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    Arctic rush

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    max steel
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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  max steel on Fri Oct 23, 2015 12:08 am

    Russia nearly done building its biggest Arctic military base

    Russia to complete creation of Arctic forces by 2018

    PapaDragon
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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  PapaDragon on Sun Oct 25, 2015 11:08 pm


    Photo report about building new Arctic base, loads of pictures!!! russia

    I posted some on media tread before but there is plenty of fresh ones here...


    http://sdelanounas.ru/blogs/69569/

    Does anyone know what this spherical structure is for? I know it is not radar housing, too much metal and has interior frame...


    Cowboy's daughter
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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  Cowboy's daughter on Mon Oct 26, 2015 4:25 am

    I haven't kept up, but read this today and found it interesting!

    ARCTIC VOICE No. 11, 27 November 1996
    RUSSIAN NAVAL OFFICERS AND GEOGRAPHIC EXPLORATION IN NORTHERN RUSSIA (18TH THROUGH 20TH CENTURIES)
    By Leonid Sverdlov, Member of the Russian Geographic Society

    http://arcticcircle.uconn.edu/HistoryCulture/russianexplor.html


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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  Militarov on Wed Nov 04, 2015 3:10 am



    Russian Arctic Military Base on Alexandra Land in the Franz Josef Archipelago

    sepheronx
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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  sepheronx on Wed Nov 04, 2015 3:36 am

    Militarov wrote:

    Russian Arctic Military Base on Alexandra Land in the Franz Josef Archipelago

    I think that would be a pretty cool base to be stationed on.  It would probably get boring after a while, but still.

    Militarov
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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  Militarov on Wed Nov 04, 2015 3:53 am

    sepheronx wrote:
    Militarov wrote:

    Russian Arctic Military Base on Alexandra Land in the Franz Josef Archipelago

    I think that would be a pretty cool base to be stationed on.  It would probably get boring after a while, but still.

    I can literally spend months inside Very Happy For me personally wouldnt be the problem.

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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  sepheronx on Wed Nov 04, 2015 4:23 am

    Militarov wrote:
    I can literally spend months inside Very Happy For me personally wouldnt be the problem.

    the Inside looks ultra comfy as heck.  Comfy looking beds, showers, workout room, entertainment, etc.

    My father lived on an airforce base in north Manitoba at the arctic, and I believe near the one in Alaska as well back in the 80's.  Apparently he said that there were months were you just didn't leave the base at all as you couldn't (snowed in completely) and it sucked for him as he was lead technician for radar installation and maintenance so if you had to get out there, you had to find a way.

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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  max steel on Sat Nov 07, 2015 3:30 pm

    The US Coast Guard Is (Quietly) Building Up Allies in the Arctic

    The United States Coast Guard announced Friday the creation of a new international forum for cooperation in the Arctic. Signed at the United States Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut, the new Arctic Coast Guard Forum will include coast guards or similar agencies from Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Russia and the United States.

    “Today’s historic Arctic Coast Guard Forum represents a critical step forward in our collective efforts to promote safety, security and environmentally responsible maritime activity in the Arctic,” said Coast Guard Commandant Admiral Paul Zukunft. “As the ocean becomes more accessible to human activity, all Arctic nations have committed to enhancing maritime cooperation in this remote and challenging environment.”

    The forum complements the Arctic Council, and several groups focused on Arctic business development, as nations seek to increase operations, ensure safety and security, and address common challenges in the rapidly changing region. While the Arctic Council provides a forum for high level diplomatic cooperation on Arctic issues, the Arctic Coast Guard Forum will be an operational entity to leverage collective resources and coordinate communications, operational plans, and on-the-water activity.

    An Effective Model for Cooperation

    This latest agreement is modeled on the North Pacific Coast Guard Forum and the North Atlantic Coast Guard Forum formed in 2000 and 2007. Meeting regularly, these forerunners share strategies, conduct exercises, and coordinate operations to leverage limited resources and bring each nation’s jurisdiction to bear on transnational threats.

    At the latest Pacific forum in September, representatives discussed rules of behavior when their forces operate in proximity, adopted voluntary guidelines for combined operations to guide patrols, and planned for a multi-national, multi-mission exercise. Past efforts include joint ship patrols to combat illegal high seas driftnet fishing, planning for oil spills, and security assessments.

