modi’s victory in May 2014. This is testimony to the significance that both countries attach to bilateral partnership.


    Strong relations with Russia are a key pillar of India’s foreign policy. In his meeting with Mr Rogozin on August 20, 2016, PM Modi described Russia as “a time-tested and reliable friend...”

    Recent years have witnessed rapid growth in all aspects of bilateral partnership encompassing defence, hydrocarbons, nuclear energy, space cooperation, science and technology, and cultural collaboration and people-to-people contacts.

    Russia of today is not the Russia of 2014 when it was reeling under onslaught of Western sanctions. Russia is rapidly emerging as a confident and resurgent power. With Indian economy growing at a robust 7.6 per cent per annum, time is propitious for the two countries to take their relationship to a new level.

    Russia continues to be India’s main trading partner in military and technical sphere with more than 70 per cent of equipment in the Indian armed forces being of Russian origin. Bilateral engagement has evolved from supply of end products to technology transfer, joint research and development.

    The most rewarding example of joint cooperation is successful designing and manufacture of sophisticated BrahMos supersonic cruise missile for Indian armed forces and export to third countries. Discussions for exports to the UAE, Vietnam, South Africa and Chile are at an advanced stage.
    List of joint projects between India and Russia is formidable. A significant contract for supply and joint production of 200 Russian light helicopters Ka-226T was signed recently.

    Most bilateral projects are in consonance with “Make in India” programme launched by Mr Modi.

    Several projects like the fifth generation fighter aircraft and purchase of S-400 air missile defence system are expected to fructify soon.
    Nuclear energy has emerged as one of the most significant and fastest growing areas of bilateral cooperation. Two 1,000MW power plants are already functional at Kudankulam, Tamil Nadu. Four more are slated to come up in the same vicinity. During Mr Modi’s visit to Moscow last December, it was decided to establish six more 1,000MW nuclear power plants probably in Andhra Pradesh.

    Russian atomic power corporation Rosatom is interested in participating in “Make in India” programme and assembly of fuel rods and control system components.

    Some components can be assembled in India for using domestically, for export to Russia and to third markets.

    Hydrocarbons hold enormous potential for bilateral cooperation. Russia is one of the world’s largest producers of oil and gas.
    As a result of Western sanctions Russia has adopted a new “Asia Pivot” strategy, the most marked aspect of which is its turn towards India and China.

    Energy security for Russia means having long-term arrangements for supplying its oil and gas. India’s energy demand is growing at a rapid pace. Today India is dependent on imports of oil to the extent of 80 per cent of its requirement and in gas to the tune of 37 per cent. Russia and India hence make an ideal match as producer and consumer.

    India is significantly invested in Russia’s oil and gas sector. Its first investment was a 20 per cent stake in Sakhalin-I worth $1.7 billion in 2001. This investment has yielded impressive gains. ONGC Videsh Limited (OVL) invested $2.1 billion to buy 100 per cent stake in Imperial Energy in 2009. This turned out to be highly unprofitable both because of the high price paid and inadequate production from the oil field. In lieu, OVL has picked up significant stakes in Bashneft, Titov and Trebs fields off the Arctic continental shelf.

    In July 2015, Essar and Rosneft signed a preliminary agreement for Rosneft to acquire 49 per cent stake in Essar’s Vadinar Oil refinery and supply crude to Essar for over 10 years. In September 2015, OVL signed an agreement with Rosneft to acquire 15 per cent stake in Vankorneft project, the second largest oil field in Russia. Recently in June, an Indian consortium signed a sale-purchase agreement with Rosneft for acquisition of 23.9 per cent in Vankor oil block.

    Growth in bilateral trade and investment has not been commensurate with other areas of bilateral engagement. Two-way trade continues to languish at an abysmally low level of $10 billion. The two countries have fixed a target of $30 billion by 2025. Several silver linings have appeared recently on the horizon. Some of these include: India’s prospective membership of Eurasian Economic Union, development of International North-South Transport Corridor, trial runs on which took place on August 8, 2016, construction and upgradation of Chabahar seaport to promote and improve connectivity with Central Asia, Russia and Afghanistan.

    India’s membership of Shanghai Cooperation Organisation will provide several opportunities to promote security, stability and economic growth in Central Asia and the region. Regional countries need to collaborate actively to ensure that Afghanistan does not descend into conflict and instability. Russia and India can play a crucial role in this as also in dealing with the scourge of terrorism emanating from Pakistan, Afghanistan and West Asia. Unrest and continuing violence in Syria as well as the uncontrolled spread of Islamic State, terrorism and radicalisation of youth are other challenges that the two countries need to quell and overcome together.

    Both India and Russia are factors of peace, stability, security and economic development, domestically, bilaterally and regionally. Rapidly expanding special and privileged strategic partnership between the two countries bodes well for future of India and Russia as well as the region.
    The author is a former ambassador
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    Pinto

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    Now, India turns to Russia for mega defence deals

    Post  Pinto on Wed Sep 07, 2016 7:07 am

    After a pronounced tilt towards the US in terms of defence deals and military-to-military ties over the last decade, further reinforced by the recent inking of the bilateral logistics pact, India has reassured Russia that their traditional strategic partnership will continue on its upward trajectory.

    Defence ministry sources said negotiations for mega defence projects with Russia like joint development of the futuristic fifth generation fighter aircraft (FGFA) andKamov Ka-226T light utility helicopters were “well on track” after being stalled for some time.

    Similarly, major defence deals with Russia, ranging from the Rs 39,000 crore acquisition of five S-400 Triumf advanced air defence missile systems to the $1.5 billion lease of a second nuclear-powered submarine, are also in the offing.

