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    Russia as superpower status

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    GarryB
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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  GarryB on Tue Dec 23, 2014 4:56 am

    The US is not a very good neighbour to Mexico... but then look at Chinese business deals in Africa where they give the locals gifts like paved modern roads after deals are done... that sort of thing puts western companies to shame in most cases (there are western companies that do that sort of thing but they are a minority).

    Better relations with Russia and indeed other countries around the world including China will either make the US more belligerent and dangerous to mexico and the countries with better relations with mexico, or miracle of miracles the US might look at its own actions and how they really don't map with their rhetoric and sermons and they might change their behaviour... my expectations would be sanctions and belligerence.


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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  mx109 on Tue Dec 30, 2014 6:43 pm

    call me ignorant but if thats the case lets say mexico sought a better relationship with russia , i agree the us wouldn't sit by and let that happen so if itreached the point were they decided to attack mexico what support could russia give hypothetically

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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  TR1 on Tue Dec 30, 2014 9:03 pm

    No, talk about being a superpower while half the budget is at the mercy of OPEC is hilarious indeed.

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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  sepheronx on Tue Dec 30, 2014 9:13 pm

    TR1 wrote:No, talk about being a superpower while half the budget is at the mercy of OPEC is hilarious indeed.

    Agree to an extent. Superpower status is stupid. Regional power is more in line of being right.

    As for budget, it was stupid for them to set budget at unreasonable oil price levels. And yes, having half the state budget per year to be dictated by oil and gas is silly imo. They need to reduce that to at least 10 - 15%. Even if it means state budget becomes less, any surplus revenue can go into the sectors that need money. With military budget at 4%, means they can still easily fund it. The beurocracy and social structure is heavily bloated causing an issue to the budget. Needs revision without causing a mess.

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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  mx109 on Tue Dec 30, 2014 9:27 pm

    so no support ?

    TR1
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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  TR1 on Tue Dec 30, 2014 9:33 pm

    sepheronx wrote:
    TR1 wrote:No, talk about being a superpower while half the budget is at the mercy of OPEC is hilarious indeed.

    Agree to an extent. Superpower status is stupid. Regional power is more in line of being right.

    As for budget, it was stupid for them to set budget at unreasonable oil price levels. And yes, having half the state budget per year to be dictated by oil and gas is silly imo. They need to reduce that to at least 10 - 15%. Even if it means state budget becomes less, any surplus revenue can go into the sectors that need money. With military budget at 4%, means they can still easily fund it. The beurocracy and social structure is heavily bloated causing an issue to the budget. Needs revision without causing a mess.

    How can they easily fund military with a budget short fall of 2+ trillion rubles for 2015?
    Sure, oil will probably go up by the end of 2015, but next year will be tight to put it mildly.

    Mil spending may only be 4% or so of GDP, but it is a huge portion of the budget.

    The US spends a similarly small % of its GDP on the military, but as a % of budget it is well over 20%.

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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  GarryB on Wed Dec 31, 2014 3:20 am

    so no support ?

    The best support Russia can offer small countries like Mexico and Venezuela is armaments and the ability to use them to defend themselves.

    the situation is too much like the georgian invasion of south ossetia in 8 8 8.

    Despite being a superpower the US could do little in the end to help their puppet state except verbal support.

    With the roles reversed Russia could do rather less in the case of the US deciding to attack mexico.

    Of course I really don't think the US would actually attack mexico... it would more likely impose sanctions and do everything it could to hurt the mexican people to make them vote their government out. The CIA would of course assassinate a few key figures and bribe others and pretty soon a new government will rise up in a popular uprising to save the day.

    It would be interesting to see what effect a blatant US invasion of Mexico would do regarding the large mexican population in the US... internment camps anyone?


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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  magnumcromagnon on Wed Dec 31, 2014 3:58 am

    TR1 wrote:No, talk about being a superpower while half the budget is at the mercy of OPEC is hilarious indeed.

