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    Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  Regular on Sun Nov 22, 2015 3:48 pm

    Ukraine was saying that it was nationalist who did this. They were in conflict with Ukrainian police before. Russia should hit Ukraine in the wallet and hard.

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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  George1 on Tue Dec 22, 2015 10:09 am

    Crimea to integrate in all-Russia electric power market as of 2018

    Supplies of power Russia’s integrated power grid are one-third smaller than the prices, at which electricity was sold to Crimea by Ukraine

    MOSCOW, December 22. /TASS/. Crimean Peninsula will integrate into the all-Russia market of electric power as a non-price zone as of 2018, Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak said in an interview published by Kommersant Daily on Tuesday.

    "When Crimea gets its own power generating facilities, they will be included in the (all-Russia) wholesale market, and the Crimean Peninsula will integrate in it as a non-price zone but this will happen only in 2018," he said. "For the time being, however, a special pattern of wholesale electricity purchases will be in effect."

    Supplies of power Russia’s integrated power grid are one-third smaller than the prices, at which electricity was sold to Crimea by Ukraine.

    On the whole, Crimea consumers about 6.4 bln kWh of electricity a year and purchases from Ukraine totaled 4.9 bln kWh. Now almost a half of needed power will be supplied from the Russian power grids and the electricity produced by Crimea’s own generating facilities will add to it.

    "When the electricity bridge (a submerged high-voltage line that transmits electric power to Crimea from mainland Russia across the Kerch Strait - TASS) adds another 400 MW, we’ll be able to cross out supplies from Ukraine at all but this won’t solve the importance of subsidizing the fees foe electric power for the customers located in the Crimean Federal District, since the final tariffs will be smaller than the economically substantiated expenditure for purchases and transmission of electricity," Novak said. "That why the subsidies for covering electricity fees in Crimea will be lifted stage by stage."

    As he answered a question about construction on a thermal power plant in Taman on the North-Caucasian coast of the Black Sea, he said the consumer demand for electricity from that facility is guaranteed.

    "There are many of those who’d like to take part in the bidding contest and you can find Russian and foreign companies among the bidders, including companies from China," Novak said. "We expect the bidding contest will be held in the second half of 2016.".


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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  PapaDragon on Mon Dec 28, 2015 3:38 pm


    Yahoo/AP view... dunno

    Crimeans enter 2016 struggling, but optimistic

    http://news.yahoo.com/crimeans-enter-2016-struggling-optimisticc-141322183.html

    SEVASTOPOL, Crimea (AP) — As New Year's Eve approaches, the central square of Crimea's largest city is festooned with bright festive decorations, including a soaring artificial tree that flashes and winks. But areas just a few steps away are sunk in darkness, the street lamps turned off because of an electricity shortage.

    Sevastopol and the rest of Crimea are slowly recovering from a blackout that hit the Russia-annexed peninsula in late November when unidentified attackers blew up pylons of the lines from mainland Ukraine that supplied nearly all its electricity. The blackout underscored how dependent Crimea remained on Ukraine even after Russia claimed control of the region in March 2014 following a referendum sparked by the political chaos in Ukraine, where the Russia-friendly president fled amid massive protests.

    For about two weeks after the pylon bombing, the peninsula's 2 million people were almost entirely without power, and critical establishments such as hospitals relied on their own emergency generators. Conditions eased somewhat after Ukraine restored one of the power lines and after the first of several underwater electricity cables from Russia went into service. That so-called "energy bridge" had been under development before the blackout.

    While Ukrainian nationalists and Crimean Tatars who oppose Russian annexation vengefully cheered the blackout, most of Crimea's people appear to see it as confirmation they did the right thing by voting to split off from Ukraine.

    Businessman Artyom Kryuchkov said he and his wife had to buy an electric generator and stand in lines to get petrol. But the hardships did not make him or his family want to go back to Ukraine.

    "The two-week long black-out brought us closer to each other," Kryuchkov said.

