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    China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

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    max steel
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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  max steel on Sun Sep 06, 2015 8:26 pm

    higurashihougi wrote:
    max steel wrote:http://www.defenseone.com/threats/2014/11/how-powerful-russias-military/99062/?oref=DefenseOneTCO

    Read the article and some comments.

    " Russia is the only nation having nuclear weapons at par with usa " . LoL. Its above par actually.

    In 1955, Russia successfully tested its first non-tritium H-bomb. In 1961, Russia tested the Tsar Bomba. Shockwave caused by explosion moved 7 circle around the Earth.

    Meanwhile. U.S. H-bomb today stills need tritium. And tritium means expensive to maintain and replenish, short half life.


    I guess you're right . Kindly read the article it mentions about same issue .

    http://www.nti.org/gsn/article/some-nuclear-experts-question-ramp-up-in-us-tritium-production/

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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  AlfaT8 on Sun Sep 06, 2015 10:12 pm

    China retakes there island scenario


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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  JohninMK on Tue Sep 15, 2015 12:15 am

    The US is having to come to terms with the prospect of losing 'top dog' status. The cost and complexity of world beating hi-tech solutions is now probably beyond even the resources of the US.

    Whether fact or fiction, the US has long believed itself to have the advantage in air combat. But new advances in Russian radar and missile technology have the US military admitting that its assumed superiority is dwindling, with one commander confessing "they’ve closed the gap."

    "The advantage that we had from the air I can honestly say is shrinking," Gen. Frank Gorenc, commander of US Air Forces in Europe, said during the Air Force Association Air and Space Conference on Monday, according to Breaking Defense. "Not only with respect to the aircraft that they’re producing, but the more alarming thing is their ability to create anti-access/area denied [zones] that are very well defended."

    Gorenc’s admission may come a surprise for a military that has spent the last few years bragging about the development of the F-35, the nearly $400 billion fighter barely capable of surviving a dogfight against the 18-year-old F-22. But with the improved “quality and quantity” of the Russian military, the commander has been forced to face modern realities.

    "It’s one thing to address an aircraft threat which has increased significantly – which by the way it has – but clearly surface to air missile systems are much cheaper, they’re much more available," he said. "There’s clearly a whole set of modern long-range surface-to-air missile systems that are being layered in a way that makes access into that area more difficult." In particular, the general references ground-based missile installations in Kaliningrad, which pose a considerable challenge to the Pentagon’s airpower in Europe. "Up to this point, we have talked about anti-access/area denial with respect to the Pacific problem, but what I’m telling you is this is not just a Pacific problem," he said. "It’s as significant in Europe as it is anywhere else on the planet."

    This fear of Russian air defenses can partially explain the Pentagon’s push for state-of-the-art stealth aircraft. The F-35 was designed with stealth capabilities in mind, and the US Air Force is currently assessing proposals for a new Long Range Strike Bomber which focuses a high priority on evading detection.

    The problem is that both of these aircraft have cost US taxpayers billions. Repair of major design flaws in the F-35 led costs of that project to skyrocket. The Air Force has already set aside $58.2 billion for the development of the next generation bomber, but that cost could balloon, as well.

    The need for stealth could also explain the recent sightings of the retired F-117 in the skies over Nevada. Used to bomb Yugoslavia in 1999, the Nighthawk stealth fighters were officially retired in 2008, but a number of F-117s have been spotted conducted flight tests over the desert.

    "We’re going to have to extend the training that we do to allow for access into areas that are very well defended," Gorenc said. The commander also suggests developing new tactics, techniques, and procedures, known as TTPs. He also suggested that NATO reconfigure its airbase postings, spreading aircraft among a large number of facilities to avoid bombardment. "It’s pretty clear we’re going to have go back and start exercising some of the same stuff we used to do in the Cold War," he added.


    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/us/20150914/1026993707.html#ixzz3lklnLDmQ

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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  George1 on Fri Sep 18, 2015 12:46 am

    US Naval Commander Fears China's, Russia's Increasing Tech Capabilities

    China and Russia’s increasing confidence and modernizing military are ‘concerning,’ even ‘disconcerting,’ the head of the US Air Force in the Pacific, Gen. Lori Robinson said.

    During the Air Force Association conference Robinson said, “I get incredibly concerned about the capability gap decreasing [between the US and other nations]. That technology gap continues to get smaller and smaller, and for us that should be very disconcerting.”

    Robinson said that increased Russia’s long-range aviation complicates US strategy further.

    “They’re allowed to fly in that airspace. It’s international airspace,” Robinson noted. “But it’s new” that the Russians are exercising that right, Robinson said.

    Talking about what ‘concerns’ her about China, she said that Chinese aren’t just interested in US technology but are also interested in US people.

    “Chinese service members asked in fascination about the chevrons on the sleeves of American NCOs. The conversation led to a real human connection between the two countries’ personnel,” Breaking Defense website reported.

    She also noted that US and China have worked together in disaster prone areas such as Nepal after the earthquake of 2015. In a region prone to earthquakes, tsunamis, etc. humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HADR) result in much of America’s work in collaboration with all its Pacific partners.

    Apart from humanitarian work, Robinson mentioned the aerial warfare in which she stressed that the US widely exceeds. In the huge annual Red Flag exercise, Robinson noted, “We had US E-3, Australian Wedge-tail, and a Japanese 767 performing command-and-control. It was incredible.”

    This sort of complex flying network is a major plus in aerial warfare, Robinson said.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/military/20150917/1027129143/us-commander-china-russia-concern.html#ixzz3m2Saru97


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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  flamming_python on Fri Sep 18, 2015 1:27 am

    What's a woman doing commanding the US Air Force in the Pacific anyway?

    I'm pretty sure that out of all the US Air Force officers with at least a passing level of experience necessary for the position; 99% would be men - but a woman gets the job just because.
    Hope my own country never has to suffer from this politically-correct crap.

    Anyway, I really don't know what technological gap she's referring to.
    If talking about an operational experience gap, organizational gap, network-centricity gap - then sure, those all exist.

    But speaking about a 'technology' gap is just a way to propagate more propaganda BS about how Russian technology is inferior; despite such assertions not actually being backed up by anyone with any knowledge in the field include most likely the US Air Force's own experts.

    We can safely disregard these statements as being political BS then.