    India already operates a nuclear-powered Akula-II submarine christened INS Chakra, which was acquired on a 10-year lease from Russia in April 2012 under a $900 million deal inked earlier.


    All this is reflected in the flurry of top-level bilateral meetings to be held in the coming days. The 16th meeting of the India-Russia Military Technical Cooperation Working Group, for instance, will be held on Wednesday and Thursday.

    The Indian delegation will be led by the director-general of defence acquisitions in the meeting, which will include the inking of a joint protocol. Concurrently , the two countries will also hold a top meeting on shipbuilding, aviation and land systems, which will be co-chaired by the defence production secretary from India.

    The fine balance India is trying to strike between the two erstwhile Cold War rivals is also evident in the way the Indian Army will hold combat exercises with US and Russian forces this month.

    The ‘Yudh Abhyas’ exercise between US troops from Fort Louis and Madras Regiment soldiers will be held at Chaubatia in Uttarakhand from September 14 to 27. The ‘Indra’ exercise between Russian soldiers and Kuma on Regiment troops will be held at Vladivostok from September 22 to October 2.

    After Indian, US and Japanese warships conducted the top-notch Malabar exercise off Okinawa in June, India and Russia will hold their Indra naval wargames in theIndian Ocean around December.”Russia was worried whether India wanted to continue complex projects like the FGFA. We have expressed our keenness to ink the final R&D design contract for the Indian ‘perspective multi-role fighter’ (based on the Russian FGFA called Sukhoi T-50 or PAK-FA) in 2016-2017,” said a source.

    India, however, has conveyed that it is not interested in the proposed joint development of the multi-role transport aircraft (MTA) due to the twin-engine plane’s cost-viability, delivery timelines and failure to meet high-altitude requirements.But Russia has taken heart from India’s positive response on other projects, and has even offered its under-construction nuclear-powered aircraft carrier ‘Storm’ (Shtorm) and technologies associated with the project.

    TOI had earlier reported that the US was currently unwilling to offer help to India in nuclear propulsion for the proposed construction of its largest-ever warship, the 65,000-tonne aircraft carrier INS Vishal. In effect, the USRussia rivalry to woo India in the military arena continues.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Now-India-turns-to-Russia-for-mega-defence-deals/articleshow/54039916.cms
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    Pinto

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    Russia, India Still in Talks on S-400 Triumf Missile System Deliveries

    Post  Pinto on Wed Sep 07, 2016 7:09 am

    The Indian Defense Ministry is still in talks with Rosoboronexport on the supply of S-400 Triumf missile systems, according to the state arms exporter Rosoboronexport’s deputy director.

    Read more: https://sputniknews.com/military/20160906/1045013888/russia-india-s-400.html

    KUBINKA (Moscow Region) (Sputnik) – Russia and India are yet to sign a contract on the delivery of S-400 Triumf missile systems as consultations are still ongoing, the state arms exporter Rosoboronexport’s deputy director told Sputnik on Tuesday.

    "The Indian Defense Ministry official’s comments published by some Russian and Indian media of an already signed contract on the supply of S-400 Triumf are not true. These are only consultations so far, and there is no decision on the number, much less the value, of the possible contract," Sergey Goreslavsky said at the Army-2016 military and technical forum near Moscow.

    Read more: https://sputniknews.com/military/20160906/1045013888/russia-india-s-400.html
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    Rogozin to visit India to fix agenda for Putin-Modi summit

    Post  Pinto on Wed Sep 07, 2016 1:53 pm

    Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin will travel to New Delhi for the 22nd session of the Inter-Governmental Commission on Trade, Economic, Scientific, Technological and Cultural Cooperation (IRIGC-TEC) on September 13. It will be Rogozin’s second visit to India in less than a month.

    The 22nd session of the Indo-Russian Inter-Governmental Commission on Trade, Economic, Scientific, Technological and Cultural Cooperation (IRIGC-TEC) will be held in New Delhi on September 13.

    Russia’s Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin and his Indian counterpart, External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj will co-chair the meeting, held annually alternately in Moscow and New Delhi. They are expected to raise the India-Russia “special, privileged strategic partnership” to a new level across different fields of cooperation; in trade and economic affairs, defence, civil nuclear energy and hydrocarbons.

    The IRIGC-TEC is a critical institutional mechanism to promote and strengthen India’s strategic partnership with Russia.

    The session will make a thorough review of the progress of joint projects in different fields of bilateral cooperation, on the basis of reports submitted by the various joint working groups (JWG), which have met since the last IRIGC-TEC meeting in October 2015, in Moscow. It will also prepare an ambitious agenda for the summit between Russian President Vladimir Putin and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi in Goa on October 15.


    At the IRIGC-TEC meeting, Rogozin and Swaraj will also finalize a number of agreements to be signed during the Putin-Modi summit. The India-Russia summit at the highest political level is being held in October, rather than December, because Putin will be in Goa for the 8th BRICS summit


    During his visit, Rogozin will also call on the Indian Prime Minister to exchange views on the preparation of the Putin’s visit. This will be Rogozin’s fifth visit to India since the NDA government came to power in 2014. Most recently, he travelled to New Delhi in August and met with Modi to discuss bilateral ties and finalise the agenda for the visit of the Russian President, both for the India-Russia bilateral and BRICS summits, in Goa.

    The prospect of joint projects, increased investments, greater participation in oil and gas exploration, expansion of trade and economic relations and defence ties within the framework of Indian government’s “Make in India” programme, will be high on the agenda of the IRIGC meeting, a source told RIR.

    Russia is the first country to take the initiative under the “Make in India” programme in the two key strategic sectors of civil nuclear energy and military-technical cooperation.