    "By punishing Crimeans, Ukrainian officials have lost Crimea and played right into Putin's hands," Andrei Kolesnikov of the Moscow Carnegie Center said in a recent article. "By pursuing revenge against the regime they have hurt ordinary people instead. This will only make the regime stronger, and the besieged fortress will become even more besieged."

    Crimea faces an array of problems, including a severe decline in tourism, a key piece of its economy. Crimea's tourism minister, Sergei Strelbitsky, bragged in October that some 4 million people had come to the region's beaches and mountains in 2015 — but that's far below the 5.7 to 6 million recorded in the two years preceding the annexation.

    Many residents complain that the region is poorly run.

    "The main negative thing is the work of local authorities: heaps of garbage around, bad roads and the inability or unwillingness (of officials) to tackle the issues," Kryuchkov said.

    While local schools and hospitals have received expensive equipment and funds for refurbishment from Russia in recent months, Moscow's investment in Crimea is not evident when driving on Crimea's potholed roads or walking by crumbling building facades.

    In December, Crimean Governor Sergei Aksyonov complained that Moscow had not sent "a single kopeck" from the billions it had promised. Aksyonov accused the government of seeking too much control over how the peninsula spends the money. Russian state news agencies in turn quoted an unnamed government source saying that Moscow has sent 2 billion rubles ($28 million) to Crimea, but that local authorities simply don't know what to do with it.

    Foreign investors fled after the peninsula was slapped with Western economic sanctions, casting doubt on the region's future. Major Russian companies including cell phone operators, oil firms and banks closed their branches in Crimea fearing the backlash of Western sanctions, leaving the region's banking and telecommunications to obscure private-owned firms.

    These days, even ardent supporters of the annexation like former Sevastopol mayor Alexei Chaly admit that federal incentives to restart the economy, such as a plan to establish a free economic zone in Sevastopol, have failed.

    "Sea, warm climate, a free economic zone — that's an advantage," Chaly, speaker of the Sevastopol parliament, said in an interview with the RIA Novosti news agency last week. "But the disadvantages are the collapsed infrastructure and an unpredictable government."

    But Kryuchkov and his wife, who both work in tourism, are somewhat optimistic.

    "The prices are going up, we see lots of problems with getting new documents, the banks are still few in number," Olga Kryuchkova said. "But for people who went through the 1990s it's nothing. We've seen worse times."

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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  kvs on Mon Dec 28, 2015 3:49 pm

    What's the point of posting this obviously biased AP drivel? Crimea was suffering under the rule of Kiev and
    Kiev siphoned a lot of money out of Crimea. Why doesn't AP visit the local food markets and tell us all how
    deprived Crimeans are of well priced food and selection. They use the electricity terrorism by Kiev regime
    irregulars as a tool to bash Crimea. Fuck AP.

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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  sepheronx on Mon Dec 28, 2015 4:03 pm

    Yeah, it is just foolish and idiotic to post such news.

    Crimea already seen more investments in 1 year than they have in 10 when part of Ukraine.

    Always anecdotal evidence with these news sites using faceless people.  "Tourism" and "somewhat optimistic" is a joke since Crimea saw 5mil tourists this year, much more than in the past.  Much more.

    http://sdelanounas.ru/blogs/?search=крым

    Here is the tag section Crimea in sdelanounas.  This is where you will find cold hard facts. Not drivel that is backed up by joe blow and his wife.

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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  PapaDragon on Mon Dec 28, 2015 4:12 pm

    kvs wrote:What's the point of posting this obviously biased AP drivel?   Crimea was suffering under the rule of Kiev and
    Kiev siphoned a lot of money out of Crimea.    Why doesn't AP visit the local food markets and tell us all how
    deprived Crimeans are of well priced food and selection.    They use the electricity terrorism by Kiev regime
    irregulars as a tool to bash Crimea.  Fuck AP.

    So I could watch you guys take it apart. I do get quite a kick out of watching qualified people tearing MSM bunk apart...  Cool

    I also post entire articles instead of just links so that MSM b-holes do not get any unnecessary clicks.