    Superpower status is an over inflated and overused word. First the British Empire, then the USSR, and recently now the U.S. and NATO's combined effort failed to tame tribal goat herders in Afghanistan, each empire left in defeat. What about the Roman Empire? They were even beyond a superpower, they were a hyperpower, so much so that they were able to declare 'Pax Romana', and they were eventually smashed by a rag-tag group of barbarians, and the great Rome was raped and sacked. The reality is neither America, nor Russia, or China has the ability to defeat each other without annihilating themselves in the process. So throw out all notions of 'military supremacy', tactical nukes would easily wipe out even the most powerful conventional military's within hours, and the 3 big military powers have thousands of tactical nukes each.

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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  Kyo on Mon Jan 05, 2015 1:13 am

    Paul Craig Roberts' outlook for the New Year.




    http://www.paulcraigroberts.org/2014/12/29/outlook-new-year-paul-craig-roberts-2/

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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  Battalion0415 on Sat Jan 10, 2015 9:32 pm

    What is a federation really?

    My quiz.

    A riecher citizen. True or false?

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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  Battalion0415 on Wed Jan 14, 2015 9:14 pm

    I like Euroasia more than SuperPower of Russia. Plus no new era of Soviet Union. If Euroasia taken land in Azerbadjan, Georgia and Tjetjenien plus maybe Ukraine. They can build new Soviet Union.

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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  GarryB on Thu Jan 15, 2015 12:36 am

    They can build new Soviet Union.

    And if Brazil and Peru and Argentina and Chile and Belize get together and form a republic they can call themselves the United States of America... Rolling Eyes


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    ― Samuel P. Huntington, The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order

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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  Battalion0415 on Thu Jan 15, 2015 12:29 pm

    They are South American EU last 10 years.

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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  GarryB on Fri Jan 16, 2015 10:48 am

    And what if they decide to stop being the European Union and become NATO... Laughing


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    ― Samuel P. Huntington, The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order

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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  Kyo on Mon Jan 19, 2015 8:35 pm

    The idea of creating a buffer state with Novorossiya.

    NATO expansion and Russian national security

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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  George1 on Mon Oct 12, 2015 11:43 pm

    Russia Is On the Cusp of Regaining Global Power

    Oil and Middle East politics combine to afford Russia a chance to resume a position it lost at the collapse of the USSR

    Vladimir Putin has chosen the timing of his intervention in Syria very skillfully. Through his operations in the Middle East, he has the chance to make Russia a world power again. This game is all about the price of oil, and Putin knows: the hand that turns the oil spigot has the last word in all geopolitical issues.

    Russia's intervention in Syria as a means to fight terrorism is only a superficial goal. Unlike the Americans, the Russians calculate their actions with prudence; not just militarily, but geopolitically as well.

    Russia has long since been a partner of Syria. Syria is an important bridgehead to the Middle East, particularly with regard to transport routes for raw materials. Originally, the Americans wanted to have the Russians cut off from these routes, but the shot backfired. The US Army refused to follow President Barack Obama.

    So in going after Assad, the Americans had to join the front with unpredictable mercenaries and terrorists. The only partner to the US was Turkey, but Turkey chose to pursue its own self-interests. The terrorists, in turn, were happy with the weapons they’d captured – and used them against the Americans, when necessary. Washington had accepted the formation of IS [ISIL/ISIS/Daesh] in the beginning. The Americans had hoped to use this war machine to topple Assad.

    At the same time, the neocons, who are behind the US strategy, tried to keep the Russians occupied with Ukraine. Through the expansion of fracking, they had hoped to establish an alternative to crude oil in the US and in Ukraine, possibly even in the EU. That, however, turned out to be a long, hard road. The fracking method is expensive and can only be financed through taxpayer money. The fracking companies were far away from any profit-earnings; stock prices plunged.

    This is the moment Putin seems to have been waiting for, because Russia was hit hard by the price decline that OPEC had instrumentally used to ward off fracking. The implementation of skillful monetary policy helped to ease the pain – i.e. strong dollar, weak ruble – but the dependence on commodity exports is Russia’s Achilles heel. During the Yeltsin years, in a trusted play between the US neo-cons and some willing oligarchs, the country was looted for all it was worth. No government has managed to diversify the Russian economy. The new commodity shock is extremely dangerous for Russia.

    The first developments in oil prices proved Putin right. The price rose after the intervention in Syria was started.