    Ahead of the IRIGC session, in August, during the 5th meeting of India-Russia Working Group on Modernization and Industrial Cooperation in New Delhi, both sides expressed interest in further strengthening and expanding bilateral cooperation between Russian and Indian companies in different sectors. They also took note of discussions held during the meeting of sub-groups on Modernization, Mining, Fertilizers and Civil Aviation.

    In the civil aviation sector, Russia has declared its readiness to participate in “Make in India” to develop Indian technical and production capabilities in this field, and potential supplies of the jointly produced equipment to third countries


    Russia has sought more information about Russian companies participating in the $90 billion Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC). Last December, during the summit in Moscow, Modi, at a meeting with Russian CEOs, invited them to participate in the Chennai-Bengaluru and Amritsar-Kolkata Industrial Corridors. India has expressed interest to jointly develop iron-ore and coal mines in Russia, which will be high on the Putin-Modi summit agenda.

    The IRIGC meeting will discuss all these new areas of investment in joint projects in a more focused way and take decisions on priority projects to increase the volume of bilateral trade and investments corresponding to the high level of political relations between the two countries, the source stressed. Indian Commerce Minister Nirmala Sitharaman recently said the volume of Indian investments in Russia’s oil and gas sector could reach $15 billion in the next five years.


    The volume of current bilateral trade is about $10 billion. Both countries have set a target to raise it to $30 billion by 2025, and mutual investment from $10 billion to $15 billion.


    Speaking at the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum (SPIEF) in June, Putin said the two countries “needed to transform the positive historical and political buildup into specific areas of cooperation, adding that the bilateral trade turnover is currently “too small” which “absolutely does not correspond to the potential.”

    In the light of two countries’ decision to achieve the fixed targets of bilateral trade and investments, the IRIGC meeting will take up the issues of fast-tracking negotiations of the Joint Study Group on the proposed Free Trade Agreement (FTA) between India and the Custom Union (Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan), hasten development of the International North-South Transport Corridor ((INSTC), trial runs of which took place on August 8, 2016 and upgradation of Chabahar seaport to improve connectivity to Central Asia and Russia.

    As the two countries have agreed to place the Indian government’s “Make in India” programme at the centre-stage of their strategic partnership, joint investment and production projects in the priority sectors of nuclear energy, hydrocarbons and defence have recently emerged as the fastest developing spheres of bilateral cooperation.

    During the dedication of Unit 1of the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant, built with Russian assistance, Putin and Modi noted that cooperation in civil nuclear energy was reflective of the “special and privileged strategic partnership.” A total of 6 units (1,000 MW each) are to be built at the plant.

    India and Russia are now preparing to sign the general framework agreement on the third stage of the construction (units 5 and 6) of the plant. The IRIGC meeting will finalize the agreement for signing during the Putin-Modi summit. India and Russia have already reached agreement to build another 6 units at another site in India. Russia plans to sell as many as 25 reactors to India.

    In July, during his visit to Russia, Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister N. Chandrababu Naidu discussed with Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev the issue of 6 reactors to be built in his state. It is expected that the IRIGC meeting will take a final decision on the proposal and the project site (Kavali in Nellore district) could announced during Putin-Modi summit.

    “Andhra Pradesh will have both American and Russian participation in nuclear energy generation, but the Russians will be the first to ‘Make in India’ in the nuclear sphere in Andhra,” Sitharaman said recently


    https://in.rbth.com/economics/coope...ia-to-fix-agenda-for-putin-modi-summit_627517

    Firebird

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Firebird on Thu Sep 08, 2016 5:16 pm

    Pinto wrote:http://www.asianage.com/india/india-and-russia-keeping-special-partnership-track-248

    Growth in bilateral trade and investment has not been commensurate with other areas of bilateral engagement. Two-way trade continues to languish at an abysmally low level of $10 billion. The two countries have fixed a target of $30 billion by 2025. Several silver linings have appeared recently on the horizon. Some of these include: India’s prospective membership of Eurasian Economic Union, development of International North-South Transport Corridor, trial runs on which took place on August 8, 2016, construction and upgradation of Chabahar seaport to promote and improve connectivity with Central Asia, Russia and Afghanistan.

    India’s membership of Shanghai Cooperation Organisation will provide several opportunities to promote security, stability and economic growth in Central Asia and the region. Regional countries need to collaborate actively to ensure that Afghanistan does not descend into conflict and instability. Russia and India can play a crucial role in this as also in dealing with the scourge of terrorism emanating from Pakistan, Afghanistan and West Asia. Unrest and continuing violence in Syria as well as the uncontrolled spread of Islamic State, terrorism and radicalisation of youth are other challenges that the two countries need to quell and overcome together.

    Both India and Russia are factors of peace, stability, security and economic development, domestically, bilaterally and regionally. Rapidly expanding special and privileged strategic partnership between the two countries bodes well for future of India and Russia as well as the region.
    The author is a former ambassador

    Pinto, or anyone else, do you know how far the North South Corridor is expected to go, long term in regards developing trade between India and Russia?

    In many ways, the 2 countries seem perfect partners.
    Ru = military superpower, vast resources, lots of technology knowhow. But a not so huge population
    India = huge population, need for resources, developing military power, also tech knowhow in other areas.

    The problem is connection. Do they anticipation the long term trade route will be via Central Asia, Pakistan, perhaps Afghanistan? Or by sea and via Iran. Or via China even?

    One good thing is that unlike China or the West, there are no real disputes between Ru and China. If the 2 were put together (which ofcourse is only possible in some ways) they'd perhaps be the global leading power or thereabouts in the not too distant future.

