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    Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

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    AlfaT8

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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

    Post  AlfaT8 on Mon Nov 07, 2016 4:58 pm

    GarryB wrote:
    Come now Garry, we both know that Medvedev was trying to play ball with Washington, then Arab spring happened, Libya, Syria and the final cord Ukraine made the situation crystal clear,.... Perhaps they're trying to acquire U.S aircraft because Russia has proven "unreliable" in the past.

    Semantics aside, i don't believe Russia was being hostile to Iran, more like they were disinterested.

    Sorry, I wasn't clear.

    My point was that the non sale of S-300 to Iran was not about Russia and Iran... it was about Russia and the US and Russia and the EU and Russia and Israel.

    The reason they were unreliable was because of the US and EU and Israeli pressure... in the scheme of things a sale of S-300 to Iran is not actually worth that much money and if it hurt relations with the US/EU/Israel then Russia really needed to consider her options. Of course with hindsight the US and EU imposed sanctions fairly readily against Russia anyway, but Iran is hardly a buddy that Russia should get upset about upsetting.

    Iran seems happy with F-14s and modified F-5s rather than Flankers and Fulcrums.


    I doubt it Garry, one such as Russia does not simply yield to external pressures like this, there must have been some sort of agreement, a deal of sorts in the background, since there was this "RESET" endeavor going on and all.

    Odd, i thought Iran had plenty of Fulcrums and Fencers?

    BTW, can Russia even supply Iran with new Flankers and/or Fulcrums, since they signed that UN arms embargo agreement?
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    miketheterrible

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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

    Post  miketheterrible on Mon Nov 07, 2016 5:15 pm

    No. Unfortunately they cannot. Only sell defensive systems.
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    GarryB

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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

    Post  GarryB on Tue Nov 08, 2016 9:46 am

    IT's not. The problem is that the acquisition of SU-27 series is a matter of contention and could be raised at the UNSC. Iran wants them, Russia wants to offload them but it is going to be problem within 5 years anyway, because most of the weapons would then be impossible to export against the UN ban. So what good is it to sell planes without weapons?

    Iran could have bought Flankers any time over the last 25 years...

    I doubt it Garry, one such as Russia does not simply yield to external pressures like this, there must have been some sort of agreement, a deal of sorts in the background, since there was this "RESET" endeavor going on and all.

    Correction... Putin does not simply yield to external pressures... Yeltsin and Medvedev seem to be made of lessor stuff.

    Odd, i thought Iran had plenty of Fulcrums and Fencers?

    Most flew from Iraq and were kept as war reparations...

    BTW, can Russia even supply Iran with new Flankers and/or Fulcrums, since they signed that UN arms embargo agreement?

    Then they should unsign it...

    Ilegal sanctions unilaterally imposed by the EU and US can be sited as the grounds for ignoring UN sanctions until ilegal US and EU sanctions are lifted... Smile

    No. Unfortunately they cannot. Only sell defensive systems.

    Yeah, because the west always abides by UN resolutions and sanctions... remind me... what was UNSC resolution 1244 all about again...


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    KoTeMoRe

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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

    Post  KoTeMoRe on Tue Nov 08, 2016 11:51 am

    GarryB wrote:
    IT's not. The problem is that the acquisition of SU-27 series is a matter of contention and could be raised at the UNSC. Iran wants them, Russia wants to offload them but it is going to be problem within 5 years anyway, because most of the weapons would then be impossible to export against the UN ban. So what good is it to sell planes without weapons?

    Iran could have bought Flankers any time over the last 25 years...

    Iran didn't have the money or economy to buy any sizable fleet of aircraft and most of its sources have been closed to Iran since 1995 at least, non withstanding the de facto embargo from the US & friends following the 79 events. We're talking about a country that only passed through multiple sanction regimes. Militarily Iran has been forced to do with scraps.

    BTW, can Russia even supply Iran with new Flankers and/or Fulcrums, since they signed that UN arms embargo agreement?

    Then they should unsign it...


    They made a deal about the Nuclear row, they are bound by it. There's no unilateral solution to this. There are ways to get around, like setting up military cooperation trusts and having Iranian specialists go up North to gain everything they can bar the assets, which would be available between 5 and 8 years.


    Ilegal sanctions unilaterally imposed by the EU and US can be sited as the grounds for ignoring UN sanctions until ilegal US and EU sanctions are lifted... Smile

    There are ways to go around while being "sanctioned". No need for confrontation, just look at how Iran implements ATGM RE while many components are supposed to be illegal to transfer or sell.

    No. Unfortunately they cannot. Only sell defensive systems.

    Yeah, because the west always abides by UN resolutions and sanctions... remind me... what was UNSC resolution 1244 all about again...

