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    Soviet military designers

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    magnumcromagnon
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    Soviet military designers

    Post  magnumcromagnon on Sun Apr 13, 2014 1:06 am

    With the deaths of Shipunov, Kalashnikov, and now Nepobedimy it's like all the legendary Soviet military designers are all passing away! cry 



    His resume from Wikipedia:

    He was the principal constructor of:

    anti-tank systems «Shmel» (1960), «Malyutka» (1963) and later, the semi-automatic «Malyutka-P» (1969);
    «Strela-2» (1968), «Strela-2M» (1970), «Strela-3» (1974), «Igla-1» (1981), «Igla» (1983);
    supersonic anti-tank guided rocket system «Sturm» - «Sturm-B» for the helicopters (1976) and «Sturm-C» for the vehicles (1978); «Ataka» (seriously modernized «Sturm») and first double-channeled Khrizantema.
    tactical rocket complexes TRK "Tochka" - with SBCh, OFBCh (1975), with KBCh (1977), with G (1979), with F-R (1982) and Tochka-U (1988), operative-tactical rocket complex OTRK "Oka" (1980).
    active armored vehicle defence system KAZ "Arena"

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergey_Nepobedimy

    If your not aware Nepobedimy I believe in Russian translates in to English as "Unconquerable" or "Invincible", such a fitting last name. It's simply amazing how many different kinds of military technology fields he innovated! R.I.P. Nepobedimy was the Leonardo Da Vinci of the Russian/USSR arms industry! Sad 

    Here's a nice article from Rostec:

    Out Undefeated
    At 93, died a renowned scholar - Sergey Undefeated

    April 11, 2014 at 93, died outstanding designer, creator of the legendary tactical missiles and operational-tactical, portable anti-aircraft and anti-tank missile Sergei Pavlovich Invincible.

    Among the developments of the Invincible - first adopted by the Soviet Army antitank system "Bumblebee", the most effective weapons in its class and the most massive in the world LAW "Baby", unsurpassed for many years man-portable air defense systems "Strela-2", "Boom- 2M "," Strela-3 "," Igla-1 "," needle ", precision tactical missile systems" Point "," Tochka-U "tactical missile complex" Oka ", etc. On account of Sergei Pavlovich Invincible - 28 missile systems for different purposes, have become a reliable weapon of deterrence and security of the Soviet Union and the Russian Federation.

    Undefeated has always looked to the future and be proactive by creating weapons, which has no equal in the next two decades will not be able to win both current and future means confronting the enemy.

    Invincible was created thanks to new scientific and technical direction - for active protection of armored vehicles and other objects. Under his leadership, turned work to create the world's only LAW, which is able to detect and hit the target in the absence of optical visibility - "Chrysanthemums-S" . He led the work on the draft design PTRC "Iskander-E" , which was commissioned by the Russian army in 2007.

    Undefeated continued to work until the last days of his life: he was an advisor principal designer NPK "KBM" (part of the holding "Precision complexes" ), chief scientific officer TSNIIAG (Moscow), scientific director of STC "Reagent" (Moscow).

    Sergei Pavlovich Undefeated will be buried at the Federal Military Memorial Cemetery.

    http://rostec.ru/news/4513154

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    Re: Soviet military designers

    Post  magnumcromagnon on Sun Apr 13, 2014 1:24 am




    http://www.1tv.ru/news/social/256249

    ...What a great loss! He was the greatest military tech designer in recent history, I mean you really have to go all the way back to the Renassiance and meet Leonardo Da Vinci, to find a military tech designer as versatile as "Mr. Invincible"! russia respekt

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    Re: Soviet military designers

    Post  collegeboy16 on Sun Apr 13, 2014 1:53 am

    time to pass the torch to the next gen of weapons designers.

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    Re: Soviet military designers

    Post  GarryB on Sun Apr 13, 2014 12:20 pm

    Well deserved Rest In Peace. russia 


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    Re: Soviet military designers

    Post  Viktor on Sun Apr 13, 2014 12:37 pm

    truly great man - RIP

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    Re: Soviet military designers

    Post  Morpheus Eberhardt on Sun Apr 13, 2014 2:24 pm

    Rest in peace.

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    Re: Soviet military designers

    Post  magnumcromagnon on Sun Apr 13, 2014 2:46 pm

    I find it amazing that the same guy who developed the Shturm, Ataka, Khrizantema ATGM's, Strela, Igla MANPAD's and the "Arena" APS system is the same guy who developed Tochka-U, Oka, and Iskander theatre range ballistic missiles. Talk about versatility, who else in recent memory even comes close to this?