    You must still be little tipsy from celebrations so I apologize for stressing you fellas out. My bad.  lol1

    Goes without saying that I don't buy into this Yahoo BS.

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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  PapaDragon on Tue Feb 09, 2016 10:30 pm


    Kerch Straight bridge construction:


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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  higurashihougi on Thu Feb 18, 2016 5:11 am

    Kuban-Krum bridge will be finished this summer.

    http://politikus.ru/v-rossii/70220-rabochie-mosty-soedinyat-kuban-i-krym-k-letu.html

    Pic Cool


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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  George1 on Fri Apr 15, 2016 5:38 pm

    Third line of power bridge to Crimea put into operation — energy minister

    More:
    http://tass.ru/en/economy/869837


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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  par far on Thu Apr 21, 2016 6:34 pm

    "Turkey Takes Steps to Destabilize Caucasus and Crimea".

    https://southfront.org/turkey-takes-steps-to-destabilize-caucasus-and-crimea/


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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  sepheronx on Thu Apr 28, 2016 3:40 pm



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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  sepheronx on Wed May 04, 2016 12:06 am

    Hederlez – Biggest Crimean Tatar celebration was held in Crimea, and no western Media outlet mentioned it.

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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  kvs on Wed May 04, 2016 1:11 am

    par far wrote:"Turkey Takes Steps to Destabilize Caucasus and Crimea".

    https://southfront.org/turkey-takes-steps-to-destabilize-caucasus-and-crimea/


    In their demented dreams. NATzO seems not realize that having a few malcontents around who will sell their mothers
    for a few pieces of silver is not enough to achieve anything in the short and long term. You can see this pathetic delusion
    in NATzO rabid support for the lunatic liberast fringe in Russia. There is zero chance this collection of smelly idiots who
    can't even keep their traps shut to achieve their agenda (they have a compulsion to crap on Russians) will succeed in
    establishing some pro-NATzO regime. The same goes for the Tatar minority in Crimea. They will not establish some
    Erdo-turd friendly regime. In fact, if they try to pull the terrorism card there will be nothing left of this minority after
    a few years. They will be cornered and extinguished. I do not mean genocide, I mean that most of the ones
    who are not directly implicated in crimes will run off to Turdkey or the rest of NATzO.

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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  sepheronx on Wed May 04, 2016 1:17 am

    kvs wrote:
    par far wrote:"Turkey Takes Steps to Destabilize Caucasus and Crimea".

    https://southfront.org/turkey-takes-steps-to-destabilize-caucasus-and-crimea/


    In their demented dreams.   NATzO seems not realize that having a few malcontents around who will sell their mothers
    for a few pieces of silver is not enough to achieve anything in the short and long term.    You can see this pathetic delusion
    in NATzO rabid support for the lunatic liberast fringe in Russia.    There is zero chance this collection of smelly idiots who
    can't even keep their traps shut to achieve their agenda (they have a compulsion to crap on Russians) will succeed in
    establishing some pro-NATzO regime.   The same goes for the Tatar minority in Crimea.   They will not establish some
    Erdo-turd friendly regime.   In fact, if they try to pull the terrorism card there will be nothing left of this minority after
    a few years.   They will be cornered and extinguished.    I do not mean genocide, I mean that most of the ones
    who are not directly implicated in crimes will run off to Turdkey or the rest of NATzO.  

    This fringe group isn't even in Crimea. They are a couple of these idiots and a whole swab of Turdkish grey wolves, and all are in the Kherson region. The idiots in Moscow are all rotted leftovers from 90's era that everyone already remembers the bad taste, only the small fringe who enjoyed the flavor support them, and that is less than 3% of the voters.

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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  auslander on Wed May 04, 2016 2:14 pm

    On the more pleasant side, weather for 09 May looks to be pretty good. It is Krim and predictions can change but should be sunny and warm. Good thing because we'll be at Battery at 06:00 for formation and jumping in your assigned vehicle, then it's convoy time to the top of Lenina with the period vehicles. My bride is the designated photographer for us that day so should have some really good ones.