    For better or worse, they are doing fairly well in negating those sanctions.
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    AlfaT8

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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

    Post  AlfaT8 on Tue Nov 08, 2016 10:00 pm

    GarryB wrote:
    I doubt it Garry, one such as Russia does not simply yield to external pressures like this, there must have been some sort of agreement, a deal of sorts in the background, since there was this "RESET" endeavor going on and all.

    Correction... Putin does not simply yield to external pressures... Yeltsin and Medvedev seem to be made of lessor stuff.

    You know, normally i would say your just moving the goalpost, but i am inclined to somewhat agree on this one, yet at the same time maintain that there must have been something of benefit to Russia at the time in exchange.
    Why couldn't they simply put it on hold, why did Medvedev go so far as to sign a goddamn UN embargo, which in effect put Russia's credibility as a reliable arms exporter into serious doubt, WTF were they going for???

    BTW, can Russia even supply Iran with new Flankers and/or Fulcrums, since they signed that UN arms embargo agreement?

    Then they should unsign it...

    Ilegal sanctions unilaterally imposed by the EU and US can be sited as the grounds for ignoring UN sanctions until ilegal US and EU sanctions are lifted... Smile

    I would love to see Russia do that. Twisted Evil
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    KoTeMoRe

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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

    Post  KoTeMoRe on Wed Nov 09, 2016 9:07 am

    They were going for a carrot & stick approach after Georgia.

    It backfired spectacularly. And now back to normalcy.

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    GarryB

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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

    Post  GarryB on Wed Nov 09, 2016 9:39 am

    Iran didn't have the money or economy to buy any sizable fleet of aircraft and most of its sources have been closed to Iran since 1995 at least, non withstanding the de facto embargo from the US & friends following the 79 events. We're talking about a country that only passed through multiple sanction regimes. Militarily Iran has been forced to do with scraps

    They have done amazing work keeping the F-14 and other aircraft flying... a fraction of that effort could have been directed and buying some cheap Flankers to replace them... they were clearly not interested... and I can understand that... Iran and Russia are not best buddies... Iran has no more reason to buy lots of Russian stuff as it is to want to buy lots of French or British stuff... but if they want to buy lots of American stuff then that is fine... trust goes both ways... Russia has no reason to think Iran is trustable... sell them stuff but that is all...

    They made a deal about the Nuclear row, they are bound by it. There's no unilateral solution to this. There are ways to get around, like setting up military cooperation trusts and having Iranian specialists go up North to gain everything they can bar the assets, which would be available between 5 and 8 years.

    Can't believe I am saying this but it is a shame Hilary didn't win because that agreement would not have lasted long with her in charge anyway.

    For better or worse, they are doing fairly well in negating those sanctions.

    They should use the threat of bad behaviour to get rid of those sanctions or at least compensate for the effect.

    If someone claims Russia is doing something bad and then imposes sanctions on them for it then Russia should say they will do something bad in protest.

    In this case... the EU and US have imposed various sanctions upon Russia because of claimed Russian interference in the Ukraine... Russia should simply state that with no evidence of this Russian interference and clear western interference in the Ukraine that Russia will start exporting of certain technology to countries like North Korea and Iran... till the western interference and sanctions stop.

    Fuck em.

    You know, normally i would say your just moving the goalpost, but i am inclined to somewhat agree on this one, yet at the same time maintain that there must have been something of benefit to Russia at the time in exchange.

    Medvedev like Gorby and Yeltsin basically believed the west was good and honest and thought they would get credit for cooperation regarding Iran... Putin is not so Naive...

    Why couldn't they simply put it on hold, why did Medvedev go so far as to sign a goddamn UN embargo, which in effect put Russia's credibility as a reliable arms exporter into serious doubt, WTF were they going for???

    They clearly wanted proof of his good intentions before delivering what they promised... I wonder what he was promised and whether he got it... would be interesting to see another Medvedev presidency to see whether he would be so west friendly or not...

    I would love to see Russia do that.

    They should play hardball and unsign a lot of things that are no longer useful to Russia but the west benefits from.


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    KoTeMoRe

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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

    Post  KoTeMoRe on Thu Nov 10, 2016 11:57 am

    GarryB wrote:
    Iran didn't have the money or economy to buy any sizable fleet of aircraft and most of its sources have been closed to Iran since 1995 at least, non withstanding the de facto embargo from the US & friends following the 79 events. We're talking about a country that only passed through multiple sanction regimes. Militarily Iran has been forced to do with scraps

    They have done amazing work keeping the F-14 and other aircraft flying... a fraction of that effort could have been directed and buying some cheap Flankers to replace them... they were clearly not interested... and I can understand that... Iran and Russia are not best buddies... Iran has no more reason to buy lots of Russian stuff as it is to want to buy lots of French or British stuff... but if they want to buy lots of American stuff then that is fine... trust goes both ways... Russia has no reason to think Iran is trustable... sell them stuff but that is all...

