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    US intervention in Colombian conflict

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    Jelena

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    US intervention in Colombian conflict

    Post  Jelena on Wed Nov 11, 2009 4:18 am

    “Colombia turning into giant US military base”


    Published 11 November, 2009, 03:27

    The US and Colombia have signed an agreement “that is basically converting Colombia into one giant US military base in South America,” attorney and writer Eva Golinger told RT.
    She said the agreement was signed on October 30 and it “authorizes the US not only to occupy seven military bases in Colombia, but also to occupy any installation throughout the entire country.”

    While Columbia insists its partnership with the US is aimed only at preventing drug trafficking and fighting against leftist gorilla groups, neighboring Venezuela fears that the deal goes beyond that. This week, President Hugo Chavez told the country's military to prepare for a possible confrontation with Colombia.

    Golinger believes there is very clear evidence that the US-Colombian partnership is not at all what is described to be.

    She cited two Air Force documents, one of them requesting “$46 million from the US Congress.” It has now been approved for the 2010 budget, she said. The document “talks about using one of the Colombian air bases in Palanquero for continental-wide US military operations.”

    http://russiatoday.com/Top_News/2009-11-11/colombia-us-military-base.html
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    Vladimir79

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    Re: US intervention in Colombian conflict

    Post  Vladimir79 on Wed Nov 11, 2009 4:27 am

    It's going to be real funny when Chavez's army overuns those US bases and finds what they are really hiding. lol!
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    brisas2k

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    Imperial Pretexts: The Real Reasons behind US Intervention in Colombia

    Post  brisas2k on Tue Feb 17, 2015 3:37 pm


    Imperial Pretexts: The Real Reasons behind US Intervention in Colombia

    https://www.globalpolicy.org/component/content/article/154/26037.html

    Highlights:

    "... This article explains how we can account for the continuity of US counter-insurgency (CI) in post-Cold War Colombia. I make three main arguments in relation to this continuity. First, I argue that the US has considerable economic interests in South America which necessitates the preservation of "stability" geared to those interests. As part of this impulse to maintain stability, US CI has been employed in Colombia to pacify Colombia's armed groups and progressive elements of civil society. Second, the US has a considerable economic and strategic interest in maintaining access to South American oil. Furthermore, the desire to maintain access to South American oil has increased as the US's traditional oil suppliers in the Middle East have increasingly become potentially unstable following the two Gulf Wars. Third, I argue that the legacy of the CI ideology continues to effect the way in which insurgency is perceived by both Colombian and US planners, and as such contributes to the continuity in militarised solutions to Colombia's problems. In sum, I identify three reasons for the continuity of US sponsored counterinsurgency in Colombia. These are related to US strategic and economic interests and a dominant ideology that has continued to function after the Cold War. I do not wish to argue that one of these areas is more important than the other, or indeed that these reasons provide an exhaustive set of causal explanations for US policy. I do think, however, that all of these factors feed into the US policy process and are the principal factors underlying US CI in Colombia. I start with an examination of US economic interests and their role in US intervention in post-Cold War Colombia. "
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    brisas2k

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    Cocain trafficking and the role of us-colombia relations

    Post  brisas2k on Tue Feb 17, 2015 3:45 pm

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Central Intelligence Agency

    "...The involvement of the United States Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) in cocaine trafficking in Central America during the Reagan Administration as part of the Contra war in Nicaragua has been the subject of several official and journalistic investigations since the mid-1980s.

    In 1986, the Reagan Administration acknowledged that funds from cocaine smuggling helped fund the Contra rebels, but stated that it was not authorized by the US government or resistance leaders. The Kerry Committee found that Contra drug links included payments to known drug traffickers by the U.S. State Department to carry out humanitarian assistance to the Contras.