    The Changing Arctic Environment


    The new forum comes as steadily melting Arctic ice is opening more water to seasonal maritime traffic, natural resource usage, and other activity. The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), which monitors the annual summer ice melt in the Arctic, reported that 2015 had the fourth lowest extent of ice since monitoring began in 1979 and sea ice declined 13.4 percent per decade between 1981 and 2010.

    “What we have seen this summer reinforces our conclusions that Arctic sea ice extent is in a long-term decline and that we are headed for a seasonally ice-free ocean,” said NSIDC director Mark Serreze. Since scientists began monitoring Arctic ice coverage with satellites, the nine lowest years for summer ice extent were from 2007 to 2015.

    The results of this melting include increased shipping, resource exploration, and adventure tourism. This includes Royal Dutch Shell’s exploratory drilling in the Arctic Ocean in 2012 and 2015, an 118 percent increase in maritime transits in the Bering Strait between 2008 and 2012, and plans for a cruise ship with 1,700 on board to sail next year from Alaska, through the Northwest Passage, to Greenland and New York. And this increase in activity is expected to continue.

    Lack of U.S. Capability


    Coast Guard officials and others have long warned the U.S. government does not have the equipment or infrastructure needed to respond to emergencies, enforce the U.S. exclusive economic zone, or achieve other national objectives in a more heavily traversed Arctic. The Coast Guard’s Arctic Strategy describes the operational challenges to include vast distances, extreme weather, and limited infrastructure. The closest U.S. deep water port to Barrow, Alaska, the main population center, is more than 1,100 miles away in Dutch Harbor and there are only two small commercial airports in the U.S. Arctic at Barrow and Deadhorse, Alaska.

    Other challenges include poor radio propagation, partial satellite coverage, geomagnetic interference with navigation equipment, and limited cellular networks.

    During a trip to the region in September, President Obama responded to both capability shortfalls and a lack of knowledge about the region when he announced a proposal to accelerate the building of a Coast Guard icebreaker, a new ocean charting and coastline mapping program, and additional science efforts.

    This plan is welcomed but likely only a down payment on future U.S. needs. The White House announcement compared Russia’s forty current and eleven planned icebreakers to the two operational polar icebreakers of the United States. A 2011 study of Coast Guard ice breaking requirements found the service requires between six and ten icebreakers to meet U.S. needs for polar access.

    And while breakers are important for access to ice laden waters, they are not the only need. Fort Wainwright, located in Fairbanks, Alaska, and the U.S. military air field closest to the Arctic, is more than five hundred miles from the Barrow. The closest Coast Guard air station is nearly one thousand miles away in Kodiak, Alaska. Gaps in command and control, vessel tracking and other assets will also limit the ability of the United States to provide maritime safety, security and environmental protection in the region. The Obama administration’s National Strategy for the Arctic Region recognizes this when it states that it will “intelligently evolve our Arctic infrastructure and capabilities.”

    Benefits of the Arctic Coast Guard Forum

    Through its on-the-water focus, the new forum will improve the ability of the Coast Guard and other signatories to enable safe and secure maritime activity in the Arctic, particularly given current and medium-term resource gaps. Of note, it also represents an opportunity for the eight Arctic countries to engage in a formal dialogue on security interests that is prohibited by the Arctic Council charter.

    The forum’s emphasis on cooperation promotes American desires to keep the region free from conflict, and the inclusion of Russia is an important detail. The signing of the agreement was reportedly delayed eighteen months due to Canadian objections of Russian aggression in Ukraine.

    Despite concerns with Russian actions in Europe and the Middle East, and the pending claims of Arctic seabed by member nations, the Arctic Coast Guard Forum allows a dialogue with Russia on common issues even while relations are strained elsewhere.

    George1
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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  George1 on Wed Nov 11, 2015 12:24 am



    _________________
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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  max steel on Mon Nov 23, 2015 10:47 pm

    The construction of military facilities in the Arctic is under threat of suspension


    No Rush Rolling Eyes

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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  kvs on Tue Nov 24, 2015 12:13 am

    max steel wrote:The construction of military facilities in the Arctic is under threat of suspension


    No Rush Rolling Eyes

    It's a business dispute. The headline makes it sound like termination by the Russian government. I would like Putin
    to personally go kick some corporate bureaucrat ass. The Duma should pass a law to make sure contractors don't
    engage in blackmail. If they want government money, then they should be prepared to lump it. If they don't like
    the terms, then they can go elsewhere.

    sepheronx
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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  sepheronx on Tue Nov 24, 2015 3:49 am

    Gee, its as if there are no other cobstruction companies in Russia   Rolling Eyes

    Half the politicians in Duma own a construction company.