    The commodity analyst Dallas McEndree has a very interesting analysis on Oilprice.com:

    Energy is the foundation of Russia, its economy, its government, and its political system. Putin has often stressed the importance of mineral resources for the preservation of Russia's economic growth and industrial development. Mineral resources are needed to help Russia catch up to the more developed economies and for modernizing Russia’s military, and their defense industry.

    Since 1992, the correlation between GDP growth on the one hand and the production of oil and gas, exports and prices on the other has been clearly evident. Russia’s oil and natural gas are not just important for Russia, but for its Eurasian neighbors as well. In 2014, Russia supplied about 30 percent of Europe's gas and a quarter of its crude oil in 2013.

    Besides the raw materials themselves, Russia’s well-developed ground infrastructure for the distribution of these resources is of great importance to Russia. Tatiana Mitrova, Head of the Oil and Gas Department in the Energy Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (ERI RAS), reckons: “Russia has a unique, transcontinental infrastructure in the heart of Eurasia (150,000 km of pipelines), which makes it the backbone of a vast and developing Eurasian gas market.

    The control over both the means of transport as well as the gas reserves makes Russia the pivotal center of this new market.” The land-based oil-distribution network is small, but not insignificant. The 4000-kilometer-long Druzhba Pipeline, for example, covers about 30 percent of total deliveries to Europe. The Russian government is keen on furthering the development of this infrastructure, and has already introduced a number of pipeline projects.

    The threats to the Russian energy sector have intensified more and more in recent years and the revenues that Russia is able to draw from the business are under severe pressure. The decision of Saudi Arabia to let the market determine the prices has led to sharp drops in the prices of crude oil and petroleum. The export prices are also affected, which in turn, are what is partly responsible for the switch to hybrid pricing models for gas in Europe.

    The charts show how threatening the situation is:

    The sanctions ordered by the US against Russia have increased the pressure. Due to the sanctions, Russian energy projects receive no financial backing, nor can projects be supported through the delivery of technology or equipment. On top of that, the US and Canada have already established themselves as strong competitors in oil and gas production, as McEndree has analyzed.

    It was therefore necessary for Putin to act. He managed to persuade the rebels in the eastern Ukraine to keep quiet. Recently, they have even canceled the regional elections – brokered by Putin. Lucky for Putin, the EU-funded Kiev government is corrupt and argues mainly about which pockets the EU taxpayers' money should be flowing into. The EU has to finance the Greek debt at the same time, and is busy dealing with the refugees, therefore neither Germany nor France have an interest in escalating the conditions in Ukraine. They simply can’t afford it.

    The third aspect is the issue of the US elections. Obama is a lame duck - and perhaps that is why he’s the only one in Washington who’s still somewhat sane. Obama knows that the military involvement in Syria was a disaster. Obama doesn’t want to go down in history as the president who threw the Middle East and Europe into total chaos.

    Obama is therefore willing to cooperate with Putin and is glad that he is there to pull his chestnuts out of the fire for him. The Neocons are in an uproar, but can’t do much. The advantage of the military-industrial complex is in this case, the fact that Obama is the commander-in-chief. The neocons and NATO can’t do much more than bark.

    Putin's alliances with Iraq, Iran, and especially with China are proof of a certain foresight. With partners like these, Russia can play a leading role in the Middle East. By wisely looking ahead, Putin was also able to involve Israel. Above all, Putin might succeed in breaking OPEC’s power hold. This is directed primarily against Saudi Arabia. The Saudis themselves are busy at the moment with the generation change and are going in a direction so that the young sheikhs can distinguish themselves with an illegal war against Yemen. This occupies a lot of forces and serves to divert their attention.

    McEndree has precisely analyzed this aspect in Putin's strategy:

    The question remains to be clarified as to whether the developments in the Middle East could save the Russian energy market. Tensions there are usually linked to the security of transport routes for raw materials. The Middle East itself is primarily dependent on sea transport. Since all waterways include a geographical bottleneck, they are far more vulnerable to external threats than the pipelines used by Russia. By expanding the airbases in Syria, Russia could influence these pathways.

    Putin’s action has significantly strengthened Russia's influence on OPEC. Russia already has close ties with Iran and Venezuela, and soon possibly with Iraq. These countries stand against Saudi Arabia's decision on oil prices. The Russian Deputy Prime Minister for Energy Policy noted that OPEC members are now suffering from the effects of their own strategy to edge out rivals by flooding the market, and doubts that OPEC members would be really satisfied with long-term low oil prices.