    ..... dunno dunno A CIA internal investigation found that agents had worked with drug traffickers to support the Contra program, but found no evidence of any conspiracy by CIA or its employees to bring drugs into the United States." dunno dunno
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    brisas2k

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    Re: US intervention in Colombian conflict

    Post  brisas2k on Tue Feb 17, 2015 3:51 pm

    Allegations of CIA drug trafficking
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    Central Intelligence Agency

    Some sources say that the United States Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) has been involved in several drug trafficking operations. Some of these reports claim that congressional evidence indicates that the CIA worked with groups which it knew were involved in drug trafficking, so that these groups would provide them with useful intelligence and material support, in exchange for allowing their criminal activities to continue,[1] and impeding or preventing their arrest, indictment, and imprisonment by U.S. law enforcement agencies.[2]

    Counter-Intelligence: Shining a Light on Black Operations by Metanoia films is a five part documentary.[3] Part 2, 'Deep state' "focuses on close historical links between the Mafia and CIA and the role of narcotics trafficking in all major CIA covert operations."[4]

       "Peter Dale Scott, who is interviewed at length, stresses the instrumental role of the CIA in ALL global narcotics trafficking. The converse is also true. Citing the French Connection (centered in Marseilles) and the Golden Triangle (in Southeast Asia) as prime examples, he makes the case that all major narcotics hubs collapse following CIA withdrawal from the region."[
    Allegations of CIA drug trafficking
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allegations_of_CIA_drug_trafficking
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    brisas2k

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    Panama-Colombia-US triangle

    Post  brisas2k on Tue Feb 17, 2015 4:03 pm

    In 1989, the United States invaded Panama as part of Operation Just Cause, which involved 25,000 American troops. Gen. Manuel Noriega, head of government of Panama, had been giving military assistance to Contra groups in Nicaragua at the request of the U.S.—which, in exchange, allowed him to continue his drug-trafficking activities—which they had known about since the 1960s.[34][35] When the DEA tried to indict Noriega in 1971, the CIA prevented them from doing so.[34] The CIA, which was then directed by future president George H. W. Bush, provided Noriega with hundreds of thousands of dollars per year as payment for his work in Latin America.[34] However, when CIA pilot Eugene Hasenfus was shot down over Nicaragua by the Sandinistas, documents aboard the plane revealed many of the CIA's activities in Latin America, and the CIA's connections with Noriega became a public relations "liability" for the U.S. government, which finally allowed the DEA to indict him for drug trafficking, after decades of allowing his drug operations to proceed unchecked.[34] Operation Just Cause, whose ostensible purpose was to capture Noriega, pushed the former Panamanian leader into the Papal Nuncio where he surrendered to U.S. authorities. His trial took place in Miami, where he was sentenced to 45 years in prison.[34]

    Noriega's prison sentence was reduced from 30 years to 17 years for good behavior.[36] After serving 17 years in detention and imprisonment, his prison sentence ended on September 9, 2007.[37] He was held under U.S. custody before being extradited to French custody where he was sentenced to 7 years for laundering money from Colombian drug cartels.[38]


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allegations_of_CIA_drug_trafficking#Panama
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    brisas2k

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    Re: US intervention in Colombian conflict

    Post  brisas2k on Tue Feb 17, 2015 4:11 pm

    Involvement with CIA

    Although the relationship did not become contractual until 1967, Noriega worked with the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) from the late 1950s until the 1980s.[9] In 1988 grand juries in Tampa and Miami indicted him on U.S. federal drug charges.[10][11]

    The 1988 Senate Subcommittee on Terrorism, Narcotics and International Operations concluded: "The saga of Panama's General Manuel Antonio Noriega represents one of the most serious foreign policy failures for the United States. Throughout the 1970s and the 1980s, Noriega was able to manipulate U.S. policy toward his country, while skillfully accumulating near-absolute power in Panama. It is clear that each U.S. government agency which had a relationship with Noriega turned a blind eye to his corruption and drug dealing, even as he was emerging as a key player on behalf of the Medellín Cartel (a member of which was notorious Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar)." Noriega was allowed to establish "the hemisphere's first 'narcokleptocracy'".[12] One of the large financial institutions that he was able to use to launder money was the Bank of Credit and Commerce International (BCCI), which was shut down at the end of the Cold War by the FBI. Noriega shared his cell with ex-BCCI executives in the facility known as "Club Fed".