    Cheap Flankers? 1 Flankers for the Iranian Economy were never cheap, an Air Force cannibalizing its own jets to maintain a token force means that it really hasn't the means to buy anything relevant. Then there's is the military budget. even now with sizable overhaul of the military budget, the procurement average of Iran's armed forces is 500/600 million USD (2015 numbers) which is roughly 5% of the current nominal budget.

    Through out the 1990's the Iranian military budget has been of 2.2 billion on average. While any half squadron of SU's would have cost them 20% of that number (with spares and weapons). Even in the 2000 years the military budget has been of 5/6 billion on average (except for black budget sometimes doubling it). It's just not possible for a force like the Iranian Military to be able to stash money for procurement. They did so with the S300 contract which backfired in a spectacular fashion.

    It's more complex than trust. Iran doesn't have many sources. For high end assets, Russia and China remain unavoidable.That's why Iran adopted the C802/Noor and that's why they wanted the S300.

    When Iran became more than interested and had the cash it was already under embargo. And it will remain so for a decade. Now there's 5 more years.

    They made a deal about the Nuclear row, they are bound by it. There's no unilateral solution to this. There are ways to get around, like setting up military cooperation trusts and having Iranian specialists go up North to gain everything they can bar the assets, which would be available between 5 and 8 years.

    Can't believe I am saying this but it is a shame Hilary didn't win because that agreement would not have lasted long with her in charge anyway.

    I don't think that Trump was too keen on the agreement either. So careful what you wish for.

    For better or worse, they are doing fairly well in negating those sanctions.

    They should use the threat of bad behaviour to get rid of those sanctions or at least compensate for the effect.

    If someone claims Russia is doing something bad and then imposes sanctions on them for it then Russia should say they will do something bad in protest.

    In this case... the EU and US have imposed various sanctions upon Russia because of claimed Russian interference in the Ukraine... Russia should simply state that with no evidence of this Russian interference and clear western interference in the Ukraine that Russia will start exporting of certain technology to countries like North Korea and Iran... till the western interference and sanctions stop.

    This is not recess. Every country knows that predictability is a better answer even though in the long run, the contrary emerges. It was predictable that the US would fail on its ME endeavor, and it failed more spectacularly than if it was asymmetrically countered by countries like China and Russia. Read Sun Tzu, crack a beer. Iran is doing great, they're picking the long haul vs the shortcut. That what countries with a past do. They rely on their roots to prevail.

    Fuck em.

    It's sweeter when said diplomatically.
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    GarryB

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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

    Post  GarryB on Fri Nov 11, 2016 9:40 am

    It's sweeter when said diplomatically.

    I was once told that real diplomacy is being able to tell someone to go screw themselves and have their response being to sincerely thank you for the advice...


    Cheap Flankers? 1 Flankers for the Iranian Economy were never cheap, an Air Force cannibalizing its own jets to maintain a token force means that it really hasn't the means to buy anything relevant. Then there's is the military budget. even now with sizable overhaul of the military budget, the procurement average of Iran's armed forces is 500/600 million USD (2015 numbers) which is roughly 5% of the current nominal budget.

    They didn't need to try to buy Su-27Ms... base model Su-27s in the 1990s would have cost less than $30 mil each... over five years a few squadrons would have been vastly more useful than wasting time and money trying to keep F-5s and F-4s and F-14s going.

    Through out the 1990's the Iranian military budget has been of 2.2 billion on average. While any half squadron of SU's would have cost them 20% of that number (with spares and weapons). Even in the 2000 years the military budget has been of 5/6 billion on average (except for black budget sometimes doubling it). It's just not possible for a force like the Iranian Military to be able to stash money for procurement. They did so with the S300 contract which backfired in a spectacular fashion.

    Its military budget would not include its rocket and nuclear weapon budget...

    Buy air defence capabilities before you develop the need to be invaded...


    Iran is doing great, they're picking the long haul vs the shortcut. That what countries with a past do. They rely on their roots to prevail.

    Buying Boeings from a country that has a habit of imposing sanctions on any country that shows growth and expands its capabilities in any area is very shortsighted...

    But I guess that is up to the hostage to get over Stockholm syndrome...


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    KoTeMoRe

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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

    Post  KoTeMoRe on Fri Nov 11, 2016 1:24 pm

    GarryB wrote:
    It's sweeter when said diplomatically.