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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  ExBeobachter1987 on Thu May 05, 2016 1:00 pm

    Crimea as a Paradise for High-Class Tourism? - Plans for the economic renewal and modernization of Crimea were discussed at a recent economic forum in Yalta

    Ulrich Heyden wrote:The second, International Business Forum of Yalta took place from April 13 to 15 at the luxury Mriya Hotel, southwest of the city. The forum discussed and debated strategies for how the peninsula can promote economically, notwithstanding Russia’s present economic turmoil and the economic sanctions imposed by Western countries. Experts attending the forum explained that the untapped potential of Crimea is huge, particularly in the tourism, health and IT industries.

    The general tenor of the conference was that Russia’s economic turmoil and the Western sanctions are not so much obstacles as they are incentives to reach for new horizons of development. The conference was attended by 1,100 people, including 60 foreigners from 26 countries.

    Sergei Aksyonov, Chairman of the Ministerial Council of the Republic of Crimea (as Crimea is now formally titled within Russia), promised in emphatic terms to the numerous business people attending the conference a “de-bureaucratization” of economic life. He praised what has been achieved so far, ever since Crimeans voted to secede from Ukraine on March 16, 2014.

    Aksyonov’s list of achievements included access via the internet for investment proposals and document submissions to government authorities. The maximum processing time by officials has been set at 30 days. This compares to the two or three year waiting times that were typical when Crimea was still a part of Ukraine, he said.

    There were no investment contracts with foreign investors signed at the Yalta forum. Andrei Nazarov, one of the forum organizers and a co-chairman of the Delovoy Rossii (‘Business Russia’) association, announced at a forum press briefing that meetings with German and other potential investors are planned for June.

    Avoiding isolation

    Aksyonov explained (see 6′:40″ mark in this video) that for foreign investors, “it is important to sidestep the sanctions regime” by the West which targets Crimea. To prevent this, there are “a number of instruments through which foreigners may invest here and receive a cash flow to get the dividends which they expect.” He said he is confident that foreigners “would make use of this access”. Aksyonov didn´t said exactly which instruments foreigners can use to invest while avoiding the injurious sanctions. But what became clear at the forum is that Crimea will not stand by and allow itself to be economically isolated.

    The goal of the economic forum was not only to discuss Crimea’s future but also to show that present conditions in the peninsula are calm. In a final briefing to foreign journalists, Aksyonov said that visiting foreigners are “surprised there are no tanks in the streets with us”. Upon visiting, they had become convinced that all is calm.

    This author can attest to the claim of calm and no tanks in the streets, though Amnesty International claims that some members of the small opposition among Tatar people have been detained. But the dramatic travel warning presently in effect by the Foreign Office of the German government needs an urgent update. It says: “Traveling to the Crimean peninsula is strongly discouraged…

    “Since June 2015, travel to Crimea from the Ukrainian mainland requires an entry permit from the competent authority of Ukraine. This is only issued under certain conditions, but under no circumstance is it granted for tourism purposes…

    “In view of the current situation, consular protection for German nationals in Crimea cannot be provided.”

    A new airport and a bridge from the Russian mainland

    At the forum, Prime Minister Aksyonov announced that 12 investment agreements for Crimea have been concluded, for a total amount equivalent to 935 million euros. However, these are exclusively investments by Russian companies or the Russian state.

    The majority of that investment – 427 million euros – is directed at the planned construction of a new airport in Simferopol, the capital of Crimea. The construction is scheduled to begin later this year and the opening is planned for 2018. The project will be financed by two small, Crimea banks, Genbank and RNKB, and by Rossiya Bank of St. Petersburg. The latter is an existing target of the Western sanctions.

    The airport is one of the modernization projects that should bring tourism in Crimea to new heights. During the Soviet Union times, some 12 million people would visit the peninsula annually for vacations. The new Crimea is hoping to attain similar numbers. But this will obviously take time. In 2015, 4.2 million tourists visited. In 2016, 4.9 million are expected. Since Turkey is now boycotted by Russia as a holiday destination, Crimea will be a ready alternative for Russians. However, prices on the peninsula have increased by 20 percent so far this year.