    I don't think a mass transfer of peoples would work. But certainly close collaboration in many other areas. One idea I have is for Indian workers to work in special zones in underpopulated parts of Russia. Say one industry towns, or agricultural areas. They would not get residency, movement or passport rights, as they would be working for both Russia and India. But they would have good wages, potential skill development and allowing both the Indian and Russian economies to grow. They could then return to India and repatriate their post tax earnings. It would be better too for Russia - allowing it to leverage its resources and knowhow - and not falling into the errors Western govts have made in importing cheap labour on mass, with all the cultural problems that may cause.

    So I wonder how far Russia-India trade and development will go. Because currently, despite their undouted synergies, trade is rather modest outside of arms.

    I wonder if Pakistan and Afghanistan would want to get in on this N-South Corridor? The Russia-India route could certainly rival the China-Russia-Europe new silk road.

    I really think success between Ru and India could be massive for both countries. Russia can be uneasy about China, but there shouldn't be any need to be with India. Likewise, NATO countries don't tend to show India (or Russia) much respect. So in many ways, they are natural partners.
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    Pinto

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Pinto on Thu Sep 08, 2016 7:25 pm

    Firebird wrote:
    Pinto wrote:http://www.asianage.com/india/india-and-russia-keeping-special-partnership-track-248

    Growth in bilateral trade and investment has not been commensurate with other areas of bilateral engagement. Two-way trade continues to languish at an abysmally low level of $10 billion. The two countries have fixed a target of $30 billion by 2025. Several silver linings have appeared recently on the horizon. Some of these include: India’s prospective membership of Eurasian Economic Union, development of International North-South Transport Corridor, trial runs on which took place on August 8, 2016, construction and upgradation of Chabahar seaport to promote and improve connectivity with Central Asia, Russia and Afghanistan.

    India’s membership of Shanghai Cooperation Organisation will provide several opportunities to promote security, stability and economic growth in Central Asia and the region. Regional countries need to collaborate actively to ensure that Afghanistan does not descend into conflict and instability. Russia and India can play a crucial role in this as also in dealing with the scourge of terrorism emanating from Pakistan, Afghanistan and West Asia. Unrest and continuing violence in Syria as well as the uncontrolled spread of Islamic State, terrorism and radicalisation of youth are other challenges that the two countries need to quell and overcome together.

    Both India and Russia are factors of peace, stability, security and economic development, domestically, bilaterally and regionally. Rapidly expanding special and privileged strategic partnership between the two countries bodes well for future of India and Russia as well as the region.
    The author is a former ambassador

    Pinto, or anyone else, do you know how far the North South Corridor is expected to go, long term in regards developing trade between India and Russia?

    In many ways, the 2 countries seem perfect partners.
    Ru = military superpower, vast resources, lots of technology knowhow. But a not so huge population
    India = huge population, need for resources, developing military power, also tech knowhow in other areas.

    The problem is connection. Do they anticipation the long term trade route will be via Central Asia, Pakistan, perhaps Afghanistan? Or by sea and via Iran. Or via China even?

    One good thing is that unlike China or the West, there are no real disputes between Ru and China. If the 2 were put together (which ofcourse is only possible in some ways) they'd perhaps be the global leading power or thereabouts in the not too distant future.

    I don't think a mass transfer of peoples would work. But certainly close collaboration in many other areas. One idea I have is for Indian workers to work in special zones in underpopulated parts of Russia. Say one industry towns, or agricultural areas. They would not get residency, movement or passport rights, as they would be working for both Russia and India. But they would have good wages, potential skill development and allowing both the Indian and Russian economies to grow. They could then return to India and repatriate their post tax earnings. It would be better too for Russia - allowing it to leverage its resources and knowhow - and not falling into the errors Western govts have made in importing cheap labour on mass, with all the cultural problems that may cause.

    So I wonder how far Russia-India trade and development will go. Because currently, despite their undouted synergies, trade is rather modest outside of arms.

    I wonder if Pakistan and Afghanistan would want to get in on this N-South Corridor? The Russia-India route could certainly rival the China-Russia-Europe new silk road.

    I really think success between Ru and India could be massive for both countries. Russia can be uneasy about China, but there shouldn't be any need to be with India. Likewise, NATO countries don't tend to show India (or Russia) much respect. So in many ways, they are natural partners.

    yeah you are right bro actually since cold war one aspect which remained undermined with Russia has been two way trade between our two countries
    which has sky high potential to benefit both countries immensely. Actually this has been realized by both countries leaders now, because since past 2 summit we are seeing more emphasis on trade and not alone defence which is laudable effort

    India is expected to have 70% of its arms of Russian origin for 2 decades more at least and so its hard to get from 90 - 100 in defence so it makes sense to work on trade ties two where both  countries if tried sincerely can achieve 100b$ trade by 2025 not 30b 4 which is the target now

    Firebird

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Firebird on Thu Sep 08, 2016 9:58 pm

    Pinto wrote:
    Firebird wrote:
    Pinto wrote:http://www.asianage.com/india/india-and-russia-keeping-special-partnership-track-248

    Growth in bilateral trade and investment has not been commensurate with other areas of bilateral engagement. Two-way trade continues to languish at an abysmally low level of $10 billion. The two countries have fixed a target of $30 billion by 2025. Several silver linings have appeared recently on the horizon. Some of these include: India’s prospective membership of Eurasian Economic Union, development of International North-South Transport Corridor, trial runs on which took place on August 8, 2016, construction and upgradation of Chabahar seaport to promote and improve connectivity with Central Asia, Russia and Afghanistan.