    George1
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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  George1 on Mon Dec 07, 2015 1:49 pm

    Russia completes equipping of six military bases in Arctic — General Staff source

    According to a source, the work for the deployment and equipment of six military bases on the Arctic islands and in the polar part of mainland Russia is completed

    ST. PETERSBURG, December 7. /TASS/. Russia has completed equipping its six military bases in the Arctic, a high-ranking source in the Russian army’s General Staff told TASS on Monday.

    "According to the General Staff’s execution documents, the work for the deployment and equipment of six military bases on the Arctic islands and in the polar part of mainland Russia is completed," the source said at the fifth international forum that discusses the Arctic and its present and future.

    He said that the bases were deployed on the islands of Kotelny (New Siberian Islands), Alexandra Land (part of the Franz-Joseph Land archipelago), Sredny (Severnaya Zemlya), as well as in the Rogachevo settlement (Novaya Zemlya), on Cape Schmidt and Wrangel Island (part of the Chukotka autonomous area).


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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  Backinblack on Fri Dec 25, 2015 9:20 am

    Russia Keeps Building Military Facilities in Arctic Even in Polar Night

    http://mil.today/2015/Arctic4/

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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  Militarov on Thu Jan 07, 2016 3:10 am


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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  franco on Sat Jan 30, 2016 12:34 am

    Air and Air Defense forces in the North Command will be called the 45th Army.

    MOSCOW, January 29 - RIA Novosti. In order to strengthen the system of air monitoring in the Arctic in December 2015 formed 45th Army Air Force and Air Defense of the Northern Fleet, said on Friday, Russian Defence Minister, Army General Sergei Shoigu.

    "Particular attention is paid to strengthening the control of air situation (in the Arctic zone). To this end, in December 2015, formed 45th Army Air Force and Air Defense of the Northern Fleet," - said the Minister of Defence at the board meeting of the military department in the National Center for Control of Defense.

    He said that "step up alert air defense units of the radio engineering troops and anti-aircraft missile regiment equipped with modernized S-300" Favorite "in the archipelago of Franz Josef Land, Novaya Zemlya, Severnaya Zemlya, the New Siberian Islands." In addition, Shoigu said, "carried out in the Arctic build groups of troops being deployed on a permanent basis."

    "As a result of the expanded capabilities of the armed forces to ensure the protection of national interests in the region", - said the head of the military department.

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    Battle for the artic

    Post  par far on Sat Feb 06, 2016 4:21 pm

    After watching this, you can just see that the artic is going to be the next flash point. I just wish for three things to happen:

    1.) The breakup of th EU, I think this would really help because then the European countries will have a little more freedom to make their decisions.

    2.) Have many refugees/migrants move to Norway, Sweden Finland and Poland, these countries are the most anti-Russian countries that there are, so having refugees/migrants giving them problems and raping thier women would not be a bad thing.


    3.) Cut down on trade with anti Russian countries and give it to the BRICS, Iran and other countries not hostile to Russia.

    http://southfront.org/russia-defense-report-battle-for-arctic/


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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  higurashihougi on Tue Feb 09, 2016 3:03 pm

    Both North and South

    https://www.rt.com/news/331837-china-antarctic-arctic-russia/

    Dragon + Bear: China seeks Russia's help in mastering Arctic, sets sights on Antarctic

    China wants to further explore the Antarctic and Arctic, according to the Chinese State Oceanic Administration. Deep-sea mining and deep-sea space stations are on the agenda, while Beijing wants to arrange a joint Arctic expedition with Russia.

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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  max steel on Tue Feb 09, 2016 3:54 pm

    How Russia Could Annex the Arctic

    Tensions have increased a notch in the Arctic with the news that the Russians have started a major military exercise in the region. Nearly 40,000 servicemen, 41 warships and 15 submarines will be taking part in drills to make them combat-ready—a major show of strength in a region that has long been an area of strategic interest to Russia.