    Russia could indeed succeed in splitting OPEC into two blocks, and thus isolating Saudi Arabia. A strategic alliance between Putin and Iran, as well as Putin and Iraq, could create even more opportunities for Russia to put pressure on Saudi Arabia. For one thing, they could test Saudi determination to defend its market. Secondly, by cooperating with Iran and Iraq, one could take over Saudi market shares in the Chinese market. The Chinese market will be the second largest import market, and with its ever-growing demand, it will be of even greater interest to all parties in the next few years.

    So thanks to his impeccable timing, Putin could achieve far more than just a military prestige victory over the Americans. Turkey, led by an opportunistic and unscrupulous Erdogan, will quickly bring Putin to its side. The Turkish Stream project is underway. Current delays are not very important; they’re Putin’s threats against Erdogan. So far, Putin hasn’t said anything about Erdogan’s private war against the Kurds. He’s pleased that Erdogan is preoccupied with the Kurds and doesn’t have any corresponding interests with the Americans.

    The EU won’t budge. It is now totally dependent on the Russian supply of energy. If Russia controls the Middle East, the talks with the EU will all of the sudden become very constructive for the following reason: there will be two partners sitting at the table for these energy imports with Russia and Iran, and the chaotic EU leadership will be hopelessly secondary.

    McEndree thinks Putin would have to consider his actions carefully, so as not to arouse the fear of total energy dependence on Russia in Europe. The risk is negligible, because most of the EU’s fears are currently centered on the refugees, and they will pay any price to get the issue off the table. Erdogan has already flexed his muscles in Brussels. Once Putin pacifies Syria, he’ll be welcomed with open arms.

    If the plan works, Russia could actually break up OPEC and thus win access to the oil price. It’s not possible for Russia to exist with a long term low gas price. A not-to-be-underestimated danger for Putin is the recent warning of the Governor of the Bank of England, Mark Carney. He said with unusual clarity that drastic regulations for oil and gas products could happen very suddenly. That would hit Russia hard.

    Granted, it wouldn’t hit Russia in the short term, but it could redirect the flow of capital into alternative energy sources. Russia is too weak to stop this sort of attack. The alliance with China could pay off here. China has created a new level of infrastructure projects with the aid of the new Investment Bank AIIB and the Silk Road Project.

    McEndree writes, “All of these options require successful cooperation with Syria, Iraq, and Iran. This is not completely guaranteed in light of the Ukraine crisis.”

    That's true, but if Putin wins this battle, he has at least a fair chance to have Russia taken seriously as a world power. Big talk coming from the US or the EU is not enough, because what matters in the foreseeable future is this: the hand that turns the global oil spigot has the last word.

    http://russia-insider.com/en/politics/russia-cusp-regaining-global-power/ri10435


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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  flamming_python on Tue Oct 13, 2015 12:27 am

    Screw that.

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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  Walther von Oldenburg on Tue Oct 13, 2015 12:54 am

    Screw what?

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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  sepheronx on Tue Oct 13, 2015 12:59 am

    Walther von Oldenburg wrote:Screw what?

    Russia becoming a super power.

    I tend to agree cause it causes more trouble than it is worth. instead, Russia should just stick as a partner for Russian friendly nations (Iran, Syria, Kazakhstan, etc) and use the CSTO as a method of trying to keep the balance and peace (I really hope that Iran and Syria joins CSTO eventually).

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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  kvs on Tue Oct 13, 2015 1:03 am

    1) Russia never stopped being a superpower. To call it a regional power is retarded. Germany is a regional power.

    2) Russia has no interest in Soviet-style superpower activity. That is now the job of the USA, which is exporting revolution
    (aka regime change) around the world.

    3) Russia will counter US imperialism when it is necessary since the USA cannot be allowed to undermine Russia. This
    is not "Russia regaining its superpower status". This is Russia acting rationally to defend itself.