    Russia is currently investing large sums to free Crimea from its geographical isolation. While guests at the Yalta forum were listening to the speeches of Russian ministers, bankers and business leaders, in the east of the peninsula, the concrete pillars of a future bridge 19 kilometers long across the Kerch Strait connecting to Russia were under construction. This first direct road and rail connection to the Russian mainland is set for completion in December 2018.

    ‘We create problems which we then heroically solve’

    Sergei Glasew, the left-wing, patriotic economic advisor to the Russian president, initiated one of his presentations, delivered to the final plenary session, with a pointed remark that provoked knowing smiles. He explained that he has participated in debates during the past 20 years on the economic development of Crimea, “but other than the participants in this present discussion, almost nothing has changed.” The old saying is true, he said: “We create problems and then we heroically solve them.”

    Russian participants have gathered at the conference, Glasew said, “to convince foreign investors that they should invest in the economy of Crimea”. But every wise, foreign investor is justified in asking: “Why do you [Russians] not even invest in Crimea?”

    The Russian central bank, according to Glasew, must finally get around to increasing the country’s money supply in order to stimulate economic investment. If the Russian state does not make loans available with lengthy repayment terms, don’t be surprised when no foreign investors show interest, he said.

    Transition problems in connecting to Russia

    The re-connection of Crimea to Russia in March 2014 was clearly desired by a majority of the population. But a tremendous number of problems have arisen in that process, costing a lot of time, attention and money.

    Following the sabotage in November 2015 in southern Ukraine of the electricity lines supplying Crimea, which cut nearly all power supply in Crimea, a connection to the Russian power grid was rushed into service in stages in the form of temporary power cables under the Kerch Strait. In a few weeks, this measure will be fully operational. This will bring Crimea’s electricity supply from Russia up to 800 megawatts daily, which together with the small amount of electricity which Crimea generates itself will suffice for its immediate needs.[1] But many other problems remain:

    *All of Crimea’s administrative apparatus had to learn to work on the basis of Russian laws.

    *Many government documents are written in Ukrainian and require translated to Russian.

    *Ukraine has blocked food shipments to Crimea by road, and so food must be brought to the peninsula by ship.

    *Citizens had to re-register their cars. Now they must also re-register their real estate holdings according to Russian laws.

    West European experts provide modernization concepts to the forum

    Several guests from the European Union were given the opportunity to present their ideas on modernization of Crimea from the main stage of the forum.

    1. Jean Pierre Thomas, the head of the finance company ‘Thomas Vendome Investment’ and a former advisor to French President Nicolas Sarkozy, called on entrepreneurs in Europe to invest now in Crimea. If sanctions are lifted -they cannot last longer than one or two years, Thomas said -an established presence in Crimea will be a great advantage.

    Thomas suggested investing in university cooperation. Such cooperation does not fall under the sanctions. He said the low ruble exchange rate is an advantage in cases of a new investment, because the wages are low compared to western Europe. Entrepreneurs in Europe should rethink their strategies of simply exporting goods and services to Russia. Instead, they should invest in Russia and export manufactured goods from there.

    2. Several tourism experts from western Europe advised to aim a significant part of the development of the tourism industry at a luxury clientele. Dominique Fashe and the Moscow lawyer Karl Eckstein, who serves as Honorary Consul for Russia in Switzerland, presented concepts whereby a tourism infrastructure would be created in Crimea to make it an attractive destination for high income earners. They proposed building marinas, golf courses, concert halls, expanded ski areas with new lifts, clearly delineated eco-trails and mountain hotels.

    These proposals left out reference to existing tourism, which is particularly attractive for low income earners. What is obvious to the visitor to Crimea is that proposals for high-class tourism will be difficult because much of the peninsula is already covered in hotels, especially on the south, Black Sea coast.