    Russia might be reshaping national borders in Europe as it reasserts its geopolitical influence, but the equivalent borders in the Arctic have never been firmly established. Historically it has proven much harder for states to assert sovereignty over the ocean than over land, even in cases where waters are ice-covered for most of the year.

    For centuries the extent to which a nation state could control its coastal areas was based on the so-called cannon-shot rule—a three-nautical-mile limit based on the range of a cannon fired from the land. But this changed after World War II, leading to the United Nations Law of the Sea Convention (UNCLOS) in 1982.

    Under UNCLOS, every signatory was given the right to declare territorial waters up to 12 nautical miles and an exclusive economic zone (EEZ) of up to 200 for commercial activities, such as fishing and oil exploration. Signatories could also extend their sovereignty beyond the limits of this EEZ by up to an additional 150 nautical miles if they could prove that their continental shelves extended beyond 200 nautical miles from the shore.

    Orderly settlement


    It is quite common to read about a “scramble for the Arctic” in which the states concerned—Denmark, Norway, Canada, Russia and the US—race to carve up the region between themselves. In fact, this is not a very accurate description.

    There are two dimensions to developments in the region—one legal and the other political. In legal terms, these five littoral states have sought to use UNCLOS to establish borders and assert their primacy over much of the Arctic Ocean and the seabed below (with the exception of the US, which is yet to ratify the convention).

    Canada and Russia have also used the special provisions provided byArticle 234 of UNCLOS—relating to the right to regulate over ice-covered waters—to strengthen their authority over emerging Arctic shipping routes (the Northwest Passage and the Northern Sea Route).

    In 2008 the five states issued the Ilulissat Declaration, committing to the “orderly settlement of any possible overlapping claims” using the legal framework provided by the law of the sea. This has been reflected in the continental-shelf claims they have submitted to the UN over the past 15 years: Russia (2001), Norway (2006), Canada (2013) andDenmark (2014).

    These submissions are all claims for an extension of exclusive rights to continental shelves beyond 200 nautical miles from each land border. This leaves a small area in the central Arctic Ocean unclaimed but alsoraises issues about various territories where more than one state has posted a claim (see graphic below).

    Among the claimants, Russia has been asked by the UN to submit further scientific evidence in support of its case. This has not yet happened to the other states, but since it will take time for their claims to be assessed, this may yet change. Until the US ratifies UNCLOS, it can’t submit a claim.



    Insecure borders

    Legal provisions only go so far. The question remains: what happens if the Arctic states become more assertive in the delimitation of their national borders?

    Canada and Denmark have made significant commitments to backing up their claims, including developing new security strategies. In 2012 Denmark established a specialised military command to police its Arctic territories, for instance. But over the last decade, it is Russia that has advanced the most significant plans for building up its security forces in the region – even before its most recent exercises began.

    In material terms, Russia currently has the most to gain from industrially developing its Arctic zone. The Russian Arctic contains significant reserves of hydrocarbons, diamonds, metals and other minerals with an estimated value of more than $22.4tn (£15.2tn). The area is already a major producer of rare and precious metals and important oil and gas fields.

    This makes it easy to see why the Kremlin announced in 2008 that it will use the Arctic zone as a “strategic resource base” for the socio-economic development of Russia in the 21st century. In 2013 the Kremlin further observed that such development would be heavily dependent on foreign investment, technology and expertise.

    Yet this apparent openness to international business interests has been accompanied by an intense sense of insecurity about Russia maintaining influence and authority in the region. It is wary of a Western bloc forming within the Arctic Council (the five littoral states plus Finland, Iceland and Sweden) and has preferred to engage the other Arctic states on a bilateral or regional basis. Russia is particularly concerned about the potential for the EU and NATO to become more active in Arctic affairs, given that all of the other Arctic states are members of one or both of these organizations.

    Vladimir Putin has spoken publicly about the need to keep tensions to a minimum in the Arctic, while embarking on its extensive military and security program in the region at the same time—not least establishinga new Arctic strategic command last December.

    The Kremlin showed in its response to the Greenpeace 30 incident, in which environmental activists tried to seize a Russian oil platform in 2013, that it will not tolerate any threat to its economic activities in the Arctic, nor allow any precedent that might undermine its authority over what it essentially regards as its territorial waters.