    India’s membership of Shanghai Cooperation Organisation will provide several opportunities to promote security, stability and economic growth in Central Asia and the region. Regional countries need to collaborate actively to ensure that Afghanistan does not descend into conflict and instability. Russia and India can play a crucial role in this as also in dealing with the scourge of terrorism emanating from Pakistan, Afghanistan and West Asia. Unrest and continuing violence in Syria as well as the uncontrolled spread of Islamic State, terrorism and radicalisation of youth are other challenges that the two countries need to quell and overcome together.

    Both India and Russia are factors of peace, stability, security and economic development, domestically, bilaterally and regionally. Rapidly expanding special and privileged strategic partnership between the two countries bodes well for future of India and Russia as well as the region.
    The author is a former ambassador

    Pinto, or anyone else, do you know how far the North South Corridor is expected to go, long term in regards developing trade between India and Russia?

    In many ways, the 2 countries seem perfect partners.
    Ru = military superpower, vast resources, lots of technology knowhow. But a not so huge population
    India = huge population, need for resources, developing military power, also tech knowhow in other areas.

    The problem is connection. Do they anticipation the long term trade route will be via Central Asia, Pakistan, perhaps Afghanistan? Or by sea and via Iran. Or via China even?

    One good thing is that unlike China or the West, there are no real disputes between Ru and China. If the 2 were put together (which ofcourse is only possible in some ways) they'd perhaps be the global leading power or thereabouts in the not too distant future.

    I don't think a mass transfer of peoples would work. But certainly close collaboration in many other areas. One idea I have is for Indian workers to work in special zones in underpopulated parts of Russia. Say one industry towns, or agricultural areas. They would not get residency, movement or passport rights, as they would be working for both Russia and India. But they would have good wages, potential skill development and allowing both the Indian and Russian economies to grow. They could then return to India and repatriate their post tax earnings. It would be better too for Russia - allowing it to leverage its resources and knowhow - and not falling into the errors Western govts have made in importing cheap labour on mass, with all the cultural problems that may cause.

    So I wonder how far Russia-India trade and development will go. Because currently, despite their undouted synergies, trade is rather modest outside of arms.

    I wonder if Pakistan and Afghanistan would want to get in on this N-South Corridor? The Russia-India route could certainly rival the China-Russia-Europe new silk road.

    I really think success between Ru and India could be massive for both countries. Russia can be uneasy about China, but there shouldn't be any need to be with India. Likewise, NATO countries don't tend to show India (or Russia) much respect. So in many ways, they are natural partners.

    yeah you are right bro actually since cold war one aspect which remained undermined with Russia has been two way trade between our two countries
    which has sky high potential to benefit both countries immensely. Actually this has been realized by both countries leaders now, because since past 2 summit we are seeing more emphasis on trade and not alone defence which is laudable effort

    India is expected to have 70% of its arms of Russian origin for 2 decades more at least and so its hard to get from 90 - 100 in defence so it makes sense to work on trade ties two where both  countries if tried sincerely can achieve 100b$ trade by 2025 not 30b 4 which is the target now

    Seems the problem is transport costs.
    I wonder if the route across the Caspian Sea, via Iran and on to Indian ports (or vice versa) will be cost effective and fast enough?

    A cheap and quick route via 4(?) 'Stans or via China is likely to be a long way off. I wonder if Pakistan can come onboard in a transport corridor? As its no longer big mates with America!

    Obviously its tricky for Russia to sell its petrochemicals via Iran. As Iran is also a big petro player. But perhaps there can be some sort of 3 way deal there. (Iran is still having sanctions BS re that).

    I also think huge airships may be a way in the future. Perhaps more cost effective than some huge rail or sea journeys.

    It would take a while for Ru-India trade to match Ru-EU or RU-China trade, but if the logistics can be fixed, then trade could be at a v high level for Russia+India.
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    Pinto

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    India, Russia defence talks make sense

    Post  Pinto on Tue Sep 13, 2016 10:02 am

    It did not make much difference but to keep the Indian rulers in good humour, the Obama administration made a departure from its past practice and modified the military logistics agreement, Logistics Support Agreement (LSA) to Logistics Exchange Memorandum of Agreement (LEMOA). The USA has a standard draft text of military logistics agreement to be signed by the countries. Since the Obama administration badly needed on their side and was also aware of the criticism Narendra Modi and his government will have to face for allying with the US, the standard draft was replaced by a new summary text.

    Obviously India preferring to ignore its new friend and rearing to sign a defence deal worth millions of dollars with Russia during the summit level meeting between Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Russian President Vladimir Putin scheduled to take place in October in Goa is significant. The deals that are to be signed include purchase of S-400 air defense missile system, IL-78 multi-role tanker transport by India and the joint upgrading of the SU30MKI and Kamov 28. Naturally the question of what made India look towards Russia arises.

    Nevertheless an insight into the recent developments will make it explicit that four factors prevailed upon the Modi government to look for alternate. First, while US was  unwilling to offer help to India in nuclear propulsion for the proposed construction of its largest-ever warship, the 65,000-tonne aircraft carrier INS Vishal, last week, a Russian delegation visiting New Delhi offered the Indian Navy Russia’s latest supercarrier design, dubbed Project 23000E or Shtorm (Storm). A Russian diplomat based in India confirmed that an offer has been made. This 65,000-ton supercarrier, the second ship of the Vikrant-class, will feature “significant design changes from the lead vessel, the INS Vikrant, including possible nuclear propulsion and Catapult Assisted Take-Off But Arrested Recovery (CATOBAR) and Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch Systems (EMALS).