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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  magnumcromagnon on Fri Sep 18, 2015 2:47 am

    flamming_python wrote:What's a woman doing commanding the US Air Force in the Pacific anyway?

    I'm pretty sure that out of all the US Air Force officers with at least a passing level of experience necessary for the position; 99% would be men - but a woman gets the job just because.
    Hope my own country never has to suffer from this politically-correct crap.

    Anyway, I really don't know what technological gap she's referring to.
    If talking about an operational experience gap, organizational gap, network-centricity gap - then sure, those all exist.

    But speaking about a 'technology' gap is just a way to propagate more propaganda BS about how Russian technology is inferior; despite such assertions not actually being backed up by anyone with any knowledge in the field include most likely the US Air Force's own experts.

    We can safely disregard these statements as being political BS then.

    Ironically enough Russia ranks #1 in the world for upward mobility in the workplace for women, and it's genuine, unlike the tokenism and affirmative action bullshit you see here in the United States, which is artificial and superimposed.

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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  max steel on Wed Oct 14, 2015 4:26 pm

    Welcome to the world of Asymmetric Warfare. Idea


    China can make about 1,200 Carrier Killer missiles for the price of a single US Aircraft Carrier

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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  max steel on Tue Oct 20, 2015 4:31 pm

    5 Things the Pentagon Isn’t Telling Us About the Chinese Military


    3 year old article though . Things have changed now.

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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  JohninMK on Thu Oct 22, 2015 7:58 pm

    How about this for order value shrinkage? First sentence $784B then second sentence $784M, think the latter is correct but it is still $78M a year for the next 10 years, just to try to keep track of what Russia is doing. Still I bet they are having a hell of a party tonight.


    WASHINGTON (Sputnik) – The US government awarded defense contractor Lockheed Martin $784 billion to create and operate a new ballistic missile defense radar, the US Defense Department said in a release.

    “Lockheed Martin Corp. … is being awarded a $784,289,883 fixed-price incentive contract with options to develop, deploy, test and operate a Long Range Discrimination Radar (LRDR),” the release stated on Wednesday.

    The Defense Department said the creation of the ballistic missile defense system will take place in Moorestown, New Jersey and at Clear Air Force Station, Alaska. The work is expected to be completed by January 21, 2024 when the contract will end.

    “The LRDR will provide persistent discrimination capability to the Ballistic Missile Defense system to support the defense of the homeland,” the Defense Department said.

    The US Missile Defense Agency in Huntsville, Alabama is handling the contract with Lockheed Martin.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/military/20151022/1028903930/Lockheed-Awarded-Millions-to-Develop-Radar.html#ixzz3pJvJsB8o

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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  max steel on Thu Oct 22, 2015 9:07 pm

    JohninMK wrote:How about this for order value shrinkage? First sentence $784B then second sentence $784M, think the latter is correct but it is still $78M a year for the next 10 years, just to try to keep track of what Russia is doing. Still I bet they are having a hell of a party tonight.


    WASHINGTON (Sputnik) – The US government awarded defense contractor Lockheed Martin $784 billion to create and operate a new ballistic missile defense radar, the US Defense Department said in a release.

    “Lockheed Martin Corp. … is being awarded a $784,289,883 fixed-price incentive contract with options to develop, deploy, test and operate a Long Range Discrimination Radar (LRDR),” the release stated on Wednesday.

    The Defense Department said the creation of the ballistic missile defense system will take place in Moorestown, New Jersey and at Clear Air Force Station, Alaska. The work is expected to be completed by January 21, 2024 when the contract will end.

    “The LRDR will provide persistent discrimination capability to the Ballistic Missile Defense system to support the defense of the homeland,” the Defense Department said.

    The US Missile Defense Agency in Huntsville, Alabama is handling the contract with Lockheed Martin.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/military/20151022/1028903930/Lockheed-Awarded-Millions-to-Develop-Radar.html#ixzz3pJvJsB8o


    Not an appropriate thread though and sputnik made a typo there. 784 million just for a long range radar ? dunno

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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  max steel on Thu Oct 29, 2015 4:26 pm

    Here’s Proof We’re Losing the Arms Race to Russia and China

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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  magnumcromagnon on Thu Oct 29, 2015 4:46 pm

    max steel wrote:Here’s Proof We’re Losing the Arms Race to Russia and China

    The article is terrible, I stopped at the point when it claimed that the gas pipeline to China would "bailout Mother Russia"....yeah because Russia, a country that paid off 30% of it's foreign debt in this year alone (despite sanctions and concerted speculative attacks on the Rouble), needs bailing out LMAO....Rolling Eyes  Wink lol1

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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  max steel on Sat Dec 26, 2015 12:14 am


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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  George1 on Fri Feb 05, 2016 6:45 am

    New Bill Aims to Speed Up US Electronic War Advances to Match Russia

    Senators Mark Kirk and Kirsten Gillibrand stated that without reforms to its electronic warfare technology and programs, the US military will continue losing its competitive edge to countries like Russia, China and Iran.

    WASHINGTON (Sputnik) — A new bill was introduced in the US Congress that seeks to provide more funding to quickly develop criticaltechnology, Senators Mark Kirk and Kirsten Gillibrand said in a press release on Thursday.

    "The US military’s electronic warfare capabilities have fallen behind those of countries like Russia, China and Iran, leaving our servicemen and women vulnerable," the release stated. "This bill will get lifesaving electronic warfare technologies to the warfighter more quickly."

    Without reforms to its electronic warfare technology and programs, the US military will continue losing its competitive edge to countries like Russia, China and Iran, the senators warned.

    The Electronic Warfare Enhancement Act will enable the US Department of Defense to cut through acquisition red tape and provide more funding flexibility to develop electronic warfare technology, the release claimed.

    US Army in Europe Commander Lieutenant General Ben Hodges described Russia’s electronic warfare capability and sophistication as "eye-watering," the release added.

    The current Defense Department acquisition process for electronic warfare equipment can take up to ten years, and often the technology being fielded is out-of-date by the time it is approved, according to the release.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/military/20160204/1034242519/us-electonic-warfare.html#ixzz3zGlklucn


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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  George1 on Wed Feb 10, 2016 12:19 am

    US National Intel: Russia,China Progress in Developing Counterspace Weapons

    US National Intelligence Director James Clapper said during testimony on Tuesday that the continued progress of Russia and China in developing counterspace weapons system will degrade and disrupt US space systems.