    Future uncertainties

    Russia will submit a new claim for an extension of its EEZ into the Arctic Ocean to the UN in 2015 (encompassing an area of roughly 1.2m sqkm). Already state officials in Russia are positioning the situation as a test of whether the international scientific community will accept Russian science.

    A second rejection of Russian claims in the Arctic might further feed Russian concerns about being kept down and encircled by Western rivals. On the other hand, if Russia’s claim is accepted, the rest of the international community might quite rightly become concerned about how the Kremlin will exert its authority within such significantly expanded maritime borders in the Arctic. This is because Russia will likely continue using Article 234 of UNCLOS to enable it to exercise complete authority in its extended EEZ, with little regard for the right to innocent passage.

    The deterioration in Russia’s relations with the West is only likely to up the stakes for the Kremlin when it comes to settling its maritime borders in the Arctic. Russia has remained engaged in the Arctic Council and has repeatedly called for the Arctic to remain insulated from the fallout from Ukraine. Yet in the coming years, Russia’s neighbors are likely to remain wary about how exactly the Kremlin plans to negotiate and secure its borders along its Arctic frontier.

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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  George1 on Wed Feb 10, 2016 7:09 am

    Russia submits revised application for extending Arctic shelf to UN

    More:
    http://tass.ru/en/politics/855582


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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  max steel on Sat Apr 16, 2016 9:32 pm

    Russian Defense Ministry Orders Three More Arctic Helicopters

    The Russian Defense Ministry has ordered the delivery of three additional helicopter developed specifically for the Arctic deployment, a managing director of Ulan-Ude Aviation Plant manufacturing facility, part of Russia’s state technologies corporation Rostec, said Friday.

    In November, the Russian military received its first Mi-8AMTSh-VA helicopter that features new Klimov VK-2500-03 turboshaft engines, a more powerful TA-14 auxiliary power plant and upgraded avionics. It has high-altitude navigation, as well as the capability for day and night flight in adverse weather conditions.

    "[The helicopter] has no equals in the ability to perform tasks in the arctic climate," Leonid Belykh said commenting on the ministry's interest in procuring the aircraft.

    Russia's revised military doctrine, signed by President Vladimir Putin in December 2014, for the first time named the protection of national interests in the Arctic among the main priorities for its armed forces during peacetime.


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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  medo on Wed Apr 20, 2016 10:32 pm



    Shoigu was visiting new military base in Nagurskoye in Land of Alexander island.

    http://vpk.name/news/153842_na_ostrove_zemlya_aleksandryi_planiruetsya_razmestit_zveno_boevyih_samoletov.html

    It is interesting, that it is not still clear which fighters will be stationed in Nagurskoye. Will they be 4 Su-34 or 4 MiG-31BM? On the other hand it seems it will be under Northern fleet Navy and Su-34 and MiG-31 are air force jets. Which ever jets they will be, their job will be mostly maritime patrols and flying over the sea.

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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  medo on Thu Apr 21, 2016 9:39 pm


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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  max steel on Tue May 10, 2016 11:26 pm

    Russia orders new Project 23550 Arctic class patrol ship



    Russia has ordered two Project 23550 ice-class armed patrol boats, the Russian Ministry of Defence (MoD) has announced.The class is described (in Russian) by the MoD as being "without analogues in the world", and combining "the qualities of tug, ice-breaker, and patrol boat".

    The two vessels ordered will be built by Admiralty Shipyards in St Petersburg and are scheduled to be delivered to the Russian Navy by 2020.

    The MoD specifies the Project 23550 class as being able to break ice up to 1.5 m thick. A concept image released by the MoD showed the vessel armed with a medium-calibre main gun on the foredeck (likely an A-190 100 mm naval gun), a helicopter deck and hangar, and two aft payload bays each fitted with a containerised missile launch system (akin to the Club-K system offered for export) armed with four erectable launch tubes - presumably for either Club anti-ship or Kalibr-NK land-attack missiles. Although billed as patrol boats, this level of armament makes them better armed than many corvettes.


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    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  PapaDragon on Fri Jun 17, 2016 11:06 pm


    Russian troops cleared out 6000 old barrels from the North

    http://sdelanounas.ru/blogs/79153/

    Sponsored content

    Re: Arctic rush

    Post  Sponsored content Today at 4:58 pm


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