    I was once told that real diplomacy is being able to tell someone to go screw themselves and have their response being to sincerely thank you for the advice...
    That's the idea.


    Cheap Flankers? 1 Flankers for the Iranian Economy were never cheap, an Air Force cannibalizing its own jets to maintain a token force means that it really hasn't the means to buy anything relevant. Then there's is the military budget. even now with sizable overhaul of the military budget, the procurement average of Iran's armed forces is 500/600 million USD (2015 numbers) which is roughly 5% of the current nominal budget.

    They didn't need to try to buy Su-27Ms... base model Su-27s in the 1990s would have cost less than $30 mil each... over five years a few squadrons would have been vastly more useful than wasting time and money trying to keep F-5s and F-4s and F-14s going.

    Half a squadron would have taken all the procurement budget for years...that's the whole point. Iran didn't have the plans and cash for aircraft. Iranians also knew that their airforce would be done early and fast in any open conflict with the Great Satan. That's why they wanted GBAD not Air Force.

    Through out the 1990's the Iranian military budget has been of 2.2 billion on average. While any half squadron of SU's would have cost them 20% of that number (with spares and weapons). Even in the 2000 years the military budget has been of 5/6 billion on average (except for black budget sometimes doubling it). It's just not possible for a force like the Iranian Military to be able to stash money for procurement. They did so with the S300 contract which backfired in a spectacular fashion.

    Its military budget would not include its rocket and nuclear weapon budget...

    Buy air defence capabilities before you develop the need to be invaded...

    I spoke about black budget didn't I? anyway, just not enough cash for aircrafts...it's simple. And relatively small need for them, to be modern.

    Iran is doing great, they're picking the long haul vs the shortcut. That what countries with a past do. They rely on their roots to prevail.

    Buying Boeings from a country that has a habit of imposing sanctions on any country that shows growth and expands its capabilities in any area is very shortsighted...

    But I guess that is up to the hostage to get over Stockholm syndrome...
    [/quote]

    They're buying the planes for their civilian companies that are certified to be able to fly in all airports...they also have experience with them, when Russia had nothing to offer. Seems to me that you are disputing these facts for the sake of hitting on Iran. This is how the game is played; when the rules would be bendable, Iran will bend them.
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    GarryB

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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

    Post  GarryB on Sat Nov 12, 2016 7:37 am

    Seems to me that you are disputing these facts for the sake of hitting on Iran.

    The post I started my response to was basically... why is Russia so mean to Iran when Iran has done nothing to Russia.

    In my first post I mentioned they did fund an insurgency against Soviet supported Afghanistan... and continued from there that Iran and Russia have never been buddies.

    Iran does not owe Russia anything but also vice versa.

    Russia is building nuclear power stations in Iran for money.

    Russia is defending Iran in the UNSC because that is what the UNSC is supposed to do... protect countries from big bullies.

    Iran can buy from anyone they like and Russia can do what they like including refusing to sell something when it suits them....


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    Viktor

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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

    Post  Viktor on Sat Nov 12, 2016 9:10 am

    @Garry

    building NPP is not only about money. No one wanted to build NPP in Iran and Iran would be left without one if not for Russia to press on against the West.

    Iran would be most likely bombed if not for Russia to press on with nuke deal. Russia in that regard shielded Iran from being destroyed.

    Iran because of it gained acces to 100 bin$ of its frozen assets. Iran because of it gained momentum in foreign investment. Iran because of it can make free trade agreement with EEAU

    and SCO, Iran because regained its oil production back and access to hi-technologies and S-300 and all the other big defense deals that are being negotiated with Russia that will make

    Iran security that much more. Iran because of it gained GDP growth. That makes this video/stories a spam of epic proportions.
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    KoTeMoRe

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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

    Post  KoTeMoRe on Sat Nov 12, 2016 9:50 am

    GarryB wrote:
    Seems to me that you are disputing these facts for the sake of hitting on Iran.

    The post I started my response to was basically... why is Russia so mean to Iran when Iran has done nothing to Russia.

    In my first post I mentioned they did fund an insurgency against Soviet supported Afghanistan... and continued from there that Iran and Russia have never been buddies.

    Iran does not owe Russia anything but also vice versa.

    Russia is building nuclear power stations in Iran for money.

    Russia is defending Iran in the UNSC because that is what the UNSC is supposed to do... protect countries from big bullies.

    Iran can buy from anyone they like and Russia can do what they like including refusing to sell something when it suits them....


    When you quote me, you engage me in the debate. My point was never that Iran was mean, so you pulling me in and giving a certain answer, distorts what I said.