    Russia will soon have its own cash transfer system

    A particularly evident sign of how much Crimea is affected by sanctions is the challenge of cashless money transactions. ATM machines here feature the logo of the little-known Russian National Commercial Bank (RNKB). This bank has become the main bank on the island after the large Ukrainian financial institutions, such as Privat Bank, closed but also after UniCredit Bank of Austria and Sperbank, Russia’s largest bank, withdrew from the peninsula, out of fear of Western sanctions.

    A representative of the National Payment Card System announced to the forum that a money payment system under the name ‘Mir’ will be launched in June in Russia. The name translates as ‘peace’, or ‘Earth’. The new system will allow citizens in Crimea to use a Mir credit card and to withdraw cash from ATMs. This will supplant Visa and MasterCard, whose use here is very difficult if notimpossible

    Kiev to impose entry bans for visitors to Crimea?

    Besides the already mentioned politicians and entrepreneurs attended the economic conference, there were representatives of political parties from western and eastern Europe in attendance, including Axel Kassegger and Barbara Rosenkranz, MPs of the Austrian right-populist Freedom Party; the Czech MEP Jaromir Kochlitschek; the Italian deputy Stefano Valdegamberi of the Veneto region party of Luca Zaia; and Christo Marinov of the right-wing Ataka party in Bulgaria.

    Among the few, prominent left-wing guests at the conference were Konstantinos Isyhos, the former deputy defense minister of Greece and member of the left-wing, Popular Unity split from the Syriza Party, and Nicaragua’s ambassador in Moscow, Juan Araya.

    Ukraine was clearly not pleased by the participation of foreigners in a conference taking place on “Russian-occupied territory”. The right-wing German MEP, Marcus Pretzell, demonstratively announced via Facebook his journey to the Yalta forum, whereupon the Ukrainian Ambassador to Germany, Andriy Melnyk, said via Twitter that Pretzell’s journey will have “hard legal consequences”.

    According to media reports, foreigner journalists who visit the “Russian-occupied” territories of Crimea, Donetsk or Lugansk are being indefinitely prohibited from travel to Ukraine by the Ukrainian government.

    Notes:
    [1] In addition to the electricity сables under the Kerch Strait, energy supply in Crimea will be consolidated in the next few years with a natural gas pipeline from the Russian mainland and several natural gas power stations to be constructed.

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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  George1 on Thu May 12, 2016 10:52 am

    Putin launches fourth stretch of power linkup with Crimea

    More:
    http://tass.ru/en/politics/875014


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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  medo on Wed May 18, 2016 5:42 pm

    http://sputniknews.com/europe/20160518/1039827715/veneto-italy-russia-sanctions.html

    Venetian regional Council with absolute majority of 27 against 9 out of 51 members of Council vote a resolution to recognize Crimean referendum and to recognize Crimea is part of Russia. They also urge to end sanctions against Russia. As this resolution is legally biding, this most probably mean, that Veneto will end sanctions against Russia.

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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  GarryB on Thu May 19, 2016 11:16 am

    If Italy ends its sanctions and can start exporting to Russia again... and there is good trade then maybe other EU nations might realise their mistake.

    Sounds good, but then I think separation from the EU via EU sanctions has actually been good for Russia so in a way I only hope a few specific EU countries drop their ban like Italy and Greece and they return to normal bilateral trade that is mutually beneficial... and screw the rest. pirat


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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  JohninMK on Thu May 19, 2016 2:08 pm

    GarryB wrote:If Italy ends its sanctions and can start exporting to Russia again... and there is good trade then maybe other EU nations might realise their mistake.

    Sounds good, but then I think separation from the EU via EU sanctions has actually been good for Russia so in a way I only hope a few specific EU countries drop their ban like Italy and Greece and they return to normal bilateral trade that is mutually beneficial... and screw the rest.  pirat
    Its a bit like Birmingham or Manchester saying they want to trade with Crimea. Immaterial to the decisions of the EU. No democracy here!