    NEW YORK (Sputnik) — Clapper claimed that the threats to US military, civil, and commercial space systems will increase in the next few years.

    "Threats to our use of military, civil, and commercial space systems will increase in the next few years as Russia and China progress in developing counterspace weapon systems to deny, degrade, or disrupt US space systems," Clapper said.

    "Foreign military leaders understand the unique advantages that space-based systems provide to the United States."

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/military/20160209/1034466829/russia-china-counterspace-weapons.html#ixzz3ziROxSh3


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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  max steel on Tue Feb 23, 2016 12:03 am

    US Dominates Arms Trade as Asia, Mid-East Boost Imports


    The global transfer of major arms has risen in recent years, with the United States increasing its dominance of the trade while the flow of weaponry to Africa, Asia and the Middle East has increased, a new study published Monday showed.

    According to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) report, the volume of international transfers of major weapons — including sales and donations — was 14 percent higher in 2011-2015 than over the five previous years, with the US and Russia doing most of the exporting.

    The biggest importers were India, Saudi Arabia, China and the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

    The authors of the report singled out the conflict in Yemen, where a Saudi-led coalition is backing the government against Iran-supported Shiite Huthi rebels.

    "A coalition of Arab states is putting mainly US- and European-sourced advanced arms into use in Yemen," senior SIPRI researcher Pieter Wezeman said in the report.

    The United States has sold or donated major arms to a diverse range of recipients across the globe, the report said.

    "As regional conflicts and tensions continue to mount, the USA remains the leading global arms supplier by a significant margin," said Aude Fleurant, director of the SIPRI Arms and Military Expenditure Programme.

    "The USA has sold or donated major arms to at least 96 states in the past five years, and the US arms industry has large outstanding export orders," including for over 600 F-35 combat aircraft, said Fleurant.

    The biggest chunk of US major arms, 41 percent, went into Saudi Arabia and the rest of the Middle East.

    "Despite low oil prices, large deliveries of arms to the Middle East are scheduled to continue as part of contracts signed in the past five years," Wezeman added.

    Russia remains in second place on the SIPRI exporters list, with its share of the total up three points to 25 percent, though the levels dropped in 2014 and 2015 — coinciding with Western sanctions against Moscow over the Ukraine conflict.

    India took the largest chunk of Russian weaponry and SIPRI also listed pro-Moscow rebels in Ukraine among the recipients.




    While the flows of weapons to Africa, Asia and Oceania and the Middle East all increased between 2006-10 and 2011-15, there had been a sharp fall in the flow to Europe and a minor decrease in the volume heading to the Americas, according to SIPRI.

    The overall transfer of arms has been upwards this century after a relative drop in the previous 20 years.

    China leapfrogged both France and Germany over the past five years to become the third-largest source of major arms globally, with an 88-percent rise in exports.

    Most of the Chinese weapons went to other Asian countries, with Pakistan the main recipient.

    India remains by far the biggest importer of major arms, accounting for 14 percent of the total; twice as much as second-placed Saudi Arabia and three times as much as China.

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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  George1 on Wed Mar 02, 2016 12:44 am

    This is How Pentagon Wants to Counter Russia and China

    The Pentagon is seeking more funds to counter technologically-savvy adversaries like Russia and China by investing in the so-called Third Offset strategy, the Japan Business Press asserted.

    "The Third Offset strategy was specifically designed to counterbalance the military might" of Moscow and Beijing, as well as undermine their Anti-Access/Area Denial (A2/AD) capabilities, the media outlet noted.

    The US defense agency plans to spend $3.6 billion on innovative defense capabilities as part of its $71.8 billion budget for fiscal year 2017. In total, the Pentagon is expected to allocate $18 billion on the Third Offset through the Future Years Defense Program.

    The US Department of Defense "plans to spend $3 billion on Anti-Area/Access-Denial (A2/AD) technologies, $500 million on guided munitions challenges, $3 billion on submarine and undersea challenges, $3 billion on human-machine collaboration and teaming, $1.7 billion on cyber and EW issues, and $500 million on expanding war gaming and operational concept tests and demonstrations," an unnamed source told Defense News in February.

    The US Air Force plans to replace Lockheed Martin’s infamous U-2 spy plane with Northrop Grumman’s RQ-4 Global Hawk.

    Some of the military programs, key to the Third Offset strategy, include the RQ-4 Global Hawk unmanned surveillance aircraft, the X-47B drone designed for aircraft carrier-based operations, the Long Range Strike Bomber (LRS-B), the Virginia Payload Module (VPM) for the SSN-774 class nuclear-powered attack submarines, etc., the Japan Business Press detailed.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/military/20160301/1035606365/dod-third-offset.html#ixzz41hKioBIE


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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  max steel on Sat Mar 05, 2016 8:33 am

    China's airpower will overtake the US Air Force by 2030


    In a stark assessment, the US Air Force chief-of-staff warned that China's People's Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) will be poised to overtake the US Air Force by 2030.
    On March 2, General Mark Welsh told the House Appropriations Committee's defense subcommittee that currently it is estimated that the US has a "couple thousand more aircraft" than China, The National Interest reports.

    The PLAAF is larger than the US Air Force in terms of personnel, and that size will be represented by the number of aircraft China has in the coming years.

    “At the rate they’re building, the models they’re fielding, by 2030 they will have fielded—they will have made up that 2,000 aircraft gap and they will be at least as big—if not bigger—than our air forces," Welsh told the subcommittee.

    More importantly than just the number of aircraft and personnel in the PLAAF, though, is Beijing's trend of acquiring and successfully fielding more and more advanced weapons systems. This drive by the PLAAF will also shrink the commanding technological advantage that the US currently holds over China.

    “We are not keeping up with that kind of technology development,” Welsh said. “We are still in a position of—we will have the best technology in the battlespace especially if we can continue with our current big three modernization programs.”

    Welsh also went on to warn that China "will have a lot of technology that’s better than the stuff we’ve had before."

    China is currently constructing prototypes for two different fifth-generation fighters that are specifically tailored to different mission sets. It's J-20 is thought to be making quick development progress, while it's J-31 is believed to be the equal of the F-35 due to espionage and Chinese theft of trade secrets.