    In the 1988 U.S. presidential election, Democratic candidate Michael Dukakis highlighted this history in a campaign commercial attacking his opponent, Vice President (and former CIA Director) George H. W. Bush, for his close relationship with "Panamanian drug lord Noriega."[13]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manuel_Noriega#cite_note-32

    Noriega's prison sentence was reduced from 30 years to 17 years for good behavior.[36] After serving 17 years in detention and imprisonment, his prison sentence ended on September 9, 2007.[37] He was held under U.S. custody before being extradited to French custody where he was sentenced to 7 years for laundering money from Colombian drug cartels.[38]


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allegations_of_CIA_drug_trafficking#Panama[/quote]
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    brisas2k

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    Re: US intervention in Colombian conflict

    Post  brisas2k on Tue Feb 17, 2015 4:25 pm

    How Drug Cartels Work With CIA and Others in Central America

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PLIOdAHNBsg
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    brisas2k

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    Re: US intervention in Colombian conflict

    Post  brisas2k on Tue Feb 17, 2015 4:40 pm

    1980s, CENTRAL AMERICA

    The San Jose Mercury News series documents just one thread of the interwoven operations linking the CIA, the contras and the cocaine cartels. Obsessed with overthrowing the leftist Sandinista government in Nicaragua, Reagan administration officials tolerated drug trafficking as long as the traffickers gave support to the contras. In 1989, the Senate Subcommittee on Terrorism, Narcotics, and International Operations (the Kerry committee) concluded a three-year investigation by stating:

    "There was substantial evidence of drug smuggling through the war zones on the part of individual Contras, Contra suppliers, Contra pilots mercenaries who worked with the Contras, and Contra supporters throughout the region.... U.S. officials involved in Central America failed to address the drug issue for fear of jeopardizing the war efforts against Nicaragua.... In each case, one or another agency of the U.S. govemment had information regarding the involvement either while it was occurring, or immediately thereafter.... Senior U.S. policy makers were not immune to the idea that drug money was a perfect solution to the Contras' funding problems." (Drugs, Law Enforcement and Foreign Policy, a Report of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, Subcommittee on Terrorism, Narcotics and Intemational Operations, 1989)

    In Costa Rica, which served as the "Southern Front" for the contras (Honduras being the Northern Front), there were several different ClA-contra networks involved in drug trafficking. In addition to those servicing the Meneses-Blandon operation detailed by the Mercury News, and Noriega's operation, there was CIA operative John Hull, whose farms along Costa Rica's border with Nicaragua were the main staging area for the contras. Hull and other ClA-connected contra supporters and pilots teamed up with George Morales, a major Miami-based Colombian drug trafficker who later admitted to giving $3 million in cash and several planes to contra leaders. In 1989, after the Costa Rica government indicted Hull for drug trafficking, a DEA-hired plane clandestinely and illegally flew the CIA operative to Miami, via Haiti. The U.S. repeatedly thwarted Costa Rican efforts to extradite Hull back to Costa Rica to stand trial.

    Another Costa Rican-based drug ring involved a group of Cuban Americans whom the CIA had hired as military trainers for the contras. Many had long been involved with the CIA and drug trafficking They used contra planes and a Costa Rican-based shrimp company, which laundered money for the CIA, to move cocaine to the U.S.

    Costa Rica was not the only route. Guatemala, whose military intelligence service — closely associated with the CIA — harbored many drug traffickers, according to the DEA, was another way station along the cocaine highway. Additionally, the Medellin Cartel's Miami accountant, Ramon Milian Rodriguez, testified that he funneled nearly $10 million to Nicaraguan contras through long-time CIA operative Felix Rodriguez, who was based at Ilopango Air Force Base in El Salvador.