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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  Project Canada on Tue Oct 13, 2015 3:27 am


    Russia can be a "silent" superpower, a country that has the all the parameters of a superpower but without the hype and enormous boasting like Pindostan

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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  BTRfan on Tue Oct 13, 2015 4:11 am

    Vann7 wrote:
    mx109 wrote:Im just throwing this out there why doesnt russia try to strengthen alliances with mexico and help them deal with the cartels


    Because mexican government fears US retaliation. MExican presidents understand that the American CIA and its anti drug agencies are the biggest traffickers of Drugs in USA..They don't want US to start flooding mexico with NGOs and terrorist and repeat a Syrian fake revolution in mexico. And this is not mentioning how US could easily give weapons to Drug cartels. They can however ask for technology and weapons to be more efficient, to counter drugs and intelligence.

    TR1 and other fanboys of the "land of freedom" will love this.. Not conspiracy theories.. but a major scandal in USA for CIA busted helping drug cartels.  and US arming criminals in Nicaragua (just like they doing in Syria today) to overthrow a legitimate government that was friendly to Russia.



    So Mexico well knows they have a very dangerous neighbor at their borders ,and prefer to just look to the sides.
    Honestly is hard to say if they are doing the right thing or not.. because if you don't have a united country , US could destroy it in no time ,the Ukrainian way.  You bet.. that the white house who is always planning how to increase its empire ,will have a plan B and Plan C and hundreds more, to overthrow any Mexican government that seeks a military alliance with Russia and ask for Russia military bases. Mexico shares a big border with US , and it requires
    a major nation unity with very educated society ,with a very strong economy to become a fully independent nation in Mexico..  Look at Russia how  US is attacking their currency.. This is the reason most latin countries prefer to look to the sides.. since do not have the capabilities to resist a US offense. By the way.. the american journalist Gary webbs who uncovered the story of US Government drug trafficing was murdered later ,in a very violent way .  US have a multibillionaire business in Drug trafficing.. and they use their military bases today to bypass any country security.
    in argentina the government was not impressed and ordered its police to inspect their airforce transport plane and found cocaine bags. In afganistan NATO traffic Heroine and the money goes to Generals and politicians pockets.
    That say the level of corruption in US gov..is mind blowing.. movies fall short of their actions.


    Amongst those who understand reality in the USA, the joke is that CIA stands for "Cocaine Importing Agency."

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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  George1 on Fri Jan 15, 2016 4:05 pm

    Back With a Bang: How Russia is Growing on the International Stage

    Political experts at the Bruno Kreisky Forum for International Dialogue held in Vienna agree that Russia has become a much more influential player in the international arena over the past few years.

    In 2014, the Black Sea peninsula of Crimea declared independence from Ukraine and officially asked for entry into Russia. The EU and European countries accused Russia of illegal annexation of Crimea and introduced a series of sanctions against Moscow.

    Tensions further escalated when Russia started an air campaign in Syria to defend the legitimate government against Daesh terrorists. Relations between Moscow and the West reached their lowest point since the 1980s.

    Despite the sanctions and tense relations with the West, Russia has made a strong come-back to the global arena of international players.

    Political analyst Ivan Krasteav said at the forum, “Russia is back. The problem is that Russia is mainly back because of its ‘hard power’. This is a significant difference between countries such as China, on the one hand, and Russia on the other,” Press TV reported.

    Deliberating on whether Russian air campaign in Syria may lead to mutual interaction between Moscow and the West in the fight against terrorism, Gerhard Mangos from International Security Research Group said that there is an active Russian military presence in the conflict in Syria and this may lead to Assad remaining in power for the foreseeable future.

    “This has made European governments understand that a political solution to the Syrian crisis, and there is no military solution, can only be found in cooperation with Russia,” Mongos said.

    According to the experts of the forum, what Russia wants to do is transform the hegemonic system in which the United States plays a leading role into a multipolar system by the inclusion of more centers of power and decision-makers in the international sphere.

    Read more: http://sputniknews.com/russia/20160114/1033132893/russia-leads-political-arena.html#ixzz3xKFvYuE3


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    Re: Russia as superpower status

    Post  JohninMK on Thu Feb 04, 2016 11:15 pm

    I'm back with another VT thread for your perusal. Again it has to be said that there can be some off the wall stuff over there but there are gems too. This, to my mind is one, it is a very very long read for a thread but very thought provoking. Here are the first few paras setting the scene


    The Russian Phoenix: Hope or Illusion? By Moti Nissani on February 3, 2016

    Russia and the USA: Criminal Gangs Competing for Turf?