    Additionally, China is also developing a stealth drone as well as seeking to buy Russia's highly capable Su-35S fighter aircraft.

    All these measures taken together will cumulatively make China a significantly more capable military force that could project its will against US protest across East Asia.



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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  max steel on Sat Mar 05, 2016 7:17 pm

    Inside China’s Plan for a Military That Can Counter U.S. Muscle


    With a series of edicts, speeches and martial ceremonies, President Xi Jinping has over the past six months unveiled China’s biggest military overhaul since the aftermath of the Korean War.The plan seeks to transform the 2.3-million-member People’s Liberation Army, which features 21st-century hardware but an outdated, Soviet-inspired command structure, into a fighting force capable of winning a modern war.

    China is shifting from a “large country to a large and powerful one,” Xi explained in November. The restructuring will be a major focus of the country’s new defense budget, which will be announced Saturday as the annual National People’s Congress gets under way in Beijing.

    “A lot of countries do military reforms, but they are rarely as tectonic as what we are seeing in China,” said Dean Cheng, a senior research fellow at the Heritage Foundation in Washington who specializes in military capabilities. “Any single one of these elements constitutes a bureaucratic overhaul of the first order.”



    Here are the key elements of Xi’s plan:

    Fewer Singers, More Sailors

    The first piece of the overhaul — announced by Xi during a grand military parade through Tiananmen Square on Sept. 3 — calls for eliminating 300,000 PLA personnel by 2017. While Xi presented the cutbacks as proof of China’s commitment to peace, they’ll largely target non-combat personnel and should make the country’s forces more focused and efficient.



    Out are military cooks, hospital workers, journalists and some 10,000 members of the PLA’s famed troops of singers and dancers. Even so, China’s military will remain by far the world’s largest, with more than 600,000 more active service members than the U.S., according to estimates by the International Institute for Strategic Studies.

    The reorganization will also chip away at the army’s dominance as modern mechanized warfare requires far fewer conventional troops. China needs more pilots, sailors, commandos and drone operators to achieve ambitions of projecting force farther afield.

    Who’s the Boss?

    Advanced military actions such as intercepting rival aircraft, carrying out drone strikes and using special forces to extract hostages, demand the sort of close collaboration China’s army-centric military has lacked. Xi intends to fix that by reorganizing the armed forces into five branches under a joint-command structure modeled after that of the U.S.

    In addition to the existing army, PLA Air Force and PLA Navy, a new Rocket Force will be responsible for China’s nuclear arsenal and conventional missiles while a Strategic Support Force will oversee cyberwarfare and protect China’s financial system from attack.


    Redrawing the Map


    As part of the move toward a unified command, China consolidated its seven military regions into five “Theater Commands” or “Battle Zones,” with each service reporting to a single commander, a move first reported by Bloomberg News in September. How these zones will function remains unclear.




    “A lot of energy will be spent figuring out who commands who; who supports who; and most importantly who controls which budgets?” said Felix Chang, a senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute in Philadelphia.
    Many will be watching to see how far beyond China’s borders the new zones reach and how the revamped military map will shape PLA activities in regional hotspots such as the South China Sea.

    Consolidating Power



    Xi is also centralizing his authority by breaking up the military’s massive, back-office bureaucracy. Four existing general departments will be divided into 15 smaller units responsible for everything from training and logistics to punishing corrupt officers and ensuring soldiers get sufficient education in Marxist ideology. They’ll all report directly to the Central Military Commission, a Communist Party body led by Xi.

    “It may be that this is a means for Xi to increase his support within the PLA, as all these new general officer billets will be filled with his people,” said Cheng, of the Heritage Foundation.

    Success of the reform plan will depend heavily on Xi’s capacity to overcome entrenched interests in the PLA, which has long enjoyed a privileged status as the guarantor of Communist Party rule. In a sign of the army’s continued influence, all five of the commanders chosen for the new battle zones hail from the ground forces.

    One thing Xi has made clear: he has no plans to transfer control over the PLA to the government from the party, something foreign military experts say is needed to professionalize the services.

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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  max steel on Sat Apr 02, 2016 9:24 am

    China’s Military Wants to Put Its Nukes on a Hair Trigger

    If Barack Obama gets one thing done at the 2016 Nuclear Security Summit, it should be dissuading Xi Jinping from doing this. silent

    Even as Chinese President Xi Jinping strides into the final Nuclear Security Summit today in Washington, D.C., he is considering a dangerous policy change: The Chinese military is asking to put its nuclear missiles on hair-trigger alert so they can be launched immediately upon detecting an incoming attack. President Barack Obama should encourage his counterpart to carefully consider such a change, because it would dramatically increase the risk of an accidental or mistaken nuclear launch against the United States or its allies.

    China’s previous political leaders believed prudence demanded they wait and ride out a nuclear attack—should it come—before retaliating later at a time and place of their choosing. Their strategic patience was celebrated, at home and abroad, as a responsible expression of confidence that would discourage any enemy, including the United States, from attacking China with nuclear weapons in the first place.

    But the current commander-in-chief is a new kind of leader. Xi appears to be a man in a hurry, and he has said he wants to make the Chinese military better prepared to fight and win wars, not simply prevent them.

    Chinese military strategists expressed their desire to put the country’s nuclear weapons on high alert three years ago. Their language is labored but the meaning is clear:

    When conditions are prepared and when necessary, we can, under conditions confirming the enemy has launched nuclear missiles against us, before the enemy nuclear warheads have reached their targets and effectively exploded, before they have caused us actual nuclear damage, quickly launch a nuclear missile retaliatory strike.


    The strategists argue this is necessary to protect China from being disarmed of its roughly 150 nuclear missiles by a U.S. first strike, even a conventional one. China’s liquid-fueled ICBMs are fixed in identifiable silos and take time to prepare for launch. The military also has mobile solid-fueled ICBMs, but planners worry that mobility is less of a guarantee of survival than it used to be, given U.S. surveillance capabilities. A modest expansion is underway that includes replacing the large single warheads on the liquid-fueled missiles with two or three smaller ones. But the strategists worry that even this expansion will not be enough to guarantee an ability to retaliate.