    India already operates a nuclear-powered Akula-II submarine christened INS Chakra, which was acquired on a 10-year lease from Russia in April 2012 under a $900 million deal inked earlier. Major defence deals with Russia, ranging from the Rs 39,000 crore acquisition of five S-400 Triumf advanced air defence missile systems to the $1.5 billion lease of a second nuclear-powered submarine, are also in the offing.

    Secondly, the Modi government is not sure of the approach and attitude of the new US President towards India.
    Though Obama maintained a friendly relation with Modi, he did not persuade the American Senate to recognise India as a “global strategic and defence partner” of the US. It is not yet clear whether Obama really intended to confer this privilege on India.

    A day after Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s address to a joint session of Congress, top Republican senator John McCain had moved an amendment to the National Defence Authorisation Act (NDAA-17) which if passed would have recognised India as a global strategic and defence partner. But it could not get through.  McCain had expressed disappointment. What USA did was to acknowledge India as a “major defence partner” through a joint statement issued after Modi held talks with Obama which supported defence-related trade and technology. In fact Modi had expressed surprise as to why the US Senate failed to recognise India as a “global strategic and defence partner”.

    Yet another factor that appears to have prevailed upon the Modi government to make a tactical shift in its policy towards USA has been the increasing say of Russia in the global affair. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump only a week back vowed to seek better relations with China and Russia if elected. He also announced that he would make U.S. allies bear more of the financial burden for their defense. Trump, a bitter critic of Barack Obama’s foreign policy, accuses him of letting China take advantage of the USA. He pledged to “shake the rust off America’s foreign policy.” For Trump “an easing of tensions with Russia from a position of strength” is possible.

    Meanwhile Russia has been trying to recover its friendship with China. Its joint military exercises in the East China Sea are a clear show of strength against USA and Japan. The US sanctions have in fact upgraded China’s importance to Russia. Closer ties between Moscow and Beijing have been expected long before the Ukraine crisis. A new foreign policy concept published by the Russian government in 2013 noted the importance of friendly relations with China and India, and Russia and China have often joined together to oppose the western members of the United Nations Security Council.

    With a loosening grip over the Western market, Russia is slowly picking up its own pivot towards the East, drawing closer than ever to China and finding new friends like Pakistan. Recently Moscow closed a landmark military deal with Islamabad – the first in many decades – while its relationship with Beijing continues to develop.

    Back home, the peoples’ perception towards USA might have played a major role in making the Modi government look towards Russia. A vast section of the Indians feel that USA has been treating properly. The Modi government has been simply acting on the advice and suggestions of the Obama administration, which mostly are against Indian interests.

    Though US military company has agreed to produce aircraft F 16 under make in India programme, the fact remains that Russia is the first country to have agreed to take the initiative under the “Make in India” umbrella in two key strategic sectors — nuclear and defence. This move underlines that Russia has confidence in India’s economy.

    On September 13, Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin will be visiting India to hold the intergovernmental committee on technical and economic cooperation. This will also pave the way for the bilateral meeting between both leaders. Modi and Putin will be holding their bilateral meeting on October 15 in Goa on the sidelines of the BRICS Summit. India and Russia are also expected to discuss the expansion of the civil nuclear cooperation between them. Russia kept its promise and on August 10, Modi and Putin inaugurated, through video conference, the Kudankulam Unit 1, which is a 1,000 MWt power plant.

    Both sides are also expected to sign an agreement on the fifth generation fighter aircraft (FGFA) project or the Perspective Multirole Fighter (PMF). The talks for the project were revived earlier this year. It took a back seat when India opted for the French Rafale fighter jets. The final R&D contract for the FGFA was on hold till now despite the two countries having first inked an inter-governmental agreement in 2007.

    Russian-Indian cooperation in the defence sector is not just of “seller-buyer” but works on complex joint development projects with participation of Indian public and private companies, and licensed production in India. It is also encouraging that India and Russia agreed to strengthen the defense partnership in line with the “Make in India” programme.

    http://www.freepressjournal.in/analysis/india-russia-defence-talks-make-sense-arun-srivastava/924697
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    Pinto

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    India, Russia to review bilateral ties ahead of Vladimir Putin’s visit

    Post  Pinto on Tue Sep 13, 2016 12:48 pm

    Vladimir Putin will be travelling to India in October for BRICS Summit and will also hold a bilateral Summit with Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

    Ahead of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s visit, India and Russia will review the status of bilateral ties on Tuesday as also lay the ground for next month’s Presidential visit.

    The discussions will be part of the 22nd Session of the India-Russia Inter-Governmental Commission (IRIGC-TEC) where External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj will lead the Indian delegation, while Dmitry Olegovich Rogozin, Deputy Chairman, will head the Russian side.

    Asserting that India and Russia share a special and privileged strategic partnership, External Affairs Ministry said Swaraj and Rogozin would review the work of various working groups and subgroups under the IRIGC-TEC mechanism and discuss the preparations for the forthcoming visit of Putin.
    Putin will be travelling to India in October for BRICS Summit and will also hold a bilateral Summit with Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

    The India-Russia Inter-Governmental Commission on Trade, Economic, Scientific, Technological and Cultural Cooperation (IRIGC-TEC) provides a framework for review of a broad spectrum of bilateral issues covering trade, economic, scientific, educational and cultural cooperation.

    The last meeting of the Commission was held in Moscow in October 2015.


    http://indianexpress.com/article/india/india-news-india/india-russia-to-review-bilateral-ties-ahead-of-vladimir-putins-visit-3027824/
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    Moscow sees no problem in India’s re-exporting Russian Mi-24 to Afghanistan

    Post  Pinto on Wed Sep 14, 2016 4:22 pm

    First published by TASS.

    https://in.rbth.com/news/2016/09/13...exporting-russian-mi-24-to-afghanistan_629579


    Russia sees no problem in India’s possible re-exporting Russian-made Mi-24 helicopters to Afghanistan, a senior Russian diplomat said on Tuesday.