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    Mikhail Simonov -like Kalashnikow, Mikoyan, Korolev etc..- this other soviet hero

    Post  nemrod on Thu Aug 13, 2015 5:32 pm




    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/obituaries/mikhail-simonov-aircraft-designer-whose-su27-is-regarded-as-the-best-jet-fighter-of-the-20th-century-2240870.html

    Mikhail Simonov: Aircraft designer whose Su-27 is regarded as the best jet fighter of the 20th century



    Mikhail Simonov was an aircraft designer whose innovative planes placed the Soviet Union at the forefront of aerial warfare.

    His supremely manoeuvrable, heavily armed Su-27 jet fighter is recognised as the best fighter of the 20th century and unlocked the export market for the USSR's most prized weapons systems.

    His name synonymous with pioneering designs and engineering, Simonov created a series of Sukhoi fighters that left the West envious. Developed to counter the US F-15 fighter, Simonov's twin-engine, twin-finned Su-27 joined the Soviet Air Force in 1984 and won respect in the West for its range of over 2,000 miles, its agility and its ability to fly at 2.35 times the speed of sound.

    It was the star of international air shows, performing aerobatics that few other fighter planes could accomplish, and is matched only by the MiG jets and Kalashnikov's AK-47 assault rifle as a symbol of Russia's considerable prowess in weapons-making. The Su-27's superb thrust-to-weight ratio and sophisticated control system allowed it to perform exceptional manoeuvres at very low speeds, such as raising its nose and standing on its tail for a few seconds – a stunt termed "the Cobra".

    However, the Su-27's rise had not been smooth. In 1977, the prototype (T-10) was viewed as worse than the American jet, which was already operational. Reluctantly, Simonov had to go to the Aircraft Industry Minister to explain that the plane needed more work. He later recalled the Minister saying, "It's a good job that today is not 1937." It was seen as a scandal. Following a number of redesigns, fatalities and considerable development problems the Su-27 became operational in 1984, although manufacturing difficulties kept it from appearing in strength until 1986.

    Simonov believed that perestroika allowed the Su-27 to eventually become the best. With the demise of the Soviet Union in 1991, a lack of money forced the Sukhoi Company to try to sell the jet abroad. Following a visit to the United Arab Emirates, and their desire to have a plane that could conduct air combat as well as destroy underwater and ground targets, the Su-27 was redesigned as a multi-function fighter.

    After 1991, with state defence orders almost non-existent, Simonov played a pivotal role in winning lucrative contracts to sell the Su-27 to China, India and other foreign customers, and was praised or keeping Sukhoi afloat at a time when most other Russian aircraft makers have struggled to survive.

    The Su-27 remained a mainstay of the Russian Air Force after the Soviet collapse, along with advanced versions such as the Su-30 and the Su-35. Simonov's creations gained their reputation as the best in the '90s, when Su-27 pilots were invited to take part in military training with the F-15.

    The rules of the "battle" required the Russian planes to get on the tail of the American jets, the opponents then changing places. In both scenarios, SUs were victorious, due to the plane's high manoeuvrability and thrust-to-weight ratio which meant that it gained speed on the upward trajectory faster than the F-15.

    A more emphatic victory occurred when American F-16s took on the Su-30MKI in 2004. "The defeat was unquestionable," Simonov said. In 2006, the Su-30MKI took on the British Tornado; the RAF's Air-Vice Marshall, Christopher Harper, praised the MKI's dogfight ability, calling it "absolutely masterful and unbeatable."

    Mikhail Petrovich Simonov was born into a family of teachers in Rostov-on-Don in south-western Russia between the Black and Caspian Seas in 1929. During the Second World War he became fascinated with aircraft and, as a teenager was taken on by a plane manufacturer. In 1947, he entered the Novocherkassk Polytechnic Institute, one of Russia's largest technical higher education institutions, where he specialised in Design and Engineering and won a prestigious Stalin scholarship. In 1951, he enrolled at the renowned Kazan Aviation Institute, renamed in 1973 after the aircraft designer Andrei Tupolev. On graduating in 1954, he remained at the Institute, where he became chief designer. He later set up a flying club in which he showcased and flew the first all-metal Soviet gliders.

    Simonov's flair did not go unnoticed and in 1969 he was transferred to Moscow as deputy chief designer of the Taganrog Aircraft Company, but a year later joined the Sukhoi Design Bureau, again as deputy chief designer. Over the next nine years, he was responsible for the development of the Su-24 "Fencer" bomber, the Su-25 "Frogfoot" ground attack plane and the Su-27 "Flanker" fighter.