    Chinese engineers know U.S. ballistic missile defense isn’t ready for prime time. Given the countermeasures problem, it may never be. But the strategists aren’t engineers. They simply cannot believe the U.S. government would dump that much money into something that couldn’t work. China has been surprised by new military technology before. The strategists are wary the United States could scale up the size and capabilities of U.S. missile defenses. And they worry that even a marginally effective future BMD system might be able to ward off what few Chinese nuclear missiles survive a first strike to be launched in retaliation.

    This is why the military strategists want Xi to put China’s nuclear missiles on high alert: they feel they need to be able to launch them before they are destroyed. And in their minds, at least, a Chinese launch on warning is still a second strike.

    Moreover, they wonder, if the United States and Russia keep missiles on high alert, why shouldn’t China?

    If Xi finds the case made by his military strategists compelling, he will be overlooking something important. The early warning systems needed to detect and confirm an incoming nuclear attack have been known to give false warning, especially in the early years of their operation. Even if the warning was real, would the Chinese operators be able to distinguish an incoming conventional strike from a nuclear strike? Would that matter if they thought the conventional strike was aimed at their nuclear forces? If China’s military stands up such a system and is given permission to launch on warning, it would create the risk of an accidental or mistaken nuclear launch against the United States.

    Avoiding this risk should be a high priority for the White House, especially at a summit focused on nuclear security.

    Xi may respond by encouraging Obama to take a harder look at the United States’ own nuclear weapons policy. The U.S. military currently keeps its 450 land-based ICBMs on alert and maintains the option to launch them quickly, even though it has submarine-launched long-range missiles that provide a survivable retaliatory force.

    If the only outcome of Obama’s final nuclear security summit is that both nations see the folly of keeping nuclear forces on high alert, history will record it as a turning point in the effort to reduce the risk of nuclear war.

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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  max steel on Tue Apr 12, 2016 1:26 pm

    How China Is Building the Biggest Commercial-Military Empire in History




    In the 18th and 19th centuries, the sun famously never set on the British empire. A commanding navy enforced its will, yet all would have been lost if it were not for ports, roads, and railroads. The infrastructure that the British built everywhere they went embedded and enabled their power like bones and veins in a body.

    Great nations have done this since Rome paved 55,000 miles (89,000 km) of roads and aqueducts in Europe. In the 19th and 20th centuries, Russia and the United States established their own imprint, skewering and taming nearby territories with projects like the Trans-Siberian and the Trans-Continental railways.

    Now it’s the turn of the Chinese. Much has been made of Beijing’s “resource grab” in Africa and elsewhere, its construction of militarized artificial islands in the South China Sea and, most recently, its new strategy to project naval power broadly in the open seas.

    Yet these profiles of an allegedly grasping and treacherous China tend to consider its ambitions in disconnected pieces. What these pieces add up to is a whole latticework of infrastructure materializing around the world. Combined with the ambitious activities of Chinese companies, they are quickly growing into history’s most extensive global commercial empire.

    China views almost no place as uncontested. Chinese-financed and -built dams, roads, railroads, natural gas pipelines, ports, and airports are either in place or will be from Samoa to Rio de Janeiro, St. Petersburg to Jakarta, Mombasa to Vanuatu, and from the Arctic to Antarctica. Many are built in service of current and prospective mines, oilfields, and other businesses back to China, and at times to markets abroad.

    But while this grand picture suggests a deliberate plan devised in Beijing, it also reflects an unbridled commercial frenzy. Chinese companies are venturing out and doing deals lacking any particular order. Mostly, they’re interested in finding growth abroad that is proving difficult to manage at home. This, too, is typical for a fast-growing power.

    “This is very much in line with what we would expect from other great powers whose military posture follows its economic and diplomatic footprint,” Lyle Morris, a China specialist with Rand, told Quartz.

    Below are snapshots of components that are either already in place or on the way.


    The story starts with a reimagined Silk Road



    In September 2013, newly anointed Chinese leader Xi Jinping visited Kazakhstan’s capital, Astana. He was in town to seal the Chinese purchase of a $5 billion stake in Kashagan, one of the world’s largest oilfields. On that trip, he unveiled a plan ultimately dubbed “One Belt, One Road”—a land-and-sea version of the fabled East-West Silk Road trading route.

    The idea is audacious in scope.

    On land, Beijing has in mind a high-speed rail network (map 2). It will start in Kunming, the capital of Yunnan province, and connect with Laos and on into Cambodia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam.

    Another overland network of roads, rail and energy pipelines will begin in Xi’an in central China and head west as far as Belgium (see dotted brown line above). As we’ve written previously, Beijing has already initiated an 8,011-mile cargo rail route between the Chinese city of Yiwu and Madrid, Spain. Finally, another 1,125-mile-long bullet train will start in Kashgar and punch south through Pakistan to the Arabian Sea port of Gwadur. The thinking behind this rail-driven plan isn’t new–as we have written previously, Beijing has been piecing it together for awhile.

    At sea, a companion 21st-century Maritime Silk Road (see dotted blue line in map 1) would connect the South China Sea, and the Indian and South Pacific oceans. China would begin to protect its own sea lanes as well. On May 26 it disclosed a strategy for expanding its navy into a fleet that not only hugs its own shores, but can wander the open ocean.

    China does not need to build all of these thousands of miles of railroads and other facilities. Much of the infrastructure already exists; where it does, the trick is to link it all together.

    Everywhere, new public works will be required. And to make its vision materialize, Beijing must be careful to be seen as generously sharing the big engineering and construction projects. Up to now, such contracts have been treated as rare, big profit opportunities for state-owned Chinese industrial units. These include the China Railway Group, whose already-inflated share prices have often gone up each time another piece of the overseas empire has fallen into place. If local infrastructure companies are excluded from the largesse, there will be push-back on almost every continent.

    In any case, not all this will necessarily happen. In a recent note to clients, China observer Jonathan Fenby of the research firm Trusted Sources suggested that it may all be too ambitious. China has had a history of announcing and then shelving projects, such as a $3.7 billion railway canceled by Mexico in February amid allegations of local nepotism. Meanwhile, Japan has begun to challenge Chinese plans. It has launched rival bids for billion-dollar high-speed rail and other projects in Indonesia, Thailand and elsewhere, with relatively low-interest loans and sometimes better technology (paywall).