    So I repeat:

    - Iran has almost no choice in its strategical partnerships.
    - Iran tried to buy Russian, when it was possible(it ended up in half success, Kornet sale was a very good news for Iran, S300PM, not so much). It just doesn't have the money to make sweeping purchases like Iraq. To compare the two budgets, Iran has spent as much as Iraq from 2012 to 2015 in foreign procurement in 15 years.
    -Russia was not defending Iran, it was defending its interests that happen to be aligned with Iran. However now it is far more than interests. Now it is a reluctant alliance that is blooming. It is probably going to be a full blown alliance once they bash some sense in the Sunni populations in the Aleppo, Tehran axis.
    Iran cannot buy from anyone on the military side of their deals. NATO countries are a big No-No. Russia, China and some wild cards like South Africa will be Iran's only possibilities.

    What we see now, is a disastrous US policy, backfiring in spectacular fashion.
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    d_taddei2

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    reply

    Post  d_taddei2 on Mon Nov 14, 2016 5:28 pm

    Iran’s demand for Russian weaponry is estimated at $10 bln

    The package of contracts that have been discussed by now and Iran’s demand are estimated at about $10 billion. It is not an amount to be provided over one year. It will take far more time

    http://tass.com/defense/912141

    https://www.almasdarnews.com/article/irans-demand-russian-weaponry-estimated-10-billion/


    lets wait and see what materialises.


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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

    Post  JohninMK on Tue Feb 07, 2017 1:34 am

    A really interesting article on the lessons Iran is learning from the Russians in Syria. These are the first two paras, rest at link

    Iranian military cooperation with Russia in Syria is dramatically increasing Tehran’s ability to plan and conduct complex conventional operations. Iranians are learning by seeing and by doing, and are consciously trying to capture lessons-learned in Syria for use throughout their military and para-military forces. Iran is fielding a conventional force capability to complement and in some cases supplant its reliance on asymmetric means of combat. Russia is assisting Iran’s military leadership conduct this effort. It is introducing Iran and its proxies to signature Russian campaign-design concepts such as cauldron battles, multiple simultaneous and successive operations, and frontal aviation in Syria. These concepts are the fruit of almost a century of advanced Soviet and Russian thought and hard-won experience in conventional military operations. This knowledge-transfer can help the Iranian military advance its understanding of conventional war far more rapidly than it might otherwise be able to do. It can help Iran become a formidable conventional military power in the Middle East in relatively short order, permanently changing the balance of power and the security environment in the region.

    The Iranian military is using the Syrian conflict as a learning environment for its forces. The Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC)’s Imam Hossein University (IHU), which is home to the IRGC’s advanced military education programs, has deployed students to Syria almost certainly as part of an internal study and educational program for Iranian officers. Iranian officers recognize the benefits of experiencing Russian military operations. One Iranian major general, for example, praised Russia’s use of the Shahid Nojeh Air Base in Iran’s Hamedan province for exposing Iranian Air Force personnel to “[Russian] planes and the way they were operated.” Iran has also recently conducted exercises specifically to capture and practice lessons learned from Syria.


    http://www.understandingwar.org/backgrounder/how-iran-learning-russia-syria
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    George1

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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

    Post  George1 on Thu Feb 09, 2017 1:33 am

    Iran in January and February 2017 imported from Russia at least 150 tons of natural uranium

    http://bmpd.livejournal.com/2423649.html


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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

    Post  AbdulhamidtheSecond on Thu Feb 09, 2017 12:22 pm

    Iran is a totally secterian country,and has to continue to be so.

    Secterian politics of Iran will yield huge destability across MidEast,and at the end,loser will be Iran I guess.

    Iran has to rely Shia secterianism because ethnic figure of Iran is very complex, at least 40% of the population being not Farsi, but Shia.This clearly shows why Iran pursues such a policy.

    However,fighting against huge Sunni population in MidEast is not a clever option. 90% of todays Muslims are estimated to be Sunni,at least not Shia.And if one looks at MidEast,except Iran and partly Iraq, there is no Shia majority countries mentionable.

    Today,Iran is the first reason of destabilized Yemen,Iraq,partly Syria and in the future Bahrain,Quwait,Lebanon etc.

    As for Turkey, it is not desired to have a third disastrous neighbor country after Syria and Iraq, yielding huge losses in economy.

    But, Iran keeps being away to have any consensus to put an end to this MidEast wars.