    In 1979, following a disagreement with the head of design at Sukhoi, Simonov moved to the Ministry of Aviation as deputy Minister for Science and New Technology. His brief was the creation of air combat systems. In 1981, he was sent to Afghanistan to provide technical assistance for the Su-25, flying counter-insurgency missions against the Mujahideen. By the end of the war, nearly 50 Su-25s were deployed at Afghan airbases, carrying out 60,000 sorties. From 1981 until the end of the war in 1989, 21 aircraft were lost.

    For more than 25 years, it has seen combat with several air forces. Iraq deployed against Iran during the 1980-89 Iran-Iraq War; most were later destroyed or taken to Iran in the 1991 Gulf War. In 1993, Abkhazian separatists used it against Georgians, while eight years later, Macedonia used Su-25s against Albanian insurgents, and in 2008, Georgia and Russia used Su-25s in the South Ossetian conflict. African states, including the Ivory Coast, Chad, and Sudan have all used the Su-25 in local insurgencies and civil wars.

    In January 1983, Simonov returned to Sukhoi as Chief Designer (CEO from 1995-99). Under his leadership the company gained prestige world-wide with a range of multi-purpose aircraft such as the Su-30, designed for air superiority, the aircraft carrier-based Su-33 and the Su-34 bomber. Simonov also saw the future in developing the airline industry, producing designs and prototypes for passenger planes capable of flying at supersonic speeds.

    Simonov received a number of awards including three of the highest honours awarded in the former Soviet Union for scientific achievement, the Lenin Prize, Shukhov Gold Medal and Order of the Red Banner. In 1999, he was awarded with the Hero of Russia medal and is a member of a number of institutions such as the Russian Academy of Aviation and Aeronautics and the International and Russian Academy of Engineering.

    Simonov was buried in Moscow's most prestigious Novodevichy cemetery, alongside the likes of former President Boris Yeltsin and world renowned cellist Mstislav Rostropovich.

    Mikhail Petrovich Simonov, aircraft designer; born Rostov-on-Don, Russia 19 October 1929; died Moscow 4 March 2011
    Martin Childs Monday 14 March 2011

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    Rostislav Belyakov - obituary

    Post  nemrod on Fri Aug 28, 2015 8:12 pm


    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/10732966/Rostislav-Belyakov-obituary.html


    Rostislav Belyakov - obituary
    Rostislav Belyakov designed Russia’s MiG fighter jets and sold his aircraft on the open market when the Cold War ended

    Rostislav Apollosovich Belyakov, who has died aged 94, was the chief designer of the MiG fighter jets, responsible, among other things, for the design of the MiG-29 “Fulcrum” front line fighter and the MiG-31 “Foxhound” interceptor; the MiG-29 has been described as the most influential and important aircraft ever to roll off Soviet production lines.

    The Fulcrum (a Nato codename), was developed in secret in the 1970s to counter new American fighters such as the McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle, and the General Dynamics F-16 Fighting Falcon. When it entered service with the Soviet Air Force in 1983 it represented a major breathrough for Soviet aerospace. According to The Encyclopedia of Russian Aircraft 1875-1995, it incorporated “integral aerodynamics with lifting fuselage disappearing into a large wing, two underslung engines with variable inlets, structure for a sustained 9Gs, multimode Pulse-Doppler radar, comprehensive fire-control and electronic warfare systems and gun plus not fewer than six air-to-air missiles”.

    Western agencies had seen satellite images of the aircraft in 1977, but the first opportunity to get a more detailed look came in 1986 when the Russians took six Fulcrums over to Finland for a demonstration show. The following year the aircraft caused a sensation when it became the first high performance Russian fighter ever to appear at the Farnborough Air Show, where it performed aerobatics unmatched by rivals.

    But by this time the Soviet Union was in dire need of hard cash, its economy having been driven to near ruin by the Reagan arms race of the early 1980s. As communism started to crumble, and old Soviet military design bureaus lost their “unlimited funding” status, excess Soviet military hardware became widely available for sale — in particular Soviet aircraft which (apart from oil) represented virtually the only exportable commodity the Russians had.

    Belyakov, whose name had been virtually unknown in the West until the collapse of the Soviet Union, emerged to spearhead the MiG sales drive. In 1991 he popped up at the Paris Air Show to announce that there were no longer any political barriers to Russian arms sales: “If you have $40 million, we will sell you a MiG-31,” he declared.

    To begin with progress was slow and Belyakov expressed frustration with western rivals, whom he accused of hidden pricing tactics, lies about Russian quality, and in at least one case, unauthorised use of MiG technology to compete against Russian products. In fact western pilots, who got to fly the MiGs after German reunification brought former East German forces into Nato recognised that they were good aircraft but felt that they had a somewhat rough-and-ready “agricultural” quality.