    "If the Indians want to sell them, there is a special procedure for that. I don’t see any problems," Zamir Kabulov, Russian president’s envoy for Afghanistan and director of the Russian Foreign Ministry’s second Asia department, said, adding that India has Russia's authorization to re-export helicopters.



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    Moscow invites New Delhi to take part in Arctic projects

    Post  Pinto on Thu Sep 15, 2016 1:58 pm

    https://in.rbth.com/economics/cooperation/2016/09/14/moscow-invites-new-delhi-to-take-part-in-arctic-projects_629811

    India may take part in the development of the Arctic shelf along with Russia and China, Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin said on Tuesday.

    "There are definitely interesting projects in the sphere of shelf development and as we establish a joint instrument for the development of the Arctic shelf we plan to invite there not only Chinese but also Indian partners," he told journalists after talks of the India-Russia Inter-Governmental Commission on Trade, Economic, Scientific, Technical and Cultural Cooperation.


    Apart from that that, he said there is a possibility of joint use of the Northern Sea Route.

    According to the Russian deputy prime minister, India is interested in establishing an international transport corridor North-South, from Russia’s St. Petersburg to India’s Mumbai, to ship cargoes, commodity and passengers between the Baltic countries and India.

    "The transport corridor is an extremely interesting thing, and I think it has good chances to be realized," Rogozin stressed.

    The India-Russia Inter-Governmental Commission on Trade, Economic, Scientific, Technical and Cultural Cooperation (IRIGC-TEC) met in New Delhi on Tuesday, to review the status of ongoing bilateral projects and further broaden strategic cooperation in the critical areas of trade and commerce, energy, space and high technology.

    First published by TASS.
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    Kudankulam Could Work On Next-Generation N-Fuel In Near-Term, Says Russia

    Post  Pinto on Fri Sep 16, 2016 9:32 am

    NEW DELHI: The Russian-built Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project (KNPP) in Tamil Nadu could, in the near future, be operating on the newer generation TVS-2M fuel assembly, which offers increased uranium capacity, improved heat reliability and enhanced operational safety, a senior Russian official has said.

    "Today we can offer our Indian colleagues a more modern design of nuclear fuel -- TVS-2M -- with improved economic and technical characteristics," Oleg A Grigoryev, Vice President of TVEL, the fuel company run by the ROSATOM national atomic energy corporation, told IANS in an e-mail interview from Moscow.

    "Negotiations on this issue are already underway with Indian partners. We are ready to change KNPP's fuel as soon as possible according to all requirements of the Indian Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) for greater reliability and security of fuel assemblies," he said.

    Currently, the first two 1,000 MW units are operational at Kudankulam. Four more are in the pipeline.

    According to Mr Grigoryev, the only restriction on supplying the advanced nuclear fuel assemblies is the existing agreement over the UTVS fuel now being supplied.

    "The only restriction for this project is time. As soon as the UTVS fuel has been used, the station will operate on the new fuel," Mr Grigoryev said.

    TVEL accounts for around 17 per cent of the global nuclear fuel market. The company supplies fuel worldwide for research, transport and commercial power reactors.

    TVEL's fuel development programmes for Russian-designed VVER light water reactors in Russia and abroad aim to increase their service life and cost-effectiveness.

    "After transfer to TVS-2M the customer will not face additional difficulties. The new fuel will save (create) 60-70 operational days in around three years (due to reduced downtime)," the Russian said.

    Mr Grigoryev also spoke of "localisation" of production.

    "We are ready to support the efforts of our Indian partners in the localisation of the production of nuclear fuel in India. But it should be understood that the plant should be cost-effective," he said, echoing the argument of Chinese solar module manufacturers, for instance, who have to grapple with India's domestic component requirements under the National Solar Programme.

    "We have repeatedly carried out economic calculations and estimated the number of plants to which fuel has to be supplied to make it profitable. The result, together with regional and country-specificity, ranges from 10 to 12 units," Mr Grigoryev said.

    "We hope that in the next 10 years the first components produced in India will be used in the fuel for Indian nuclear power plants," he said, adding, however, that preparations need to start right away "to work on adaptation of Indian legislation to Russian standards, to teach Indians who will be engaged in manufacturing."

    Russia has offered India a new range of reactor units -- the VVER-Toi (typical optimised, enhanced information) design -- for the third and fourth units of the Kudankulam project.

    In this connection, former Atomic Energy Commission chairman and ex-secretary Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) MR Srinivasan said TVEL has supplied fuel for KNPP and fuel pellets for India's Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors.

    "India will work with TVEL on localisation of nuclear fuel. This could be achieved in about five years," he said. "There will be more localisation for KNPP units 3, 4, 5 and 6. Cooperation between India and TVEL will grow in the coming years," he added.

    An inter-governmental agreement between India and Russia was signed in December 2008 for setting up Kudankulam's units 3 to 6. The ground-breaking ceremony for construction of units 3 and 4 was performed earlier this year.

    According to Mr Grigoryev, India plans to increase the number of Russian design reactors to 12 in the next 10-15 years.

    http://www.ndtv.com/tamil-nadu-news/kudankulam-could-work-on-next-generation-n-fuel-in-near-term-says-russia-1459118
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    Pinto

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    'India's unique security ties with Russia remain unaffected'

    Post  Pinto on Fri Sep 16, 2016 9:33 am

    India's "unique security ties" with Russia remain unaffected by the growing Indo-US relationship, highly placed sources said here ahead of President Russian President Vladimir Putin's visit to this country.