    Maybe Astana talks can be an initial initiative,why not....
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    Viktor

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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

    Post  Viktor on Wed Mar 08, 2017 11:27 pm

    Iran Russia oil deal slowly progressing

    http://www.vestifinance.ru/articles/82279
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    George1

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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

    Post  George1 on Wed Mar 29, 2017 9:34 am

    MOSCOW, March 28 (Itar-Tass) - RIA Novosti. "Helicopters of Russia" and the Iranian Organization for Industrial Development and Reconstruction signed a memorandum of understanding suggesting the establishment of a joint venture to assemble light helicopters Ka-226 or Ansat, the press service of the holding said on Tuesday.

    https://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?depth=3&hl=en&rurl=translate.google.com&sl=auto&sp=nmt4&tl=en&u=https://ria.ru/defense_safety/20170328/1490964813.html&usg=ALkJrhjn804CY4B6XTo8HcDf3RmRiOpgZw


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    George1

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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

    Post  George1 on Wed Mar 29, 2017 9:41 am

    Putin-Rouhani meeting round-up

    Vladimir Putin has hailed Iran as Russia’s most reliable and stable partner

    MOSCOW, March 28. /TASS/. Russian leader Vladimir Putin and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani made a joint statement after their meeting in the Kremlin on March 28.

    Iran nuclear deal

    Putin and Rouhani have underscored the importance of all parties’ compliance with their obligations under the agreement on the Iranian nuclear program.

    "While stating the importance of this Joint Plan as a multilateral international document, approved by the UN Security Council, Russia and Iran emphasized the need for full compliance by all parties with obligations under this document. At the same time they stressed the fact that the Islamic republic of Iran has full legitimate rights to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy in accordance with the Non-Proliferation Treaty," Putin and Rouhani said in the statement.

    Russia welcomed "Iran’s strict compliance with its obligations under the Joint Plan, confirmed by the IAEA, as well as its firm intention to strictly observe the agreements within the established deadlines."

    Putin and Rouhani described in positive terms cooperation within the framework of the Joint Plan, "in particular, the signing of the contract for pre-project works to alter the two cascades of gas centrifuges in Fordow for the production of stable isotopes and stressed the need for its prompt implementation."

    Iran plans to continue cooperation with Russia on issues of the implementation of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action of 2015, Rouhani said.

    "As for the JCPOA, cooperation between our countries will be continued. Both sides reiterated their course towards the strengthening and implementation of the JCPOA and towards coordination of our cooperation on issues of peaceful use of nuclear energy," he said.

    The Iranian president hailed Russia’s assistance in reaching the agreements on the Iranian nuclear program and its role in helping Iranian industry switch to peaceful use of nuclear energy.

    The joint statement says Russia and Iran are unanimous that the NPT treaty is a corner stone of non-proliferation, of building up nuclear disarmament efforts and of using nuclear power for peaceful purposes."

    "Russia and Iran, supportive of the idea of converting the Middle East into a nuclear-free region, confirmed that the resolution on the Middle East, adopted at the 1995 NPT Review and Extension Conference, will stay in effect until its aims have been achieved," the resolution runs.

    Unilateral sanctions

    Moscow and Tehran believe unilateral sanctions against countries to be illegitimate. "Imposing unilateral sanctions against countries is illegitimate," the statement reads.

    The two presidents emphasized the need to continue joint efforts aimed at building a just world order based on international law, namely the United Nations Charter, as well as at solving global issues. "By boosting bilateral cooperation, Russia and Iran seek to enhance the central coordinating role of the United Nations in ensuring peace, security and sustainable development, and to further improve its effectiveness," the statement adds.

    Cyberattacks

    Russia and Iran stand for elaborating rules under the UN aegis for states’ conduct in the information space and have denounced the use of the IT-sphere for harmful purposes.

    "Russia and Iran expressed their concern over the steadily rising number of the instances of using information and communication technologies for criminal, terrorist, military and political goals," the statement reads.

    "The sides have denounced the attempts of using force or the threat of force in the information space, such as an attack on Iranian nuclear facilities with the help of the Stuxnet malware, and also any attempts to involve information and communication techniques for harmful purposes," according to the statement.

    Putin and Rouhani also "pointed to the need to elaborate under the UN aegis the rules of the states’ responsible behavior in the information space and noted the readiness of Russia and Iran to develop cooperation in this direction," the document reads.

    Situation in Afghanistan

    Russia and Iran will continue efforts to help Afghanistan strengthen its statehood and call for the implementation of measures to uproot drug production in that and other countries.

    "Putin and Rouhani expressed concern over the deteriorating situation in Afghanistan, over the growth of terrorist threats from extremist forces in that country," the document says. "Russian and Iran reiterate their commitment to continue assistance to Afghanistan’s efforts to strengthen its state system as a peaceful, democratic, independent and prosperous sate."

    The two presidents hailed the launch of the Moscow dialogue aiming to find the ways to promote peace settlement in Afghanistan and to give an impetus to the process of national reconciliation in that country.