    Belyakov also had problems with Russian bureaucrats: “I’m just sick and tired,” he told a reporter from Moscow News in 1992. “If we do sell them [MiGs] at all, they grab all the money.”

    MiGs eventually achieved significant sales worldwide, including a large order from India. However the Russian drive to develop new overseas markets for its military hardware had implications for western strategists, who, instead of worrying about how the Soviet Union and its allies might deploy fighter aircraft in any future conflict, had to shift the main focus of their attention to undesirables among Russia’s military clientele. MiG-29s very briefly saw combat in the 1991 Gulf War with the Iraqi Air Force, but five of the aircraft were quickly shot down by USAF F-15s after which the MiGs did not reappear. Syrian Arab Air Force MiG-29s have been involved in encounters with Israeli fighter and reconnaissance aircraft, while last October Syrian MiG-29s performed ground attack missions with unguided rockets and bombs against Free Syrian Army insurgents in the Damascus area.

    By the mid 1990s, however, Belyakov, who had supported the attempted military coup against Russia’s president Boris Yeltsin, had become persona non grata in the Kremlin and in 1995 he retired due to “bad health”.

    Rostislav Apollosovich Belyakov was born in the Russian city of Murom on March 4 1919. After graduation from the Moscow Aviation Institute in 1941 he started his work in the Aviation Design Bureau of Artem Mikoyan, the aircraft designer brother of Stalin’s foreign minister, who had been appointed to lead a new aircraft design bureau two years earlier.

    Belyakov rose rapidly through the ranks, becoming deputy chief designer in 1957, responsible for the development of new fighter aircraft, among them the MiG -21 and MiG-23. The MiG-21 famously hit the headlines in August 1966 when Israeli Intelligence managed to persuade an Iraqi defector called Munir Redfa to land an Iraqi Air Force MiG-21 at an air base in Israel. Redfa felt his Christianity had prevented his promotion in the military and was angry at being ordered to attack Iraqi Kurds. In negotiations with Mossad agents he agreed to fly his MiG-21 to Israel in exchange for $1 million, Israeli citizenship, and the smuggling of his family out of Iraq. The opportunity to defect came on August 16 1966 and involved a large element of luck. While Redfa was flying over northern Jordan, his plane was tracked by radar. The Jordanians contacted Syria but were reassured that the plane belonged to the Syrian Air Force and was on a training mission. After landing the plane at the Hatzor air base Redfa claimed he had been down to “the last drop of fuel”. Israel and the United States were able to study the plane and the following year Israel had made good use of this knowledge during the “Six-Day War” when its Air Force brought down 6 Syrian MiG-21s in battles over the Golan Heights — without losing any of its Dassault Mirage IIIs.

    Following Mikoyan’s death in 1969, Belyakov became chief designer of the MiG design bureau.

    Belyakov won numerous honours and awards, including the Order of Lenin, and was an Academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences. In 1994 he published a history of the MiG empire, MiG: 50 Years of Secret Aircraft Design and in 2005 was awarded the title of “Laureate Legend” by the magazine Aviation Week & Space Technology.

    Rostislav Belyakov, born March 4 1919, died February 28 2014



    magnumcromagnon
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    Re: Soviet military designers

    Post  magnumcromagnon on Sun Feb 14, 2016 7:07 am

    Yet another legendary Soviet-era military weapon designer passes away:

    Gennady Denezhkin, the lead designer/contributor of Grad, Uragan, and Smerch MRLS, has passed away R.I.P.



    Gennady Denezhkin, lead Soviet MRLS designer, passes away

    Morpheus Eberhardt
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    Yet another legendary Soviet-era military weapon designer passes away:

    Post  Morpheus Eberhardt on Sun Feb 14, 2016 7:52 am

    magnumcromagnon wrote:Yet another legendary Soviet-era military weapon designer passes away:

    Gennady Denezhkin, the lead designer/contributor of Grad, Uragan, and Smerch MRLS, has passed away R.I.P.



    Gennady Denezhkin, lead Soviet MRLS designer, passes away

    Rest in peace, Gennadij Denezhkin.

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    Re: Soviet military designers

    Post  George1 on Fri Nov 25, 2016 5:24 pm

    Soviet co-developer of legendary MiG-29 fighter jet Ivan Mikoyan passes away

    More:
    http://tass.com/defense/914705


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    Re: Soviet military designers

    Post  archangelski on Fri Nov 25, 2016 5:58 pm

    George1 wrote:Soviet co-developer of legendary MiG-29 fighter jet Ivan Mikoyan passes away

    More:
    http://tass.com/defense/914705

    До свидания сэр МИКОЯН...отдых в мире.

    Rest In Peace Sir...

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