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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  sepheronx on Thu May 19, 2016 2:29 pm

    There will probably be a return to trade, but won't be the same. First is because of a bad taste in the mouth experience for Russians who may just stick to Russian produced goods. Second will be due to Putin also saying not too long ago that they will continue to expand own production. Third is due to devaluation of Ruble and costs on exchange market will make it cheaper to buy from home produce. The lifting of sanctions will benefit in some regards to goods that just are not made in Russia but Italy makes, FDI from Italy to Russia (especially in Crimea) and travel.

    Russian agriculture will continue to get a boost due to massive investments already poured in.

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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  medo on Thu May 19, 2016 6:13 pm

    Veneto is not that stupid as we think. It's true, its just one region and not whole Italy, but this is long term investment. Italians already want to invest a lot in agronomy in Crimea, specially in vineyards and cheese production. Also they know, that in 2019, when road and railroad bridge from Russian mainland to Kerch will be build, Crimean ports will be fully operational for Russian imports and exports and not only Novorossiysk in the Black Sea. All trade, which now go through Baltic states, will than go through Crimean ports and Venice want to be the first in shipping goods between Europe and Russian Black sea ports and that the trade will go through Venice port. Venice will be making money in trade on the cost of Baltic republics and other eastern European nuts, who are making troubles to Russia.

    When Venetian Republic will become independent state again, they will again become the most important trading power in the Mediteranean sea. They are not nuts, they know, what they are doing. Even if Italy stay together, you could bet, that Italy will use this act of Veneto to their benefit, when the time will come for them.

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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  GarryB on Fri May 20, 2016 11:12 am

    Its a bit like Birmingham or Manchester saying they want to trade with Crimea. Immaterial to the decisions of the EU. No democracy here!

    I am glad the EU as a whole keep their stupid sanctions as it seems to be good medicine for Russia even if it has a short term negative effect on their economy, the long term effects are actually probably good.

    What I would like to see is Russia friendly EU countries stepping out of the EU line and doing what is right for them, and for them and Russia to benefit from this.

    I would love to see Russia adopt the trade practises of the west, but without joining any binding org like TPP or the EU equivalent... that way Russia can maintain its own laws without having to bow down to multinational companies... it can decide for itself on medicine or GM food, or even labelling products... something the EU is likely to sign away...


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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  higurashihougi on Wed Jun 15, 2016 12:21 pm

    One comment of this article said that U.S. taxpayer are spending money to create flying target for Russia to practice shooting...

    http://russia-insider.com/en/politics/russians-have-shot-down-numerous-us-drones-violating-crimean-airspace/ri14963

    The Russians Have Already Shot Down Numerous US Drones Violating Crimean Airspace (Video)

    And one of them, the mother of all drones, the massive Northrop Grumman RQ-4 Global Hawk, was apparently commandeered by Russian electronic warfare and landed in Simferopol

    May be a bit Off Topic but that makes me remember about how Iran hacked and captured the RQ-170...

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    Re: Crimea's integration into Russian Federation:

    Post  KiloGolf on Wed Jun 15, 2016 12:28 pm

    medo wrote:Veneto is not that stupid as we think. It's true, its just one region and not whole Italy, but this is long term investment. Italians already want to invest a lot in agronomy in Crimea, specially in vineyards and cheese production. Also they know, that in 2019, when road and railroad bridge from Russian mainland to Kerch will be build, Crimean ports will be fully operational for Russian imports and exports and not only Novorossiysk in the Black Sea. All trade, which now go through Baltic states, will than go through Crimean ports and Venice want to be the first in shipping goods between Europe and Russian Black sea ports and that the trade will go through Venice port. Venice will be making money in trade on the cost of Baltic republics and other eastern European nuts, who are making troubles to Russia.

    When Venetian Republic will become independent state again, they will again become the most important trading power in the Mediteranean sea. They are not nuts, they know, what they are doing. Even if Italy stay together, you could bet, that Italy will use this act of Veneto to their benefit, when the time will come for them.

    Venice is a cruise port mainly.

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