    The contras provided both protection and infrastructure (planes, pilots, airstrips, warehouses, front companies and banks) to these ClA-linked drug networks. At least four transport companies under investigation for drug trafficking received US government contracts to carry non-lethal supplies to the contras. Southern Air Transport, "formerly" ClA-owned, and later under Pentagon contract, was involved in the drug running as well. Cocaine-laden planes flew to Florida, Texas, Louisiana and other locations, including several military bases. Designated as 'Contra Craft,' these shipments were not to be inspected. When some authority wasn't clued in, and made an arrest, powerful strings were pulled on behalf of dropping the case, acquittal, reduced sentence, or deportation.

    http://www.serendipity.li/cia/blum1.html
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    brisas2k

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    A Small Primer on The Medellin Cartel

    Post  brisas2k on Tue Feb 17, 2015 5:07 pm

    Relations with the Colombian government

    "Once authorities were made aware of "questionable activities", the group would be put under Federal Drug Task Force surveillance. Evidence would be gathered, compiled and presented to a grand jury, resulting in indictments, arrests and prison sentences, for those convicted. The number of Colombian cartel leaders actually taken into custody as a result of these operations was very few. Mostly, non-Colombians conspiring with the Cartel were the "fruits" of these indictments.[citation needed]

    Most Colombians targeted, as well as those named in such indictments, lived and stayed in Colombia, or fled before indictments were unsealed. However, by 1993 most, if not all, cartel fugitives had been imprisoned or hunted and gunned down by the Colombian National Police trained and assisted by specialized military units and the CIA

    The last of Escobar's lieutenants to be assassinated was Juan Diego Arcila Henao, who had been released from a Colombian prison in 2002 and hidden in Venezuela to avoid the vengeance of Los Pepes. However he was gunned down in his Jeep Cherokee as he exited the parking area of his home in Cumana, Venezuela in April of 2007.<El Tiempo, Bogotá Abril 18, 2007>

    While it is broadly believed that the group "Los Pepes" have been instrumental in the assassination of the cartel's members over the last 17 years, it is still in dispute whether the mantle is just a screen designed to deflect political repercussions from both the Colombian and United States governments' involvement in these assassinations.[citation needed]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medell%C3%ADn_Cartel


    You would ask how this and other groups or cartels operated with such impunity ande force, for so long. A proper answer to that question will inevitably yield government officers engaging in criminal activities. Drug trade is a political crime of the elites. Otherwise it could not exist the way it does.
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    George1

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    Re: US intervention in Colombian conflict

    Post  George1 on Sat May 09, 2015 2:36 pm

    Colombia Government, FARC Agree on Specific Minefield Clearance Plan

    FARC and the country's government reportedly have agreed on a roadmap for the clearance of minefields.

    MEXICO CITY (Sputnik) – The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and the country's government have agreed on a roadmap for the clearance of minefields, particularly in the Meta and Antioquia departments, Diario de Pernambuco reports.

    The deal was reached after talks between the two sides in Havana, Cuba, the Brazilian daily newspaper said on Friday, adding that the participants in the peace negotiations issued a joint statement saying that they have also discussed the technical and logistical aspects of the implementation of each phase of the demining process.

    FARC members agreed to work together with Colombia's government to clear minefields in the country's rural areas in March, after peace talks in Cuba that have been ongoing since 2012.

    The landmine clearance process is to be supervised by an Oslo-Based nonprofit organization Norwegian People's Aid (NPA), which provides post-conflict reconstruction assistance and humanitarian relief.

    Colombia is considered to be one of the most landmine-contaminated countries in the world, according to the International Crisis Group think tank. An estimated 11,000 people have been killed or maimed in landmine explosions since FARC insurgency began in Colombia in the early 1990s.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/latam/20150509/1021904574.html#ixzz3Ze08s5vq
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    George1

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    Re: US intervention in Colombian conflict

    Post  George1 on Thu Jun 23, 2016 11:57 pm

    After Decades of War, Colombia and FARC Rebels Reach Definitive Peace Deal

    http://sputniknews.com/latam/20160622/1041756807/colombia-farc-war-over.html


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