    But Beijing seems to recognize its own limits. Rather, the world may help to build at least some of the infrastructure through another Chinese creation—the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, with its 57 founding members, modeled loosely on the World Bank. Projects backed by the bank are meant to be good for the country where they are built. But given China’s outsize influence in the institution, they are certain to include some that fit into its grand scheme of global infrastructure.

    extends into South America



    Xi has pledged $250 billion in investment in South America over the next 10 years. The centerpiece is a $10 billion, 3,300-mile, high-speed railroad (dotted red line above) that would start in Acu, near Rio de Janeiro, crossing the Amazon rainforest and the Andes Mountains, and terminate on the Peruvian coast. (NPR’s Tom Ashbrook conducted anexcellent hour-long program on the railroad.)

    On top of that, there’s an advanced proposal by Chinese billionaire Wang Jing to build a 170-mile-long, $50 billion canal through Nicaragua.

    and also across Africa

    In January, China agreed with the African Union to help build railroads (map 4), roads, and airports to link all 54 African countries. These plans are already under way, including a $13 billion, 875-mile-long coastal railroad in Nigeria; a $3.8 billion, 500-mile-long railroad connecting the Kenyan cities of Nairobi and Mombasa; a $4 billion, 460-mile railway linking the Ethiopian cities of Addis Ababa and Djibouti; and a $5.6 billion, 850-mile network of rail lines in Chad.

    Then there are China’s maritime ambitions. These envision modern ports in the Tanzanian capital, Dar es Salaam; the Mozambican capital, Maputo; Libreville, Gabon; the Ghanaian city of Tema; and the Senegalese capital, Dakar.

    All these land and marine projects align with existing Chinese natural-resource investments on the continent. For example, the China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC) has large oil projects in Chadand Mozambique, and Chinese manufacturers are fast setting upEthiopian factories that rely on cheap local labor.

    The new Chinese empire is enveloping its neighbors

    In addition to its planned high-speed rail network into Malaysia and Singapore (map 2) and Laos (map 5) into southeast Asia (see map 5 for Laotian portion), China plans a canal across the Isthmus of Kra in Thailand, a deep-water container port and industrial park in Kuantan, Malaysia, and a $511-million expansionof Male airport in the Maldives.

    and nations further afield in the Pacific



    China wants to dominate not only the South and East China seas, but far into the Pacific (map 6). According to the Lowly Institute, transportation comprises by far the largest portion of $2.5 billion in Chinese assistance and commercial credit to South Sea nations. Among the projects are:

    Fiji: A $158 million hydroelectric plant and several sports complexes, including the 4,000-seat Vodafone stadium in Suva.

    Samoa: A $100 million hospital in Apia, a $40 million terminal and upgraded runway at Faleolo Airport, and a $140 million wharf at Vaiusu.

    Tonga: A $12 million government building to be called St. George Palace, and two small Chinese turboprop aircraft for domestic routes aboard Real Tonga airlines. The aircraft deal has been controversial because neither of the planes are certified for use in the West.

    Vanuatu: Two more turboprops, this time for Air Vanuatu, and $60 million to build a Port Vila campus of the University of the South Pacific and a Parliament House (both loans have been forgiven).

    Pakistan is pivotal to China’s Silk Road



    Why has China lavished $42 billion in infrastructure projects on Pakistan? The two have always been allies. But China has a particular goal: It wants to contain Uighur separatists who have been fomenting violence in the western province of Xinjiang. Some of these separatists have sanctuaries in Pakistan and Afghanistan, and Beijing has pushed hard for both countries to hand over Uighurs living there.



    But sending goods through Pakistan (map 7) also helps China avoid the Malacca Strait (map Cool. Much of Beijing’s oil and other natural resources passes through this narrow, 500-mile-long stretch of sea between Malaysia and Indonesia. China worries that, if its relations with Washington become truly hostile, the US could theoretically blockade the strait and starve the country of its lifeblood resources. That is in large part why Beijing is financing a deep Arabian Sea port at Gwadur, and the 1,125-mile-long super-highway, high-speed railway and oil-pipeline route to the Chinese city of Kashgar.

    as is Central Asia

    Central Asia has been an almost exclusively Russian playground for almost two centuries. It still is when it comes to pure muscle. But in matters of cash, China is fast moving in.

    The relationship revolves around oil and natural gas. Turkmenistansupplies more than half of China’s imported gas. It gets there throughthree, 1,150-mile-long pipelines; a fourth pipeline is soon to begin construction. China is the only foreign nation that Turkmenistan allows to drill for gas onshore, in particular from Galkynysh, the second-largest gasfield in the world. China’s $5 billion share of the Kashagan oilfield in Kazakhstan is one of its largest oil stakes anywhere. Xi also has signed $15 billion in gas and uranium deals inUzbekistan.

    and Russia



    Two years ago, Russia announced a pivot towards China. The centerpiece of the shift is two natural-gas pipelines (the larger of the two is the dotted red line in map 9) through which a fifth of China’s gas imports would flow. The deal had some snags, but they reportedly have been worked out, and construction is to begin soon. In addition, China is to build a $242 billion, 4,300-mile high-speed railway from Beijing to Moscow, a two-day trip compared with the current six-day Trans-Mongolian Express.

    China is speeding up how fast goods get to Europe



    The Maritime Silk Road (the solid blue line in map 10) will enter Europe through a $260 million Chinese-funded upgrade of the Greek port of Piraeus. From there, rail service will continue into the Balkans. Ships from China will also make port in Lisbon, Portugal, and Duisburg, Germany. To take the network into the heart of Europe, Beijing has agreed to finance a 250-mile bullet train, costing up to $3 billion, from Belgrade to Budapest. Separately, China’s new 8,011-mile cargo railroadfrom Yiwu to Madrid is taking away business from far more time-consuming truck shipping.

    and has piled into US real estate



    For now, the Chinese web of infrastructure does not extend to the US. Instead, what has been built elsewhere is serving as a jumping-off point to the gigantic US market. High-speed trains are only now starting to be planned in the US, and Chinese firms are front-runners to win contracts, including a $1 billion contest for the San Francisco-to-Los Angeles route, expected to be worth $68 billion. China’s CNR Corp. is already providing 284 passenger cars worth $566 million to the Boston subway system.