    Apart from that, the Russian and Iranian presidents "expressed mutual concern over the growth of drug production in Afghanistan which poses a threat to peace and stability, socio-economic development and security of Afghanistan and other states," the statement stresses. "The sides pointed to the necessity of the implementation of concrete measures to eliminate global production of drugs, including to uproot illegally sowed narcotic-containing crops and to do away with their processing."

    Iraq’s territorial integrity

    Russia and Iran support preserving Iraq’s territorial integrity, stand for lifting the blockade on Yemen, positively assess the Lebanon political process and express the hope for the fair settlement of the Palestinian problem.

    "Russia and Iran state their support for the sovereignty and territorial integrity of the Republic of Iraq, the efforts taken by the Iraqi authorities aimed at fighting terrorism represented by the Islamic State [a terrorist organization outlawed in Russia] and other extremist groupings, and also at restoring control of the country’s territories seized by such groupings," the joint statement reads.

    "The sides resolutely denounce the terrorists’ crimes against the Iraqi people, including the crimes aimed against the national and religious minorities and the cultural heritage of Iraq," according to the statement.

    In their joint statement, Putin and Rouhani also voiced concern "over the continued destructive war in Yemen" and spoke "for the quickest termination of clashes and the bloodshed," and also stressed "the need to settle this crisis politically as part of a nation-wide dialog."

    "Warning about the grave humanitarian and economic consequences of the crisis for the Yemeni people, Russia and Iran stated the need to step up efforts in this direction and, in particular, noted the importance of lifting the economic and humanitarian blockade of Yemen and sending humanitarian aid to that country," the statement reads.

    As for the situation in Lebanon, Putin and Rouhani positively assessed and welcomed cooperation of the country’s political groups in solving the issue of electing the president and forming the government.

    "The sides consider the accords reached by them as a good example for solving the remaining Lebanese problems and also for settling internal disagreements in other states of the region," the joint statement says.

    "The presidents who expressed the hope for the fair and sustainable settlement of the Palestinian problem stressed the need for the exercise of the national rights of the Palestinian people," the document says.

    Global energy balance

    Russia and Iran will cooperate in oil export limiting for stabilization of the global energy market.

    "Putin and Rouhani hailed agreements of OPEC and non-OPEC countries contributing to demand and offer balancing on the oil market in an acceptable price range and supporting investment attractiveness of the oil sector." the statement says.

    "Russia and Iran will continue cooperating in this sphere for purposes of global energy market stabilization and provision of sustainable economic growth," the statement says. "The parties agree to continue meaningful interaction within the framework of the Gas Exporting Countries Forum aimed at forming a fair balance of interests of gas producers and consumers and at wider application of this efficient and ecofriendly kind of fossil fuel in the global energy balance, particularly for purposes of reducing greenhouse gas emissions."

    Development of large hydrocarbon fields

    Russian companies have reached agreements on development of major hydrocarbon fields in Iran.

    "We see good potential to broaden interaction in the oil and gas sector. Leading Russian companies reached a series of important agreements on development of large hydrocarbon fields in Iran," the Russian leader said.

    Russia and Iran discussed extension of cooperation in supplies of hydrocarbons, including to third countries.

    "Particular attention was paid to expansion of cooperation in the oil and gas sphere, particularly to implementation of joint projects in the territory of Iran in the sphere of exploration, production and transportation of raw hydrocarbons, including to third countries, technology transfers, swaps and construction of related infrastructure," the document says.

    The parties also agree to continue interaction within the framework of the Gas Exporting Countries Forum, "aimed at forming a fair balance of interests of gas producers and consumers and at wider application of this efficient and ecofriendly kind of fossil fuel in the global energy balance, particularly for purposes of reducing greenhouse gas emissions."

    Russia and Iran support agreements of OPEC and non-OPEC countries contributing to demand and offer balancing on the oil market in an acceptable price range and supporting investment attractiveness of the oil sector in the joint statement:

    "Russia and Iran will continue cooperating in this sphere for purposes of global energy market stabilization and provision of sustainable economic growth."

    Export credits extension

    Russia informed Iran about completion of internal procedures for extension of two export credits to Iran.

    "The Russian party informed Iran about completion of domestic government procedures required for entry into force of the agreement between governments of two nations on extension of a state export credit for Iran to finance construction of a thermal power plant and the agreement on provision of a state export credit for Iran to finance electrification of Garmsar - Ince-Burun railway segment, signed in Tehran on December 13, 2016," the statement says.

    Implementation of projects stipulated by these agreements will promote investment and trade-economic cooperation between Russia and Iran, the parties said.