    Apart from the mainstream portrayal of Russia as a ruthless expansionist dictatorship (a portrayal too ludicrous to merit attention here), most awake commentators fall into one of two camps.

    Members of the first camp believe that the realization of a better world depends on Russia’s success in its efforts to reform itself, maintain its independence, and contain American ambitions.

    Members of the second camp believe that the Russo-American confrontation is of no significance to the long-term future of humanity either because that conflict is being engineered by the people who control both nations, or because both sides to the conflict are “criminal networks that use brutality and violence to enforce their control over given areas and to terrorize others.”

    Neither camp, to my knowledge, provides a fact-based bird’s-eye view of this topic. The present article attempts to close this gap, thereby enabling readers to form their own opinion. The article concludes with my own tentative attempt to resolve the dispute between these two camps, arguing that both are partially in the right—and partially in the wrong.


    http://www.veteranstoday.com/2016/02/03/the-russian-phoenix-hope-or-illusion/

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    An enlarged 21st century Russia-based superstate during the 21st century..?

    Post  Firebird on Thu Sep 01, 2016 1:24 pm

    Obviously until 1991 there were 2 world superpowers. The USSR (often incorrectly called "Russia") and the USA. Since then, the EU and China have emerged major players. And Russia has taken a deliberate "lower profile" atleast until the last few years.

    I was thinking about China and how Russia MIGHT develop as a "megapower" in the 21 century.
    China is actually "7 kingdoms" or was traditionally, before it became an empire. China also has many languages. So you could argue that China isn't even really one country today - given that the provinces are culturally, linguistically etc rather different.

    So I wonder... how far a "Russian superstate" might be feasible? Or even a "Russia centric superstate". Here's the points in its favour:-

    1)Global warming.
    Good land eg in the US and Africa and Asia will become too hot for farming perhaps.
    Russia's vast colder spaces may become vastly more valuable. Especially if you look at ways of reclaiming the Tundra for farming (check out Pleiceocene Park in Sakha Rep).
    Check out some reports and Russia+Canada are tipped to be potential "megapowers" in this century as water and food become much more valuable.

    2)Russia can sustain a huge population. UNlike other powers. It is "underpopulated".
    3)It is a military, intellectual and resource powerhouse.
    4)Its "lean and mean" - low debt, low levels of "decadent frivolity" unlike some states.
    5)In 1900, its population (the Russian Empire) was expected to reach 650 MILLION by the late 20th century. But it is now under 150M - for various reasons.
    6)Most former Soviet states are pro Russia or have pro Russian elements. That easily brings a population up to 225m or so
    7)Rivals have major problems.
    America's dominance is purely historic (it was the sole WW2 "victor" etc and has a waning dollar hegemony. America has lost its lead, it has debt, and potential racial/class unrest. Its spending more than it earns in many ways and is hooked on immigration and excess materialism.

    Europe has some of America's problems esp racial/other disharmony.
    China will come to a crunch when its workforce has to retire. How will it fund that? Also there are potentially many angry young men who can't find wives.

    8)Much of Eastern Europe shares immense cultural roots with Russia. Much of the Ukraine basically IS Russia. But look at Bulgaria, Poland and others. Likewise, linguistic links.

    Now I'm sure some will say "I'm Polish, its nothing like Russia". Well? Will you accept zillions of Iraqis into Poland as Frau Merkel demands? Do you think Polish and French are similar culturally or linguistically? Nope. China is 7 kingdoms and its pretty integrated. So, I wonder if much of the Slavic world could reintegrate. After all Slavic nationalism or patriotism wasn't a Stalin idea. Hungary and Bulgaria's residents even migrated from what is now Russia/related places many many years ago. West Europeans don't particularly "like" E Europeans. However, in Russia there will be the perspective of "slavic brotherhood". Perhaps more than a feeling of brotherhood between a European Russian and certain Asian Russian republics etc.

    So, I wonder if there is any upshoot to all this?
    Could a Russia centric superstate appear this century?
    What sort of format will it be in?











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    Re: Russia as superpower status

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      Current date/time is Sun Dec 04, 2016 11:20 pm