    The strategic ties with Russia have been "persistent, continuous and critical" element of India's foreign policy policy, the sources said.



    Putin will arrive in India in mid-October for the five- nation BRICS (Brazil-Russia-India-China-South Africa) Summit to be held in Goa as well as annual Indo-Russia bilateral Summit with Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

    While admitting that Indo-Russia ties in the area of trade and economy have not remained the same, the sources said the effort during the upcoming bilateral Summit would be to bring the relationship "back on track".
    The sources also mentioned that Indo-Russia military

    cooperation was undergoing a change as India not only was procuring defence equipment off the shelf, but was also inviting Russians to take part in 'make in India' defence joint ventures.

    In this regard, they cited the recent agreement on the manufacture of 200 Russian Kamov 226 T light choppers in India. The deal is estimated to be USD one billion under the 'make in India' initiative.

    The sources also brought out importance of regional consultations with Russia such as on Afghanistan.

    Both India and Russia know that the bilateral ties were "vital" for balance in Asia-Pacific region, they said.

    They also warned that Indo-Russia ties should not be reduced to the "litmus test" of Russia-Pakistan relationship.
    Apart from the conventional key areas which were very

    critical components of the bilateral ties including military technology cooperation, energy and civil nuclear sector, India was also keen to explore the new areas of collaboration such as infrastructure and railways, the sources said.

    Talking about robust ties in the diamond sector, they said there were areas like agriculture, food processing, mining and ship building where Russians have strong expertise which could be used by India.

    This will also give a boost to bilateral commercial ties. Bilateral trade in 2015 amounted to USD 7.83 billion (decline of 17.74 per cent over the previous year), with Indian export amounting to USD 2.26 billion and imports from Russia USD 5.57 billion.

    In December 2014, the leaders of the two countries set a target of USD 30 billion bilateral trade by 2025.

    http://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/india-s-unique-security-ties-with-russia-remain-unaffected-116091501090_1.html
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    Pinto

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    Russia, India to Hold Indra-2016 Joint Military Drills in September-October

    Post  Pinto on Fri Sep 16, 2016 4:16 pm

    Russia and India joint military exercises will take place in the Russian Far East in late September - early October.

    China Border on September 14-27 NEW DELHI (Sputnik) — Joint military exercises between Russia and India, dubbed Indra-2016, will take place in the Russian Far East in late September — early October, a source in the Indian Defense Ministry told RIA Novosti Wednesday.

    "The drills are scheduled to be conducted on September 22 — October 2. Each side will have be represented by 250 servicemen," the source said.. The exercises will take place on the territory of the Russian Eastern Military District. The first Indra drills were held in 2003. They serve to facilitate cooperation and foster the exchange of relevant experience between the Indian and Russian armed forces.


    Read more: https://sputniknews.com/military/20160914/1045288117/russia-india-miliatry-drill.html
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    Pinto

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Pinto on Sat Sep 17, 2016 8:35 pm

    https://sputniknews.com/politics/20160916/1045382077/india-russia-best-friends.html

    Despite growing trade and political ties with the US, India continues to accord top priority to its unique relationship with Russia.

    New Delhi (Sputnik) — Putting all speculation to rest, it is now confirmed that India considers Russia its most reliable friend. One of the most senior diplomats in India’s External Affairs Ministry has asserted that despite India’s growing cooperation with the US on many global agendas, Russia remains the one friend that India believes will be the first to respond to a crisis call.

    India’s Ministry of External Affairs is currently preparing for a crucial diplomatic summit between Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Russian President Vladimir Putin to be held in Goa in India’s south next month on the sidelines of the BRICS summit.

    A senior diplomat involved in the preparations for the summit, told reporters on condition of anonymity in New Delhi, “Diplomats often wonder where they would place their first call if India faced a security challenge. The answer is Russia.”

    This statement holds immense significance as it comes amid fledgling closeness between Russia and India’s foremost adversary Pakistan. The two countries plan to hold a joint military exercise soon. Moreover, Pakistan has displayed keen interest in purchasing the Su-35 combat aircraft from Russia, a move which troubles India. Moscow’s ties with Beijing have also been a matter of concern for India. However, the unparalleled history of mutual trust remains unhindered by individual aspirations.

    During the Kargil War in 1999 with Pakistan when Indian forces ran out of arms and ammunition, Russia supplied India's stocks upon a single request from India, said a source.

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    Re: Russia - India Strategic Relationship: News

    Post  Pinto on Mon Sep 19, 2016 4:55 pm

    http://in.rbth.com/world/2016/09/19/russia-strongly-condemns-uri-attack_631299

    Russia strongly condemns Uri attack

    19 September 2016 ALEXANDER KORABLINOV, RIR

    Moscow expresses concern that base was attacked from Pakistani territory.

    The Russian Foreign Ministry has strongly condemned the September 18 attack on an army base in Uri, India, which claimed the lives of 18 Indian soldiers.

    “We strongly condemn the terrorist attack against an army base in Jammu and Kashmir’s Uri in the early hours of September 18, which killed 17 and injured 30 service personnel. We offer our condolences to the families of the victims and wish a rapid recovery to all those injured,” the Russian Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

    “Regarding the Pathankot Indian air base attack in January 2016, we are very concerned about the terrorist attacks near the Line of Control,” the ministry added. “We are also concerned about the fact that, according to New Delhi, the army base near Uri was attacked from Pakistani territory.”

    Russia called for a proper investigation. “We believe that this criminal act will be investigated properly, and that its organisers and perpetrators will be held accountable,” the ministry said. “We confirm our continued support for the Indian government’s counter terrorism efforts.”

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