    Furthermore, Putin and Rouhani stressed "importance of more active interbank cooperation, including between central banks, and importance of using national currencies in mutual settlements."

    Iran’s Bushehr NPP

    The first block of Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant reached the design capacity and documents for construction of the second and the third blocks undergo coordination, Putin said.

    "The first block of Bushehr NPP built by Rosatom reached the design capacity, operates steadily and generates electric power for the Iranian economy. Documents for construction of the second and the third power blocks of the plant undergo coordination," Putin said.

    Russia is providing significant aid to Iran in the nuclear sphere, the president said. "Our interaction is implemented in strict compliance with international law, IAEA requirements and subject to all provisions of the comprehensive action plan in respect of the Iran’s nuclear program," Putin added.

    SSJ-100 aircraft and helicopters deliveries

    Moscow and Tehran discussed an opportunity of supplying SSJ-100 aircraft and helicopters to Iran.

    "Ways of expanding cooperation in machine-building and in the civil aviation sector were discussed during negotiations. Potential deliveries of modern medium-range Sukhoi SuperJet-100 aircraft to Iran and helicopters for national ambulance aviation are on the agenda," Putin said.

    Inter-regional cooperation

    Putin and Rouhani support the idea to hold a bilateral forum on inter-regional cooperation until the year ends.

    "The parties pointed to a high level of cooperation between the regions of Russia and Iran and stated their intention to fully support this field of interaction," the statement reads. "Putin and Rouhani upheld the idea to arrange a Russian-Iranian forum on inter-regional cooperation either in Astrakhan or Sari before the end of 2017. Regional heads and representatives of the two countries’ business circles could attend the forum," the statement adds.

    "We have agreed with our Iranian counterparts to fully support the development of direct ties between our countries’ regions and to arrange a Russian-Iranian inter-regional cooperation forum in Astrakhan until the end of the year," Putin said following his talks with Rouhani.

    Russia and Iran will create favorable conditions for counter-deliveries of foods and use of national currencies in mutual settlements.

    Turnover between Iran and Russia surged by more than 70% in 2016, Putin said. This is "a good result indeed," particularly in conditions of unstable global market situation and volatility remaining on commodity and forex markets, he added.

    "It was recognized important to proactively work on implementation of the coordination roadmap in trade and industry; importance of creating favorable conditions for counter-deliveries of agricultural products and foods, for development of interbank relations and use of domestic currencies in mutual settlements was noted," the Russian President said.
    Easing visa restrictions

    Moscow and Tehran will consider further joint steps aimed at easing visa restrictions for certain categories of Russian and Iranian citizens.

    "Putin and Rouhani welcome the signing of the Agreement on visa-free group tours that aims at boosting cultural and humanitarian cooperation between Russia and Iran as well as at creating conditions for boosting tourist exchange," the statement adds. According to the document, "the presidents handed down instructions to consider further joint steps to remove administrative barriers hampering trips of certain categories of citizens."

    SCO membership


    Russia supports Iran’s plans to join the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO).

    "The Russia side confirmed its support to Iran’s application for membership in the Shanghai Cooperation Organization and spoke in favor of the swift consideration of this application," the statement says.

    According to the statement, the two presidents focused on the importance of strengthening Russian-Iranian cooperation not only within the SCO but also in other multilateral regional formats. Apart from that, with an aim of enhancing peace and stability in Central Asia and South Caucasus, Moscow and Teheran "confirmed their readiness to expand cooperation in these regions in the political, economic and other spheres and stressed their commitment to cooperation in multilateral formats involving other regional nations."

    The Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) is a permanent regional association founded in Shanghai, China, on June 15, 2001 by six nations, namely Russia, China, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. Its priority tasks include joint counteraction to terrorism and extremism; cooperation in education as well as in the energy, oil and gas, transport, communication and other spheres. In 2015, a decision was taken to grant full-fledged membership to India and Pakistan. Iran has been enjoying an observer nation status since 2005.


    More:
    http://tass.com/world/938043


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    George1

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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

    Post  George1 on Wed Mar 29, 2017 10:26 am



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    par far

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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

    Post  par far on Thu Mar 30, 2017 6:26 pm





    lulldapull

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    Orion-20 Ekranoplans for Iran

    Post  lulldapull on Sun Apr 23, 2017 4:40 pm

    Well, sounds like there is interest from the Iranians in Ekranoplans. Except that these things are little babies compared to the Caspian Sea Monster or the Loon beast developed by the Alexiev bureau in the 70's:

    https://sputniknews.com/russia/201704231052908731-russia-iran-ekranoplans/

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    Re: Iran–Russia strategic partnership:

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