    Another big splash: the United States is China’s favored destination for real estate investment (see chart above). This has included commercial jewels such as New York’s Waldorf Astoria ($1.95 billion to Angbang Insurance) and the Chase Manhattan Plaza ($725 million to Fosun). But the bigger sums have been spent in all-cash deals by wealthy Chinesefor residential properties.

    Last but not least, China has polar ambitions

    Though the closest Chinese territory gets to the Arctic Circle is a thousand miles away, China nonetheless calls itself a “near-Arctic state.” Chinese oil company Cnooc has a majority share in Iceland’s Dreki oil and natural gas field, and Beijing established the Arctic Yellow River Station, a permanent research facility on Norway’s Spitsbergen Island. In Antarctica, China has four research stations, structures that allow nations to stake a claim to the continent. Plans for a fifth station at a place called Inexpressible Island are under way. It is positioning itself to move for the continent’s resources when a 1959 treaty guaranteeing its wilderness status expires in 2048.

    Some of the infrastructure China is creating around the world will align with Western economic interests. But to the extent that it does, that will be inadvertent. Some of the most modern transportation infrastructure going up not only in China, but around the developing world, is deliberately linked to China. It is meant to make the global economy a friendly place for Chinese commerce.

    That does not make China’s ambitions necessarily menacing or pernicious. But it does make them China-centric. It’s worth remembering that this way of doing economic development is not a Chinese invention. As Michael Pillsbury, author of “The Hundred Year Marathon,” tells Quartz, China’s ambitions are rooted in “a fierce sense of competitiveness which they claim they learned from the America of the 1800s.”

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    CNN: Russia contests US Navy supremacy

    Post  nemrod on Sun May 08, 2016 4:39 pm

    Thx Max for these useful informations.

    http://www.pravdareport.com/news/russia/06-05-2016/134350-navy-0/
    - See more at: http://www.pravdareport.com/news/russia/06-05-2016/134350-navy-0/#sthash.F8nq97me.dpuf


    CNN: Russia contests US Navy supremacy

    The American military is deeply concerned that new Russian submarines will challenge the US Navy supremacy.

    "We're back to the point now where we have to consider there is an adversary ready to challenge us in the undersea domain and that undersea superiority is not guaranteed," U.S. Navy Commodore Ollie Lewis told CNN.

    New American Virginia-class submarines are able to carry out a wide range of tasks, gather intelligence and launch torpedoes at ground targets. But they will face a new challenge quite soon, that is the Russian Yasen class submarine.

    As Michael Kofman, an expert at the Washington Wilson Center, explained, among all the submarines that the US adversaries possess, the Yasen is the quietest one, and the US "Navy is not really sure it can track it".

    The Russian submarines' increased activity is also noted to be in the triangle Greenland-Iceland-Great Britain, and that is the key naval corridor for the US military reinforcement in Europe.

    Beside that, according to the USS Missouri's commander Fraser Hudson, Russia does not intend to just make a "political statement", but rather to gain a practical experience.



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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  max steel on Tue May 17, 2016 1:05 am

    Russia, China Missiles Overcome All Defenses

    Last month, Russia and China each demonstrated hypersonic vehicles capable of rapidly delivering nuclear warheads to any locations in the world, with no present or near-term interception defense. Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitri Rogozin compared the importance of these new weapons as on par with nuclear arms development.

    He declared, “Whoever is first to achieve” mastery of hypersonic weapons will “overturn the principles” of how wars are waged.

    China conducted its seventh successful hypersonic vehicle test just three days after Russia demonstrated its second . . . a 3M22 Zircon hypersonic glider launched atop a SS-19 ballistic missile from a base near the Kazakhstan border.

    An armed version is scheduled to go into operation by 2018 aboard a new Pak DA stealth bomber now under development. Jane’s Intelligence Review reports that Russia may be able to deploy up to 24 hypersonic nuclear delivery vehicles from their Dombarovsky air force base between 2020 and 2025,

    Beijing’s DF-ZF hypersonic glide vehicle fired from the Shanxi Province Wuzhai launch center in central China has reportedly reached speeds over 7,000 miles per hour. The Congressional Sino-U.S. Economic and Security Review Commission reports that the program is “progressing rapidly," and that a new strike weapon could be deployed by 2020.

    A powered version (rather than glider) under development may be fielded by 2025.

    The commission reported that “The very high speeds of these weapons, combined with their maneuverability and ability to travel at lower, radar-evading altitudes, would make them far less vulnerable than existing missiles to current missile defenses.” A capacity to transport nuclear warheads at 10 times the speed of sound exceeds the ability of conventional ballistic missile defenses to prevent them from reaching U.S. homeland.

    Former Pentagon strategic forces policymaker, Mark Schneider, observes: “U.S. programs involving hypersonic vehicles are modest by comparison.” He added, “I would be surprised if we actually deploy one. If we do, it will likely be conventional. Russian hypersonic vehicles will likely either be nuclear armed or nuclear-capable since this is the norm for Russia.”

    A U.S. Army hypersonic test vehicle exploded about a year and a half ago. The Pentagon has stressed that the U.S. hypersonic program will not carry nuclear weapons.

    Washington Free Beacon national security reporter and senior editor Bill Gertz warns about America’s vulnerability to high speed hypersonic attacks. Quoting China National Security Policy Committee researcher, Li Bingyan: “Only by matching real-time information with zero-time firepower [lasers] can one achieve the operational result of destruction upon detection.”

    Yet out of DOD’s $7.5 billion 2017 budget, only $23 million is provided for a low-power laser capable of targeting hypersonic weapons. No tests of that capability are planned until 2021 . . . years after Russia and China are expected to deploy operational capabilities.

    According to A U.S. Department of Defense report, from 2005 through 2014 China’s annual defense spending adjusted for inflation rose an average 9.5 percent annually, while U.S. outlays averaged just under 0.4 percent. Included are advanced Chinese naval developments such as “supercavitation” technology which allows torpedoes to travel at the speed of sound (which is 3,320 miles per hour under water).

    It reduces water drag by creating a bubble of gas for the missile to travel through, enabling those launched from Shanghai to reach San Francisco in less than two hours.

    Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Ala., chairman of the House Armed Services Strategic Forces Subcommittee, told the Washington Times: “I’m troubled that Russia and China continue to outpace the U.S. in development of these prompt global strike capabilities, complain about our tepid development programs, and the Obama administration’s ideological reductions to the Missile Defense Agency budget have denied that agency resources to do anything to develop defenses.”

    Responding to China’s most recent DF-ZF vehicle test, retired former U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet intelligence director Captain Jim Fanell observes that: “The threat of hypersonic missile attack not only impacts conventional warfare scenarios like we are seeing develop in the South and East China Sea, but it also puts U.S. nuclear defense strategies at risk.”

    Also reported in the Washington Free Beacon, House Armed Services subcommittee on sea power Chairman Randy Forbes, R-Va. said: “Beijing is committed to up-ending both the conventional military and nuclear balance, with grave implications for the stability of Asia.”

    President Obama has clearly followed through on his pledge made during a 2009 Prague speech that “To put an end to Cold War thinking, we will reduce the role of nuclear weapons in our national security strategy.” There should be little wonder then, why Vladimir Putin saw no good reason to attend the nuclear summit photo-op event he hosted last month in Washington.

    As Mikhail Ulyanov of the Russian foreign ministry explained at the time, “We don’t really know what the point of this summit is.” It seems that the Russians and Chinese never read that White House memo.


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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  AlfaT8 on Sat May 21, 2016 10:38 pm

    max steel wrote:Russia, China Missiles Overcome All Defenses

    Last month, Russia and China each demonstrated hypersonic vehicles capable of rapidly delivering nuclear warheads to any locations in the world, with no present or near-term interception defense. Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitri Rogozin compared the importance of these new weapons as on par with nuclear arms development.

    He declared, “Whoever is first to achieve” mastery of hypersonic weapons will “overturn the principles” of how wars are waged.

    China conducted its seventh successful hypersonic vehicle test just three days after Russia demonstrated its second . . . a 3M22 Zircon hypersonic glider launched atop a SS-19 ballistic missile from a base near the Kazakhstan border.

    An armed version is scheduled to go into operation by 2018 aboard a new Pak DA stealth bomber now under development. Jane’s Intelligence Review reports that Russia may be able to deploy up to 24 hypersonic nuclear delivery vehicles from their Dombarovsky air force base between 2020 and 2025,

    Beijing’s DF-ZF hypersonic glide vehicle fired from the Shanxi Province Wuzhai launch center in central China has reportedly reached speeds over 7,000 miles per hour. The Congressional Sino-U.S. Economic and Security Review Commission reports that the program is “progressing rapidly," and that a new strike weapon could be deployed by 2020.

    A powered version (rather than glider) under development may be fielded by 2025.

    The commission reported that “The very high speeds of these weapons, combined with their maneuverability and ability to travel at lower, radar-evading altitudes, would make them far less vulnerable than existing missiles to current missile defenses.” A capacity to transport nuclear warheads at 10 times the speed of sound exceeds the ability of conventional ballistic missile defenses to prevent them from reaching U.S. homeland.

    Former Pentagon strategic forces policymaker, Mark Schneider, observes: “U.S. programs involving hypersonic vehicles are modest by comparison.” He added, “I would be surprised if we actually deploy one. If we do, it will likely be conventional. Russian hypersonic vehicles will likely either be nuclear armed or nuclear-capable since this is the norm for Russia.”

    A U.S. Army hypersonic test vehicle exploded about a year and a half ago. The Pentagon has stressed that the U.S. hypersonic program will not carry nuclear weapons.

    Washington Free Beacon national security reporter and senior editor Bill Gertz warns about America’s vulnerability to high speed hypersonic attacks. Quoting China National Security Policy Committee researcher, Li Bingyan: “Only by matching real-time information with zero-time firepower [lasers] can one achieve the operational result of destruction upon detection.”

    Yet out of DOD’s $7.5 billion 2017 budget, only $23 million is provided for a low-power laser capable of targeting hypersonic weapons. No tests of that capability are planned until 2021 . . . years after Russia and China are expected to deploy operational capabilities.

    According to A U.S. Department of Defense report, from 2005 through 2014 China’s annual defense spending adjusted for inflation rose an average 9.5 percent annually, while U.S. outlays averaged just under 0.4 percent. Included are advanced Chinese naval developments such as “supercavitation” technology which allows torpedoes to travel at the speed of sound (which is 3,320 miles per hour under water).

    It reduces water drag by creating a bubble of gas for the missile to travel through, enabling those launched from Shanghai to reach San Francisco in less than two hours.

    Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Ala., chairman of the House Armed Services Strategic Forces Subcommittee, told the Washington Times: “I’m troubled that Russia and China continue to outpace the U.S. in development of these prompt global strike capabilities, complain about our tepid development programs, and the Obama administration’s ideological reductions to the Missile Defense Agency budget have denied that agency resources to do anything to develop defenses.”

    Responding to China’s most recent DF-ZF vehicle test, retired former U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet intelligence director Captain Jim Fanell observes that: “The threat of hypersonic missile attack not only impacts conventional warfare scenarios like we are seeing develop in the South and East China Sea, but it also puts U.S. nuclear defense strategies at risk.”

    Also reported in the Washington Free Beacon, House Armed Services subcommittee on sea power Chairman Randy Forbes, R-Va. said: “Beijing is committed to up-ending both the conventional military and nuclear balance, with grave implications for the stability of Asia.”

    President Obama has clearly followed through on his pledge made during a 2009 Prague speech that “To put an end to Cold War thinking, we will reduce the role of nuclear weapons in our national security strategy.” There should be little wonder then, why Vladimir Putin saw no good reason to attend the nuclear summit photo-op event he hosted last month in Washington.

    As Mikhail Ulyanov of the Russian foreign ministry explained at the time, “We don’t really know what the point of this summit is.” It seems that the Russians and Chinese never read that White House memo.


    WTF, they started this global prompt sh#t and now they're bitching about it because they're losing, for reals.  Rolling Eyes

    Now they're all troubled by these developments and desperately trying to make Obama a scapegoat for there inept defense industry, this is hilarious.  Laughing

    BTW "low-power laser capable of targeting hypersonic weapons" are you kidding me.  Laughing

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    Re: China & Russia close the tech gap vs USA in weapons race

    Post  Godric on Sat May 21, 2016 11:08 pm

    America's defence spending is bloated beyond all belief ... the corruption is off the scale when they can't account for missing trillions of defence spending and to think these clowns believe even more defence spending is necessary when the US is over $18 trillion in debt .... they are clearly not living in the real world

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